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Contents Letter From the Editor .......................................................................................................................... 3 PART I: POETRY. ................................................................................................................................ 4 Ndaba Sibanda ....................................................................................................................................... 5 Blissful Kingdom ...................................................................................................................................... 6 Karen Mary Berr .................................................................................................................................... 8 Back to you .............................................................................................................................................. 9 Madness ................................................................................................................................................. 11 DJ Tyrer ................................................................................................................................................ 13 Hirgeth ................................................................................................................................................... 14 Obsession. .............................................................................................................................................. 16 Desirable Haiku ...................................................................................................................................... 18 Desire Haiku .......................................................................................................................................... 20 Self-Denial Haiku .................................................................................................................................. 22 Love Denied ........................................................................................................................................... 24 Eric Mwathi .......................................................................................................................................... 26 Mysterious Wish ..................................................................................................................................... 27 Awdl Cyhydeddfer. ................................................................................................................................. 29 PART II: POSE FICTION ................................................................................................................. 31 Ndaba Sibanda ..................................................................................................................................... 32 The Escape Rout in the Dark ................................................................................................................. 33 DJ Tyrer ................................................................................................................................................ 36 Two Liv(e)´s ........................................................................................................................................... 37 PART III: NON-FICTION ................................................................................................................ 38 Interview with Novelist and Philosopher Daniel D. Watkins .................................................................. 39 Contributer’s Profiles. .......................................................................................................................... 65 Afterword .............................................................................................................................................. 71

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Letter from the Editor People, who feel desire usually experience two main things. First of all they feel that they are lacking something that may contribute to their happiness, in one way or another. Secondly, they feel a strong want to have it. This creates what is known as desire. Some people have managed to be happy, by not desiring a lot of things. To be happy, without giving way to a feeling of desire, seems to be unimaginable for most, today. That is strange, if you think of the fact that most unhappiness comes from an unfulfilled desire. Even in the popular tale of Aladdin, on a magical creature, who fulfils all of a poor man’s wishes, the fulfilment of a wish is often the source of unhappiness. The moral of the story is that we often crave for things that only make us happy for a short time, even when it makes us miserable in the long run. In this third issue of anthology29, desire shall be dealt with in contemporary prose and poetry, before an interesting interview, with the novelist Daniel Watkins.Hoping that you will enjoy this third issue of anthology29 Best Wishes, Eric Mwathi

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.Part I: Poetry.

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.Ndaba Sibanda.

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Blissful Kingdom It can be delightfully And liberatingly ludicrous, For them it is a conducive haven. And it is not boring either, It is but a burrowing life! Call it the basement kingdom, For animals` fantastic freedom, They are protected from predators, From things like the overly dry climates, From extreme temperatures as well. Their cosy cafeteria is there too! Talk of guys like tubers, roots, worms, grubs, insects, insect eggs and larvae; How great to hunt for food underground! For moles and earthworms their entire Lives are spent blissfully in this kingdom, Animals adapted to living undergroundLike Aardvarks, armadillos, and moles Will tell you that fossorial life is the best!

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.Karen Mary Berr.

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Back to you "Is it too late for a Stranger’s remembranceIs it perharps too early? ” E.D

There’s a trace something in my chest, leaks so strong you can smell it in the streets a blossom of fire as in sleep, suddenly moves there’s a spur of flesh in your absence nailed into nothing there’s a spur a carnal trace constricted as in some spray paint not to be exposed to direct sunlight but laid in a refrigerated body box a trace so alive, so luminous it blooms along my frozen nerves and lips your imprint a poison of unknown name that perforates and burns, say, after use my salty throat and uterine wallsthere’s a spur of flesh rising from underneath the skin of loss outliving cold veins and still blood there’s a trace piercing the balloon of my amnesia gunshots holes in my funeral dress now, fling open your worn blue coat don’t stay chaste with me, love It’s not you, it‘s me, god chastised for living without you was lying in a coffin but now, sweet defiant, look there’s a carnal trace in everything blood colored suns on the road to nothingness wooly cells, red diodes, lustrous anomalies that leads me to your cummy hands 9


as you knead my heart and eat it like bread on your way to some peep show cabinOh my weird stone, my man, my absolutist there’s a rain there’s a rain of flesh in this noisy space in every interference there’s a trace there’s a spur of flesh in your absence that stands naked in the rearview mirror and delivers me from heaven.

