Page 1

ERIC SALITSKY SELECTED WORKS


1 2 3 4 5

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R INTERFAITH WORSHIP

4

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

24

SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

52

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

64

FA B R I C AT I O N S T U D I E S

84

RED HOOK FARMER’S MARKET CRITIC: PETER MACAPIA FALL, 2013

3


4


THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR INTERFAITH WORSHIP WASHINGTON, D.C. C R I T I C : D AV I D R U Y PAR TNER: EMMA SPILSBURY FALL, 2015

5


6

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

PROMPT This theoretical project envisions a massive aggregation of diverse worship spaces under one roof. Tasked with producing a monument on the last available site on the National Mall in Washington D.C., this center represents a national statement about the significance of religious diversity to the American experience. The four floors of full-sized sanctuaries (about fifteen per floor) include a plurality of American religious denominations as well as a number of non-denominational spaces for the growing population of “spiritual but not religious” such as meditation rooms, yoga studios, and gardens. This facility also contains spaces of shared ritual beyond the sanctuary such as classrooms, a communal cafeteria that is equipped to handle the many forms of religious dietary restrictions, and a ritual bathing facility for baptisms, ablutions, mikvah, and a spa. “We should begin by setting conscience free. When all men of all religions shall enjoy equal liberty, property, and an equal chance for honors and power we may expect that improvements will be made in the human character and the state of society.” -John Adams, 1785 “Given the increasing diversity of america’s population, the dangers of sectarianism have never been greater. Whatever we once were, we are no longer a christian nation — at least, not just; we are also a jewish nation, a muslim nation, a buddhist nation, a hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers.” -Barack Obama, 2006


CATHOLIC

10% 8

NON-CHRISTIAN FAITHS

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

0% BORN 1946-1964

BORN 1928-1945

BORN 1965-1980

BORN 1981-1989

BORN 1990-1996

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER

U.S. DISTRIBUTION OF RELIGIONS

R E L I G I O U S A F F I L I AT I O N S H I F T B Y G E N E R AT I O N 60% 50%

UNAFFILIATED

EVANGELICAL ROOF / SUPERSTRUCTURE

40%

VARIOUS RELIGIOUS SPACES

UNAFFILIATED PROTESTANT

STEPPED GARDENS AND COURT-

OTHER FAITHS HINDU

30%

BUDDHIST MUSLIM

20%

JEWISH OTHER CHRISTIAN

10%

CATHOLIC

JEHOVAH'S WITNESS

NON-CHRISTIAN FAITHS

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

0% BORN 1928-1945

BORN 1946-1964

BORN 1965-1980

BORN 1981-1989

BORN 1990-1996

SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER

MORMON

MAINLINE PROTESTANT

HO

“WE SHOULD BEGIN BY SETTING CONSCIENCE FREE. WHEN ALL MEN OF ALL RELIGIONS SHALL ENJOY EQUAL LIBERTY, PROPERTY, AND AN EQUAL CHANCE FOR HONORS AND POWER WE MAY EXPECT THAT IMPROVEMENTS WILL BE MADE IN THE HUMAN CHARACTER AND THE STATE OF SOCIETY.” -JOHN ADAMS, 1785

CATHOLIC

HISTORICALLY

“GIVEN THE INCREASING DIVERSITY OF AMERICA'S POPULATION, THE DANGERS OF SECTARIANISM HAVE BLACK NEVER BEEN GREATER. WHATEVER WE ONCE WERE, WE ARE NO LONGER A CHRISTIAN NATION — AT LEAST, NOT JUST; WE ARE ALSO A JEWISH NATION, A MUSLIM NATION, A BUDDHIST NATION, A HINDU NATION, AND A NATION OF NONBELIEVERS.”

