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TABLE OF CONTENTS BIOGRAPHY (4-5) L AND (6-21)

Chanel Contemporary Art Container BMW Central Building Lacoste Shoes Icone Bag Z-Car I&II

PROCESS (22-23) SEA (24-49) Z-Boat Abu Dhabi Performance Arts Center Sheikh Zayed Bridge Glasgow Riverside Museum of Transport Avilion Triflow Tap Liquid Glacial Table

INSPIRATION (50-51) SK Y (52-65) Capital Hill Residence Innovation Tower Dorobanti Tower

BIBLIOGRAPHY (66-67)


She attended convent schools in Baghdad and Switzerland, afterwards received a degree in mathematics at the American University in Beirut. Not until 1972 at the age of 22 she enroll into the Architectural Association in London. During the 70’s when pre-1968 optimistic modernism was being abandon, the AA was a hotspot for ambitious, independently minded aspired architects, such as Rem Koolhaas, and Will Alsop. It was the epicenter for a vital generation of architectural minds. The AA during this time period rejected kitsch post-modernism and aimed to become more modernist. They discarded failed Utopian projects and

She had her own ideas on architecture to nurture, which went through a long period incubation. She taught at AA, while developing her own brand of neo-modernist architecture. She went back to modernist roots in 20th century constructivism and suprematism. Her graduation project was a hotel on London’s Hungerford Bridge, called Malevich’s Tectonik, after Kashmir Malevich whom was a supremacist. She created landscape, which metaphorically, and perhaps in one day literally seemed to take off, which followed suit in Malevich’s quote “we can only perceive space when we break free from the earth, when the point of support disappears.”

Zaha Hadid born in 1950 in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq at the time was an entirely different country then what it is today. Hadid grew up during a period when Iraq was flourishing, liberal, secular, and western focused. It was also during the time when Iraq’s economy was booming. Her family, which was high class, played a roll in the Ba’ath party, which took power in 1963. Her father, Mohammad Hadid, was a politician, economist and industrialist and a co-founder of the Iraqi National Democratic. He was also a leader of the Iraqi Progressive Democratic Parties. Her father became a role model and she believed that she could be equally ambitious, even as a female of Iraqi decent.

BIOGRAPHY


ZAHA HADID

The fluid, shape shifting, and sci-fi architecture would be impossible to design and visualize without the advancement of computer-aided design, allowing the impossible to become possible. In the 1980’s along with several other architects, Hadid was handpicked to showcase work at the New York Museum of Modern Art under the seminal Deconstructivist Architecture exhibition. She was able to present her work, in abstract paintings, which she believes was the only way that she could convey the feeling of her radical, fluid space, which architectural drawings couldn’t. From then on she slowly rose, getting attention from clients that had the money to invest in her radical and new architectural design. But new digital design tools allow for integration of highly complex forms into a seamless whole, and 3D modeling has served a definite purpose during the design process. Her ambitions to create fluid, dynamic and therefore complex structures have been aided by technological innovations. Zaha Hadid remains one of the greatest female architects of her time.

Her work breaks through classical form; rule bound modernism, and the old rules of space. The pieces were reassembles together and called “a new fluid, kind of spatiality”. Creating multiple perspective points and fragmented geometry, which from a design stand point resembles the chaotic fluidity of modern life. Her architecture causes the viewers to see solid walls and space as a morphing and shape shifting apparatus. Hadid rarely talks of theory, symbolism within her work, or the connections to her cultural identity. However her obsessions with shadows and ambiguity has deep correlations to her roots in Islamic architectural tradition, but its fluidity, open nature is a politically charged response to increasingly fortified and undemocratic modern urban landscapes, possibly Iraq.

aimed to rethink a new modernism with more sophisticated ideas of history and human identity, architecture that embodies modernity’s chaos and disjuncture in its very shape. Hadid was most drawn to Rem Koolhaas, one of her tutors, who worked out his ideas of neo-modernity in books such as 1977’s Delirious New York. Koolhaas offered her a job, after she graduated in 1977, as a partner in Ella Zenghell’s new firm, the office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA). Koolhaas described as, A planet in her own orbit” after her short period of working at OMA.