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Madness Is the child with his father, playing, in the background of his unstable heart ? How the music, within, sounds ? Are the red grains of flesh heavier, my flashbacks finally hacked? Does his man’s love wander through each tender bones like a stubborn fire? Have we ceased eating knives? Is my sun with his father ? Can I wash off my wrists ? In this strange world, I, alone know nothing. I live inside a shadow, treat it like a solid thing, and I certainly don’t ask for understanding. You can even stone me if my red anamnesis in his fatherhood of rubber is all there is. As if nothing else existed except a steady break into orgasms of granite when, being nixed, the ache never stopped asking about him.

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.DJ Tyrer.

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Hiraeth Born in the valleys or amongst the mountains Or a visitor to the Cambrian west Something of that place insinuates itself Deep within your soul So that should you ever manage to leave It will continue to call you back Towards the setting sun A longing that will always tug at your soul A longing that will never leave you Until you die or until you return

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Obsession An overwhelming desire To possess it is your sole aim Whether a lover or a lifestyle Or a child and that all-important toy Everything else just fades away Unimportant in comparison Forgotten in the pursuit Of that overwhelming desire

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Desirable Haiku

An urge to possess So very essential Like the summer sun

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Desire Haiku Overwhelming urge A must-have mentality Irresistible

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Self-Denial Haiku All things you desire Set aside for greater good Like food for winter

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A Love Denied Admit it not Not even to yourself A secret best left Dormant, Lifeless In your breast

(A Love Denied has previously been published in The Pen[USA])

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.Eric Mwathi.

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Mysterious Wish One day there had been this strong want, That Aphrodite had never felt, One day, it had begun to haunt, Her mind, more than she’d dealt.

It drew tears from those pretty eyes, Strange people asked her what was wrong. Small children stopped to cheer her up, By singing her a song.

This wish had mocked her all the time, Saying, you’ll never grab hold of me, And it begun to mock those tears, But would not let her be.

That’s when she started to regret, Being made, so she will never die. She’d live forever, with this wish, And still never know why.

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Awdl: Cyhydeddfer

I'll eat healthily and I’ll wait, Until I lose a bit of weight,

And I’ll be much better looking, For single girls, who’re still looking,

For lonesome men upon this earth, With few dark secrets to unearth,

Before one marries me for good, And we two will be glad for good,

As I’m glad this diet did work, When going about my daily work.

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.Part II: Prose. Fiction.

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.Ndaba Sibanda.

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The Escape Route In the Dark When the elders came up with the adage, 'There is no need to fear a darkness without leopards,' they did not mean the situation in which Mr. Bhidliza found himself in... Once upon a time there lived a very notorious man. He had the beguiling face of a youthful model, guiltless eyes of a tried and tested devout, a beetling chin whose beard looked a little too lengthy and thick for comfort, and sometimes priestly, and a handsomely curvy mouth that seemed to mosey, gyrate and beam each time he uttered or smirked. It is rumoured that some adolescent Hlatshwayo women fetchers of water, at a river well, once exchanged razor-sharp blows after arguing over the number of times he bathed per day and whether he devoted more time toward making babies than thieving. Upon being pressed to clarify why he had too many children, he was quick to underline that even the Bible encourages people to proliferate whilst the health experts harp on child-spacing (which in his case and understanding translated into having children in different villages!). What was no rumour, though, was that women of all ages and sizes, in general, fell over themselves for him. It is said that one very dark night Mr. Bhidliza had snuck into the homestead of a loud-mouthed member of parliament, and within seconds, the honourable Member of Parliament’s classy car was cruising at breakneck speed on a bumpy road when it eventually experienced a breakdown. Mr. Gwebu — (for that was his real name) — alighted from the stolen vehicle, pried open the bonnet, and was unmistakably 33


