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Test Bank for

Home and School Relations: Teachers and Parents Working Together Fourth Edition Glenn Olsen University of North Dakota

Mary Lou Fuller University of North Dakota, Emeritus Prepared by Yuliya Kartoshkina University of North Dakota

Angela Bell University of North Dakota

Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-home-and-school-relations-4th-edition-olsen

______________________________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2012, 2008, 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This publication is protected by Copyright and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. For information regarding permission(s), write to: Rights and Permissions Department. Pearson® is a registered trademark of Pearson plc Instructors of classes using Olsen and Fuller’s Home and School Relations: Teachers and Parents Working Together, Fourth Edition, may reproduce material from the test bank for classroom use.

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

ISBN-10: 0132373416 ISBN-13: 9780132373418 www.pearsonhighered.com

Table of Contents

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Chapter 1: An Introduction to Families

1

Chapter 2: Families and Their Functions—Past and Present

3

Chapter 3: Family Diversity

6

Chapter 4: Parents’ Perspectives on Parenting

9

Chapter 5: Teachers and Parenting: Multiple Views

12

Chapter 6: Parent-Teacher Communication: Who’s Talking?

14

Chapter 7: Family Involvement in Education

17

Chapter 8: Families and Their Children with Disabilities

19

Chapter 9: Family Involvement Models

22

Chapter 10: Education Law and Parental Rights

25

Chapter 11: Family Violence: The Effect on Teachers, Parents, and Children

28

Chapter 12: Poverty: The Enemy of Children and Families

31

Chapter 13: Fathering, Schools, and Schooling: What Fathers Contribute and Why It Is Important

33

Chapter 14: The Implications of Home–School Partnerships for School Violence and Bullying Chapter 15: Finding a Voice for Children for Children and Families: Public Policy, Social Services, and Advocacy in Action

35

Answer Key

38 40

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CHAPTER 1

An Introduction to Families True/False Questions Circle T if the statement is true; circle F if the statement is false. T F 1. Parents in all times and parents have been concerned about their children’s health, nutrition, and safety. T F 2. Parents are the only ones who are involved in the enculturation of their children. T F 3. In the mid-1880s, the role of parents in the United States shifted from being actively involved in running the school to being guests of the school. Multiple Choice Questions Circle the best answer. 4. What were the primary purposes of families in the past? a. to prepare children by making sure that they went to school b. to protect children from harm and prepare them to function within society c. to make sure that children went to school and protect them d. a & b 5. Which of the following has NOT changed over time? a. The function of the family b. The nature of the dangers children faced c. The character of society d. All of the above 6. The process by which a family and/or society prepares children to behave appropriately and appreciate their cultural values and traditions is known as __________. a. deculturation b. enculturation c. socialization d. b & c 7. In what state were public schools initially legislated? a. Massachusetts b. New York c. Pennsylvania d. Ohio 8. If teachers’ professional efforts are to complement those of parents, they need to have _______.

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a. b. c. d.

children of their own a better understanding of families more education than the parents lived in poverty

9. What changes related to the school took place in the mid-1880s when the United States became more industrialized? a. the influence of the individual parent on the school increased. b. school districts decreased in size c. the power shifted from administrators to the parents d. the influence of the individual parent on the school decreased 10. Who had the primary role to interact with the school during the 1950s–70s? a. Mothers b. Fathers c. Both mothers and fathers d. Grandparents 11. What factor determines the quality of life for most families? a. Income b. Ethnicity c. Family structure d. Assimilation 12. Which is NOT a characteristic of the changing family structure? a. The increase of single parent household headed by women b. The increase in age of first time parents c. The decrease in fathers who wish to be involved in parenting d. The increase of fathers who are awarded custody after a divorce Essay Questions Give complete responses to each statement. 13. What are the effects of the changing economy on schools? 14. What is the primary purpose of the enculturation process? 15. How and why did the role of a teacher develop in a contemporary society? 16. Why do teachers need to have an understanding of families and how they function? 17. How are technological, societal, and demographic demands reflected in contemporary families?