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C H A N E L MOBILE A RT C O N TA I N E R MOBILE ART CHANEL CONTEMPOR ARY ART C O N TA I N E R ZAHA HADID Hong Kong, Tokyo, New York, currently Paris 2008 – 2010 700m2 Width 29m Length 45m 74t of Steel

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The Chanel Pavilion celebrates of the iconic work of Chanel its smooth layering of exquisite details to create an elegant, cohesive whole within a unique, sculptural space created as a series of continuous arches sequencing towards a central courtyard. Artificial light washes the structure through translucent walls and ceilings, creating an artificial landscape to contain exhibitions and events. A large roof light opening dramatically floods the entrance in daylight to blur the relationship between interior and exterior. The central courtyard, largely open to the sky above, serves as an intermediate space between exhibition and public areas. Reflective materials allow the exterior skin to be illuminated with varying colours which can be tailored to the differing programmes of special events in each city. The pavilion’s steel structure is designed to enable construction and subsequent decommissioning within a single week. The dichotomy between the powerful sculptural mass of the Chanel Pavilion’s structure and the lightness of its envelope create a bold and enigmatic element. To date, the structure has been erected for use in Hong Kong, Tokyo, New York and Paris.


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*K ARL LAGERFELD HEAD DESIGNER FOR CHANEL


BMW CENTR AL BUILDING BM W CEN T R A L BUIL DING ZAHA HADID Leipzig, Germany 2001 – 2005 27,500m2

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The central Building for BMW constituted a radical reinterpretation of the traditional office, transforming the building and the functions it contains into a more dynamic, engaging ‘nerve-center’ or ‘communication knot.’ It funnels all the movement around the manufacturing complex through a space that transcends conventional white collar/blue collar spatial divisions. The German motor home has sensed the importance of linking their own brand, always dedicated to a projective line of elegant and sensual, with a striking, modern spaces, offices, workshops and headquarters. This administrative and communications center combines modern design with great functionality and versatility. The building combines the areas of production, providing a shortcut in the communication of different departments, and providing spaces for encounters between workers, or workers with visitors to the plant.

*GERMAN ARCHITECT AWARD2005

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Z-CAR I&II Z-C A R MODEL I ZAHA HADID London, United Kingdom 2005-2008 Length 3800mm Width 1800mm Height 1700mm

Z-C A R MODEL II ZAHA HADID London, United Kingdom 2005-2008 Length 3680mm Width 1700mm Height 1400mm

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The Z Car is a hydrogen-powered, zero emission city car for two people with a three wheel base. The streamlined form combines functionality, quiet operation and aerodynamic performance. The space and car components gives a high degree of weight and nice fit for all the mechanical and electrical components in this small car body. The Z Car II is an evolution and enlargement of the first Z Car concept. It is a four wheel drive base, and a four seater model. Same as the Z Car it is emission free but rather than using hydrogen as a fuel source, it is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery.


P R O C E S S Zaha Hadid said that she doesn’t take anything directly from organic morphology (the study of the form and structure of organisms), just pure abstraction. She is inspired by landscapes, topography (representation of surface features of a place on a map), sedimentology, and geological patterns. For Zaha Hadid, painting acted as a design tool that allowed for intense experimentation in both form and movement. In an interview, she said “I felt limited by the poverty of the traditional system of drawing in architecture and was search for means of representation”. When she was asked about sketching, Hadid said thatit is an absolutely critical part of her process. Sketching and painting have remained integral to her process and the drawings allow her to see a project from every possible and impossible perspective. And because the drawings take such a long time to put together, it gives her time to develop and experiment with the different layers. Although Zaha Hadid’s paintings are featured in museums and galleries, she doesn’t consider herself a painter. She says,“I can paint but I am not a painter” Her paintings were always created as part of the research for architectural projects. About her own paintings she says, “…They were very important at the time as they were like elaborate sketches. They were part of a process of thinking taking your time and drawing”. When Zaha Hadid works, she works on multiple projects at once. She says that she has five screens with different projects that she works on developing. Nothing comes easily though; sometimes a sketch will take a few tries and sometimes a few years. She says, “not every idea can be used right then. But nothing is lost.” While discussing computer renderings compared to rendering by hand, Zaha Hadid said that she felt that renders by hand were much more open to improvising. “Now it’s less complex, less transparent, much more opaque and, let’s say real. I still think the work that was done in graphical presentation was originally LAND

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more complex and less predictable”, said Hadid when asked about a correspondence between the drawing and the pictorial representation and the tools of digital representation today. Her team still continues to create models and she continues to create sketches. But new digital design tools allow for integration of highly complex forms into a seamless whole, and 3D modeling has served a definite purpose during the design process. Her ambitions to create fluid, dynamic and therefore complex structures have been aided by technological innovations. She was able to present her work, in abstract paintings, which she believes was the only way that she could convey the feeling of her radical, fluid space, which architectural drawings couldn’t. From then on she slowly rose, getting attention from clients that had the money to invest in her radical and new architectural design. But new digital design tools allow for integration of highly complex forms into a seamless whole, and 3D modeling has served a definite purpose during the design process. Her ambitions to create fluid, dynamic and therefore complex structures have been aided by technological innovations. Zaha Hadid remains one of the greatest female architects of her time.


