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Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Instructor’s Manual For R. Wayne Mondy Human Resource Management

Thirteenth Edition

Prepared by                                                                          R. Wayne Mondy


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy

PREFACE The 13th edition of the Instructor’s Manual was written with you, the human resource management instructor, in mind. In this manual my goal was to assist you in making class discussions more interesting and informative while helping reduce the amount of time you spend preparing for class sessions. No matter how much information is presented in a textbook, the instructor plays a crucial role in effectively discussing the concepts and theories and in building student enthusiasm for the subject matter. To my knowledge, this manual is one of the most comprehensive available for any human resource management textbook, and I believe that you will find it to be a valuable teaching aid. R. Wayne Mondy SPHR


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy TABLE OF CONTENTS Topic

Page CHAPTER 1: STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 12 Answers to Chapter Exercises.................................................................................................. Answers to Chapter Questions for Review.............................................................................. Discussion of Chapter Incidents...............................................................................................

CHAPTER 2: BUSINESS ETHICS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................ Lecture Outline 29 Answers to Chapter Ethical Dilemma...................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 33 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review.............................................................................. Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................... CHAPTER 3: WORK FORCE DIVERSITY, EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY, AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................ Lecture Outline 40 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma....................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 49 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review.............................................................................. Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................... CHAPTER 4: JOB ANALYSIS, STRATEGIC PLANNING, AND HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................ Lecture Outline 62 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma....................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 70 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review.............................................................................. Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................... CHAPTER 5: RECRUITMENT Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Lecture Outline 80 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma....................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 86 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review.............................................................................. Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................... CHAPTER 6: SELECTION Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................... Key Terms................................................................................................................................ Lecture Outline 97 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 106 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 7: TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms............................................................................................................................... Lecture Outline 119 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 128 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 8: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND APPRAISAL Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 138 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 145 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents.............................................................................................


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy CHAPTER 9: COMPENSATION Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 156 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 164 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 10: INDIRECT FINANCIAL COMPENSATION (BENEFITS) AND NONFINANCIAL COMPENSATION Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 176 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 183 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 11: A SAFE AND HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENT Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 194 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 199 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 12: LABOR UNIONS AND COLLECTIVE BARGAINING Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 208 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 218 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents.............................................................................................

CHAPTER 13: INTERNAL EMPLOYEE RELATIONS Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms..............................................................................................................................


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Lecture Outline 229 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 235 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents............................................................................................. CHAPTER 14: GLOBAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Chapter Objectives................................................................................................................. Key Terms.............................................................................................................................. Lecture Outline 242 Answer to Chapter Ethical Dilemma..................................................................................... Answers to Chapter Exercises 246 Answers to Chapter Questions for Review............................................................................ Discussion of Chapter Incidents.............................................................................................


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy TEACHING RESOURCES Chapter Objectives Chapter objectives are provided at the beginning of each chapter. Key Terms All key terms used in each chapter are defined. Lecture Outline A comprehensive lecture outline is prepared for each chapter. Ethical Dilemmas A brief exercise called “Ethical Dilemma� is included in all except the first chapter. These exercises are designed to permit students to make decisions regarding situations that could occur in the real world. In all instances it should be readily evident what the ethical choice should be. Decisions are often nice and neat in an academic environment. Then, students should ask themselves if there are other factors that some would consider in making a decision. Often there are factors that might sway a person to make a less than ethical decision. Discussion of Chapter Exercises End of chapter exercises have been added as a new feature to the 13th edition. These exercises provide in-depth, thought-provoking questions to the material covered in the text. Answers to Chapter Review Questions Answers to each of the review questions at the end of the chapter are provided. Discussion of Chapter Incidents Possible answers to each of the HRM Incidents presented in the text are provided. Because there are few instances in human resource management where there is a perfect right or wrong way to accomplish a task, please remember that responses provide only a guide to the discussion of the cases. Instructors may wish to elaborate further in their discussion.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Sample Syllabus C.

MANAGEMENT 310 A HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Spring 20XX

Catalog Description: Lec. 3 Cr. 3 Human resource management topics include staffing, human resource development, compensation, health and safety, employee and labor relations, and human resource research. NOTE: IF A STUDENT DOES NOT HAVE THE REQUIRED PREREQUISITES, THEY MUST DROP THE COURSE OR THEY MAY BE DROPPED BY THE INSTRUCTOR. Prerequisites: Junior standing INSTRUCTOR: OFFICE HOURS:

Professor Tuesday - 7:00 – 9:00 Thursday - 9:15 – 11:15 Wednesday - 2:55 – 5:25

OFFICE: BBC 218 PHONE: 555-5555

VIRTUAL OFFICE HOURS—Professor@internet.com Monday – 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. Wednesday – 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. I will respond quickly to your inquiries during these times. You will find that it is a very effective means of communicating with me. I also check my e-mail frequently and will respond to you as soon as possible. TEXT: Human Resource Management 13th edition by R. Wayne Mondy PLEASE NOTE: Any student with a disability is encouraged to contact the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities in Drew Hall, Room 200 (555) 555-5555. It is each student's responsibility to register with the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities when requesting a reasonable accommodation. COURSE OBJECTIVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

An insight into the evolving role of strategic HRM in today’s organizations, the strategic role of HR functions, and the impact of technology and global competition. An awareness of the importance of business ethics and corporate social responsibility in HRM. An insight into how workforce diversity provides an opportunity for management. Examine the legislation and regulations affecting staffing. Know the significant federal court decisions affecting staffing. Understand the Uniform Guidelines, Adverse Impact, and Affirmative Action Programs that affect staffing. Understand the ethical, regulatory, environmental, social, political and technological issues of staffing.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 8.

An understanding of job analysis, strategic planning, human resource planning, recruitment (including Internet recruiting), and selection. 9. An awareness of the importance of training and developing for employees at all levels. 10. An understanding of performance appraisal and its role in performance management. 11. An appreciation of how compensation and benefits programs are formulated and administered. 12. An understanding of safety and health factors as they affect the firm’s profitability. 13. An opportunity to understand employee and labor relations. 14. An appreciation of the global dimension of HRM. TENTATIVE SCHEDULE (Keep a few topics ahead because the schedule is only tentative) Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 Day 21 Day 22 Day 23 Day 24 Day 25 Day 26 Day 27 Day 28 Day 29 Day 30 Day 31

Introduction Overview of Human Resource Management Workforce Diversity Laws affecting Equal Employment Review for Exam One Exam 1 Return and discuss Test 1 Court Decisions Affecting Equal Employment Affirmative Action Job Analysis, Strategic Planning and Human Resource Planning Review for Exam Two Exam Two Recruitment Selection Training and Development Review for Exam Three Exam Three Performance Appraisal Direct Financial Compensation Indirect Financial Comp Nonfinancial Compensation Health and Safety Review for Exam Four Exam 4 Labor Unions and Collective Bargaining Internal Employee Relations Business Ethics and Social Responsibility Global Human Resource Management Review for Exam Five Exam Five Makeup examination date Review for final Final Examination


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Student Evaluation: Five objective exams, in addition to a comprehensive final exam will be given. The final will count the equivalent of two tests. Test questions may come from your text, my lecture, or a combination. All tests are weighted 100 points each. The following grading scale pertains: 90 - 100 = A; 80 - 89 = B; 70 - 79 = C; 60 - 69 = D; below 60 = F. I curve each test. Therefore, you must have a 90-grade average for an “A.” 89.99 is not an “A.” Your grade for each test will be available to you in “Student Tools,” “Check Your Grade” in Blackboard. I will also return the test the next class period.

