Issuu on Google+

Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

Chapter 2

End­of­Chapter Questions: Suggested Approaches 1. Identify and discuss some of the widely used techniques to gain and hold consumer attention. Conduct an experiment to test your ideas. There are a variety of techniques to gaining attention, including the use of  colour. Generally, colour rather than black and white gains more attention and indeed different colours have different attention values. The warm colours  (orange and red) advance toward us in our perception having the effect of  making whatever it is appear larger, whereas the cooler colours (blue) recede  in our perception making the message appear smaller. On this basis red is  often cited as having the highest attention value. Movement is another technique. Film, in television or cinema advertising, are  often considered as being able to gain greater attention than static press  messages. However, it is possible to simulate movement in a still picture and  this is often done effectively with blurred backgrounds suggesting a moving  foreground, for instance, the speeding sports car. In a classic case in USA a whisky company supplied display racks to a  department store. Whenever a customer physically got close to the rack, a  mechanism in the rack released a bottle so it fell, only a short way, to be held  again by the rack. This was wonderfully successful at gaining attention, nearly all the customers lunged forward to try to catch the falling bottle. However,  although this achieved the aims of the attention stage, it had negative effects  on subsequent stages, being thought of as a rather 'sneaky' trick. There is an  important message here. Whatever happens in one stage can affect other  stages. In this case the attitudes formed were somewhat negative, even  though the attention was supremely achieved. The position of the message is also important in gaining attention. The back  outside cover of a magazine, for example, means that the message can be  noticed even without opening the magazine at all. Some believe that the right­ hand page attracts more attention than the left because as we leaf through  the pages from the beginning, it is the right page that is uncovered first.  Those, however, who start with the sports page on the rear of a newspaper  may well disagree and argue that the left hand page is the one that is usually  noticed first! If a double­page spread is employed then there are no  competing messages and so attention could be more likely because of this. The size of the message has also been the focus of marketing discussion.  This is not, however, a straightforward matter. Doubling the size of a message is unlikely to double attention. A suggestion is that attention increases as the  square root of the message size. 


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

Another approach to gaining attention uses what might be described as  known conditioned responses. We attend, almost automatically, to the sound  of a telephone ringing and this approach is used to good effect in radio  advertising. Other examples include the introduction to a radio advertisement  with a statement such as 'Here is a news flash'. The Avon advertisement  using a ringing door bell and 'Avon calling' slogan, is another well­known  example. If a message is in some way different then because of this contrast it can  stand out and attract more attention. Novelty messages such as upside down  ones in print media or something that is unusual fit into this category. The use  of technology is another example. The use of computer displays in shop  windows was once considered new and different and attracted attention for  these reasons. The problem of course is that novelty only lasts a short time so the employment of this approach must be especially dynamic in order to  maintain the novelty element.  One poster advertisement for Levi jeans actually had a pair of 501s glued to  the poster itself. The result was that many people clearly noticed the message because many of them tried to get the jeans, but of course they were  positioned too high on the poster for this to be an easy matter. Another  version of this also involved a poster. A Ford car was glued to the poster,  which was advertising Araldite, not Ford! A later version of this series actually  saw two cars glued to each other on the poster. It is not only important to attract the attention of consumers, but also to hold  the attention and get the message across. Attention getting devices are many, but if this attention is attracted by methods that do not fit with the message or  the situation, the attention is readily lost. Even irritation might result from  these artificial attention getting devices, as in the whisky bottle example. The  ad with the word SEX may attract attention, but if the message has nothing to  do with sex, irritation and a negative connotation may result. Attention may be hold through 'participation'. These messages might be  ambiguous or incomplete and for this reason the audience (sometimes  through a 'double take') will attend to the message more than would otherwise be the case, in order to 'complete' the message and to make sense of it. This  is explored further in 4c. Students could set up experiments among their peers or ‘real’ respondents to  assess the extent to which messages are noticed and attended to: using  different colours, or typefaces, ambiguity and novelty and so on. They might  use student notice­boards in different buildings or faculties so that  experimental and control groups might be operationalised. 


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

2. What is perception? Discuss the role of our five senses in perception. Use some common examples to illustrate.  Here, students can use examples of how they themselves use sight, sound, touch, smell and taste in their own buying behaviour. This will clearly apply more   to   products  than   services   and   the   degree   of   importance   attached   to each sense can be explored.  An issue that might be worth discussion is on­line buying behaviour, where sight and sound are generally the only senses available. Does the absence of other sensory inputs restrict the internet in its ability to offer what consumers want in their search for the right product ? Could virtual shopping assistants help overcome any of the obstacles here? 3.   Services   are   characterised   by   many   features   such   as   their intangibility.     Using   examples   of   your   own,   discuss   the   impact   of intangibility on services advertising.  How can marketers resolve those problems?  Exhibit   2.24   in   the   text   provides   a   good   framework   for   this   question.   But students must come up with their own application of theory via examples from their own experience, reading or imagination. Exhibit 2.24: Creative approaches to improve consumers’ perceptions of services Creative Message Treatment Show   the   physical   components   of   a service delivery process.  Focus on the tangibles