*Z AHA HADID’S PROCESS

BEGINS WITH PAINTING AND PURE ABSTRACTION


Z- B O AT

Z- B O AT ZAHA HADID London, United Kingdom 2013 - TBC Length overall: 7.47 m Width overall: 2.46 m Loaded waterline length: 6.60 m Fiber Glass (body structure) 220 HP Mercruiser 8 Passengers S E A | 22


Designed by Zaha Hadid and Patrick Schumacher for Kenny Schachter, A London based gallery curator, writer, art dealer and owner of London’s Rove Gallery. The boat will cost approximately 375,000 Euros, at a limited production of 12. The Z-Boat measures at 7.47 meters from bow to stern and 2.46 meters port to starboard. The fiberglass boat zooms across the water with a 220hp Mercruiser motor and carriers up to 8 passengers. The boat is in production by French manufacturing company Shoreteam and planned for early 2013.


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ABU DHABI PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE A B U D H A B I PERFORMANCE ARTS CENTER ZAHA HADID Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 2007 – TBC 62,770m2 62m X 135m Levels: 10 above 4 underground Length: 490m (Including Bridge) Footprint: 25,800m² (Excluding Bridge)


The new Performing Arts Centre (PAC), one of five major cultural institutions located on Saadiyat Island, Abu Dhabi, houses five theatres – a music hall, concert hall, opera house, drama theatre and a flexible theatre with a combined seating capacity for 6,300. Plans began in 2007 and currently in production; the 62,700 sq. meter mega structure stands at 62 meters high and 135 meter while. With the included bridge that leads directly into the Centre the mega structure is a whopping 490 meters long. The main building will have 10 floors above ground and 4 underground.

The predominant movements in the urban fabric symbolize the PAC’s ‘energy’, found along the central axis of the pedestrian corridor and the cultural centre’s seafront promenade, the site’s two intersecting primar y elements. Growth–simulation processes have been used to develop spatial representations into a set of basic geometries and then superimposed with programmatic diagrams into a series of repeated cycles. The primary components of this biological analogy (branches, stems, fruits and leaves) are then transformed from these abstract diagrams into architectonic design.

The building’s distinct formal language is derived Zaha Hadid has described the design of the Performing from a set of typologies evident in organizational Arts Centre as: systems and growth in the natural world – natural scenarios formed the release and subsequent “A sculptural form that emerges from a linear intersection of pedestrian paths within the cultural district, gradually decline of energy supplied to enclosed systems. The predominant movements in the urban fabric sym- developing into a growing organism that sprouts a network of successive branches. As it winds through bolize the PAC’s ‘energy’, found along the central the site, the architecture increases in complexity, axis of the pedestrian corridor and the cultural cenbuilding up height and depth and achieving multiple tre’s seafront promenade, the site’s two intersecting summits in the body that houses the performance primary elements. spaces, which spring from thestructure like fruits The building’s distinct formal language is derived on a vine and face westward, toward the water.” from a set of typologies evident in organizational systems and growth in the natural world – natural scenarios formed the release and subsequent decline of energy supplied to enclosed systems.

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LONDON A Q U AT I C S CENTRE LONDON AQUATIC CENTER ZAHA HADID London, United Kingdom 2005 – 2011 36,875m2 Olympic Ground Floor: 15,402m² First Floor: 16,387m² Seating Area: 7352m² (17500 capacity) Legacy Ground Floor: 15,137m² First Floor: 10,168m² Seating Capacity: 2500