immersed in the gearbox when a female voice suddenly emanated from the backseat! For a while he was transfixed. “Why don't you look at the number plates, SekaNtombi? ” Mr. Gwebu shuddered at the question. “Why don’t you look at the number plates, SekaNtombi? Have we gone past our ancestral cemetery, SekaNtombi?” The female voice came alive again. His knees squirmed inside his gold designer trousers. It is said a ghostly apparition engulfed and outsmarted him and he tore away, vanishing into distance, into the concentrated darkness that also engulfed him. The recently awakened old woman is said to have fleetingly sneezed, salivated and snoozed, then dozed and drooled again; before eventually slipping into a fully-fledged slumber characterized by a dream that gave her an all-seeing role: An arm-less bearded priest talks in monologues of walking impeccably clean, seeks to scamper away from what looks like a gloomy palace infested with numberless marching disgruntled skeletons and wheezing bees. But along the only path that purportedly leads to the gate of freedom lurks a deep ditch. The pit is pitilessly dark and awesomely blistering. The fugitive cleric, heavy-laden with a mountainous loot of gold and silver, cars, cattle and curses, garments and grudges, women and weaknesses, farcical truths and gossips in place of the gospel of salvation, bribes and brutality instead of bibles and peace, human bones and human odour, and other problematic paraphernalia, literally gropes for the path that leads toward freedom, but slips into the gloomy pit! 34


Some villagers soon come to the party, and Lord of Lords, she recognizes some of them as the chief priests die-hard sycophants and mistresses! She tries to drive them away to no avail as they hurl down one part of a long rope into the abyss for the palace escapee to clinch with his long-matured but tireless and merciless teeth. Up, up the fawning poor pawns pull the tough line. On the verge of reaching the surface, his thrill of anticipated relief and for continued reign galvanizes him to prematurely utter, “Thank you com‌â€? and with his horrible heap, he falls tragically back! Confounded, the old woman woke up. Feeling a startling measure of relief and freedom, she waited in vain until dawn became a verdict that proclaimed that she had been stolen as well. She claims that such a horrifying memory is enshrined in her heart up to this very moment.

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.DJ Tyrer.

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Two Li(v)es The man who, in his heart, was a woman and the woman, who in her heart was a man, exchanged appraising glances, each thinking, "They have all that I desire yet squander it!", never realising the truth.

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.Part III: Non.Fictional Prose.

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.Interview. .By. .Eric Mwathi. .With. .Daniel Watkins.

Current profile picture of Daniel Watkins, at the top.

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General Information INTERVIEWER What is your age, Occupation and passions? WATKINS 50 years. Tutor, writer, thinker. INTERVIEWER What country town or area are you from? WATKINS British. Oxford, England. INTERVIEWER What languages do you speak? WATKINS A little French and Arabic. INTERVIEWER What language was spoken at home? WATKINS English.

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Daniel Watkins at his fiftieth birthday

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INTERVIEWER What were your past publications? WATKINS Glengoth, The Malcotte Worms, Malcotte Hall, Where Are the Songs of Spring? INTERVIEWER What clothing do you like to wear and are there any specific labels you favour over others? WATKINS Shorts. GAP. INTERVIEWER Do you keep pets and have favourite animals? WATKINS Stray cats and dogs. My partner in Portugal looks after our three legged cat. INTERVIEWER Would you see yourself as introverted, extroverted, melancholy cheerful or otherwise? WATKINS Introvert. INTERVIEWER What food do you like to eat? WATKINS 42


Cairo curry. My own invention and staple diet. INTERVIEWER How do your friends and family see you? WATKINS Distant. Mostly absent.

Daniel Watkins holding up his birthday present

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Family INTERVIEWER What profession were your parents? WATKINS Father was an Oxford don and fellow of Wolfson College. Microbiology. My mother ran away from six children to live with dogs and horses. INTERVIEWER Do you have any siblings? WATKINS 5 – four sisters one brother. INTERVIEWER Were there writers or avid readers in your family? WATKINS Just my father. Wrote medical reviews for Times Literary Supplement before he went mad. In the end they banned him.

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Daniel Watkins at the Salisbury Plain running race.

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Specific Information INTERVIEWER Why do you write novels? WATKINS Creative outlet. Boredom. INTERVIEWER Do you write other things apart from novels? WATKINS Blog at www.Bareskindie.com INTERVIEWER Are there local or international writers who have influenced you? WATKINS Nothing here that's overarching other than possibly Shakespeare. Each separate work I write has its own references/antecedents/intertextualities that are often not written texts. My last novel, Where are the Songs of Spring? was vibe-driven by Muse's album, Absolution. My next novel Portrait of a Landscape (out next month) is influenced by the art and writings of Sven Berlin and other fine art artists. It's a Stuckist piece, really and includes art images from Barbara Hepworth, Clovis, Gauguin and others... Tim Schmalz, Saul Leiter ... My next novel is inspired by David Bowie. INTERVIEWER Are there any writers whoes work you do not like?