U.S. DISTRIBUTION OF RELIGIONS HINDUMORMONISLA

UNAFFILIATED

EVANGELICAL

PROTES-

JUDA-

JEHOVAH’S WIT-

ORTHODOX CHRIS-

OTHER FAITHS HINDU

S


L

NLINE ESTANT

PROTES-

JUDA-

ORTHODOX CHRIS-

JEHOVAH’S WIT-

BUDCATHOLI-

HOW AMERICANS FEEL ABOUT OTHER RELIGIOUS GROUPS IF YOU KNOW SOMEONE FROM THAT GROUP

MEAN TOTAL 100

IF YOU HAVE NEVER MET ANYONE FROM THAT GROUP

70 - BUDDHISTS 69 - JEWS

WARMER, MORE POSITIVE

50

63 - JEWS 62 - CATHOLICS 61 - EVANGELICALS 53 - BUDDHISTS

53 - MORMONS

50 - HINDUS

50 - ATHEISTS 49 - MUSLIMS

48 - MORMONS

COLDER, MORE NEGATIVE

65 - EVANGELICALS 64 - CATHOLICS 63 - HINDUS

41 - ATHEISTS 40 - MUSLIMS

55 - JEWS

49 - EVANGELICALS 48 - BUDDHISTS 47 - CATHOLICS, HINDUS 44 - MORMONS

35 - MUSLIMS 29 - ATHEISTS

0 SOURCE: PEW RESEARCH CENTER

PROGRAM The main consideration for the program was how to represent both the religious makeup of the U.S. but also its changing religious landscape. It is not only a country of religious diversity and ingenuity, it is also a country that challenges religious assumptions as shown by the rise of the religiously unaffiliated. Therefore, the goal was to celebrate the diversity of religious practice by creating spaces designed for specific religious communities with consideration of all their theological and spatial needs and each given a unique design identity. But a secondary goals was to to encourage curiosity about the “other” as the interaction between faith communities with each other and with nonbelievers is one of defining aspects of American discourse. The worship spaces were designed to consist of many overlapping, intersecting, and abutting sanctuary envelopes. This forces both a formal representative acknowledgment of the adjacent sanctuaries as one space fractures into another, as well as offering privileged viewpoints to be able to witness the rituals and practices of other communities. As the glazing system of one sanctuary becomes enveloped by another sanctuary, what was once a view into the exterior becomes a literal window into another community’s worship service.

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

9


10

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

PROCESS After deciding on an overall program for this project, initial studies in form were developed from the inside out. Transcendent experiences in constructed space would be an important aspect of this project, but successfully designing even one is a lofty task let alone designing an aggregation of them. Thus, interior spaces were developed through collecting photographs of inspiring religious spaces and collaging them into imagined interior renderings. The process, in essence, began with the end; a final image of a space yet to be designed. After developing mashups that would consist of Ando, Scarpa, Zumthor, SANAA, and many others, these collages were precisely designed in model space before being edited and then aggregated many times over. By giving each faith a unique space as opposed to a predefined module in a grid, the uniqueness of each faith’s religious expression could be accounted for.


11


12


13


14

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

O R G A N I Z AT I O N The conceit of an aggregation of diverse objects is that their unification as a combined form does not result in the streamlined effect that a modular system provides. An organizational system was developed based off of Tony Cragg’s Stack (1975) and Cumulus (1998) who arranges diverse objects into a gestalt through the implication of a cube. By precisely conforming the massing to a flat rectulinear edge, the building as a whole is given a single composition whereas from the interior courtyard the “piling up” of objects of different sizes and shapes is visible.


19 1

18 17

2

3 16

15

1 . MOSQU E 2. CHURCH 3 . H I N D U TE MPLE 4 . SYN A G OG U E 5 . OR TH OD OX C H UR C H 6. CHURCH 7 . C LA SSR OOMS 8 . B ATH R OOMS 9 . MOSQU E 1 0 C H UR C H 11. RAIN GARDEN 1 2 . B UD D H I ST TE MPLE 1 3 . ME D I TATI ON R OOM 1 4 . YOG A R OOM 15. CHURCH 16. CHURCH 1 7 . B A PTI STRY / SPA 1 8 . MI K VA H 1 9 . B ATH R OOMS

4 14

MECCA EAST

13 12

5

11

9 6

10

8

7

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

15


CATHOLIC CHURCH

MOSQUE

BAPTISTRY / SPA

SYNAGOGUE


T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

17


18

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

E A S T E L E VA T I O N

N O R T H E L E VA T I O N


W E S T E L E VA T I O N

SECTION

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

19


21


22

T H E N AT I O N A L C E N T E R F O R I N T E R FA I T H W O R S H I P

PHYSICAL MODEL 3D PRINTED


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET EL PASO, TEXAS CRITIC: ALEX BARKER PAR TNERS: LAUREN KIRK, CRAIG SINCLAIR STRUCTURAL: CRISTOBAL CORREA MECHANICAL: ROBERT KEARNS ENVELOPE: SAMEER KUMAR S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y : M E TA B R U N Z E M A SPRING, 2015

25


EL PASO, TEXAS

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

PROMPT This group project proposes a grocery store in El Paso, Texas, on a site that faces the border crossing to Mexico. Considering the politically charged issue of immigration regarding this site, much research was put into the Slow Food movement in order to reconsider the typology of the supermarket and how the process leading up to the arrival to the supermarket is obscured. This project attempted to expose shoppers to the broken connection between agriculture and consumerism, both to expose it and to criticize it. A special emphasis was also put into local food traditions and agricultural history.

