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The Freedom Issue: Mike Perry / Ideal Indifference / Amber Eller / Ally Demski / Spring Breakers / Ai Weiwei / Brutal Belle

JAW

AUGUS T 2 0 1 3

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contributing artists & writers ALEX GRANOZIO

ERIC RIKER

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Age: Older than I look, younger than I feel. Current Job: Managed to work 50 years of hours in a 26 year time span. Musical Interest: All types, all volume levels. Self-taught musician, played in three different bands with a wide range of styles. There is nothing like playing in front of a crowd who dig what you are playin’. Cold Weather: HATE IT. No, really. I HATE IT.

What’s up? This is me. Beards, beers, and body mods. 22 in real life; 5 years old in my mind. Going on random ass adventures in nature or in walmart. Experimenting with food is what I'm about. I’ll try anything once.

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ALY ROSE

MELANIE SMITH —

Graphic designer, art director, and all around creative currently shacked up in NYC with her boyfriend and crazed dog named Whiskey. Most likely found hunting through a thrift shop or flea market.

Twenty-three years old / writer, designer, and mother of one kitten / wreaking havoc on the streets of downtown los angeles / horror movie enthusiast / worships e. e. cummings, kurt halsey, and damien rice / obsessed with all things scandinavian / dreaming of my own type foundry.

"It doesn't matter what you do, as long as you do something."

5, 9, 50

71 CARLEY PARSONS —

SARAH LIDDELL

COPY EDITOR

Twenty-three year old soul with an unhealthy fetish for stationary. My writing gets better when dressed in a good font. I like to make short films using tripod-toolbelt snorricams and skateboard dollies. A Frankenstein mix of Conor Oberst and “anyone lived in a pretty how town” by e.e. cuummings created the monster in me ten years ago and I’ve been spitting out awkward metaphors ever since.

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COPY EDITOR

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23-year-old Buffalo native / knitting and doodling extraordinaire, but not all at once / seeing patterns wherever I go and sometimes putting them into print / a pencil in one hand and a tub of garlic hummus in the other / hand-drawn type, pastel colors, and purposefully off-register prints / future pig owner.

LAUREN MAHAFFY

FELICITA SALA

Twelve year old trapped in a twentythree year old body / music student in boston, but dreaming about LA / roller coaster and dance party enthusiast / love everything that most people hate / the weirdest person you will ever meet.

Felicita is an illustrator and painter from Rome. She spent most of her life in Australia, where she graduated in philosophy and went to the beach a lot. She now lives in Rome, drawing beets and carrots and collaborating on stop motion videos with her husband Gianluca. For more info see www.felicitasala. blogspot.com.

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CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS & WRITERS We are looking to expand our JAW family! If you are interested in being a regular contributor or have a project you'd like to see in the magazine, contact us and tell us what you're all about. If you are interested in showcasing your business, band, label, etc., we offer crazy cheap ad space in a 1 or 2 page spread.

info@jawmagazine.com

Contact us for more info.

in this edition MIKE PERRY

AMBER ELLER

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www.mikeperrystudio.com mike@mikeperrystudio.com

IDEAL INDIFFERENCE

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soundcloud.com/ideal-indifference facebook.com/Ideal.Indifference

ambereller@gmail.com

BRUTAL BELLE

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brutalbelle.bigcartel.com facebook.com/brutalbelle brutalbellestore@gmail.com


table of contents INTRO

music

5.........JAW Statement

30......Ralph Stanley

MELANIE SMITH

6........editor’s letter ERICA RIKER

design 7.........alternatively ampersand: gosh darned doily

SARAH LIDDELL

9.........type hunt VENICE BEACH

ALLY DEMSKI

13........finch

ALLY DEMSKI

16......15/15 with MIKE PERRY

ERIC RIKER

31.......new shit

LAUREN MAHAFFY

32.......long live amy soul

ERICA RIKER

34.......interview: Ideal Indifference

ERIC RIKER

36.......album review: OBSIDIAN

LAUREN MAHAFFY

MELANIE SMITH

11........mister owl

ERICA RIKER

fine arts 38.......works we love: Ai Weiwei

ERICA RIKER


on the cover

digital design by Erica Riker

food

film

39.......illustrated recipes: Feta & Eggplant Meatballs

50.......films we love: Spring Breakers (2012)

FELICITA SALA

41.......cooking with chooch: Hawaiian Burger

ALEX GRANOZIO

43.......red hot like pizza supper: GREEK

ERICA RIKER

44.......bottoms up: Del's Frozen Lemonade

ERICA RIKER

writing 46.......316 in Summer

ERICA RIKER

48......Freedom - Walt Whitman

ERICA RIKER

MELANIE SMITH

ERICA RIKER

51.......film analysis: The Great Gatsby (2013)

photo 53.......#instajaw

ERICA RIKER

AMBER ELLER

62.......If I Gave Up

fashion 71.......the misplaced tourist

ALY ROSE

80.....collections we love: Clover Canyon S/S 13

ERICA RIKER

81.......feature ad: Brutal Belle


editor’s letter EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

ERICA RIKER Designer, installation artist, daughter, sister, activist.

