Issuu on Google+

Eco­Premium or Eco­Penalty?  Eco­labels, quality and knowledge in the organic  wine market      (working paper March 2011)    Magali Delmas (UCLA)  Neil Lessem (UCLA)    Abstract  Eco‐labels are intended to signal to consumers the environmental attributes of a product and  thereby  elicit  increased  demand  for  products  perceived  as  environmentally  favorable.  This  eco‐product  price  premium  is  essential  to  defray  the  higher  cost  of  improved  environmental  management  practices.  However  a  profusion  of  eco‐labels  can  confuse  consumers  over  their  meaning,  eroding  or  destroying  the  eco‐label  premium.  In  our  study  we  examine  two  similar  eco‐labels, one associated with a potential quality reduction and the other not. We show that  quality  concerns  over  one  eco‐label  are  transferred  onto  another  by  consumers  who  are  unaware of the difference between the two labels. This results in an eco‐label penalty for high  price, high quality products of both types. This eco‐label penalty is absent amongst consumers  who understand the difference between the two label types. In the context of the wine industry  we  show  that  even  though  environmentally  minded  consumers  have  a  preference  for  eco‐labeled wine, they associate it with low quality and will not buy higher priced eco‐labeled  wine.  This  goes  for  both  organic  wine  which  can  be  of  a  lower  quality  and  wine  made  from  organic grapes which is not. This incorrect eco‐penalty on wine made from organic grapes does  not hold for the minority of consumers who are aware of the difference.        Keywords: organic wine, eco‐label, eco‐premium, Discrete choice analysis; Wine choice  behavior

 

 


1. Introduction    Eco‐labels  are  parts  of  a  new  wave  of  environmental  policies  that  emphasize  information  provision  to  elicit  more  cost‐effective  private  market  and  legal  forces  (Delmas,  Montes,  &  Shimshack,  2009).  Eco‐labels  signal  to  consumers  the  environmental  attributes  of  a  product.  The goal of eco‐labels is to provide easily interpretable information and thereby elicit increased  demand  for  products  perceived  as  environmentally  favorable.  Examples  of  eco‐labels  include  the organic label for agricultural products, the Energy Star label for energy appliances, and the  Forest Sustainable Stewardship label for lumber. The value of eco‐products on the market and  the number of new eco‐label programs are growing rapidly. For example, retail sales of organic  foods  increased  from  US$3.8  billion  in  1997  to  US$26.6  billion  in  2010  (Organic  Trade  Association, 2010). The number of eco‐label programs has grown from a mere dozen worldwide  in the 1990s to more than 377 programs today (see www.ecolabelindex.com).    One  of  the  conditions  for  effective  eco‐labels  is  that  customers  be  willing  to  pay  a  price  premium that helps defray the higher cost of improved environmental management practices.  However,  circumstances  under  which  eco‐labels  can  command  price  premiums  are  not  fully  understood. Many previous studies use contingent values regarding the hypothetical purchase  of  eco‐labeled  products  rather  than  actual  or  simulated  purchases  (Leire  &  Thidell,  2005;  Loureiro & Lotade, 2005). Looking at the wine industry in particular, Delmas and Grant (2010)  conduct a hedonic analysis of wine price on wine characteristics (including quality) and find that  within their wine sample, eco‐labeled wines do not command a price premium. This raises an  interesting  puzzle  –  if  consumers  are  willing  to  pay  premiums  for  eco‐labeled  products,  why  does this not extend to the wine industry?    We propose a simple model of wine choice where environmentally minded consumers prefer  eco‐labeled wines, but also have perceptions over the quality of such wines. Consumers making  a choice over wine, make quality inferences based on the price of the wine, the appellation, the  brand name and the eco‐label. In the US there are two predominant eco‐labels for wine: “made  from  organic  grapes”  and  “organic”.1  Wine  made  from  organic  grapes  is  wine  made  from  grapes that have been grown without pesticides. Organic wine is also made with organic grapes  but  prohibits  sulfite  use  in  the  wine‐making  process.  This  distinction  is  important  because  sulfites  affect  the  quality  of  the  wine.  Sulfites  act  as  a  preservative.  Eliminating  sulfites  can  reduce the quality of the wine because the wine is not as stable and cannot be kept very long.  There is no such problem for wine made from organically grown grapes, which constitute the  vast  majority  of  eco‐certified  wines  because  sulfites  are  used  in  the  wine‐making  process.  Unfortunately, most consumers are unaware of this distinction (Delmas 2008), and perceive all  eco‐labeled  wines  to  be  of  lower  quality.  In  our  model  eco‐conscious  consumers  have  to  balance out their desire for organic products versus this quality tradeoff.      We then test this model using a discrete choice exercise, where almost 900 survey respondents                                                          1  There is also the privately administered “Biodynamic” eco‐label, administered by the Demeter Association. This  standard is less common and so we omit it from our analysis     