A concept inspired by the fluid geometr y of water in motion . Cr eating sp ace s and a sur r ounding environment in sympathy with the river landscape of the Olympic Park. An undulating roof sweeps up from the ground in a wave, enclosing the pools of the Centre with its unif ying gesture. Building began in 2005 and completed in 2011 in time for 2012 Olympic games in London. The 36,875 square meter Centre had seating up to 17,500 over two floors; a ground floor and first floor. The London Aquatic Centre is designed to accommodate the London 2012 Olympic Games while also providing the optimum size and capacity for use in legacy mode beyond the event. The site is positioned on the south eastern edge of the Olympic Park with direct proximities to Stratford and new pedestrian access from Stratford City Bridge crossing over it. The LAC is planned on an orthogonal axis perpendicular to the Stratford City Bridge, along which the three pools are laid out. The training pool is located under the bridge whilst the competition and diving pools are within a large volumetric pool hall. The overall strategy is to frame the base of the pool hall as a podium by surrounding it and connecting it into the bridge. This podium element allows us to contain a variety of differentiated and cellular program-

matic elements into a single architectural volume, which appears to be completely assimilated with the bridge and the landscape. The podium emerges from underneath the bridge, cascading around the pool hall to the lower level of the canal side level. The pool hall is expressed above the podium level by a large roof arching along the same axis as the pools, its form generated by sight lines for spectators during Olympic mode. The site is positioned on the south eastern edge of the Olympic Park with direct proximities to Stratford and new pedestrian access from Stratford City Bridge crossing over it. Double curvature geometry creates a structure of parabolic arches that provide the unique characteristics of the roof. Its design addresses the main public realm spaces implicit within the Olympic Park and Stratford City planning – primarily the east west connection of the Stratford City Bridge and the continuation of the Olympic Park space alongside the canal.

*2012 LONDON OLYMPICS

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GL A S GO W RIVERSIDE MUSEUM GL A SGOW RIVERSIDE MUSEUM OF TRANSPORT ZAHA HADID Glasgow, United Kingdom 2004 – 2011 11,000m2 Exhibition Area: 7,000m² Site Area: 22,400m² Footprint Area: 7,800m²

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The historical development of the city of Glasgow and the shipbuilding, seafaring and industrial waterfront along the river Clyde, gives both a unique shared legacy. Situated where the city meets river, ‘flowing’ between the t wo in a symbolic representation of their dynamic relationship, the museum places itself in the very roots of its origins establishing a clear connection between its exhibits and their wider context. The museum, a sectional extrusion open at both ends, its outline encapsulating a wave or pleat, flows from city to waterfront, symbolizing dynamic relationship between Glasgow and the ship-building, seafaring and industrial legacy of the river Clyde. Clear glass facades allow light to flood through the main exhibition space. The Museum’s construction began in 2004 and finished in 2011 in Glasgow, United Kingdom. The flowing structure is 11,000 square meters and sits along the Clyde River. The building, conceived as a sectional extrusion open at both ends, its cross-sectional outline encapsulating a


*EUROPEAN MUSEUM OF THE YEAR2013

wave or pleat, faces Glasgow and the Clyde, becoming porous to its context on both sides. However, this connection is not direct, but instead diverted to create a journey into the exhibition spaces contained. In every sense, the interior path through the space becomes a mediator between city and river, which can be both hermetic and porous as required. Circulation is through the main, open and column free exhibition space, from which views outward allow visitors to build up a gradual sense of their external context. At the structure’s end point, the café and corporate entertainment space offers views over the confluence of the river Kelvin and the Clyde, with access to a landscaped open courtyard. Their clear glass facades, allowing expansive views over the surrounding river landscape, mark front and rear elevations. Ringed stones create a shadow path around the building, moving visitors from hard

surfaces to a softer landscape of grass, creating an informal space. Lined trees along the existing ferry quay reduce exposure to prevailing winds, while shallow pools along the museum’s south and east sides create a seamless continuity with the river. Clear glass facades allow light to flood through the main exhibition space. The Museum’s construction began in 2004 and finished in 2011 in Glasgow, United Kingdom. The Museum’s construction began in 2004 and finished in 2011 in Glasgow, United Kingdom. The flowing structure is 11,000 square meters and sits along the Clyde River. The building, conceived as a sectional extrusion open at both ends, its cross-sectional outline encapsulating a wave or pleat, faces Glasgow and the Clyde, becoming porous to its context on both sides.


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*I CEBERG

BY ZAHA HADID


INSPIR ATION Zaha Hadid takes inspiration from a large variety of things, but her inspiration mostly comes from nature. What sets her structures apart from typical ones is the structure’s grace. For that, she draws her inspiration from rivers, dunes, and the fluid landscape of the Middle East. For some projects she draw inspiration from the fluidity, flow, and curves of calligraphy and geometry. Additionally, Zaha Hadid also has interest in linear work and how it would translate into a vertical space. Hadid was influenced by her early childhood on villages of the marshes in Southern Iraq. The beauty of the landscape where sand, water, buildings and people all somehow flowed together. She believes that architecture is meant to be looked at and enjoyed from many angles. Hadid breaks through, not only the glass ceiling, but all the barriers put up by traditional walls and floors. Zaha is a leading thinker, and among the most important architects of our time. And her radical merging of digital technology and curvaceous beauty are unmatched in the architectural world. Her constant search for an aesthetic vision encompasses all areas of design, from the large exteriors of her architecture to interiors and furniture. The interiors are just another extension of the outside. Her interior talent is seen at T he Hotel Puer ta A mer ic a in Madrid where Hadid and other renown architects were commissioned to designed various rooms within the hotel.