U.S.A. MEXICO

CIUDAD JUĂ REZ, CHIHUAHUA

26


AV E R A G E T E M P E R AT U R E

C L I M AT E D ATA

AV E R A G E P R E C I P I TAT I O N ( I N C H E S ) 2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

0.0

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

Located in the Chihuahua Desert, at the edge of the Franklin Mountains along the Rio Grande, El Paso exhibits a typical desert climate: Hot days and cold nights, with very little humidity and rainfall. In the summers, average temperatures can reach well into the 90s with lots of solar exposure. Yearly average rainfall comes out to about 9 inches per year, mostly coming down during summer monsoons, though it will occasionally snow during the winter due to El Paso’s high elevation.

M O N T H LY D I U R N A L AV E R A G E S

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

29


30

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

C I R C U L AT I O N

PROGRAM The big-box typology of the standard supermarket was replaced by intersecting and forking strands, each representing a different raw product. Starting from its most unprocessed form at the loading dock, and resulting in its most processed form by the cashiers. At every step of the way, the product would be displayed for purchase and also the methods of production would be demonstrated behind glass. For instance, milk would be sold at the most raw end of the supermarket where employees would also be using that milk to make cheese and butter, which would then be sold further down the strand. By producing as much as possible in-house in a linear fashion, this supermarket intends to educate the public about how the food makes it from farm to table. It also attempts to expose the agro-industrial process that supermarkets rely on.

OFFICES 1000SF

PROGRAM PASSAGE BAKERY

BUTCHER 2500SF CURING 1000SF RAW MEAT 2000SF

2500SF CHEESE 800SF

MILK 800SF

RAW FISH RAW DAIRY 2000SF RAW BULK 2000SF RAW FRUIT 2500SF RAW VEG 2500SF 2500SF

PREPARED FOODS 1500SF

COFFEE ROASTER 800SF

BEVERAGE BAR 1500SF

SALAD BAR 800SF CLASSROOMS 1000SF

ANAEROBIC DIGESTER 2500SF


PROGRAM DIAGRAM M O S T R AW

MOST PROCESSED

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

31


32

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

GROUND FLOOR


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

33


34

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

SECOND FLOOR / ROOF GARDEN


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

35


36

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y In attempting to expose the entire agroindustrial process within the confines of the supermarket, post-consumer waste was also considered. The group sought to approach resource self-sustainability by installing an anaerobic digester, water filtration, and other machinery to redistribute energy, water, and heat back into the building in order to offset these resources and to educate about these processes. The anaerobic digester would also allow compost to be collected and reconfigured into soil and fertilizer which would be used for the urban agriculture on the green roof of the supermarket. While it would not be able to supply the entirety of produce for the supermarket, this rooftop urban agriculture would act as a public park where locals could further experience the agricultural process of local crops that grow in the arid El Paso environment and see how they are harvested before being packaged and sold in the supermarket.

GROCERY STORE

GROCERY STORE

URBAN AGRICULTURE

ORGANIC WASTE

GREYWATER

HEAT

ELECTRICITY

WATER FILTRATION

ANAEROBIC DIGESTER

BIOMETHANE

DIGESTATE / COMPOST


LANDSCAPING AND URBAN AGRICULTURE

PLANTING DIAGRAM A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N.

N AT I V E G R A S S E S FISH FARM NOPALES CORN QUINOA W H E AT T O M AT O E S , P E P P E R S BEANS O R N A M E N TA L C A C T I SQUASHES P O TAT O E S HERBS BARLEY A G AV E

F

Attention was given to the local crops and traditional farming methods of Southwest Texas / the Chihuahua region when planning out the roofscape of the supermarket. Drought-resistant native species were laid out along the farming plots, mirroring the layout of the produce and raw ingredients below. For example, corn and quinoa are planted above the grain section of the supermarket, while sedges and prairie grasses are planted above the butchery, representing pasture lands.