Photograph by Erica Riker Brandon Sullivan, US Navy at Borderland State Park, Massachusetts

W

e seem to all have disjointed definitions of freedom because of our own personal hells. Sometimes when I'm very tired and riding in a car, thinking about everything I have to do when I get home (take off my boots, wash my hair, brush my teeth, god forbid) I wonder what would happen if I decided to get out of the car and lie down in the woods and just sleep there. Is that freedom? Is freedom the fact that I have a choice to not wash my hair at night or sleep with my boots on? Is it due to the simple fact that I live in the United States and am "free" because my boyfriend is one of many who sacrifices his "freedom" to keep us all "free"? And if "freedom isn't free" what is the actual definition and what makes it so costly? Is it the fact that we have to be accounted for? What if we wanted to sell our possessions and live off the land where no one could ever nail us down and the only requirement we were made to uphold was to live? What cost would that have if no one ever saw us again? I have enough freedom to be able to ask all these questions and sit at my fancy computer and wonder whether or not to use a drop cap, and still feel chained by the fact that having 4 jobs kept me from publishing this issue in time. Or having to take my boots off. I think maybe the less connected we are from nature or from ourselves, the less free we feel and rightfully so. Always take the time to reconnect with humans and nature and yourselves. We don't deserve freedom if we don't use it.

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ALTERNATIVELY, AMPERSAND GOSH DARNED DOILY

DESIGNER: SARAH LIDDELL

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type huntVENICE BEACH TYPE hunter: MELANIE SMITH

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mister owl

ACRYLIC & INK ON WOOD

DESIGNER: ALLY DEMSKI


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FINCH

ACRYLIC & INK ON WOOD

DESIGNER: ALLY DEMSKI

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Q FIFTEEN

FIFTEEN A

W I T H D E S I G N E R A N D A R T I S T:

PHOTOGRAPHER: ERICA RIKER

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FAV O R I T E M E D I U M

EXACTO OR BOX CUTTER

J O B Y O U ' D H AV E I F Y O U W E R E N ' T A D E S I G N E R

FAV O R I T E C R AY O N C O L O R

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ARTIST WHO MOST INFLUENCED YOU

F I R S T PAY I N G J O B

YOUR POWER ANIMAL

FAV O R I T E N O N - A R T S U B J E C T I N S C H O O L

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T Y P E FA C E Y O U WA N T Y O U R O B I T U A RY I N

F A V O R I T E G U I LT Y P L E A S U R E M O V I E

FAV O R I T E B O A R D G A M E

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I F Y O U C O U L D O N LY L I S T E N T O O N E R E C O R D FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE

A M U S T- R E A D B O O K F O R A L L D E S I G N E R S

FAV O R I T E P R O J E C T Y O U H AV E N ' T D O N E Y E T

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A WORD OF ADVICE TO FREELANCERS

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RALPH STANLEY WRITER: ERIC RIKER

If you listen to Bluegrass, then I’m sure you know who Ralph Stanley is. If you do not listen to Bluegrass, then it is time to put an ear to it and give it a try. I’m giving this space to just this one Bluegrass artist, or should I say Bluegrass legend because that is exactly what he is. Ralph Edmund Stanley was born way back in 1927 in Southwest Virginia and still lives in that area today. Ralph is an artist who grew up with little musical influences in his home and got his first banjo when he was a teenager and has played the banjo ever since. He learned to play the banjo clawhammer-style from his mother. She had a big family and all her brothers and sisters could play the five string banjo. His first song that he learned was “Shout Little Luly” after his mother showed him how she did it. Ralph tried to play it the same way but says he thinks that’s where he developed his own style of playing. Ralph created his style of banjo playing that is often called “Stanley Style”. It actually started from the Scruggs Style which is the 3 fingered technique that has very fast reverse rolls, led by the index finger. When Ralph plays, the rolls are continuous and picked very close to the bridge giving the tone of the banjo, a crisp articulate snap to the strings as he strikes them. Both styles are not as easy to play as you can imagine, especially the Scruggs Style. Bluegrass banjo requires a lot of practice.