from  across  the  United  States  make  repeated  hypothetical  purchase  choices  over  different  groupings  of  wine  bottles.  To  simulate  a  real‐world  setting,  wine  bottles  are  represented  graphically and respondents have the option of choosing to purchase none of the wines shown.  Unlike  the  real  world  however,  we  are  able  to  randomly  vary  price,  region,  brand  name  and  organic  certification  in  a  manner  that  allows  us  to  identify  consumer  preferences  over  wine  attributes.  This  was  combined  with  a  survey  that  allows  us  to  control  for  attitudes,  demographics  and  behavior.  We  evaluate  this  using  a  mixed  logit  model  that  allows  us  to  combine  both  product  and  individual  attributes  into  the  choice  decision.  We  find  that  consumers prefer eco‐labeled wines at low prices and non‐eco‐labeled wines at higher prices.  This is consistent with a model where eco‐labels are valued, but obscure the quality‐signal given  by wine price.      This eco‐label versus quality tradeoff should only be applicable to organic wines, not wine made  with  organic  grapes.  However,  most  consumers  are  unaware  of  the  difference  between  the  two. When we split the sample into those who are informed of the difference and those who  are  not,  we  obtain  telling  results.  Uninformed  consumers  treat  organic  wine  and  wine  made  with  organic  grapes  identically,  whereas  informed  consumers  (who  are  a  minority  group)  act  very differently – treating wine made with organic grapes the same as non‐organic wine.      These results shed light on the wine eco‐premium puzzle: environmentally friendly consumers  are  willing  to  pay  a  premium  for  eco‐labeled  wine.  But  they  also  are  aware  of  the  eco‐label  quality tradeoff. This has important policy implications in terms of how eco‐labels are utilized.  Firstly,  makers  of  organic  wines  need  to  find  additional  credible  methods  of  communicating  quality  on  their  wine  labels.  Secondly  and  more  importantly  misinformation  threatens  to  destroy the potential market for high quality wine made with organically grown grapes, since  for  the  most  part  consumers  are  unwilling  to  buy  expensive  wines  of  this  type.  Reacting  retroactively to this problem, the only solution is public education to inform consumers of the  difference in eco‐label types. Looking at a more general pro‐active prescription for eco‐labels,  policy  makers  need  to  make  sure  that  eco‐labels  are  clear  and  informative.  To  do  this,  policy  makers  should  minimize  eco‐label  categories,  to  avoid  confusion  across  types.  Finally,  they  need to ensure that the eco‐label is associated with a price‐premium that outweighs any quality  concerns to ensure that the eco‐standard is financially sustainable amongst producers.              The remainder of the paper proceeds as follows. In the Eco‐Premium versus Eco‐Penalty section  we discuss eco‐labeling and how it pertains to the wine industry followed by an examination of  why  such  labels  can  generate  price  premiums  or  penalties  amongst  consumers.  In  the  Model  section  we  present  a  model  of  wine  choice,  where  consumers  choose  amongst  unknown  brands.  In  the  Survey  section  we  discuss  the  online  survey  and  discrete  choice  exercise  and  some  of  the  descriptive  statistics  thereof.  In  the  Econometric  section  we  present  the  mixed  logit model that we use to evaluate the model. In the Results section we present our empirical  estimation results. We conclude the paper with a Discussion and Conclusion Section.       