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WATKINS Nothing specific. I think there are plenty of writers who are undeservedly given a platform by the industry, but that's the way it is. It's more of a shame for readers, but then we need to develop a readership more able and willing to be independent of mass marketing ploys and trends and more willing to hunt harder for intelligent and well-written work. INTERVIEWER What did you read as a child? WATKINS Anything I could. My earliest memories are the backs of Kellogg's cornflakes boxes and Albrecht D端rer woodcuts.

Daniel Watkins as a member of the Officers' Mess, at the Kwai Chung Police Station, in Hong Kong.

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That is Daniel Watkins at the Sugar Loaf Mountain, in Wales, together with the horses Anabel and Marcel.

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Information about your Creativity INTERVIEWER In what kind of environment do you work best, with regard to INTERVIEWER a) The time of the days? WATKINS Always morning between 08.00 and 11.00 INTERVIEWER b) Do you prefer to work indoors or outdoors? WATKINS Indoors. INTERVIEWER Specific rooms? WATKINS My study and in a chair not at a desk. INTERVIEWER Are there specific stationary that you prefer over others (with regard to the kind of paper, notebooks, pens of pencils you like)?

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This is Daniel Watkins with Susan Chan, at a lunchtime recital, at the Hong Kong University.

WATKINS I write on an iPad these days. It's great for editing as you go and, of course, I have a whole world of information at my fingertips. Greatest piece of technology in existence today. INTERVIEWER What inspires your creativity? WATKINS Combination of boredom and emotional/intellectual responses to specific contemporary issues. Injustice and human folly in their myriad guises. We can all pick out specific examples as we wander past the supermarket shelves. 50


INTERVIEWER What language do you write best in? WATKINS I have no choice. I've only managed to master one. INTERVIEWER What literary forms and genres did you experiment in? WATKINS Satire, political thriller, pastiche of Victorian prose, lyrical and most recently sci-fi. I consider myself as being cross-genre. Bad for marketing my work but there it is... always indie... INTERVIEWER What is the source of your most of your novels? WATKINS Too many to specify. Each project has its own unique sources. INTERVIEWER Why do you write political satire, do you have specific political views? WATKINS I think any decent novel must be political. 'Political' for me is more generally about 'power' and power dynamics within groups. The political dimensions in my novels are not specifically, if at all, about nations and nationalism. I'm interested in the social dynamics and hierarchy that dominate groups as diverse as the family and art colonies, cultures, social classes, education systems. I think good writers are able to expose the horizontal connections within social group strata and vertically between the layers.

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That is Daniel Watkins with Squad members, of the Officers' Mess, PTS, in Hong Kong.

Religion INTERVIEWER What religious views do you have? WATKINS I don't think in a religious way. I'm a free thinker. The religious cognitive process is something very alien to me. INTERVIEWER How do those religious views differ from your parents and grandparents? WATKINS They don't, really. INTERVIEWER How do they differ from your siblings? 52


WATKINS I think we were a pretty secular-minded lot. Enlightened. INTERVIEWER How do they differ from your childhood? WATKINS Things tend to get clearer, deeper and more meaningful as I get older. The mind of a child is a bean shoot. INTERVIEWER If we die, is there an afterlife? WATKINS Don't think there's an 'if' about it. We all die. INTERVIEWER Do you think angels, demons and ghosts exist? WATKINS Of course. In minds. That's not intended to be a glib answer. I think minds are really important places. Maybe too important. INTERVIEWER What was the experience with the supernatural you most remember? WATKINS I've only ever had natural experiences that I can remember. Some might argue I've exhibited unnatural behaviour at times...

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This is Daniel Watkins together with Huw Owen, at the Four Peaks Race, in Hong Kong.