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CHAPTER 2

Families and Their Functions- Past and Present True/False Questions Circle T if the statement is true; circle F if the statement is false. T F 1. The majority of families fit the stereotype of the “all-American family.” T F 2. Only present-day families are struggling with problems resulting from political, economic, and societal forces. T F 3. The church had a tremendous influence on governmental matters, family life in general, and child-rearing practices in Europe during the Middle Ages. T F 4. Locke, an English philosopher, was the first one to introduce the idea that children’s minds are like “clean slates” on which parents and teachers could write what students were to learn. T F 5. In 1912, the American government created the Children’s Bureau to address concerns about undernourished, neglected, and abused children. Multiple Choice Questions Circle the best answer. 6. Parents of the past used their family values and functions to __________ and _____________. a. Earn money and spend time with family b.Protect their children and prepare them for society c. Protect their children from disease and educate them d.Protect their children from starvation and educate them 7. With what conditions did pre-historical families deal? a. Hunger, the elements, and disease b. Clans, tribes, and other cultures c. Starvation, lack of water, drought d. None of the above 8.

To protect their members against enemy tribes and to ensure that everyone had enough to eat, pre-historical families: a. Joined with other tribes to form clans b. Made weapons and farmed c. Were geographically isolated from others d. Joined with other clans to form tribes

9. Greek and Roman period families were concerned simply with surviving during the Middle Ages (400-1400). Only ___________ were educated.

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a. b. c. d.

Noble boys Noble girls Peasant boys Peasant girls

10. Which group believed that children were naturally evil and introduced the phrased, “beat the devil out of the child?” a. European Medieval families b. Age of Reason families c. Greek and Roman families d. Pre-historical families 11. Martin Luther (1482-1546), the “father of Reformation,” proposed which revolutionary child practice? a. Beating the devil out of the child. b. Education for boys and girls by their parents was good. c. Education should be reserved for nobles. d. Racial equality in schools was good. 12. Which German educator became known as the “father of Kindergarten”? a. Rousseau b. Pestalozzi c. Froebel d. Locke 13. The _________ emphasized ____________________________. a. Industrial Revolution; human dignity b. The Age of Darkness; Reformation c. The Age of Reason; The Age of Darkness d. The Age of Reason; human dignity 14. Which period is associated with child exploitation? a. Industrial Revolution b. Age of Reason c. Period of Enlightenment d. Colonial time in North America 15. During which period did approximately one-third of all marriages last only 10 years? a. Industrial Revolution b. Age of Reason c. Period of Enlightenment d. Colonial time in North America Essay Questions Give complete responses to each statement.

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16. Why have attitudes towards children altered through time? 17. How and why did the Industrial Revolution change how children were treated? 18. How did the Great Depression and World War II affect the function of the family in the United States? 19. What are the unique challenges contemporary families face in comparison with the earlier times? Explain why those challenges are unique. 20. What is the difference between a functional and a dysfunctional family?

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Instructor’s Resource Manual for

Home and School Relations: Teachers and Parents Working Together Fourth Edition Glenn Olsen University of North Dakota

Mary Lou Fuller University of North Dakota, Emeritus Prepared by:

     Yuliya Kartoshkina University of North Dakota

Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo

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Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-home-and-school-relations-4th-edition-olsen

______________________________________________________________________________ Copyright © 2012, 2008, 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This publication is protected by Copyright and permission should be obtained from the publisher prior to any prohibited reproduction, storage in a retrieval system, or transmission in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or likewise. For information regarding permission(s), write to: Rights and Permissions Department. Pearson® is a registered trademark of Pearson plc Instructors of classes using Olsen and Fuller’s Home and School Relations: Teachers and Parents Working Together, 4e, may reproduce material from the instructor’s manual for classroom use.