Examples The   AA   van   rescuing   a   stranded customer Show   physical   facilities,   equipment, appearance of personnel Use vivid information Any   information   that   creates   very strong mental image of service Use specific and concrete language ‘strong research capability’ , ‘sound analysis’, ‘experts in delivery’ Use   relevant   tangible   objects   to ‘Under the Traveller’s Umbrella’ improve comprehension ‘The Nationwide blanket of protection’ Use interactive imagery Direct   Line’s   use   of   moving telephone,   Lombard   Direct’s   use   of talking telephone Present objectively document data on The   punctuality   record   of   a   train past performance company Show a typical service delivery event An employee going out of the way to help a customer Show   testimonials   from   customers A letter from a satisfied customer


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

about some aspect of service Show a typical customer experiencing A customer getting a good deal for his the service home   insurance;  ‘Quote   me   happy’ campaign by Norwich Union Direct Encourage people to speak positively BT’s   use   of  ‘It’s   Good   to   Talk’ about   the   service   and   use   personal campaign endorsement Educate   customers   for   service Easyjet’s   website   providing process information  to  customers about what they   need   to   do   during   the   service delivery.  Communicate back stage operations, A   service   company   showing   their rules   and   policies   to   improve backstage operations in a TV ad.  confidence Use dramaturgy AA’s dramatic use of service delivery process

4.   Select   some   press   advertisements   or   packages   that   are   good illustrations of the use of any of the following:  a) Perception of colour b) Use of visual illusions c) Ambiguity and participation This exercise tests students’ ability to use and apply course material to  specific examples. Again advertisements provide the context and each selected concept should  be applied. Different colours can transmit different meanings and emotions. Most colours  have both positive and negative meanings and of course different colours are  more or less fashionable at different points in time. Furthermore, different  colours can mean different things in different countries, thus making any  generalisations almost impossible to make.  However, in western cultures, red is often seen as being a fiery, passionate  colour; white as being pure and virginal; black as being mysterious, perhaps  wicked but sometimes smart. Yellow might be seen as being cheerful but also sometimes as being to do with deceit and cowardice. In other cultures  mistakes can easily, but foolishly, be made.  Packaging garden products in green might not be controversial but in  Malaysian markets this can mean jungle and disease. The funeral colour of 


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

black, in the UK has no major taboo attached to it, but the funeral colour of  other countries is not always black and sometimes should not be used outside the funeral context. If your class includes international students it would be fun and informative to  elicit their reactions to the use of different colours for products, packaging and promotion. b) Students can draw from perception theory to demonstrate how pack and  product design can influence how consumers interpret marketing activity. For  example, in fashion the patterns, designs and how garments are cut can  affect the visual interpretation of them, especially on different body shapes.  This should be a lively exercise and at the same time bring out the power of  visual illusions. Other examples can, of course, be in terms of pack design,  using the law of continuity to extend the ‘line’ of the pack more in one direction than another (in the mind of the consumer). This links with other perception issues: Visual illusions and the use of figure­ ground relationships and colour, in the graphics within advertising messages,  for example. c) Some classic Benson and Hedges advertisements depicted something  ambiguous, a packet of B&H in a parrot cage with the shadow of the parrot  being projected onto the wall behind the cage. Or, the depiction of one of the  stones at Stonehenge as a packet of cigarettes. These provide a sort of  game. Hunt the pack, where will it be this time? A pyramid in the dessert? In  any case, there is some participation in the approach on the part of the  receiver of the message that is needed and this means more effective  attention getting.  Ambiguity and participation introduces Gestalt psychology. Here,  students  will probably have little difficulty in finding examples of incomplete messages  because this is very much in vogue and indeed a favourite approach in youth  markets. One reason is because Generation X appears to require a more  involving and less ‘hard hitting’ advertising approach. The application of  Gestalt psychology provides incomplete messages which require a degree of  participation to complete them. Also, the approach has been said to be more  appropriate for more individualistic segments because of the greater variety of interpretation that can be put on the message and because the rather more  ‘off the wall’/surreal approach, this is, by definition, less ‘mainstream’ and can  be seen to appeal more to those who don’t want to feel part of the  mainstream. Students will, no doubt, bring examples from the style press where many such advertisements will be found. Many beer advertisements are probably to be  expected !


Full file at http://testbank360.eu/solution-manual-consumer-behaviour-2006-1st-edition-evans

5. Provide examples of the JND principle from price, pack and product changes. Conduct an experiment to measure the JND for a change in the price of a brand of beer. Students can bring examples of small changes in the price of a product or service have been made over time such that the overall change from 1 st to last change is significant but not necessarily noticed. The same could be applied to pack designs, logos and even product features. Cars might provide good examples of the latter, where radiator grill and minor interior or engine changes appear small from one model change to another, but over the years can amount to more major changes. The presentation of each incremental change to respondents can form the basis of an experiment. A time lag would be needed between exposures but respondents   might   not   be   able   to   spot   the   differences   each   time   of presentation. Where if another group of respondents were shown the first and last change only, the size of the overall movement might be clearly noticed.


Solution manual consumer behaviour 2006 1st edition evans