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ERICA CLAUSTRO / SELECTED WORK


TABLE OF CONTENTS / MUSHROOM FARM | FARMER’S MARKET / Third Year Studio / Options, F2012 BIRD BLIND / First Year Studio, F2010 RED HOUSE | LIVE-WORK / Third Year Studio, S2013 LINKING TOWER / Second Year Studio / High-rise, S2012 THE TWIST / Second Year Studio / Housing, F2011


MUSHROOM FARM | FARMER’S MARKET OPTIONS STUDIO, F2013

Newark has initiated the renewal of the Farmer’s Market throughout the city in order to improve public health by providing fresh produce and healthy alternatives to the much consumed fast-food and processed foods readily available to the community. As a means to bring more families and members of the community to the market, the project cannot solely be dependent on the sales of fresh produce on site. Because the market would only occur once or twice a week, on off days, mushrooms would be produced for wholesale to the local businesses as well as for resale during the farmer’s market. The design will provide underground growing tunnels and rooms to optimize

temperature regularity, as well as controlling humidity and fresh air ventilation. The structures, both sub grade and above, would also serve as a playscape for the children. Visitors would be able to tour the labs, and even “forage” for mushrooms. A partially covered plaza would serve the farmer’s market, as well as a public space for the community. Not only will the project function as a place of production, but as a large scale sculpture at night. By fusing the programmatic and spatial needs of the market and the mushroom labs, the project allows for the community to participate in the spectacle of growth and consumption. Studio critics: Rhett Russo, Farzin Lotfi-Jam


Above (from top): Perspective view of exterior from Ferry Street | View of farmer’s market


Above: Perspective view of exterior


Above and opposite page: Concept diagrams


Above (from top): Ground floor plan | Basement (mushroom farm) floor plan Opposite page: Physical model (3-D print)


Above (from top): Perspective view of sub level parking | View of mushroom farm tunnels


Above: Sections


Above: Perspective view of exterior at night


BIRD BLIND FIRST YEAR GRAD STUDIO, F2010

This project involves the design of a blind for observing birds and other wildlife in the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Morris County, New Jersey. The blind provides elevated space for viewing the wildlife on the ground, as well as the wildlife above within the tree canopy. Inspired by the movement of bird wings in flight, the form takes an undulating and rhythmic shape. Visitors not only can enjoy views of the surrounding environment, but experience the space as one moves through the blind. The organic form blends inconspicuously within the park. The blind is constructed

with a tectonic set of parts and are easily assembled on site, preventing significant environmental impact within the refuge during construction.

Studio critics: Rhett Russo, Michael Mostoller


Above (from top): Physical model | Exploded perspective of parts


Above: Perspective view of exterior


RED HOUSE | LIVE-WORK COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO, S2013

Located in Red Hook, Brooklyn, Red House seeks to provide a mid-rise urban housing prototype that addresses the shortage of office and workspace for young start-ups in Brooklyn and the changing dynamic of how city dwellers choose to live and work. City dwellers often exist within the city at different scales -- anonymous within the larger context of the city, as in individual within ones private space, and as a collaborator within social and work environments. This live-work community offers private dwelling spaces, as well as communal spaces that encourage a sense of community

and adapts to individuality. An open single loaded corridor with programmed social and work spaces, and an interior courtyard allow for social interaction. Each unit is equipped with a canopy garage door as a threshold between private dwelling and the corridor, or so called “elevated streets.” The “rent by-the-unit” concept allows for individuals to grow (or downsize). The project also aims to capitalize on the ecological merits of wood as a primary construction material -- specifically, Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). Studio critics: Keith Krumwiede, Michael Mostoller


ANONYMOUS / SCALE OF THE CITY

INDIVIDUAL / SCALE OF PRIVATE DWELLING

COLLABORATIVE / SCALE OF SOCIAL + WORK CIRCLES

Above (from top): Concept / How city dwellers exist | Aerial view


Above: Perspective view of exterior from Ostego Street


15’

25’

RENT BY THE “UNIT”

Above: Adaptability diagram | Perspective view of apartment unit interior Opposite page: Flexibility of apartment layouts over time

375 SF UNITS (MIN. SIZE BY CODE = 350 SF)


FLEXIBILITY OF APARTMENTS OVER TIME (in years)

THE DANCER

THE BAND

THE DIVORCEE

FLEXIBILITY OF APARTMENTS OVER TIME (In years) 1 UNIT

2 UNITS

THE DIVORCEE

THE BAND

THE DANCER

FLEXIBILITY OF APARTMENTS OVER TIME (In years) 1 UNIT

1 UNIT

2 UNITS

THE COLLABORATORS (ARCHITECTS + WEB DESIGNERS) 2 UNITS

COLLEGE KIDS

1 UNIT

THE COLLABORATORS (ARCHITECTS + WEB DESIGNERS)