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

ISBN-10: 0132373408 ISBN-13: 9780132373401 www.pearsonhighered.com

Introduction

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Dear Colleagues, This Online Instructor’s Resource Manual is designed to provide you with a set of supplementary teaching aids to enrich and enhance your use of the textbook Home and School Relations: Teachers and Parents Working Together, 4th edition. Each chapter includes the following materials: a summary, learning objectives, important concepts, ideas on how to review material from the previous chapter, ideas on how to introduce a new chapter, and ideas for homework assignments. By incorporating some of the manual’s instructional features and teaching suggestions in the classroom, you may deepen students’ knowledge and understanding of how to:           

Establish and maintain positive collaborative relationships with families Acknowledge that parents are the child’s first teachers Affirm and respect parents’ choices and goals for their child Learn how to communicate effectively with parents about the school’s goals and their child’s progress Involve families in assessing and planning for individual children, including children with disabilities, developmental delays or special needs Involve parents in making decisions related to their child’s development and understand how to involve children’s families in educational experiences Accept differences in families and in their social and cultural backgrounds Apply family systems theories and knowledge of dynamics of roles and relationships within families and communities Provide families with information regarding a range of family-oriented services designed to help families’ identified needs Communicate effectively with other professionals and agencies that support children’s development, learning and well-being Conduct effective parent teacher conferences and communicate well with parents

We are very thankful to Michael Gallo and Laurie Guy, instructors of the Home-School Relations course at the University of North Dakota, as well as authors of the textbook chapters for contributing the materials for this manual. We hope you find the manual helpful and inspiring. Yuliya Kartoshkina University of North Dakota Glenn Olsen University of North Dakota

Table of Contents iii


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/test-bank-home-and-school-relations-4th-edition-olsen

Chapter 1: An Introduction to Families

1

Chapter 2: Families and Their Functions—Past and Present

3

Chapter 3: Family Diversity

5

Chapter 4: Parents’ Perspectives on Parenting

8

Chapter 5: Teachers and Parenting: Multiple Views

10

Chapter 6: Parent-Teacher Communication: Who’s Talking?

12

Chapter 7: Family Involvement in Education

15

Chapter 8: Families and Their Children with Disabilities

17

Chapter 9: Family Involvement Models

19

Chapter 10: Education Law and Parental Rights

22

Chapter 11: Family Violence: The Effect on Teachers, Parents, and Children

25

Chapter 12: Poverty: The Enemy of Children and Families

28

Chapter 13: Fathering, Schools, and Schooling: What Fathers Contribute and Why It Is Important

31

Chapter 14: The Implications of Home–School Partnerships for School Violence and Bullying 33 Chapter 15: Finding a Voice for Children for Children and Families: Public Policy, Social 36 Services and Advocacy in Action

iv


Chapter 1 An Introduction to Families Summary: Chapter 1 provides background information on families, their purposes, needs, behaviors, diverse backgrounds and changes over time. Learning objectives:  Review historical perspectives on family and home-school relations  Understand the purpose, responsibilities and behaviors of families  Identify teacher’s role in interacting with families At the end of this chapter, students will master the following concepts: - Family (past and present perspectives) - Family responsibilities - Home-school relations (past and present perspectives) - Parent involvement Ideas for Introducing Chapter 1 1) Introduction activity: Think, pair, share Ask students to think about who they are and find a partner to exchange their perspectives on this topic. Later, ask how many of them have references to family in their answers. 2) Introductory activity: School memories Ask students to reflect on their school memories by asking them the following: Looking back at elementary school, what things have changed about education by the time you were a junior or senior in high school? Why? What positive and negative things happened in your K-12 education experience? 3) Peer discussion: (Text, p.1) Ask students to work with a peer and ask each other the following questions: - What is the purpose and behavior of families? - What are vital roles of families? - What is the teacher’s role? - What were home-school relations of the past? - How are families changing? Whole class discussion: - Why should we consider these objectives on page 1 in your textbook? - What new objectives could you add to this list? 4) Group discussion: What is family? Ask students to do the following: - Share your thoughts on the complexities of today’s families. - Brainstorm “famous” or “TV” families and list their characteristics. - Compare or contrast your perspective to the “famous” or “TV” families.