Testing Rules No leaving the classroom after the test begins. Bring a Scantron (two if you think you might have to erase) Bring a number two pencil. If you have a sinus problem, bring some tissues. Keep your eye on your own paper. I will put your name on the test. Find yours. Nothing should be on your desk except, test, ID, pencil, and Scantron. Mark your answer on your test first. When you are certain about your answers, put your answer on the Scantron. Do not erase on the Scantron. An incorrect answer because of poor erasure will count as an incorrect answer. Print your name on the Scantron. Occasionally I will place selected information on Blackboard. Grades will be on Blackboard. I will also hand the tests back in class. Attendance requirements for this class are the same as stated in the current Catalog. Attendance records will be maintained. All makeup examinations will be given on.


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CHAPTER 1 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW CHAPTER OBJECTIVES 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Describe employer branding and define human resource management. Identify the human resource management functions. Identify the external environmental factors that affect human resource management and describe the trend for increased mobility of tasks performed by HR professionals. Explain why corporate culture is a major internal environment factor. Explain who performs human resource management tasks. Describe how human resource management activities may be different for small businesses. Describe the various human resource classifications, including executives, generalists, and specialists. Describe the evolution of human resource management and explain the evolving HR organization. Describe the professionalization of human resource management. Explain the possible hurdles of managing human resources across different countries and cultures. KEY TERMS

Employer branding: Firm’s corporate image or culture focused on attracting the type of employees the firm is seeking. Human resource management (HRM): Utilization of individuals to achieve organizational objectives. Staffing: Is the process through which an organization ensures that it always has the proper number of employees with the appropriate skills in the right jobs, at the right time, to achieve organizational objectives. Human resource development (HRD): Major HRM function consisting not only of training and development but also of individual career planning and development activities, organization development, and performance management and appraisal. External environment: Factors outside an organization’s boundaries that affect a firm’s human resources make-up. Union: Comprised of employees who have joined together for the purpose of dealing with their employer. Shareholders: Owners of a corporation. Human resource information system (HRIS): Any organized approach for obtaining relevant and timely information on which to base human resource decisions. Corporate culture: System of shared values, beliefs, and habits within an organization that interacts with the formal structure to produce behavioral norms.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Human resource managers: Individuals who normally act in an advisory (or staff) capacity when working with other (line) managers regarding human resource matters. HR outsourcing (HRO): Process of hiring external HR professionals to do the HR work that was previously done internally. Shared service center (SSC): A center that takes routine, transaction-based activities dispersed throughout the organization and consolidates them in one place. Professional employer organization (PEO): Company that leases employees to other businesses. Line managers: Individuals directly involved in accomplishing the primary purpose of the organization are called line managers. Executive: Top-level manager who reports directly to a corporation’s chief executive officer or to the head of a major division. Generalist: Person who may be an executive and performs tasks in a variety of HR-related areas. Specialist: Individual who may be a HR executive, a human resource manager, or a nonmanager, and who is typically concerned with only one of the five functional areas of human resource management. Country’s culture: Set of values, symbols, beliefs, languages, and norms that guide human behavior within the country. LECTURE OUTLINE EMPLOYER BRANDING Corporate culture is the system of shared values, beliefs, and habits within an organization that interacts with the formal structure to produce behavioral norms. Throughout this text the importance of various topics related to corporate culture will be described. The first topic associated with corporate culture, employer branding, is discussed next. Employer branding is the firm’s corporate image or culture focused on attracting the type of employees the firm is seeking. Through employer branding, people get to know what the company stands for, the people it hires, the fit between jobs and people, and the results it recognizes and rewards. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT HRM can be defined as the optimal utilization of individuals to achieve organizational objectives. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS Five functional areas are associated with effective human resource management: staffing, human resource development, compensation, safety and health, and employee and labor relations. STAFFING—Process through which an organization ensures that it always has the proper number of employees with the appropriate skills in the right jobs, at the right time, to achieve organizational objectives.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Job analysis: Systematic process of determining the skills, duties, and knowledge required for performing specific jobs in an organization. Human resource planning: Systematic process of matching the internal and external supply of people with job openings anticipated in the organization over a specified period of time. Recruitment: Process of attracting qualified individuals and encouraging them to apply for work with the organization. Selection: Process through which the organization chooses, from a group of applicants, those individuals best suited both for open positions and the company. HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT—A major HRM function consisting not only of training and development but also of career planning and development activities, organization development, performance management and appraisal. Training: Activities designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills needed for their present jobs. Development: Process that involves learning that goes beyond today’s job; it has a more long-term focus. Career planning: Ongoing process whereby an individual sets career goals and identifies the means to achieve them. Career development: Formal approach used by the organization to ensure that people with the proper qualifications and experiences are available when needed. Organization development: Planned and systematic attempts to change the organization, typically to a more behavioral environment. Performance management: Goal-oriented process that is directed toward ensuring that organizational processes are in place to maximize the productivity of employees, teams, and ultimately, the organization. Performance appraisal: Formal system of review and evaluation of individual or team task performance. COMPENSATION — All rewards that individuals receive as a result of their employment. Direct Financial Compensation: Pay that a person receives in the form of wages, salaries, bonuses, and commissions.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Indirect Financial Compensation (Benefits): All financial rewards that are not included in direct compensation such as paid vacations, sick leave, holidays, and medical insurance. Nonfinancial Compensation: Satisfaction that a person receives from the job itself or from the psychological and/or physical environment in which the person works. SAFETY AND HEALTH—Employees who work in a safe environment and enjoy good health are more likely to be productive and yield long-term benefits to the organization. Safety: Activities involved in protecting employees from injuries caused by work-related accidents. Health: Activities involved in securing an employees’ freedom from illness and their general physical and mental well-being. EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS—Businesses are required by law to recognize a union and bargain with it in good faith if the firm’s employees want the union to represent them. In the past, this relationship was an accepted way of life for many employers, but most firms today would rather have a union-free environment. When a labor union represents a firm’s employees, the human resource activity is often referred to as industrial relations, which handles the job of collective bargaining. Internal employee relations comprise the human resource management activities associated with the movement of employees within the organization such as promotions, demotion, termination, and resignation. HUMAN RESOURCE RESEARCH—Pervades all HRM functional areas and the researcher’s laboratory is the entire work environment. INTERRELATIONSHIPS OF HRM FUNCTIONS—All HRM functional areas are highly interrelated. DYNAMIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENT Many interrelated factors affect the five HRM functions. Factors outside an organization’s boundaries that affect a firm’s human resources make up the external environment. LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS—Federal, state, and local legislation, and the many court decisions interpreting this legislation, in addition to, many presidential executive orders have had a major impact on human resource management. LABOR MARKET—Potential employees located within the geographic area from which employees are normally recruited. SOCIETY—Society may also exert pressure on human resource management.