I have a banjo and have tried both styles and eventually will master them, but I also play mine with a light guitar pick while using a somewhat clawhammer style of strumming all while picking single notes as I change

in his mind, just amazing. These 2 guys were Keith Whitley and Ricky Skaggs, who are also top Bluegrass names and well known throughout the Bluegrass community. Eventually Ralph’s son Ralph Stanley II took over as lead singer and rhythm guitar player for the Clinch Mountain Boys. Ralph's music was also featured in the soundtrack for the movie “O Brother, Where Art Thou?, in which he sings an old Appalachian song called “O Death”. Ralph won a 2002 Grammy for that song for Best Male Country Vocal performance. Ralph said “That put the icing on the cake for me, it put me in a different category."

chords throughout. I am creating a different style by doing this. I’m sure I’m not the first guitar player to play a banjo with a guitar pick, but it all sounds great anyway. Ok, back to Ralph Stanley; he formed The Stanley Brothers and The Clinch Mountain Boys in 1946 with his older brother Carter who played guitar. They were covering a lot of Bill Monroe (aka The Father of Bluegrass) music but realized they needed to get a sound of their own, so they began writing songs for the next couple of years. They had performed as The Stanley Brothers and the Clinch Mountain Boys for about twenty years until the death of Carter Stanley in 1966. Ralph made a tough decision to continue playing and revived the Clinch Mountain Boys and eventually hired on a couple of young guys who were

He is known in the Bluegrass community as Dr. Ralph Stanley, after being awarded an honorary Doctorate of Music from Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate Tennessee in 1976. He was inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Honor in 1992 and in 2000. He was also the first person to be inducted into the Grand Ole Opry in the third millennium. There is so much to read and listen to from Ralph so give it a shot and listen to some of the best old time bluegrass that is out there. It’s fast, fun and you can’t help but smile while hearing those banjo tunes. He also does gospel style bluegrass if that’s more your thing, but that is also done in only a way the Ralph can do it. You will appreciate this man’s effort to keep an old style of music going for all generations to see and hear.

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new shit WRITER: LAUREN MAHAFFY

THE NATIONAL

CHANCE THE RAPPER

TROUBLE WILL FIND ME

ACID RAP

ALBUM PRODUCERS - AARON DESSNER & BRYCE DESSNER

ALBUM PRODUCER - NATE FOX, PETER COTTONTALE, THELONIUS MARTIN

On "Graceless," vocalist Matt Berninger sings, "I am not my rosy self," and this statement does not come as a surprise. Despite a few upbeat moments ("Sea of Love" and "Don't Swallow The Cap"), The National's sixth album is mostly a somber, yet beautiful effort on their part. With its intricate instrumentation and poignant lyrics, this may be their most impressive album yet.

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throwback greats

JESSIE WARE WILDEST MOMENTS

Despite comparisons to the early styles of Kanye West and Eminem, Chance The Rapper's latest mixtape proves that he is an eclectic artist in a category all his own. Through the use of many different styles of music (jazz, soul, etc), he tells nostalgic and thoughtful tales of his childhood ("Cocoa Butter Kisses") and his life in Chicago's violent south side. At its best, Acid Rap is proof that there is more to Chance The Rapper than just hype.

SINGLE PRODUCER - KID HARPOON & DAVE OKUMU

Although Ware's debut album, Devotion, was released last summer in the UK, America is finally catching on to her unique blend of soul and understated synth-pop. "Wildest Moments" is not only the perfect song to help expand Ware's fanbase, but with her soaring vocals and its hip-hop inspired beats, it is destined to help define her as the sophisticated artist that she is.

CAT-IRON POOR BOY A LONG, LONG WAY FROM HOME


long live amy soul

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from top: CALVIN Yeager (lead singer/songwriter/acoustic guitar/bass), tom horton (Lead Guitar/DrumS)

IDEAL INDIFFERENCE


I had the chance to meet Tom Horton way before he started playing guitar. Now many years later, and a whole lot of guitar playing hours under his belt, he has put together a project with Calvin Yeager called Ideal Indifference. A project that was formed and mostly recorded in a college dorm room, it is a nice mix of acoustic and electric guitar jams with some added cello and drum machine sections. All mostly original songs with some very cool cover versions, done their way. I enjoy listening to these songs as they remind me of some old school acoustic music with a twist of the new modern influences thrown in. I found myself laughing while listening to some of the lyrics they came up with and when music can make you laugh or just smile, it’s worth listening to. This is some good stuff here my friends. WRITER: ERIC RIKER WHO WERE YOUR MUSICAL INFLUENCES THAT REALLY INSPIRED YOU TO GET INTO DOING MUSIC YOURSELF AND HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU STARTED TAKING IT SERIOUSLY? TOM: Well, to first pick up a guitar, I was inspired by Guitar Hero. After beating the game on expert mode, a message popped up saying, “Seriously, do this for real” and so I did. Later, I started listening to better music, i.e. Black Sabbath, Joe Walsh, and Paul Gilbert. With such greats, I just wanted to keep practicing in hopes I could be as cool as them. CALVIN: I've been listening to music forever - my parents toured the Dead and Phish extensively during my childhood. That being said, I still didn't start playing guitar until I was 15. After that, I never stopped strumming. HOW MANY DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTS DO YOU PLAY? TOM: I used to play Clarinet in grade school. I picked up guitar in late 2008, took about two years of lessons from Richard Harris of the Cortland/Ithaca, NY area, and then started to take an interest in drums in 2012. CALVIN: That doesn't seem like a hard question, but it is! I can play the guitar and the bass well, but I dabble in piano every once in a while too. DO YOU GET NERVOUS BEFORE A PERFORMANCE AND IF SO, WHAT DO YOU DO TO CALM YOUR NERVES? TOM: We rarely perform since we are a two piece band so far, guitar being both of our stronger aspects. Still, we have jammed out on campus for open mic nights, and they are indefinitely a blast. Since the campus is such a small community, and you know everyone and their brother, it’s easy. As for Calvin, he loves the feeling of being nervous.