I

C

H B

E

A

M B

K

A D

N

L

G J

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

37


38

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

W E S T E L E VAT I O N

E A S T E L E VAT I O N


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

39


3'-0" 7'-0"

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

DETAIL 1 FLASHING PLANT BED

L A U R E N K I R K E R I C S A L I T S K Y C R A I G S I N C L A I R

FLASHING PAVED WALKWAY DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE

3'-0"

14'-0"

3'-0"

DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE

7'-0"

3'-0"

3 DEGREE TRUCK DECLINE SIDEWALK DETAIL 1

MULLIONS CONCRETE COLUMN POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR

D O C K

W A L L

DETAIL 3

S E C T I O N

3'-0" 3'-0"

L O A D I N G

14'-0"

T Y P I C A L

3'-0"

DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE

1

3'-0" 7'-0"

D O C K

W A L L

S E C T I O N

DETAIL 3

FLASHING PLANT BED

14'-0"

C R I T I C S I T E M E C H A N I C A L S T R U C T U R E F A C A D E

A L E X B A R K E R M E T A B R U N Z E M A R O B E R T K E R N S S A R R A H K H A N S A M E E R K U M A R

S I T E E L

P A S O ,

T E X A S

P R O J E C T

3

T Y P I C A L

C A N T I L E V E R

W A L L

S E C T I O N

3'-0"

POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR

PLANT BED STEEL T

L A U R E N K I R K E R I C S A L I T S K Y C R A I G S I N C L A I R

S U P E R

DETAIL 2 CONCRETE COLUMN

A L E X B A R K E R M E T A B R U N Z E M A R O B E R T K E R N S S A R R A H K H A N S A M E E R K U M A R

3'-0"

DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE

14'-0"

1

L O A D I N G

PLANT BED STEEL T FLASHING PAVED WALKWAY DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE MULLIONS CONCRETE COLUMN STEEL FRAMING POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR STRUCTURAL ATTACHMENT PLANTER BOX POTTING PLANT IRRIGATION DRAINAGE

14'-0" 15'-0"

3 DEGREE TRUCK DECLINE SIDEWALK

T Y P I C A L

C R I T I C S I T E M E C H A N I C A L S T R U C T U R E F A C A D E

15'-0"

FLASHING PLANT BED

STEEL FRAMING STRUCTURAL ATTACHMENT PLANTER BOX POTTING PLANT IRRIGATION DRAINAGE

D R A W I N G W A L L

T I T L E

S E C T I O N S

1 ’

:

1 / 8 ”

S I T E E L

7'-0"

M A R K E T

P A S O ,

T E X A S

FLASHING PLANT BED

2

T Y P I C A L

F A C A D E

14'-0"

W A L L

S E C T I O N

D R A W I N G

DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB CONCRETE

MULLION PLATE GLASS JOINT PROTECTION ANCHOR SCREW

DETAIL 2 CONCRETE COLUMN POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR

3

T Y P I C A L

C A N T I L E V E R

W A L L

S E C T I O N

SLAB BASE GRATE PRECAST CONCRETE TRENCH DRAIN PAVEMENT

N U M B E R

A 4 0 0 P R O J E C T

S U P E R

M A R K E T

D R A W I N G W A L L 1 ’

T I T L E

S E C T I O N S :

1 / 8 ”

2'

40

D R A W I N G

N U M B E R

A 4 0 0 2

T Y P I C A L

F A C A D E

W A L L

S E C T I O N

4

T Y P I C A L

F A C A D E / G R O U N D

D E T A I L

4

T Y P I C A L

W A L L

P L A N T E R

D E T A I L


SECTION MODEL 3D PRINTED AND LASER CUT


42

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

A

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

L AT E R A L S E C T I O N B


3'-0" 2'-0"

2'-0"

FLASHING PLANT BED

DRIP EDGE METAL FLASHING

5'

3'

CONCRETE PARAPET

PAVERS DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER

MULLION PLATE GLASS JOINT PROTECTION L A U R E N K I R K ANCHOR SCREWCERRAI ICG S SAI LNI CT LS AK IY R

VOLUME POT

WOOD P

IRRIGATIO

STEEL FRA

SLAB BASE GRATE PRECAST CONCRETE TRENCH DRAIN PAVEMENT C R I T I C S I T E M E C H A N I C A L S T R U C T U R E F A C A D E