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Ethics: Discipline dealing with what is good and bad, or right and wrong, or with moral duty and obligation. Corporate social responsibility: Implied, enforced, or felt obligation of managers, acting in their official capacity, to serve or protect the interests of groups other than themselves. POLITICAL PARTIES—There are two major political parties in the United States. These parties often have differing opinions on human resource topics. UNIONS—Employees who have come together for the purpose of dealing collectively with their employer are collectively called a Union. A union is treated as an environmental factor because they become a third party when dealing with the company. SHAREHOLDERS—Owners of a corporation are called shareholders. Because shareholders have invested money in a firm, they may at times challenge programs considered by management to be beneficial to the organization. COMPETITION—Firms may face intense competition in both their product or service and labor markets. CUSTOMERS—People who actually use a firm’s goods and services. Management has the task of ensuring that its employment practices do not antagonize the members of the market it serves. TRENDS & INNOVATIONS MOBILE HR; IS THE CLOUD THE LIMIT? A rapidly developing HR trend is that information and actions will be increasingly portable. Mobile applications are being adopted for recruitment and other HR functions such as scheduling, employee and manager self-service, performance reviews, and e-learning. Software developers are creating mobile HR applications, and human capital management vendors are making it possible for existing applications to be used on mobile devices. A major factor influencing HR mobility is cloud computing, a means of providing computer facilities via the Internet and a means of gaining access to those same computer facilities thru the Internet from different locations. With the cloud there is no more expensive, capital-intensive hardware and infrastructure and no more expensive, time-consuming, staff-intensive upgrades. HR TECHNOLOGY—The world has never before seen the rapid rate of technological change that is occurring today. The development of technology has created new roles for HR professionals but also places additional pressures on them to keep abreast of the technology. With the increased sophistication of technology has come the ability to design more useful human resource information systems (HRIS). An HRIS is any organized approach


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy for obtaining relevant and timely information on which to base human resource decisions. Think of an HRIS as an umbrella for merging the various subsystems discussed throughout this text. ECONOMY—As a generalization, when the economy is booming, it is often more difficult to recruit qualified workers. UNANTICIPATED EVENTS—Many of the human resource functions require modification when unanticipated events occur. CORPORATE CULTURE AS A MAJOR INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT FACTOR As an internal environmental factor affecting human resource management, corporate culture refers to the firm’s social and psychological climate. Corporate culture is defined as the system of shared values, beliefs, and habits within an organization that interacts with the formal structure to produce behavioral norms. An infinite variety of cultures could exist, so we probably should view them as a continuum. Topics related to corporate culture are presented throughout this text. HR’S CHANGING STRATEGIC ROLE: WHO PERFORMS THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TASKS? The person or units who perform human resource management tasks has changed dramatically in recent years. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER—An individual who normally acts in an advisory (or staff) capacity when working with other (line) managers regarding human resource matters. HR OUTSOURCING—Process of hiring an external provider to do the work that was previously done internally. HR SHARED SERVICE CENTERS—Take routine, transaction-based activities that are dispersed throughout the organization and consolidate them in one place. PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYER ORGANIZATION (EMPLOYEE LEASING)— Company that leases employees to other businesses. When a decision is made to use a professional employer organization, the company releases its employees who are then hired by the PEO. LINE MANAGERS—Individuals directly involved in accomplishing the primary purpose of the organization. As the traditional work of HR managers diminishes, line managers are stepping up and performing some duties typically done by human resource professionals. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN SMALL BUSINESSES Typically the same HR functions previously identified must be accomplished by small business but the manner in which they are accomplished may be altered. Small businesses often do not


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy have a formal HR unit or HRM specialists. Rather, line managers handle the HR functions. The focus of their activities is generally on hiring and retaining capable employees. Some aspects of HR functions may actually be more significant in smaller firms than in larger ones. HUMAN RESOURCE DESIGNATIONS EXECUTIVE—A top-level manager who reports directly to a corporation’s chief executive officer or to the head of a major division is called an executive. GENERALIST—A person who may be an executive and performs tasks in a variety of HR-related areas is called a Generalist. SPECIALIST—An individual who may be a HR executive, a human resource manager, or a nonmanager, and who is typically concerned with only one of the five functional areas of human resource management. EVOLUTION OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Today, the person or persons who perform HR tasks is certainly different than it was even a decade ago. As more and more companies use alternative means to accomplish HR tasks, the role of the traditional HR manager is diminishing. HR must now enter into the business of strategic HR, focus more on the bottom line of the organization and leave the more administrative tasks to technology or others. EVOLVING HR ORGANIZATIONS Line managers, HR outsourcing, HR shared service centers, and professional employer organizations are now handling many more of the traditional HR tasks. PROFESSIONALIZATION OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Profession is a vocation characterized by the existence of a common body of knowledge and a procedure for certifying members. SOCIETY FOR HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT—Largest national professional organization for individuals involved in all areas of human resource management. HUMAN RESOURCE CERTIFICATION INSTITUTE—Goal is to recognize human resource professionals through a certification program. AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT—Grown to become the largest specialized professional organization in human resources.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy WORLDATWORK—Professional association focused on compensation, benefits, work–life effectiveness and integrated total rewards—strategies to attract, motivate, and retain an engaged and productive workforce. COUNTRY CULTURE AS A POSSIBLE BARRIER TO GLOBAL BUSINESS A country’s culture is the set of values, symbols, beliefs, languages, and norms that guide human behavior within the country. It is learned behavior that develops as individuals grow from childhood to adulthood. Throughout this text, cultural differences between countries will be identified as a major factor influencing global business. This  borderless world adds dramatically to the difficulty of managing human capital. Cultural differences reveal themselves in everything from the workplace environments to very divergent concepts of time, space and social interaction. Culture differences are often the biggest barrier to doing  business in the world market. Companies operating in the global environment recognize that national cultures differ and that such differences cannot be ignored.

ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 1 EXERCISES 1.

Employer branding was discussed at the beginning of this chapter. On a scale of 1 (Poor) to 5 (Great), how valuable are the following brands? Why do you rate them low or high?

In answering this exercise, use your own opinion regarding each firm. There is no right or wrong answers. Some possible answers and reasons include the following:

2.

a.

Bank of America—(1) The company is laying off a lot of employees and their bank president gets paid too much. They made a huge mistake when they purchased Merrill Lynch.

b.

McDonald’s—(4) They make a reasonably good hamburger for an affordable price, but some of their food is not heart healthy. Some of your friends work at McDonald’s and they tell you that it is a good place to work.

c.

BP Global—(1) The Gulf oil spill made up my mind for me. It really messed up the economy for the Gulf coast for a long time. They were not forthright in explaining the situation.

d.

Walmart—(3) They have some low prices and this helps a lot of people. One of your friends works there and says that they discriminate against women.