CAPITAL HILL RESIDENCE

C A P I TA L H I L L RESIDENCE ZAHA HADID Moscow, Russia 2006 – 2011 Private Client Under Construction 2650m2

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*HOME OF SUPER MODEL NAOMI CAMPBELL

The general design concept is to extend the exterior topography to the interior of the building, while geometrical definition is derived from the surrounding environment of flowing terrain levels stretched to generate the new landscape, creating continuous integration between interior and exterior spaces. Located on the north face hillside of Barvikha where pine and birch trees grow up to 20 meters high, a villa with fluid geometries emerges from the landscape. Its programme is divided into two components: one merging with the hillside, and another floating above the ground with dynamic views overlooking the forest. Original constructed for her billionaire boyfriend but later purchased by super model Naomi Campbell.


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INNOVATION TOW ER

INN O VAT I O N TOW ER ZAHA HADID Hong Kong, China 2007 – TBC 15000m2 Height: 76m Capacity: 1450

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In 2007 we were appointed following a competition to design a new ‘Innovation Tower’ for Hong Kong Polytechnic University, A beacon structure symbolizing and driving the development of Hong Kong as a design hub in Asia; a fitting setting for the institution’s many different design education and design research programs. Our designs dissolved the classic typography of tower and podium to create a seamlessly fluid new structure – establishing a vision for future achievement and referencing the university’s rich tradition. Conceptually, the university’s many different programs provided a guiding principle “collateral flexibility” governing the tower’s internal logic.


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DOROBANTI TOWER

DOROBANTI TOW ER ZAHA HADID Bucharest, Romania 2008 – TBC Under Construction 10000m2 Height: 200m

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Our design for the Dorobanti Tower provides an iconic new presence at the heart of Bucharest – its distinctive form and ingenious structure setting new parameters for sky-high living. The building presents a distinctive chamfered diamond silhouette visible for many miles; its exterior integrating a distinctive, non-regular meandering structural lattice. Urban parameters, site constraints and program requirements generate the building’s elegant tapering profile and dynamically changing surface profile. Tapering inwards at the apex, the tower maximizes views over the city and light for inhabitants. Offset at ground level, if offers a generous public ealm and entrance plaza. The chamfered diamond outline and meandering structural lattice establishes Dorobanti Tower as a landmark design for Bucharest – a residential building

standing at the centre of a new meeting place and urban plaza – a ‘concrete carpet’ on which seating areas, water basins, fountains and green spaces are arranged. Our designs dissolved the classic typography of tower and podium to create a seamlessly fluid new structure – establishing a vision for future achievement and referencing the university’s rich tradition. Conceptually, the university’s many different programs provided a guiding principle “collateral flexibility” governing the tower’s internal logic.


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BIBLIOGRAPHY Hadid, Zaha and Patrick Schumacher. Zaha Hadid: Complete Works. London: Thames & Hudson, 2004. Print. Zaha Hadid and Peter Giovanni. Zaha Hadid: Car Park and Terminus Strasbourg.Germany: Lars Muller Publishers, 2004. Print. Zaha Hadid. Zaha Hadid: Thirty Years of Architecture. USA: Guggenheim Museum Publishers, 2006. Print. Zaha Hadid. Zaha Hadid. Italy: Mondadori Electra, 2009. Print. Zaha Hadid, Patrick Schumacher, Zaha Hadid, and Zaha Hadid. Zaha Hadid: Une Architecture. France: Hazan, 2011. Print. Zaha Hadid, Francesca Serrazanetti, and Matteo Schubert. Zaha Hadid: Inspiration and Process in Architecture. N.p.: Moleskin, 2012. Print. HTTP://WWW.ZAHA-HADID.COM

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Zaha Hadid - Land.Sea.Sky  

Zaha Hadid Exhibition Book - Student Work

Zaha Hadid - Land.Sea.Sky  

Zaha Hadid Exhibition Book - Student Work

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