1 UNIT

3 UNITS

COLLEGE KIDS GRADUATE AND MOVE OUT

THE DIVORCEE FINDS A GIRLFRIEND 2 UNITS

THE DANCER OPENS OWN STUDIO

2 UNITS

BAND MEMBER MOVES IN WITH GIRLFRIEND 2 UNITS

OLD LOCAL MOVES IN

1 UNIT

THE BAND SPLITS

DESIGNER GET A GIG IN ITALY...MOVE OUT


Above: Aerial view


Above: Perspective view of interior courtyard from ground level Opposite page: Program diagram


LEVEL 01-04 Access galleries, Work retreats, Social lounges

LEVEL 01-04 Residential Units

LEVEL 00 Workspace, Retail, Public Arcade, Inner Courtyard

LEVEL -01 Parking


Above: Perspective view of interior courtyard from ground level


Living roof acts as insulation barrier and reduces stormwater runoff.

Single loaded open corridor allows for cross ventilation.

Ductless mini-split system reduces energy consumption from duct losses.

Northwest Rainwater colleciton tank and filter.

Above: Environmental diagram

Green infra providing s manageme


astructure stormwater ent.

CLT construction provides low embodied energy in production and increase in carbon sequestration.

Double pane low-E glazing reduces radiant heat transfer.

Sliding sun screens with movable louvers.

Elevated concrete podium 5’ above grade.

Southeast


Above (from top): Site plan | Ground floor plan


Above (top left, clockwise): Sublevel parking plan | First floor plan | Second floor plan | Fourth floor plan


Above (from top): Coffey Street elevation | Section A Opposite page: Perspective section of single loaded corridors (“elevated streets�)


1. Galvanized steel coping 2. Rigid metal air and vapour barrier 3. 1” Western red cedar fascia board 4. 2 + 2” Rigid mineral wool insulation 5. Timber soffit 6. Growing medium 7. Filter fleece 8. Drainage layer 3 9. Waterproof membrane 10. Concrete topping 11. 5 Layer CLT panel roof

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

1 2

Steel anchor bolts into CLT floor panel Welded steel plate and pin connection Welded steel stiffener Welded steel plate into round HSS member 6” diameter round HSS member Welded steel plate anchored into concrete slab

6

4

7 8 9 10 11

5

TYPICAL DETAIL - B1

TYPICAL DETAIL - B2

ROOF

VERTICAL SUPPORTS - ELEVATED WORK + SOCIAL SPACE

1. Western red cedar cladding 2. Timber blocking 3. 2 + 5/8” Gyp. board 4. 2“ Rigid mineral wool insulation 5. 3-layer CLT panel 6. 3/4” Air space + cross cavity flashing 7. Concrete topping (at a slight slope) 8. 5/8“ Gyp. board + wood finished floor 9. 1” Polypropylene honeycomb insulation (sound absorbtion) 10. Timber sleeper 11. Steel L angle plate (16“ o.c.) 12. 2 + 5/8” Gyp. board 13. 2“ Rigid mineral wool insulation 10 9 14. 3/4” Air space 15. 3-layer CLT panel

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1

2

Glass panel guardrail Steel vertical support and handrail 1” Western red cedar fascia Rainwater collection drainage system Concrete Topping 4“ Steel channel Timber soffit

3 4 5

8

7

6

11

12 13 14

INTERIOR

15

EXTERIOR CORRIDOR

TYPICAL DETAIL - B4

CLT FLOOR PLANEL TO CLT WALL

Above (from top): Typical details | Structure diagram

TYPICAL DETAIL - B5

EXTERIOR CORRIDOR HANDRAIL


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 2

Glulam beam 20 Gauge steel top channel Stainless steel screws at 12” o.c. 2 + 5/8” Fire-sheild gyp. board Mineral wool core 2 + 5/8” Fire-sheild gyp. board 20 Gauge steel base channel, concealed by finished floor when partition wall is not used 8. Stainless steel screws at 12” o.c. 9. Anchor bolt into CLT floor panel 10. 5 Layer CLT panel floor