Review the employment classified ads in the Wall Street Journal, HR Magazine, and a Sunday edition of a large city newspaper. Make a list of the types of human resource management jobs, the companies offering employment, and the qualifications needed to obtain the positions. What is your basic conclusion after this review in terms of the


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy availability of human resource management positions and the necessary qualifications for obtaining a position? The type of HR jobs that are advertised in the Wall Street Journal and HR Magazine will likely be senior level positions requiring considerable experience and education. The compensation offered is probably very competitive for management jobs. The Sunday edition of a large city newspaper may contain advertisments for all HR jobs although experience will likely be required. Information regarding entry level HR positions will likely be found through using the university placement center or through contacts in the business community. 3.

The Trends & Innovations in the chapter entitled “Mobile HR; Is the Cloud the Limit?” paints a much different picture of how HR work was done in the past. Do you believe that Mobile HR is truly the trend of the future? What might be the pros and cons of this trend?

There is no doubt that mobile HR is truly the trend of the future. The trend will truly grow as more and more young people who are digitally wise enter the work. This new workforce has grown up with technology and is quite comfortable in using it. Throughout the text, you will see how technology is used to accomplish HR tasks. Pros of the trend: There are many advantages to using mobile HR, but the most important benefit is that it lets HR professionals accomplish their tasks in a quicker and more efficient manner. HR professionals are not required to work in their office; HR tasks can be performed anywhere there is a signal. Cons of the trend: Some workers will be left behind because they have not kept up with the technology. It is frightening to some to have to work with mobile HR. 4.

The HR functions are highly interrelated. How would a change in one of the following affect the other HR functions? a.

Paying the lowest wages in the industry—A firm that is paying the lowest wages in the industry will likely have to recruit individuals who have limited qualifications and spend money to train them only to have them leave for better opportunities with higher paying competitors.

b.

Being recognized as an industry leader in providing continuous training and development—Better qualified workers will likely desire to join the firm assuming the pay is competitive. The recruitment process will certainly be easier once the firm becomes recognized for proving continuous training and development. Having a reputation for providing a work environment that is unhealthy—Several HR functions will be affected for a company that has a reputation for providing an unhealthy work environment. It will certainly be more difficult to recruit individuals to come to such an environment. In order to entice individuals to this

c.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy type environment, compensation will likely have to be higher. Having an unhealthy environment may well trigger a visit from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Finally, workers may believe that the only way to overcome this unhealthy work environment is to form a union. 5.

Corporate culture is discussed throughout your text as having a significant impact on HR tasks. How might the following cultures affect the five HR functions? a.

Employees generally believe that this is a fun place to work—In such an environment workers enjoy going to work each day. This form of corporate culture promotes productivity. There is likely to be low turnover in such a positive environment.

b.

Management generally has the attitude that “It’s my way. Don’t question me.”— With such an attitude, creativity is stifled and workers tend to do only those tasks that they are told to do. Often your best and most productive employees will take a position with another firm that provides a better work environment.

c.

Rewards are available for productive, hardworking employees—Most organizations would like to develop such an environment. In such an environment it is easier to retain your most productive employees. Less productive employees will tend to leave or be forced to leave the firm. It is a win—win situation for both employees and the organization.

ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 1 QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW 1. Define human resource management. What human resource management functions must be performed regardless of the organization’s size? Human resource management is the utilization of a firm’s human resources to achieve organizational objectives. Staffing: Process through which an organization ensures that it always has the proper number of employees with the appropriate skills in the right jobs, at the right time, to achieve organizational objectives. Human resource development: Major HRM function consisting not only of training and development but also of career planning and development activities, organization development, and performance management and appraisal. Compensation: Compensation includes all rewards individuals receive as a result of their employment. The reward may be one or a combination of the following:


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 

Direct financial compensation: Pay that a person receives in the form of wages, salaries, commissions and bonuses.

Indirect financial compensation (Benefits): All financial rewards that are not included in direct compensation such as paid vacations, sick leave, holidays, and medical insurance.

Nonfinancial compensation: Satisfaction that a person receives from the job itself or from the psychological and/or physical environment in which the person works.

Safety and health: Safety involves protecting employees from injuries due to workrelated accidents. Health refers to the employees’ freedom from illness, and their general physical and mental well-being. Employee and labor relations: Even with the projected decline in union membership, a business firm is required by law to recognize a union, and bargain with it in good faith, if the firm’s employees want the union to represent them. When a labor union represents a firm’s employees, the human resource activity is often referred to as industrial relations, which handles the job of collective bargaining. Internal employee relations, comprise the human resource management activities associated with the movement of employees within the organization such as promotions, demotion, termination, and resignation. 2. What are the external environmental factors that affect human resource management? Describe each. 

Legal considerations: Another significant external force affecting human resource management relates to federal, state, and local legislation, and the many court decisions interpreting this legislation. In addition, many presidential executive orders have had a major impact on human resource management.

Labor market: Potential employees located within the geographic area from which employees are normally recruited.

Society: Society may also exert pressure on human resource management. If a firm is to remain acceptable to the general public, it must be capable of accomplishing its purpose in line with societal norms.

Political parties: There are two major political parties in the United States. These parties often have differing opinions on human resource topics.

Unions: Group of employees who have joined together for the purpose of dealing collectively with their employer.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 

Shareholders: Owners of a corporation. Because shareholders have invested money in a firm, they may at times challenge programs considered by management to be beneficial to the organization.

Competition: For a firm to succeed, grow, and prosper, it must be able to maintain a supply of competent employees. Other organizations are also striving toward that objective.

Customers: Because sales are critical to the firm’s survival, management has the task of ensuring that its employment practices do not antagonize members of the market it serves.

HR technology—The world has never before seen the rapid rate of technological change that is occurring today. The development of technology has created new roles for HR professionals but also places additional pressures on them to keep abreast of the technology. With the increased sophistication of technology has come the ability to design more useful human resource information systems (HRIS). An HRIS is any organized approach for obtaining relevant and timely information on which to base human resource decisions. The HRIS brings under one technology platform interdependent human resource processes.

Economy: The economy of the nation—on the whole—and of its various segments is a major environmental factor affecting human resource management. As a generalization, when the economy is booming, it is often more difficult to recruit qualified workers. On the other hand, when a downturn is experienced, more applicants are typically available.

Unanticipated events: Occurrences in the external environment that could not be foreseen.