2'

2"

6"

15'

4"

2'-0"

1'

13'-0"

DRAINAGE THERMAL INSULATION ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER FLAT SLAB MULLION 2' X 2' CONCRETE TRUSS WEB 3' GLASS BARRIER CONCRETE TRUSS BOTTOM CHORD

A L E X B A R K E R M E T A B R U N Z E M A R O B E R T K E R N S S A R R A H K H A N S A M E E R K U M A R

CONCRE SCREW

12"

FLAT SLAB

C A N T I L E V E R

E N D

W A L L

P A R A P E T

D E T A I L

4

T Y P I C A L

F A C A D E / G R O U N D

D E T A I L

4

T Y P I C A L

W A L L

P L A N T E R

D E T A I L

DRIP EDGE ANCHOR SCREW JOINT PROTECTION PLATE GLASS MULLION

CONCRETE PARAPET DRAIN GRATING

1' CONCRETE FLAT SLAB ASH FILLER 4' 4"

PAVERS

L A U R E N K I R K E R I C S A L I T S K Y C R A I G S I N C L A I R

SOIL 2'

STEEL T SEPARATION D R A W I N G

4"

W A L L

2"

C R I T I C S I T E M E C H A N I C A L S T R U C T U R E F A C A D E

A L E X B A R K E R M E T A B R U N Z E M A R O B E R T K E R N S S A R R A H K H A N S A M E E R K U M A R

12"

FLAT SLAB

4"

1'

M A R K E T

PLANT

6"

4"

T E X A S

P R O J E C T S U P E R

DRAINAGE 6" POLISHED CONCRETE SLAB INSULATION 2' FOUNDATIONTHERMAL SLAB ROOT BARRIER MOISTURE BARRIER

2'-0"

P A S O ,

S E C T I O N S 1 ’

:

T I T L E A N D

D E T A I L S

1 / 8 ”

PAVERS 4" DRAINAGE MAT

6"

5'

OTTOM CHORD

S I T E E L

6" INSULATION

1"

3'

SIDEWALK PAVERS INSULATION

12'-0"

RUSS WEB

T Y P I C A L

METAL FLASHING

1'-0" 9"

ON

1

S E C T I O N

2'-0"

T Y P I C A L

4"

4

ROOT BARRIER

12"

VAPOR BARRIER 5"

1' CONCRETE FLAT SLAB

2"

D R A W I N G

N U M B E R

8"

T Y P I C A L

1

C E L L A RT Y W PAI LCL A SL E PCAT RI O A N P E T

2

D E T A I L

T Y P I C A L

G L A Z I N G

D E T A I L

3

A 4 0 1

R O O F

G A R D E N

D E T A I L

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

4"

5

ANCHOR SCREW JOINT PROTECTION

S I T E E L

P A S O ,

T E X A S

43


44

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

EGRESS DIAGRAM

S

P

O

N

M

L

6" CONCRETE SLAB

J

R Q H G

'-0 "

G

'-0 "

H

Q

R

I

S

K

P

O

N

6" CONCRETE SLAB

M

35'-0"

L

35'-0"

K

30'-0"

J

30'-0"

I

35'-0"

"

'-0

30

35'-0"

"

'-0

30

"

'-0

30

30'-0"

"

'-0

30

SECOND FLOOR

30'-0"

GROUND FLOOR


H VA C A N D U T I L I T I E S D I A G R A M

AHU

CHILLER

RETURN SUPPLY

S

P

O

N

6" CONCRETE SLAB

G

'-0 "

H

Q

R

I

L

35'-0"

K

35'-0"

J

30'-0"

"

'-0

30

WATER CONNECTION

30'-0"

"

'-0

30

GAS CONNECTION

M

COOLING TOWER

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

45


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

A

'-0

" "

'-0

" 30

'-0

"

C

'-0

"

F O U N D AT I O N P L A N

'-0

"

E

30

30

'-0

"

D

30

FRAMING PLAN

'-0

"

E

'-0

"

F

30

30

'-0

"

F

'-0

"

G

30

'-0

"

G H

H

" '-0

" '-0

" '-0

" '-0

K

30

J

30

J

30

I

30

I

K 35'-0"