CALVIN: I'm a big fan of jam bands. Dave Matthews Band is my favorite, but they're closely followed by Phish, Pink Floyd, and Widespread Panic. However, my musical genres can range pretty far too. I'll listen to Spacehog, Tool, or Radiohead too. There are too many good musicians to discriminate! WHERE DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME IDEAL INDIFFERENCE AND WHERE DID YOU MEET THE PEOPLE YOU RECORD OR PLAY WITH IN THAT BAND? TOM: We had actually already written something like two songs before we even gave significant consideration of being a band. One night, we were thinking – this can be a real thing. What would we call ourselves? I felt it was a form of telepathy, we just turned to eachother, “Ideal Indifference” and we’re like, yeah – I like it. Calvin thinks I came up with it. “I remember that he was lying in bed and I was sitting at my desk and we were just chatting about names. Plenty came up, but this one stuck. I remember saying (or hearing) the words "Five-Faced Mirror" too - I guess we got lucky.” WHAT MUSICIAN OR BAND WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO MEET? TOM: That’s a big question for me. I’ve always had ambitions to meet plenty of musicians. I think one of the coolest guys you could meet or jam with would be Carlos Santana. CALVIN: I would personally love to meet Clapton. There would be something about meeting someone who was so prevalent and influential that would just make it an amazing experience.

CALVIN: I don't try to calm my nerves. Back home, I climbed up on-stage and looked into the crowd and had our drummer count us down. If I didn't start, I wasn't supposed to play. WHO ARE YOUR CURRENT FAVORITE MUSICIANS OR BANDS AND HOW WIDE OF A RANGE OF MUSICAL GENRES DO YOU LISTEN TO? TOM: I know for a fact that my taste is particularly eclectic (that doesn’t necessarily mean good) I’ll listen to Jimi Hendrix, Anamanaguchi, Lindsey Sterling, Maximum the Hormone, Jot Dog, Neil Young, Garbage, and everything in between. But then again, as I’ve told all my friends, there is a huge difference between music I like and music I think is good.

HEAR their music at:

soundcloud.com/ideal-indifference

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S

ometimes the darkest places are the ones worth visiting the most. In these haunted corners of our minds, we find secrets, memories and confessions that beg to be released, if only to find peace. On Obsidian, Baths' Will Wiesenfeld takes the listener Solange Knowles is an artist that is into these spaces of releasing his mind constantly being dark reborn. After and never apologizes for what they an intriguing, yet disappointing R&B/ may find when they get there. It is Pop album in 2003, Solange released the not aacclaimed pleasant journey, but only by critically Motown-influenced album, Sol-Angel and the do Hadley St. releasing the darkness, we stand Dreams, in 2008. anlight. interesting new a chance to With see the