3. Discussion Question in MyManagementLab. Student responses will vary. 4. Define corporate culture. Explain why corporate culture is a major internal environment factor. Corporate culture is defined as the system of shared values, beliefs, and habits within an organization that interacts with the formal structure to produce behavioral norms. Culture gives people a sense of how to behave and what they ought to be doing. Each individual gradually forms such perceptions over a period of time as the person performs assigned activities under the general guidance of a superior and a set of organizational policies. The culture existing within a firm influences the employees’ degree of satisfaction with the job, as well as the level and quality of their performance. 5. This chapter describes HR’s changing role in business. Describe each component that is involved in human resource management.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Human resource manager: Individuals who normally act in an advisory (or staff) capacity when working with other (line) managers regarding human resource matters. HR outsourcing: Process of hiring an external provider to do the work that was previously done internally. HR shared service centers: Centers that take routine, transaction-based activities dispersed throughout the organization and consolidate them in one place. Professional employer organizations: Company that leases employees to other businesses. Line managers: Individuals directly involved in accomplishing the primary purpose of the organization. As the traditional work of HR managers diminishes, line managers are stepping up and performing some duties often done by human resources. 6. According to the Small Business Administration what does a a small business needs to do before hiring the first employee? New small businesses are faced with a host of federal and state government regulatory requirements, tax laws, and compensation demands. The SBA has identified various compliance steps for new small businesses. Before anyone is hired, an Employment Identification Number (EIN) should be obtained. EINs can be acquired online from the IRS and are needed to report taxes as well as information about new employees to state government. Then, procedures for withholding taxes should be made. The IRS requires that businesses keep records of employment taxes for at least four years. This includes employee wages, tips, and sickness records, as well as employee tax withholding certificates. Verification of eligibility to work is required for new employees within three days of the hire date. An Employment Eligibility Verification Form I-9 must be completed. Also all employers are required to report newly hired and re-hired employees to a state directory within 20 days of their hire or rehire date. Workers’ compensation insurance should then be obtained. Any business that hires employees must carry this insurance. A new business should also register for unemployment insurance tax. Small businesses may also be required to pay unemployment insurance tax. New companies should also check to see if they are required to purchase disability insurance. Some states require employers to provide partial wage replacement insurance coverage to eligible employees for non-work related sickness or injury. Laws also require that business prominently displays posters that inform employees of their rights and the small businesses responsibilities to them under labor laws. New employers now have different and new federal and state tax filing requirements that apply. Once the above discussed tasks have been completed, new small businesses can focus on creating a fulfilling, safe, and fair workplace.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 7. What are the various designations associated with human resource management? 

Executives: Top-level manager who reports directly to a corporation’s chief executive officer or to the head of a major division.

Generalists: Person who may be an executive and performs tasks in a variety of HRrelated areas.

Specialist: Individual who may be a HR executive, a human resource manager, or a nonmanager, and who is typically concerned with only one of the five functional areas of human resource management.

8. What has been the evolution of human resource management? Traditionally, separate functions such as staffing, training and development, compensation, safety and health, and labor relations (if the firm was unionized) were created and placed under the direction of a human resource manager or executive. Large firms might have had a manager and staff for each HR function that reported to the HR executive. The HR vice president worked closely with top management in formulating corporate policy. Today, the person or persons who perform HR tasks is certainly different than it was even a decade ago. As more and more companies use alternative means to accomplish HR tasks, the role of the traditional HR manager is diminishing. HR must now enter into the business of strategic HR, focus more on the bottom line of the organization and leave the more administrative tasks to technology or others. 9. Define profession. Do you believe that the field of human resource management is a profession? Explain your answer. Profession is a vocation characterized by the existence of a common body of knowledge and a procedure for certifying members. Performance standards are established by members of the profession rather than by outsiders; that is, the profession is self-regulated. Most professions also have effective representative organizations that permit members to exchange ideas of mutual concern. These characteristics apply to the field of human resources, and several well-known organizations serve the profession. DISCUSSION OF CHAPTER 1 INCIDENTS HRM Incident 1: HR after a Disaster After Hurricane Rita struck Lake Charles, in southwest Louisiana, many businesses wondered if they would ever return to their former selves. Massive destruction was everywhere. Lake Charles, known for its large and beautiful oak and pine trees, now had the job of removing those downed trees from homes, businesses, and lots. You could see for miles through what used to be thick forests. Huge trucks designed for removing massive tree trunks were everywhere. While driving down a street, downed trees could be seen stacked two stories high, waiting to be picked


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy up. The town grew rapidly in size because of the increased number of repair crews working on recovery operations. The noise created by their chain saws could be heard from daylight until dark. The sounds of hammers were everywhere as homeowners scrambled to get their roofs repaired. Often repair crews would just find an empty lot and set up tents for the night because all motels were full. Traffic was unbelievably slow, and it appeared as if everyone was attempting to get on the road at the same time. Just driving from Point A to Point B could often be quite an adventure. As might be expected in conditions such as these, accidents were numerous. Often police did not have the resources to ticket every fender bender, so unless there were injuries, insurance cards were exchanged and the police went on to the next accident. Months after Hurricane Rita struck, large and small businesses were still frantically trying to find workers so they could start up again. It appeared that every business in the town had a “Help Wanted� sign out front. Individuals who wanted a job could get one and could command a premium salary. Walmart, known for remaining open 24 hours a day, could only stay open on an abbreviated schedule. Employers often had to bus employees from locations not affected by the hurricane each morning and return them at night because there were not enough workers available in the local area. Restaurants that normally remained open late into the evening closed at 6:00 p.m., if they opened at all. Compensation scales that were in use prior to the hurricanes had to be thrown out and new plans implemented. Minimum-wage jobs were nonexistent. Employees who earned minimum wage before the storm could now command $10 per hour just for being a flagger (a person who directs traffic). Fast-food restaurants that normally paid minimum wage now paid $10 or $11. Burger King was even offering a $1,500 bonus for entrylevel workers. Upscale restaurants that normally paid minimum wage plus tips now paid premium rate plus tips. Restaurants that remained open often had a much younger staff and it was evident that the managers and assistant managers were working overtime to train these new workers. Restaurant patrons had to learn patience because there would be mistakes by these eager, but largely untrained workers.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy QUESTIONS 1.

Which external environment factor(s) did Hurricane Rita affect? Discuss.

Certainly the primary external environment factor was unanticipated events. Hurricane Rita could not have been foreseen although disaster planning could overcome many of the problems. Several external environmental factors resulted from the hurricane. The labor market experienced considerable change. Remember that restaurants were having difficulty in hiring experienced workers and many of the servers had to be trained. Some customers were having difficulty in receiving supplies from producers in the area. Technology was affected as cell phone towers had been destroyed in the area and it was difficult to communicate. To complicate the situation, land lines were also down. The economy took an initial beating from the storm, but the ultimate economic stimulus produced powerful results that continue today. 2.

How were the human resource functions affected by Hurricane Rita?

Virtually every area of HR was affected when Hurricane Rita struck. Businesses were desperately trying to staff their business. Compensation systems had to be significantly altered. There were many untrained workers so the training function continued. Safety issues were everywhere. 3.

Do you believe that the HR situation described regarding Hurricane Rita would be typical in a disaster? Explain.