1

3 4

1

5 2

3 4 5

6

7

8 9 10

6

TYPICAL DETAIL - B3

ES

MODULAR PARTITION WALLS IN UNITS

1 2

5

4 3

1. Glazed guardrail 2. Aluminum window and sliding door frame 3. Double pane low-e glazing 4. Sliding screen on steel track 5. Concrete Topping 6. Aluminum drip edge 7. Western red cedar fascia board 8. 1” Rigid board insulation 9. Timber soffit 10. 5/8” Gyp. board + wood finished floor 11. 1” Polypropylene honeycomb insulation (sound absorbtion) 12. Timber sleepers 13. 1” Air space 5 14. 2 + 5/8” Gyp. board 6 15. 3” Mineral wool insulation (loose fill) 16. Steel hanger and furring channel 7 17. Painted gyp. ceiling board 18. Roller shade 8 19. Exposed glulam brace (preservative treated) 20. Semi exposed glulam column (preservative treated)

1

3 4

2

10

11

12

13

9

18 14 7

6

19

TYPICAL DETAIL - B6 JULIETTE BALCONY

20

15

16

17


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Ductless mini split heat pump Sprinkler system Overhead torsion spring Door arm Vertical track for portal door Aluminum framed portal door + timber cladded Tankless water heater 2 Story social lounge equipped with kitchen

1

2

27.5’

Above: Wall section / unit, corridor, social lounge

WALL SECTION - UNIT, ACCESS GALLERY, SOCIAL LOUNGE 1”=2’ SCALE


1.5’ 3

4 5

12’

8

5

7

1’

53.5

10’

15’


Above: Perspective view of work space interior Opposite page: Perspective view of social lounge


Above: Perspective view of exterior from Ostego Street


Above and opposite page: Physical model


LINKING TOWER HIGH-RISE STUDIO, S2012

Linking Tower, a mixed use high-rise building for the United Nations, is located just south of the New York headquarters complex. The existing site holds large ventilation shaft for the Queens-Midtown Tunnel. As architects create increasingly tall skyscrapers with today’s technology, it is sometimes inevitable that they are perceived as isolated islands within the urban context. This project attempts to redefine the relationship between skyscraper and immediate urban context by connecting the vertical to the horizontal. Connections are made between the main tower and the tunnel

of tunnel ventilation shaft, the tower to the waterfront and the UN Plaza by walkways designated for visitors and delegates. The ventilation shaft is integrated into the building through aluminum cladded shafts that rise along the sides from ground to the top of the skyscraper, bringing the exhaust further up and away from ground level. In addition to offices for the UN, the building includes a museum for the UN and a cultural center.

Studio critic: Henry Grosman


Above: Aerial view from East River


Above (from top): Links from UN to relevant site in Manhattan | Study model of physical linkages to site and neighboring context, model used to generate form via inputting data set into grasshopper


Above: Diagram showing the integration of existing tunnel ventilation shaft into tower


Above: Section Opposite page (from top): Typical office plan (flrs 20-38) | Museum plan | Typical office plan (flrs 3-12)


Above: Skin diagram Opposite page: Perspective section view of office interior


Above: Perspective view of exterior and public park Opposite page: Perspective view of lobby interior


Above: Perspective view of public park, ventilation shafts, and elevated walkway


THE TWIST NEWARK HOUSING STUDIO, F2011

The site is embedded in an area where great potential exists - it could be the central point that links the many parts of the city that makes up the city as a whole. It is a place that links Baxter Terrace to NJIT, Branch Brook Park to Downtown Newark, NJIT and Rutgers to Broad Street Station, etc. The context serves as a non-physical protagonist to the site, in which a diverse number of activities and program is funneled into this one particular part of the city, creating a place of life, community, and commerce. One of the main objectives of this project is to take that analogy of

the site to the city, scale it down and apply it to the architecture itself. As those contextual elements impact the site, the same is occurring at a more local scale. Due to the nature of housing, a diverse number of program must be funneled into the building. As these abstract and physical elements compress and funnel into the building, producing greater concentration and tension - building physically reacts to manifest these energies acting upon the architecture.

Studio critics: Tom Navin, Brian Deluna


Above (from top): Perspective view of exterior from Lock Street | Perspective view of


ITT SB NE

LOCK STREET

ET

RE

ST HOYTE STREET

CENTRAL AVE

Above: Site plan


Above (top left, clockwise): Floor plan, 7th Fl | Floor plan, 8th Fl | Floor plan, 9th Fl | Floor plan, 10th Fl


Above (from top): Aerial view | Perspective view of courtyard


Above (top left, clockwise): Cross elevation | Cross section Opposite page: Longitudinal elevation | Longitudinal section


Above (from top): Diagram of unit layouts and skip-stop arrangement of corridor | Typical unit plan | Typical unit section Opposite page: Interior views


Above: Perspective view of exterior from Lock Street


CONTACT /

claustro.erica@gmail.com


KROW DETCELES

/ ORTSUALC ACIRE


Erica Claustro | Portfolio 2013  
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