seem a little less forboding. Even "Miasma Sky," a track that features a harmful line such as, "tall rock shelf/ are you maybe here to help me hurt myself," is made softer through the use of glitchy, video gameesque noises and muffled sounds that have the calming effect of an together. To anyone on the outside, it may afternoon rain storm. Another track appear as though Solange is purposely in the same vein of "Miasma Sky" is trying to distance herself from her major "Ossuary," an uptempo track laced label past and claim some indie cred, but with of death. Wiesenfeld after justthemes one listen, it becomes clear that this is where never triesshe tobelongs. cover his dark lyrics with intricate background noise, but soul sound and new collaborators (Mark Released via Terrible (record these sounds can mask these label lyrics coif Ronson, Cee-lo Green), Solange was finally owned by Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor) and On "Worsening," the bleak opening the listener wants them to. proving to the industry and the public produced/co-written by Blood Orange’s track of Obsidian, Wiesenfeld asks, that she was more than just “Beyonce’s Dev Hynes (Sky Ferreira, Charli XCX), "where is God when you hate him Like a therapist, friends, family and kid sister.” However, this was not enough True is a nostalgic and moody take on most?"who This question significant others oftenAlthough there for Solange, leftloaded Interscope in 2009 sets in late-80’s pop and dancearemusic. the tone for the entire album, and for support. These are the people order to become more independent and all seven songs on the EP follow this the listener unknowingly becomes we confide in, butissometimes they in control of her own creativity. With this formula that Hynes best known for, therapist cansingle, be the people us cameWiesenfeld's a whole new personal era for Solange, andfrom it first “Losing You,” who does ithurt the best. may be her best one It yet. a funky and stylish video there on out. is not an easy job to Accompanied the most. byThroughout Obsidian, by Melina Matsoukas (Lady Gaga, take on, as the themes of death and directed Wiesenfeld often interjects his True unhappiness is not an EP that you would expect Beyonce, Rihanna), “Losing You” is the are quite unsettling dark thoughts of life and death from and someone who has appeared in a epitome of a fun song that is carried by heavy throughout. with hushed confessions to a lover. a straight to DVD sequel of Bring It On, series of dark lyrics. In the video, Solange On "Incompatible," he uses erotic but that unpredictability is what makes sings, “I don’t know why I fight it/clearly we However, despite the dark cloud imagery ("nurse this erection back it so great. It is an EP that is probably are through,” as a man stands beside her, the subject matter to full spinning health") an to umbrella. speak of This a failed morehanging appealingover to Brooklyn hipsters thanof excitedly quick the tracks, Wiesenfeld's popular attempt at love ("failed the someone who listens to Top 40 radio, yet moment is precisely what this EP maiden is: a small sound makestwohisworlds lyrics distraction voyage"). inAtatimes, it becomes bit it haselectronic the ability to bring those seemingly darker aworld.

strange to hear about the intimate details of this relationship (including the mention of a shared toilet seat), but Wiesenfeld's honest approach creates one of the most important moments on Obsidian. His honesty can also be found on tracks such as "No Eyes," when he selfishly sings, Another particularly impressive moment "and it's not matterThings of if you loveSeem on True is a“Some Never it/Tobut it is only a matter of Fucking Work,” a somewhat my sad and fix," in hislook signature nostalgic back onfalsetto. Solange’sThese past. The confessional andtrack intimate moments majority of this is carried by one of the best theheavy EP, butthan the magic may not grooves be any of less the of the track comeswith whentalks the groove drops out songs plagued of death, and they Solange’s Despite but arevocals someshine of through. the most the constant focus on the grooves and beautiful moments on Obsidian.

intricate electronic beats in these tracks, Solange’s voice (both literally and lyrically) Atis its best, Obsidian is a therapuetic what sets her apart from other people in journey Wiesenfeld to his Lot,” the game.with In “Lovers In the Parking therapist's office, his dimly lit you her voice soars, and it almost makes bedroom, the foggy corners of his wonder how we’ve gone so long without mind, maybe even a haunted havingand her around.

house. The beauty of it is that it In the EP’s closer, “Bad of Girls, ” Solange contains an abundance secrets paints a picture of a night out gone wrong, begging to be revealed and dissected but somehow makes it sound inviting. by the people who care the most. With this EP, Solange has the power to Obsidian may be a dark album, make a rough night sound like a party and but the light within it can be seen a breakup sound like a fresh start, and that through the unsettling is the magic of True. charm that it possesses.

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works we love WRITER: ERICA RIKER

S.A.C.R.E.D AI WEIWEI, 2013, FROM THE 'DISPOSITION' EXHIBITION, THE VENICE BIENNALE

F

reedom is often something directly connected to a struggle with civil and political justices, and as a large scale contemporary artist, Ai Weiwei has used his platform to speak volumes (at his own accepted risk) about the wrongs the Chinese government has committed on its people with secrets, short cuts and its archaic foundation. In one of Ai's newest installations for the 2013 Venice Biennale, part of the Disposition exhibition, he recreated hyperrealistic scenes inside six massive iron boxes in the church of Sant'Antonin. Each box has small apertures "much like the door of a cell," into which you can view the different scenes. The acronym symbolizes each part of the process as, Supper, Accusers, Cleansing, Ritual, Entropy, and Doubt. The first public work Ai has used to directly respond to the 81-days detained by the Chinese government in April 2011. The scenes cover a range of his different experiences, including the three shown on the opposite page, from bringing him in to be interrogated to watching him sleep and shower. "The Fake Case," as it's been named, is the case against Ai Weiwei because of "tax evasions", however Ai has been publically sharing his experience, being followed, the questions regarding his work, his inability to leave his home, all directly relating to Ai's work commenting on the governments lack of protection for their people. The image to the right shows the operation scar from post-police-beating skull wounds that lead him to internal bleeding and emergency surgery (to which there was no justice.) The prices Ai Weiwei pays on a daily basis to speak for the people of China, those living and desceased, is monumental and courageous beyond words. He is a true asset to the human race, an incredible artist and a force to be reckoned with. He has been constantly silenced by force and has the courage to shout out the injustices even louder every single time. That is freedom in the human core; that is what he works for.