Certainly there can be some degree of planning for a disaster. But it is unlikely that all events can be anticipated. At times, managers just have to react to occurrences and hope that the proper decision is being made. HRM Incident 2: Downsizing As the largest employer in Ouachita County, Arkansas, International Forest Products Company (IFP) is an important part of the local economy. Ouachita County is a mostly rural area in south central Arkansas. It employs almost 10 percent of the local workforce, and few alternative job opportunities are available in the area. Scott Wheeler, the human resource director at IFP, tells of a difficult decision he once had to make. According to Scott, everything was going along pretty well despite the economic recession, but he knew that sooner or later the company would be affected. “I got the word at a private meeting with the president, Janet Deason that we would have to cut the workforce by 30 percent on a crash basis. I was to get back to her within a week with a suggested plan. I knew that my plan would not be the final one, since the move was so major, but I knew that Ms. Deason was depending on me to provide at least a workable approach. “First, I thought about how the union would react. Certainly, workers would have to be let go in order of seniority. The union would try to protect as many jobs as possible. I also knew that all of


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy management’s actions during this period would be intensely scrutinized. We had to make sure that we had our act together. “Then there was the impact on the surrounding community to consider. The economy of Ouachita County had not been in good shape recently. Aside from the influence on the individual workers who were laid off, I knew that our cutbacks would further depress the area’s economy. I knew that there would be a number of government officials and civic leaders who would want to know how we were trying to minimize the harm done to the public in the area. “We really had no choice but to make the cuts, I believed. First of all, I had no choice because Ms. Deason said we were going to do it. Also, I had recently read a news account that one of our competitors, Johns Manville Corporation in West Monroe, Louisiana, had laid off several hundred workers in a cost-cutting move. To keep our sales from being further depressed, we had to ensure that our costs were just as low as those of our competitors. The wood products market is very competitive and a cost advantage of even 2 or 3 percent would allow competitors to take many of our customers. “Finally, a major reason for the cutbacks was to protect the interests of our shareholders. A few years ago a shareholder group disrupted our annual meeting to insist that IFP make certain antipollution changes. In general, though, the shareholders seem to be more concerned with the return on their investments than with social responsibility. At our meeting, the president reminded me that, just like every other manager in the company, I should place the shareholders’ interests above all else. I really was quite overwhelmed as I began to work up a personnel plan that would balance all of these conflicting interests.” QUESTIONS 1.

All employees at IFP are not members of the union. How might identifying those who will be laid off differ for nonunion and unionized employees?

In a union environment, workers will be laid off based on seniority as defined in the labormanagement agreement. Nonunion employees will likely be laid off based on the results of their performance appraisal evaluations and the needs of the company. Scott’s office will likely go through the files of all nonunion employees and recommend to management those who will be released. 2.

List the elements in the company’s environment that will affect Scott’s suggested plan. How legitimate is the interest of each of these?

All of the elements are legitimate, of course. The local government has a right to consideration, not only because it represents the public, but because it can affect the company’s future. The union must represent the employees but also has a right to try to sustain itself as an institution. The surrounding community is already in difficult straits and will be hurt by layoffs. Competitors have no legitimate claim for consideration, except to the extent that their price-cutting activities


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy tend to force cost-cutting moves at International Forest Products. The shareholders’ interests have traditionally been considered to be the primary concern of management. 3.

Corporate culture is discussed in this chapter as a major internal environmental factor affecting an organization. How might the downsizing of International Forest Products affect the corporate culture of the company?

There is no doubt that an immediate effect of the downsizing will be on the morale of the remaining workers. Even for those who remain may wonder what will occur at a later time. Hopefully workers will ultimately realize that the downsizing was necessary to ensure the continued success of the organization. 4.

Is it true that Scott should be concerned first and foremost with protecting the interests of the shareholders? Discuss.

Scott has been told that this should be his foremost concern, and he probably has no real choice but to comply. Still, the trend in management is to recognize a variety of interests as legitimate, so Scott is certainly justified in attempting to balance the conflicting interests rather than considering only the shareholders.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy CHAPTER 2 BUSINESS ETHICS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CHAPTER OBJECTIVES 1 Explain the purpose of paying for whistleblowers. 2 Define ethics and describe sources of ethical guidance. 3 Discuss attempts at legislating ethics. 4 Explain the importance of creating an ethical culture, describe a code of ethics, and support the importance of linking pay to ethical behavior. 5 Explain human resource ethics and describe ethics training. 6 Describe the concept of corporate social responsibility. 7 Explain why everyone is not on board with regard to corporate social responsibility. 8 Explain corporate sustainability. 9 Describe a social audit. 10 Describe possible difficulties for corporate social responsibility to succeed in the global environment. KEY TERMS Ethics: Discipline dealing with what is good and bad, or right and wrong, or with moral duty and obligation. Human resource ethics: Application of ethical principles to human resource relationships and activities. Profession: Vocation characterized by the existence of a common body of knowledge and a procedure for certifying members. Corporate social responsibility (CSR): Implied, enforced, or felt obligation of managers, acting in their official capacity, to serve or protect the interests of groups other than themselves. Social audit: Systematic assessment of a company’s activities in terms of its social impact. LECTURE OUTLINE PAY FOR WHISTLEBLOWING In the legal use of the term, a whistleblower is someone who engages in a “protected activity.” The number of whistleblower suits has increased dramatically in recent years under federal and state laws aimed at uncovering fraud and protecting the public. The whistleblowing side of the Dobb-Frank is shaped after a successful 2006 IRS program. In passing the Act, Congress believed that bounty programs are an effective method to encourage people with information regarding violations of the law to come forward with the information to responsible law enforcement officials. The Act requires the SEC to provide an award to a qualifying whistleblower of no less than 10 percent and no greater than 30 percent of any sanction imposed against a violator of any securities laws as a result of “original information” from a whistleblower that is “voluntarily provided” to the SEC that leads to a successful enforcement or related action.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy

ETHICS Discipline dealing with what is good and bad, or right and wrong, or with moral duty and obligation. SOURCES OF ETHICAL GUIDANCE One might use a number of sources to determine what is right or wrong, good or bad, moral or immoral. These sources include the Bible and other holy books. They also include the still, small voice that many refer to as conscience. Another source of ethical guidance is the behavior and advice of the people psychologists call significant others—our parents, friends, role models, and members of our churches, clubs, and associations. For most professionals, there are codes of ethics that prescribe certain behaviors. LEGISLATING ETHICS Much of the current legislation was passed because of business ethics breakdowns. There have been four attempts to legislate business ethics since the late 1980s. PROCUREMENT INTEGRITY ACT of 1988—Prohibits the release of source selection and contractor bid or proposal information. Passed after reports of military contracts for $500 toilet seats. FEDERAL SENTENCING GUIDELINES FOR ORGANIZATIONS of 1992— Outlined an effective ethics program. CORPORATE AND AUDITING ACCOUNTABILITY, RESPONSIBILITY AND TRANSPARENCY ACT of 2002—Known as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the primary focus of the Act is to redress accounting and financial reporting abuses in light of recent corporate scandals. The Act has teeth, because in the 2003 Bechtel v Competitive Technologies Inc. Supreme Court case involving wrongful termination under Sarbanes– Oxley’s whistle-blower-protection rule, the Court ruled that the company violated the Act by firing two employees and ordered them reinstated. DODD-FRANK WALL STREET REFORM AND CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT—The Act has provisions relating to executive compensation and corporate governance that directly and significantly impact the executives, directors, and shareholders of publicly traded companies and continue the increased federal regulation of corporate governance and executive compensation matters that was initially reflected in the economic recovery legislation passed in 2008 and 2009. CREATING AN ETHICAL CULTURE Saying that a company has an ethical culture and actually having one may be two different things. One way to create and sustain an ethical culture is to audit corporate ethics, much as corporate finances are audited each year. An ethics audit is simply a systematic, independent, and documented process for obtaining evidence regarding the status of an organization’s ethical