Questions about literature INTERVIEWER What are the top five books you would most recommend? WATKINS Sorry. I just don't do this sort of question. My novels? Orwell? INTERVIEWER Name three or more books that disappointed you and tell me why they disappointed you. WATKINS I've never really approached books with high expectations or hopes. I don't listen to others' opinions or read reviews seriously, particularly if 54


they rave. So, a common experience for me: if I don't like a book , I simply stop reading it. I might add that this is an increasingly frequent experience with fiction. It might be because I've become too aware of how novels are put together and what they need to be doing to be good that they fail to do—having studied and taught literature for so long now and after having written a few books myself. I tend to read more non-fiction these days. Sadly... INTERVIEWER What writers do you personally know, what do they write and how do they affect you? WATKINS I'm a recluse and I live in a desert. George Steiner once came up to complain about my playing Fats Waller records too loudly. George Szirtes told me I couldn't write poetry and shouldn't bother. I've been taught by the Georgians to avoid other writers like the plague.

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This is Daniel Watkins, during a riot drill of the PTS, Hong Kong

INTERVIEWER How is your upcoming book coming along? WATKINS I'm personally pleased with Portrait of a Landscape. It'll be out on my own Bareskindie 'label' next month. It received a positive response in ms form from Readers' Favorite awards gaining a finalist medal and five star review. It's a good piece of work. I was particularly delighted by the responses from the various artists and galleries that I approached for copyright permissions, and I was particularly moved by Clovis Gauguin's responses and enthusiasm and, of course, permission to include a work of his. The novel pays homage to visual artists and creative people generally. It's an important piece for me. INTERVIEWER 56


Who will publish it? WATKINS All my work is self published. I don't approach publishers or agents because they get in the way of creativity and corrupt the creative process like all money grubbing intermediaries. I'm delighted that there are channels for distribution such as Amazon's KDP and CreateSpace now available to serious writers. Before these technologies emerged, getting a book published was like sitting in an gridlocked traffic jam forgetting what you set out for. Now writers can fly. I'm delighted to have my own 'recording label' called Bareskindie. It doesn't interest me who reads or who does not read what I write. I do like to see the writing process completed with the making of a physical copy. Book covers, book designs, interiors really fascinate me. Creating a book is like creating a single art piece or a one-off album. A vase. It gives me great pleasure to see the finished product and to be able to hold it in my hands. Not sure why that is. Self indulgent materialism? In an ideal world, there should only be one copy of any one novel. Like a painting. Mass production of units is artistically offensive. INTERVIEWER What are some of the names you are thinking of calling it? WATKINS Portrait of a Landscape is printing and available next month in pbk and on Kindle. My current work in progress is called Spaceman Daddy. INTERVIEWER What is your view of contemporary poetry and poets? WATKINS Having studied and taught poetry for over twenty years, having become so immersed in the classics from Chaucer on, I've tended to find 57


contemporary poetry increasingly urbane and/or often deliberately inaccessible. I'm very much, also, an evolved 'prose-ist' and find poetry these days cramping and self-indulgent. I admire poets like I admire chess masters or concert pianists. Then everything starts closing in on me and I have to get out the door for air.

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This is Daniel Watkins, during some boating race at Shatin, Hong Kong.

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INTERVIEWER Name an example of good contemporary poets worth reading as well as ones you recommend us not to read? WATKINS Best poets are dead ones.

This is Daniel Watkins, now, at the Plaza Hotel

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Philosophical Questions INTERVIEWER Are there any Western, Far Eastern or other Philosophers you still read? WATKINS Cover to cover days are over. I enjoy Daniel Dennett and generalists from time to time and dip into favourites like Hume, the ancients now and again, and more frequently, actually—Greeks, I mean. All French philosophy is at best just poetic masturbation—some cribbed from Heidegger. Germans are good (Nietzsche of course) but so much is lost to me because of translation. I'm pig ignorant when it comes to eastern thinkers. That's what an education does, I guess. INTERVIEWER How was it studying philosophy at Cambridge? WATKINS I enjoyed philosophy. It's a solitary thing and suited me. I never went to lectures after my first year and sat, mostly, in a chair. I still do. I still am sitting. I'm extremely fortunate that the Saudis pay me generously to sit and hide in my barrel all day. Philosophy graduates must become tutors and writers or else shelf stackers. INTERVIEWER Is Cambridge really full of geniuses? WATKINS I tend to feel the word 'genius' is best connected to creativity and divergent thinking. As such, I think Cambridge was rather lacking. There were clever people and fine minds but I could never get excited by fellow 61


students who understood General Relativity or string theory (or just said they did). I was never much of an academic and was disappointed by the lack of intellectualism. I suppose intellectuals are a solitary, rather private lot so maybe they existed but I never managed to meet them. The few real great minded students left or flunked out. There was always, of course, plenty of mental instability which I did enjoy and applauded.