D

30

L

L 35'-0"

30

35'-0"

C

30

B

'-0

M

M

6" CONCRETE SLAB N

N 30'-0"

30

35'-0"

B

O

O 30'-0"

30

30'-0"

A

30'-0"

46

P Q

P Q

R

R S

S


STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

47


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

49


50

BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

PHYSICAL MODEL LASER CUT AND HAND MODELED


BORDERLINE SUPERMARKET

51


SOHO ARTIST HOUSING SOHO, NEW YORK CRITIC: CRAIG KONYK FALL, 2014

53


54

SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

PROMPT

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

This project began at the height of the Rich Door, Poor Door controversy in New York City, where developers get tax incentives for making a percentage their residential units affordable housing, but in this case were providing a different entrance for those units, essentially creating economic segragation within the same building. This studio sought to design a residential highrise in the same Inclusionary Housing Program that seriously considered how to promote economic integration as opposed to seeing this zoning program as a hurdle to overcome. Considering the site’s location in SoHo, with its history of artist studios, and sharing the block with the Donald Judd Foundation, the solution devised for this project was to create economically diverse housing for people in the arts industry. Therefore, market rate housing could go to art dealers and gallerists, while affordable housing would go to artists who would also have access to artist studios.

1BR X 10 2BR X 4 3BR X 3 4BR X 1

1600

2300

3600

1 B R X 10 2BR X 4 3BR X 3

600 MARKET RATE (70%)

900

1100 4000

LOW INCOME (30%)

RESTAURANT

ARTIST STUDIOS

1000


56

SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

FORM Initial formal studies began with inspiration from the street art witnessed on the parti-walls of the site. The question emerged of how to design a building that used negative space to serve as oculuses for viewing a commissioned mural on the parti-walls. A cubic massing was placed on the boundaries of the site and then pyramidal perspective planes were created from the edges of the site and then subtracted from the massing. The exterior facade of the building was clad in dark concrete with a simple glazing system, almost disguising the jagged glass interior facade which allows viewing of the mural from inside the building and differentating the initial form from the cutting plane.

AS SEEN DURING SITE VISIT


FORMAL DIAGRAM

SP

SITE

RIN

G

STR

EE

T

AY DW

OA

BR

SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

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SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

LONGITUDINAL SECTION


L AT E R A L S E C T I O N


I N T E R I O R C O U R T YA R D


SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

61


62

SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

PHYSICAL MODEL LASER CUT AND HAND MODELED


SOHO ARTIST HOUSING

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QUEENSWAY MAKERSPACE QUEENS, NEW YORK CRITIC: FRANK LUPO SPRING, 2016

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Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

PROMPT AND PROCESS The Queensway is a rails-to-trails project attempting to transform a 3.5 mile stretch of abandoned railway in Queens into a linear park. The prompt for this studio project was to take the section of the proposed park between Metropolitan Ave and Union Turnpike in the Forest Hills neighborhood and design both a masterplan and an architectural proposal that serves both the park and the local community. The initial inspiration for this project was the current state of the abandoned railway. Much of the railway infrastructure remains, rusted and neglected, surrounded by over fifty years of overgrowth including a variety of species of fully grown trees. Drawing on the work of Post-Industrial landscape architects, particularly Latz + Partner, this project attempted to memorialize the manufacture and industrial heritage personified by the rail and capture the experience of nature taking over the remains of a lost past. But on the other hand, this masterplan explored the contemporary interest in community manufacturing through the inclusion of three makerspaces focusing on education and digital technology. Additionally, a bridge design was also required in order to replace what used to be a wooden bridge that spans an active rail line.


S T R U C T U R E AND CIRCU LAT ION DIA GRAM

S T R U C T U R E A N D C I R C U L AT I O N

C L AD D ING, GL AZI NG

S T E E L S T RU C T U R E

PROGR AM C IRC U L AT ION

GR OU ND C OV E R

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

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Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

E A S T E L E VAT I O N

A


B

C

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

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Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

W E S T E L E VAT I O N

C

B


A

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

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Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E


FORM All three makerspaces are connected by a gantry system that determined the form for this project. Multiple gantry cranes can access the entirety of the masterplan for a variety of purposes - to carry large art pieces from one makerspace to another, to allow for landscape elements to be manufactured in-house, or to supply the makerspaces with materials. The use of Corten and steel trusses at a large scale blur the boundary between functional and folly while creating the feel of an industrial landscape in the middle of a fifty-year old forest. The landscaping is also curated in such a way that plants extend beyond their boundaries, creating a sense of overgrowth.