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy culture. It takes a closer look at a firm’s ethical culture instead of just allowing it to remain unexamined. CODE OF ETHICS Most companies have codes of ethics. LINKING PAY TO ETHICAL BEHAVIOR The importance of linking pay to performance is an appropriate topic when discussing ethics. It is well known in the compensation world that “what you reward is what you get.” If the statement is correct, then a problem exists because most companies do not link pay to ethical behavior. HUMAN RESOURCE ETHICS Can be defined as the application of ethical principles to human resource relationships and activities. ETHICS TRAINING The Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations Act outlined an effective ethics training program and explained the seven minimum requirements for an effective program to prevent and detect violations. Ethics training is not merely for top level managers; it should be for everyone from the bottom to the top. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Implied, enforced, or felt obligation of managers, acting in their official capacity, to serve or protect the interests of groups other than themselves. NOT EVERYONE IS ON BOARD WITH CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Milton Friedman was an American economist, statistician, academic, and author who taught at the University of Chicago for more than three decades and was a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. He argued that here is one and only one social responsibility of business—to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud. Friedman disciples continue to condemn CSR as a hotchpotch of “value-destroying nonsense.” CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY Corporate sustainability has evolved from the more traditional corporate social responsibility. According to the World Commission on Environment and Sustainability, the narrow definition of sustainability or sustainable development is “meeting the needs of the present without


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In recent years, sustainability has been changed to encompass the social, economic, environmental and cultural systems needed to sustain any organization. This type of organization is capable of surviving both now and in the future. CONDUCTING A SOCIAL AUDIT A social audit is a systematic assessment of a company’s activities in terms of its social impact. Some of the topics included in the audit focus on core values such as social responsibility, open communication, treatment of employees, confidentiality, and leadership. Firms are now acknowledging responsibilities to various stakeholder groups other than corporate owners. CAN CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBLE SUCCEED IN THE GLOBAL  ENVIRONMENT? The global environment often judges management primarily on protecting the firm’s bottom line. If this is so, it may be easy to be socially responsible when the economy is good but more difficult when the economy is bad. The recent recession has some firms questioning the wisdom of being socially responsible. The question that needs to be asked is, “Can firms competing in the global environment continue the lowest possible production costs while still being in compliance with national laws and also being socially responsible?” ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 2 ETHICAL DILEMMA: A Selection Quandary You are being promoted to a new assignment with your company, and your boss has asked you to nominate one of your subordinates as your replacement. The possible candidates are Randy Carlton, who is obviously more qualified, and James Mitchell, who, though not as experienced, is much better liked by the workers. If Randy is given the promotion, you are not certain the workers will accept him as their leader. James, on the other hand, is a hard worker and is well liked and respected by the others, including Randy. As you labor over the decision, you think about how unfair it would be to Randy if the feelings of the other workers kept him from getting a deserved promotion. At the same time, you feel that your primary responsibility should be to maintain the productivity of the work unit. If your former division fell apart after your departure, it would hurt your reputation, not to mention the company. What would you do? ____________ Ethical Choice: Recommend Randy, the most qualified employee. Factors Influencing Another Decision: The department might fall apart if Randy is given the promotion. Other workers might not work for Randy and the workers would more readily accept James. Your reputation may be hurt if the department productivity decline. Besides, Randy can work with James. ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 2 EXERCISES


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 1.

Discussion Question in MyManagementLab. Student responses will vary.

2.

The Trends & Innovations in the chapter entitled “Not Everyone Is on Board with Corporate Social Responsibility” suggests that CSR is not as strongly advocated as this text suggests it is. Do you accept the argument for or against CSR? Defend your decision.

Depending on whether you accept or reject the concept of corporate social responsibility, develop a case for your decision. For Corporate Social Responsibility: Corporate social responsibility is the model in which economic, social and environmental responsibilities are satisfied concurrently. When a corporation behaves as if it has a conscience, it is said to be socially responsible. CSR considers the overall influence of corporations on society at large and goes beyond the interests of shareholders. It is how a company as a whole behaves toward society. Social responsibility has moved from nice-to-do to must-do. In fact, job seekers tend to be more attracted to organizations known for corporate social responsibility. Against Corporate Social Responsibility: Milton Friedman was an American economist, statistician, academic, and author who taught at the University of Chicago for more than three decades and was a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. In his book, Capitalism and Freedom, he states that “there is one and only one social responsibility of business—to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud.” Friedman disciples continue to condemn CSR as a hotchpotch of “value-destroying nonsense.” ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 2 QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW 1. Why does the government pay for whistleblowing? The whistleblowing side of the Dobb-Frank is shaped after a successful 2006 IRS program. In passing the Act, Congress believed that bounty programs are an effective method to encourage people with information regarding violations of the law to come forward with the information to responsible law enforcement officials. The Act requires the SEC to provide an award to a qualifying whistleblower of no less than 10 percent and no greater than 30 percent of any sanction imposed against a violator of any securities laws as a result of “original information” from a whistleblower that is “voluntarily provided” to the SEC that leads to a successful enforcement or related action. 2. What laws have been passed in an attempt to legislate ethics? 

Procurement Integrity Act of 1988: Passed after reports of military contracts for such things as $500 toilet seats. It prohibits the release of source selection and contractor bid or proposal information.


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy 

Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations of 1992: Outlined an effective ethics program.

Corporate and Auditing Accountability, Responsibility and Transparency Act of 2002: Criminalized many corporate acts that were previously relegated to various regulatory structures.

Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010: Has provisions relating to executive compensation and corporate governance that directly and significantly impact the executives, directors, and shareholders of publicly traded companies and continue the increased federal regulation of corporate governance and executive compensation matters that was initially reflected in the economic recovery legislation passed in 2008 and 2009.

3. Why is it important to have a code of ethics? A distinction needs to be made between a code of conduct and a code of ethics; the former should tell employees what the rules of conduct are. The code of ethics helps employees know what to do when there is not a rule for something. A broad-based participation of those subject to the code is important. For a company to behave ethically, it must live and breathe its code of ethics, train its personnel and communicate its code through its vision statements.

4. With regard to business ethics, what does the statement “what you reward is what you get” mean? In compensation circles it is well know that what you reward is what you get. If the statement is correct, then a problem exists with regard to compensation because most companies do not link pay to ethical behavior. 5. What are human resource ethics? The application of ethical principles to human resource relationships and activities is called human resource ethics. 6. What are the areas in which HR professionals can have a major impact on ethics? HR professionals can help foster an ethical culture, but that means more than just hanging the ethics codes posters on walls. Instead, since the HR professionals’ primary job is dealing with people, they must help to instill ethical practices into the corporate culture. Those values must be clearly communicated to all employees, early and often, beginning with the interview process, reinforced during employee orientation and regularly recognized during performance reviews, public ceremonies, celebrations and awards. They need to help establish an environment in


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy which employees throughout the organization work to reduce ethical lapses. The ethical bearing of those in HR goes a long way toward establishing the credibility of the entire organization. 7. What is corporate social responsibility? Corporate social responsibility is the implied, enforced, or felt obligation of managers, acting in their official capacity, to serve or protect the interests of groups other than themselves. It is how a company as a whole behaves towards society. 8. What does corporate sustainability mean? Corporate sustainability has evolved from the more traditional corporate social responsibility. According to the World Commission on Environment and Sustainability, the narrow definition of sustainability or sustainable development is “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In recent years, sustainability has been changed to encompass the social, economic, environmental and cultural systems needed to sustain any organization. This type of organization is capable of surviving both now and in the future. 9. What is involved in conducting a social audit? A social audit is a systematic assessment of a company’s activities in terms of its social impact. Some of the topics included in the audit focus on core values such as social responsibility, open communication, treatment of employees, confidentiality, and leadership. Firms are now acknowledging responsibilities to various stakeholder groups other than corporate owners. 10. Discussion Question in MyManagementLab. Student responses will vary.