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cooking

Chef & Writer Alex Granozio

Hawaiian Burgers 41

with


shit you’re gonna need 1 lb ground pork 3 tbsp teriyaki sauce + more for after, because that shit is delicious! 4 pineapple rings out of a can (or fresh pineapple slices brushed with honey) Onion slices Lettuce leaves Hawaiian buns or soft white hamburger bun. (Seriously, get Hawaiian buns) Canola or vegetable oil for brushing.

let's make this bitch 1. Put ground pork in a bowl and fold in teriyaki. Then divide into 4 equal portions… or 2 if you’re really hungry. 2. Brush pineapple (if fresh, first with honey) and onion with oil and put everything on medium high heat grill. Cook pineapple for 4 minutes until it's soft. Cook burgers through. 3. Slather buns with teriyaki sauce and put all that shit on it! 4. EAT

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RED HOT LIKE recipe adapted from: http://www.howsweeteats.com/

GREEK

• 1 batch of your favorite pizza dough • crumbled feta • 1 head of garlic, cloves removed, peeled and smashed • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1/4 cup fresh dill • 3/4 cup freshly grated mozzarella • 1 15-ounce can of artichoke hearts, chopped • 1/2 cup chopped kalamata olives • 1/2 red onion, sliced • 3-4 campari tomatoes, cut into wedges • 1 roasted red pepper, cut into slices

1 2 3 4 5

Prepare dough and preheat oven to 375° F Add olive oil to pan and roast the garlic half way (will roast further in the oven.) While garlic is roasting, drain and press water out of artichokes. Brush dough with olive oil, top with fresh dill, mozzarella, artichokes, olives, red onion, red peppers, tomatoes, feta and semi-roasted garlic cloves. Bake for 30-35min or until cheese is golden and crust is crispy.

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WRITER: ERICA RIKER

Frozen Del's. That's it, that's all.

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316 in Summer WRITER: ERICA RIKER


I have never let the images fade From a time when life was lovely, Painless, Warm. The familiar drop from the faded blue carpeting, To the porch's peeling linoleum floor. I felt the heat hug my arms and face, And I knew exactly Where he would be seated. In his white wicker chair, Letting its arm make impressions on his, While the radio spoke the loud voice of opinion Over a faint sound, As if he held in his hand two hummingbirds on a string. Toward my favorite rocking chair I went, Wicker like his And undisturbed. It was warm. It was home. Encased in windows, We watched the people, Neighbors or otherwise, Crowding and dispersing, Edging the streets, Like an unswept kitchen floor. They were bees without purpose, Swarming and buzzing, Aiming for nowhere, Working for no one. My toes pushed my weight Back and forth, back and forth, Conforming to the windowsill's obvious layers, Painted over Again and again, Capping the wood panel wall That would seemingly hang its head in reverence Of the place, Of the time we were in. And as the June sun blanketed me Like a small child, I was unaware. Oblivious and naive As we sat together, Comforted by the same breeze, Pacified by the purr of existence.

Soon enough his chair would be Vacant, The sunlit porch would be dim, Icy enough to watch the breath I felt heavy with guilt for having, And the peace of former days Would be no more. It is crippling It is unkind. It is life. But such injustices, Those unspoken and Weighing heavier than any Human being can handle, I would endure With a firm embrace, If only to sit with him, Draped in the comforts of Familiarity, Just one more summer afternoon.

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Walt Whitman Freedom


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films we love WRITER: MELANIE SMITH

SPRING BREAKERS HARMONY KORINE

I

can say with certainty that Spring Breakers will be one of the most controversial and underrated films of the year. The way it was marketed (girls in bikinis, violence, a pulsating dubstep soundtrack, etc.) suggested that it was meant for the crudest of audiences; but those with shallow expectations were undoubtedly left unsatisfied. Essentially, Spring Breakers is about a group of college girls who vacation in Florida and make poor decisions – it was not marketed incorrectly – but Korine took very attainable subject matter and turned it into one of the most experimental films to hit the mainstream in a long time. The performances delivered by Disney girls gone wild, Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez, Pretty Little Liars’ Ashley Benson, and Korine’s wife, Rachel were spot on. In fact, I have never been fond of Vanessa Hudgens, but I found her to be the most impressive (and bad-ass) of the four. However, the one who completely annihilated his role was James Franco. His character, the cornrowed rapper/ drug dealer, Alien stole the show and made us all remember how versatile Franco really is. I was doubled-over with laughter every time he flashed me his gold-toothed grin and spoke an obnoxiously offensive statement