5) Discussion: Looking at families and their responsibilities Ask students to discuss the following questions: - What are the most important things that families do for children? - What important lessons did you learn from your family? - How have home-school relations been changing through time? - What factors influence families? Why? (p. 6) 6) Case Study Application of Concepts (p. 10) Ask students to read a case study on p. 6 and discuss the questions: 1. How does Jordan’s life differ from that of his father when he was a child? 2. What are the strengths in Jordan’s family structure? 3. What are some potentially problematic areas? Ideas for Homework Assignments 1) Website exploration Go to Family Facts organization website (www.familyfacts.org). It provides data on family and analysis of its role in maintaining civil society in the United States. Choose one study, read about it, and bring your thoughts about the study to talk about in class. 2) Reading a children’s book Choose one of the books mentioned on p. 12, read it, and write several paragraphs on how this book is connected to the issues discussed in Chapter 1. Bring the book to the following class to read excerpts from the book to illustrate your points. 3) Interview Interview a parent, sibling or extended family member. Write a 2-3 page paper and include the following: - The history of your family - The structures and needs of your contemporary family compared to your family’s history - Thoughts of your parents and grandparents about school Bring artifacts or mementos that would best describe the unique attributes of your family to share with class.


Chapter 2 Families and Their Functions- Past and Present Summary: Chapter 2 provides the background information on the historical development of the family and reviews problems and challenges contemporary families are facing. Learning objectives:  Trace the history of the family  Identify the structures and needs of the contemporary family  Compare historical and contemporary families  Describe functional and dysfunctional families At the end of this chapter, students will master the following important concepts: - Functional family - Dysfunctional family - Divorce - Stigmatization - Single-parent families - Blended families Ideas for Review Chapter 1 1) Questions for review - What have perspectives on family and relations between home and school been changing over time? - What are the purpose, responsibilities and behaviors of families? - What is a teacher’s role in interacting with families? 2) Discussion of homework assignment (Interview) Divide students in small groups students and ask them to discuss the following: - Compare your families, their structures, and needs - Share your artifacts, if available - Compare how your parents and grandparents thought about school - Identify elements of functional and dysfunctional families based on your interview Whole Class discussion: - What were major differences and similiaries when you compared your families? - Why do you think those differences exist? - Why do you think those similarities exist? 3) Discussion of homework assignment (Website exploration) Divide students in small groups and ask them to discuss their studies from the website and what they learned about them. They can share their major learning outcomes with the class. 4) Discussion of homework assignment (A children’s book) Divide students in small groups and ask them to discuss how the book they chose connect to the material covered in Chapter 1. They can read some excerpts from the book to


illustrate their points. Ideas for Introducing Chapter 2 5) Questions for Discussion: Historical timeline - Why is it necessary to review a historical perspective on families? - Why would we think about families from other eras the way we think about families from different cultures? - What can we learn from families in the past? 6) Visual Mindmapping: Families from different historical periods (pp. 14-22) Have students work in small groups. Give each group a historical period from the textbook. Students will create a visual mind map of the given historical period and hightlight following: - Identify the challenges and the benefits for families living during that time - Compare their challenges and the benefits with contemporary families At the end of the assignment, students will draw their mind maps on the board and present them to the class. To learn more about mindmaps, go to http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newISS_01.htm 7) -

Discusion questions: Contemporary U.S. families (pp. 22-31) What familial structures of contemporary U.S. families can you name? Why are single-parent families so common in the contemporary U.S.? How can you as a teacher avoid stigmatization of children whose parents got divorced? What are the most common myths about blended families? Why do those myths exist?

8) Brainstorming exercise In small group students will brainstorm what dysfunctional families need to do to become functional. The whole class discussion will follow to compare the ideas. Ideas for Homework Assignments 1) Research Paper: Going Back in Time Choose a historical time period from the textbook and write a short research paper on what it would be like living at that time and having a family. Address the following: - What challenges might you face as parents and why? - How could you possibly overcome those challenges? 2) Collage: Functional and dysfunctional families Examine popular magazines. Cut out pictures and words (nouns and adjectives) that would represent functional and dysfunctional families. Create two collages to represent two types of those families.

Test bank home and school relations 4th edition olsen  

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