DISCUSSION OF CHAPTER 2 INCIDENTS HRM Incident 1: An Ethical Flaw Amber Davis had recently graduated from college with a degree in general business. Amber was quite bright, although her grades did not reflect this. She had thoroughly enjoyed school, dating, playing tennis, and swimming, but found few stimulating academic endeavors. When she graduated, she had not found a job. Her dad was extremely upset when he discovered this, and he took it upon himself to see that Amber became employed. Amber’s father, Allen Davis, was executive vice president of a medium-sized manufacturing firm. One of the people he contacted in seeking employment for Amber was Bill Garbo, the president of another firm in the area. Mr. Davis purchased many of his firm’s supplies from Garbo’s company. After telling Bill his problem, Allen was told to send Amber to Bill’s office for an interview. Amber went, as instructed by her father, and before she left Bill’s firm, she was surprised to learn that she had a job in the accounting department. Amber may have been lazy,


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy but she certainly was not stupid. She realized that Bill had hired her because he hoped that his action would lead to future business from her father’s company. Although Amber’s work was not challenging, it paid better than the other jobs in the accounting department. It did not take long for the employees in the department to discover the reason she had been hired; Amber told them. When a difficult job was assigned to Amber, she normally got one of the other employees to do it, implying that Mr. Garbo would be pleased with that person if he or she helped her out. She developed a pattern of coming in late, taking long lunch breaks, and leaving early. When the department manager attempted to reprimand her for these unorthodox activities, Amber would bring up the close relationship that her father had with the president of the firm. The department manager was at the end of his rope. QUESTIONS 1. From an ethical standpoint, how would you evaluate the merits of Mr. Garbo’s employing Amber? Discuss. Mr. Garbo should not have been pressured by Mr. Davis to hire his daughter, Amber. The employment of a “friend’s” son or daughter may or may not be a good business practice. If Amber had been competent, mature, ambitious, energetic, and wanted to learn the business, then Mr. Garbo would have made a good decision. However, Amber did not possess these characteristics, and so Mr. Garbo’s decision was based solely on his business relationship with Mr. Davis. Obviously, employment decisions should be based on business or professional judgment and not on personal relationships. Finally, it was unethical of Mr. Davis to have pressured Mr. Garbo to hire Amber. 2.

Now that she is employed, how would you suggest that the situation be resolved?

Amber should be encouraged to become a productive member of the accounting department, or she should be replaced. It should be made clear to her that her father’s connections with Mr. Garbo may have got her in the door, but will not keep her inside unless she becomes an effective and efficient performer. 3.

It may be that Mr. Garbo viewed the hiring of Amber as strictly a business decision that would ensure receiving continued business from Amber’s father. What might be some negative results of this questionable ethical decision?

Other workers have noticed that Amber is taking advantage of the situation. Some may use her work performance as the standard to be achieved in the department. This would prove to be a problem for them since although the department manager cannot fire Amber, other employees are not as lucky. The morale in the department is sure to suffer and the only way for it to improve is to somehow get Amber’s performance up to where it should be or to get rid of Amber. HRM Incident 2: “You Can’t Fire Me”


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Norman Blankenship came in the side door of the office at Consolidation Coal Company’s Rowland mine, near Clear Creek, West Virginia. He told the mine dispatcher not to tell anyone he was there. Norman was general superintendent of the Rowland operation. He had been with Consolidation for 23 years, having started out as a mining machine operator. Norman had heard that one of his section bosses, Tom Serinsky, had been sleeping on the job. Tom had been hired two months earlier and assigned to the Rowland mine by the regional personnel office. He had gone to work as section boss, working the midnight to 8:00 a.m. shift. Because of his age and experience, Serinsky was the senior person in the mine on his shift. Norman took one of the battery-operated jeeps used to transport personnel and supplies in and out of the mine and went to the area where Tom was assigned. Upon arriving, he saw Tom lying on an emergency stretcher. Norman stopped his jeep a few yards away from where Tom was sleeping and approached him. “Hey, are you asleep?” Norman asked. Tom awakened with a start and said, “No, I wasn’t sleeping.” Norman waited for Tom to collect his senses and then said, “I could tell that you were sleeping. But that’s beside the point. You weren’t at your workstation. You know that I have no choice but to fire you.” After Tom had left, Norman called his mine foreman and asked him to come in and complete the remainder of Tom’s shift. The next morning, Norman had the mine HR manager officially terminate Tom. As part of the standard procedure, the mine HR manager notified the regional HR manager that Tom had been fired and gave the reasons for firing him. The regional HR manager asked the mine HR manager to get Norman on the line. The regional HR manager said, “Norm, you know Tom is Justus Frederick’s brother-in-law, don’t you?” Frederick was a regional vice president. “No, I didn’t know that,” replied Norman, “but it doesn’t matter. The rules are clear. I wouldn’t care if he was Frederick’s son.” The next day, the regional human resource manager showed up at the mine just as Norman was getting ready to make a routine tour of the mine. “I guess you know what I’m here for,” said the HR manager. “Yeah, you’re here to take away my authority,” replied Norman. “No, I’m just here to investigate,” said the regional HR manager. By the time Norman returned to the mine office after his tour, the regional HR manager had finished his interviews. He told Norman, “I think we’re going to have to put Tom back to work. If we decide to do that, can you let him work for you?” “No, absolutely not,” said Norman. “In fact, if he works here, I go.” A week later, Norman learned that Tom had gone to work as section boss at another Consolidation coal mine in the region. QUESTIONS 1.

What would you do now if you were Norman?


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edition-mondy Clearly, it was wrong for Tom to receive special consideration. Still, there is probably nothing Norman can do about it at this point. He should not let the inappropriate actions of others affect his own ethics, however. Norman should attempt to forget about the incident and continue doing the best job that he can as long as he chooses to work for this firm. 2.

Do you believe the regional human resource manager handled the matter in an ethical manner? Explain.

Certainly the regional human resource manager was not ethical. There is no indication that he even went to the trouble of confronting Mr. Frederick before taking action to protect his brotherin-law, Tom. Just a minimal concern for integrity would have caused him to do that. It is possible that Mr. Frederick would have disclaimed any desire to have Tom given preferential treatment. This is just one example of a situation in which being ethical might have costs. In fact, no ethical question is involved unless there are costs associated with it. Whether Mr. Frederick wanted him to or not, the regional human resource manager should have stayed out of this situation.

Test bank human resource management 13th edition mondy  

test bank human resource management 13th edition mondy. Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-human-resource-management-13th-edi...

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