beginning with “y’all” (this occurs very often). Do not mistake Spring Breakers for a comedy, though. You will most definitely laugh, but you will also be left speechless at the weight of Korine’s intended reality check. If you’ve ever seen his work before, particularly Kids (1995), you can expect the same unapologetic and provocative energy from Spring Breakers. Korine’s aim has always been to expose the tainted morals of his characters, and with the taunting tagline, “A little sun can bring out your dark side,” Spring Breakers pleases his long-time fans and attracts a whole new group of potential Korine cult members. Unfortunately though, with every exceptional work comes a lot of criticism. I have witnessed many people dismissing this film and failing to see its powerful message. Korine’s work does not float everyone’s boat, and his attempt at appealing to a wide audience has resulted in a lot of angry backlash in the form of terrible reviews and vicious tweets (“worst movie of all time,” among many others). I have even caught wind of people playing the feminist card and expressing disgust at Korine’s exploitation of women. Believe me, I am quite the feminist, but this film does not offend me in any fashion. The women in

Spring Breakers are not victims; they are spiritually free and empowered. Korine draws a lot of lustful attention to the girls (by having them wear bikinis 90% of the time), it sure didn’t hurt box office sales, but it is apparent throughout the film that he is on their side. I’m not sure if Korine’s work will ever fully be appreciated on the big screen; I have a hunch that Spring Breakers will join Kids (1995) and Gummo (1997) in the vault of cult classics – which is not a bad place for it to be. I cannot say enough wonderful things about this film (I’m obsessed with it, to be honest). It is a glorious, dream-like experience. Korine’s use of repetition with words, images, bright colors, and music choices destroys the audience’s sense of time and applies a feeling of euphoria (but the feeling doesn’t last – he slaps you in the face with reality a few times and leaves you with a pretty bad hangover). I had unrealistically high expectations for this film – I built it up in my head for a countless number of months – and somehow, my expectations were not only met, but exceeded. I will be sporting a pink ski mask, lion face bathing suit, and faux rifle this Halloween. Spring Break forever, bitches.

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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? WRITER: ERICA RIKER

"I LOOKED AT YOU TONIGHT AND YOU WEREN'T THERE... AND I'M GONNA HOWL IT OUT, AND I'M NOT GONNA GIVE A DAMN WHAT I DO AND I'M GONNA MAKE THE BIGGEST GOD-DAMN EXPLOSION YOU'VE EVER HEARD.." -MARTHA

the great gatsby WRITER: ERICA RIKER

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weeping sickness from dramatic irony: the same feeling I felt reading F. Scott Fitzgerald's sensational tale, I felt watching Baz Luhrmann's 2013 film adaptation of the same name. I think this came about partly because at the age of 15 this novel was the first to make me sick from the perfume of sadness and naiveity Fitzgerald draped over the entire scene. Every typical human emotion was laced with proper etiquette and blanketed by some translucent barrier that, I imagine, smelled like fresh flowers and expensive booze and Chanel No5 and cigarettes.

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There were a lot of things I expected and tried to wipe my bias clean for, when I saw the picture in an old theater in the same town that the 1974 adaptation of The Great Gatsby was shot; Newport, RI. It was a lovely atmosphere and tone-setter, but the bias kicked in and I couldn't help but appreciare this film's entrance the way I appreciated Luhrmann's Romeo and Juliet (1996). A real issue I was hearing from plenty of sources was how, "Gatsby isn't about Jay-Z it's about jazz," or better yet from an ignorant NYC radio

talk show host, "Please tell me who gives a shit about flappers and old crappy trumpet music," to which he mocked a clip of Louis Armstrong, to which I slammed the radio to a different station in utter disbelief. It's somewhat troubling to me that the musical aspect of the film was such an issue because if you know Baz Luhrmann's previous works you know how he operates. Just as 2013 Jay-Z is setting a scene in 1922, so was 1996 Garbage and The Cardigans setting a scene with Shakespeare's dialogue from 1597. Luhrmann innovates the way he sees fit and there is a market


And so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into theWho's past. -Nick Caraway Photo: Mike Nichols’ Afraid of Virginia Woolf? for it because, and listen carefully here pretentious critics, these writings and this music all evoke empathy in everybody, because it speaks of the core of the human. That's it. Our need for wealth, to live comfortably, to make our desires come to fruition, to hold the person we love without having to fight for it, to not want to wait in vain, to really live. Luhrmann knows how to lift these empathies out of us and to intrigue our naturally evolving spirits with fresh combinations that can ultimately be stripped down to these simplest of things. That is something I will always appreciate about

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him, because just as Fitzgerald and Shakespeare were groundbreakers in their days, so goes with Luhrmann, and that is the damn truth. If you want these stories to stay strictly in their time periods you're wishing a disservice to the author, because their intention was to evoke feelings for the characters, not to solely gawk at the culture (we get that window as an added bonus.)

this adaptation was much louder than the beloved Gatsby of 1974, the subdued character portrayals lined with raw emotion from DiCaprio, Maguire, Edgerton, Fisher, Clarke and especially Mulligan were perfectly balanced. Mulligan as Daisy Buchanan was one of the best character portrayals I've seen in a long time. It was beautiful and quiet and just the way Fitzgerald made her.