This is Daniel Watkins with Douglas Wade, at St John's College, Cambridge.

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INTERVIEWER Do you have any personal philosophies or mottos? WATKINS In my books. It's all expressed there far better than I could here. Wittgenstein had a bit of a crush on my father once and told him: "The world is mad." That was outside Montague Burton's in Lion Yard just after the war. Sort of became a touchstone. INTERVIEWER What kind of work do you plan to release in the future? WATKINS Spaceman Daddy is a project I've just started. The ms will be completed in about three months' time and out, I hope, next summer. It's a novel but I'm writing it as a record album. Heavily influenced by David Bowie (now there's a creative genius, actually, who would never have fitted into Cambridge!). It's written in twelve 'tracks' all named after the tracks of Bowie's Heathen album and strongly linked to those songs and lyrics. It's loosely what might be called sci-fi but includes pastiches of erotica. I suppose it's a satire on the porn industry and attitudes to sexuality promulgated by capitalism, religion, and mass media. It's urban in style. Quite a harsh piece and a move away from the lyricism of my other work. INTERVIEWER Thank you so much for your time and your inspirational comments Dan!

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This is Daniel Watkins on the last day of his final exams, standing before King's College, Cambridge.

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.Contributor’s Profiles.

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.Ndaba Sibanda. Ndaba Sibanda grew up in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. He has contributed to poetry anthologies such as It`s Time, Poems For Haiti, and Snippets and Voices For Peace, as well as the past two issues of anthology29. In 2013, his hard-hitting poetry collection, The Dead Must Be Sobbing was published. His debut novel, Timebomb is set to be published in the UK.

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.Karen Mary Berr. Karen Mary Berr is currently living in France, where she studied Applied Arts and Art History. She had several exhibitions as a painter, photographer in France and Canada and is now specializing in Video Art & Poetry.

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David-John Tyrer DJ Tyrer is the founder and driving force behind Atlantean Publishing and has also contributed to many of its magazines, and of magazines and anthologies started by many other editors.

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.Eric Mwathi. Eric Mwathi’s fiction and poetry has been published under Shot Glass Journal, Tongue Mag Magworth's Literary Magazine, AllPoetry.com. Bard’s Magazine, Garbaj literary magazine, Stactes Greek literary Magazine, and The Supplement is shortlisted and considered for the World City Stories Prize and contributed to Shannon Norman’s Natural Reflections (A Collection of Poems). Before editing this poetry journal he had also started the Everyman’s Poetry Journal, edited the Anthology of Contemporary Love Poetry, and the Anthology of Religious Prose & Poetry. See more of his work at his website : http://ericmwathispoetry.webs.com/.

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.Daniel D. Watkins. Daniel Watkins was born in 1963, in the town of Oxfordshire, that is based in Oxford, Studied Philosophy at the University of Cambridge, started his own publishing label, called Bareskindie, through which he had published his own novels, many of which include The Malcott Wormes, Malcott Hall, Glengoth, Where are the Songs of Spring, and the brand new Portrait of a Landscape. Watkins has been a finalist for the Next Generation Indie Book Awards, of 2012, for his novel Glengoth, and currently works for the Royal Saudi Family, in Riadh, Saudi Arabia.

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Afterword. I would like to use this afterword, of anthology29 to thank all contributors, to this literary magazine, for your work and their input. To publish this magazine would not have been possible without your great talent and interesting experiences. Furthermore, I would like to use this opportunity to tell you that prose and poetry of any kind are strongly welcome for the next issue of this magazine, which will be on the theme of fear. I really look forward to your submissions. As usual please send them to my email address, which is mwathieric@yahoo.com. Best Wishes, Eric Mwathi (Editor)

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anthology29(Thirdissue)  

This is the third issue of the literary Magazine, called anthology29.

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