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

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Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E


PROGRAM Three makerspaces are distributed throughout this stretch of Queensway each oriented toward a different community element that decided its program. The southernmost structure is a woodworking studio, which shares a parking lot with Home Depot, allowing easy access to materials and services. On the eastern side of the former berm, a digital lab with computer stations and other digital media serves the Queens Metropolitan High School to provide additional services to the school. The northernmost makerspace is a metalworking studio, allowing users to make art pieces or learn automotive and bicycle repair skills with a garage entrance facing Metropolitan Ave.

M E TA LW O R K I N G S T U D I O I N T E R I O R


ROOF PLAN

C

B


A


1 S T F L O O R P L A N AT G R A D E ( + 4 ’ )

C

B


A


2 N D F L O O R P L A N AT B E R M ( + 2 7 ’ )

C

B


A


82

Q U E E N S WAY M A K E R S PA C E

PHYSICAL MODEL LASER CUT AND HAND MODELED


FABRICATION PROJECTS

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FA B R I C AT I O N P R O J E C T S

COMPUTER AIDED CONSTRUCTION CRITIC: BRIAN RINGLEY GRASSHOPPER, CNC MILLED R U B B E R , A C RY L I C , B A LT I C B I R C H P LY W O O D


D I G I TA L FA B R I C AT I O N IN ARCHITECTURE C R I T I C : J E F F R E Y TA R A S CNC MILLED MEDIUM DENSITY FIBERBOARD

FA B R I C AT I O N P R O J E C T S

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90

C U R R I C U L U M V I TA E

ERIC SALITSKY, AIA, LEED GA 774.261.3446 | eric.salitsky@gmail.com


E D U C AT I O N

WORK EXPERIENCE

T H E P R AT T I N S T I T U T E - B R O O K LY N , N Y Masters in Architecture, 2016

LY N N B A D E R A R C H I T E C T - T H E B R O N X , N Y July 2016-Present - Architectural Designer

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MADISON, WI Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and Religion, 2010

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE I N T E R FA I T H F O R U M O N R E L I G I O N , A R T, A N D ARCHITECTURE - AIA KNOWLEDGE COMMUNITY

+ Provided drawings for design development through beginning of construction for gutting and renovation of two story house in Queens + Attended all meetings with clients, consultants, and expeditor + Produced all construction documents in preparation for DOB permit and contractor bidding D AV I D Y U M A R C H I T E C T S - N E W Y O R K , N Y May 2015-March 2016 - Architectural Intern

March 2016-Present - Member of the Collaboration Committee F O R E N S I C A R C H I T E C T U R E - E YA L W E I Z M A N ’ S P R O J E C T T O A P P LY S PAT I A L A N A LY S I S T O H U M A N R I G H T S A B U S E S April 2015- August 2015 - 3d Modeler of photographs of war zones in collaboration with Amnesty International

SKILLS D I G I TA L

MODELING

Autocad Rhinoceros Photoshop Illustrator Indesign Revit V-Ray Maxwell render Grasshopper Maya 3Ds Max

3D printing Laser cutting Cnc milling Hand modeling

+ Researched and developed initial schematic design and design development for Chelsea micro-hotel project through physical and digital layout studies + Assisted with supervision and construction administration for Upper East Side condo renovation + Drafted bid and permit set construction documents for various apartment renovations + Designed updates on firm’s marketing materials, including the creation and branding of a new portfolio for DYA SALITSKY/HANDELMAN DESIGN - NEW YORK, NY May 2014-June 2015 - Co-Founder and Designer + Designed the interior renovation of Moss Café, a farm-to-table restaurant in the Riverdale area of the Bronx + Involved in all phases of design - from schematic scenario planning to formal layout, material sourcing, and construction documentation including initial MEP considerations

C U R R I C U L U M V I TA E

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ERIC SALITSKY ERIC.SALITSKY@GMAIL.COM 774.261.3446

Eric Salitsky - Selected Works  

Pratt Institute GAUD Master's of Architecture Portfolio 2017

Eric Salitsky - Selected Works  

Pratt Institute GAUD Master's of Architecture Portfolio 2017

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