A big round of applause goes out to the casting directors, Ronna Kress and Nikki Barrett, who absolutely nailed the main characters. Although

A beautiful film with a shining cast and an absolute contemporary gem of a soundtrack. Bravo.


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REMEMBERING THE WAR: Janina recollecting her experiences as a young girl living in Poland during the Second World War.


IF I GAVE UP Janina Regina Ryszkowska Panek WRITER & PHOTOGRAPHER: AMBER ELLER

Janina Regina Ryszkowska Panek was born September 7, 1927 in Warsaw, Poland. She was a survivor of Nazi work camps in WWII with her late husband, Walter A. Panek. She moved to America in 1949 where she raised 17 children in the city of Syracuse, New York. She passed away May 20th, 2013 with her loving family by her side.

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J

anina was only 13 years old when the Germans attacked Warsaw during the invasion of Poland. She managed to avoid death or imprisonment during the initial invasion but was captured by the Germans a few years later.. She was sent to a work camp in Germany, and it was on the

train to the camp that she met her future husband Walter Alfred Panek. He had volunteered for the camp to avoid being sent there by force; he spoke German, Polish and Russian fluently so he was given a higher rank in the camp then Janina. While on the train Janina caught him staring at her, and assuming he spoke German, said aloud to her friend in Polish that she would never marry that ugly Nazi if he was the last man on Earth. As they got off the train he brushed past her and, speaking in Polish, told her that despite what she might think of him, he thought she was the most beautiful woman he had ever laid eyes on. She was embarrassed after realizing he was no enemy, and over the next few weeks they spoke more frequently and became good friends. Janina was given the task of collecting tree sap in the forests to form bullets for the German military. Walter was also a laborer. Sometime after, Walter overheard a few of the guards say that they had no use for the women in the camp anymore and planned to blow up the building where they were kept the following morning. Walter had grown close to Janina and did not plan to stand by and watch her perish. As darkness set in he stole a bike and took Janina from her bed. They rode through the woods with her on the handlebars and him pedaling fast toward his home nearby. In the woods well outside the camp they came upon a German guard. Walter quickly informed Janina to cover her sweater over the “P” patch which indicated she was a Pole forced into the work camp and told her to speak under no circumstances. He spoke fluent German and told the guard they were headed back from a trip to the neighboring town and weren’t far from where they were headed. The guard asked Janina her name and she did not respond. Quickly Walter jumped in saying she no longer speaks because she became shell shocked from the war. They were allowed to pass. He brought her to his home which was near the work camp. With reluctant agreement from the landlord he hid Janina in the barn until the war ended--fortunately it was not long after. At the conclusion of the war Walter and Janina interviewed to move to America, where they were accepted. They settled in Syracuse, New York where Janina raised 17 children and has a legacy 45 grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren to date.


WWII DOCUMENTATION: The booklets were given to her for identification throughout the war. Several of the booklets represent her identification within the work camps in which she was detained.

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THE STRUGGLE AND THE STRENGTH: Janina walked up this set of stairs on her own for years with a quadruple heart block and deteriorated knees. She was a proud woman who cherished her independence and hoped never to burden others with her personal struggles. She wanted only to present her strengths to the world.


REPLACING WHAT WAS NEVER OWNED: Janina had so little growing up in times of war that she began collecting and storing collectables of all sorts. The urge to purchase and own fine collectables remained with her until her last days.


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ACCEPTANCE: Janina finally consented to moving in with her children at the age of 82. She was reluctant to give up her independence and let others care for her, but she finally found peace and accepted love at the end of her life.

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Photo: ImaxTree


collections we love WRITER: ERICA RIKER

CLOVER CANYON SS 2013, NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

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ozae Nichols of Clover Canyon absolutely nailed it with this year's spring and summer ready-to-wear collection. Nichols took the idea of being inspired by nature to a whole new, and quite literal, level. The girls almost entirely become camouflaged with the glorious scenic textiles, but are stunningly paired with sharp colors and effortless lines. The kaleidoscopic prints that are a staple in Nichols' collections show up in both the scenic and non-scenic prints. A stunning collection, as always.

Photos: ImaxTree

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JAW Magazine Issue N°4: Freedom  

This magazine is for those of us who can't function without bulding things, ideas. There is a rumbling under the surface of the arts culture...

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