2. Eco­Premium versus Eco­Penalty  2.1.

Eco­labeling in the wine industry 

  Green products are credence goods; consumers cannot ascertain their environmental qualities  during  purchase  or  use.  Customers  are  not  present  during  the  production  process  of  the  product and therefore cannot observe environmental friendliness of production. The objective  of eco‐labels is to reduce information asymmetry between the producer of green products and  consumers  by  providing  credible  information  related  to  the  environmental  attributes  of  the  product and to signal that the product is superior in this regard to a non‐labeled product (Crespi  & Marette, 2005). The implicit goal of eco‐labels is to prompt informed purchasing choices by  environmentally  responsible  consumers  (Leire  &  Thidell,  2005,  p.  1062).  Although  the  goal  of  eco‐labels  is  to  reduce  information  asymmetry  between  the  producer  and  the  consumer  regarding  the  environmental  attributes  of  a  product,  the  lack  of  credibility  or  the  lack  of  understanding of some eco‐labels might lead to consumer confusion or even negative reactions  toward  eco‐labels  (Delmas,  2008;  Hamilton  &  Zimmerman,  2006;  Ibanez  &  Grolleau,  2008;  Mason, 2006).  As  Weil  et  al.  (2006)  have  shown  in  the  context  of  information  policies,  whether  and  how  information is used depends on its incorporation into complex chains of comprehension, action,  and  response.  For  example,  the  presence  of  competing  eco‐labels  might  lead  to  consumer  confusion  (Leire  &  Thidell,  2005).  In  addition,  because  it  is  often  difficult  to  identify  with  accuracy  the  true  attributes  of  product  environmental  impacts,  the  credibility  of  the  eco‐labeling  process  is  important  to  facilitate  consumer  choices  of  green  products  (Mason,  2006). In some cases, eco‐labels are issued by independent organizations that have developed  transparent  environmental  criteria  and  are  third‐party  verified.  In  other  cases,  eco‐labels  just  represent claims made by manufacturers related to some environmental friendliness (Cason &  Gangadharan,  2002;  Ibanez  &  Grolleau,  2008;  Kirchhoff,  2000)2.  The  presence  of  the  second  type of eco‐label may produce some confusion in the mind of consumers over the credibility of  eco‐labels.  These  unsubstantiated  claims  can  result  in  adverse  selection  if  some  producers  provide false or misleading labeling about environmental attributes and underlying production  practices, causing consumers to choose products that do not in fact have the attributes implied  by  the  label  (Grodsky,  1993;  Hamilton  &  Zimmerman,  2006;  Ibanez  &  Grolleau,  2008).  For  example,  in  April  2007,  the  U.S.  Organic  Consumers  Association  launched  a  boycott  of  two  leading U.S.‐based organic brands Aurora and Horizon for mislabeling products “USDA Organic”  when  milk  was  coming  from  factory  farms. 3   As  a  result,  eco‐labels  with  confusing  or  non‐credible  messages  might  affect  negatively  the  reputation  of  companies  that  carry  them.  Such eco‐labels can also indirectly damage the reputation of companies adopting other more  credible  but  related  labels.  As  we  will  describe  with  the  case  of  wine  eco‐labels,  a  lack  of                                                          2  Ibanez and Grolleau (2008) suggest three dimensions that distinguish eco‐labels: (a) the way the standard underlying  the eco‐label is defined, (b) the way the claim is verified, and (c) the way it is signaled to consumers. Kirchhoff (2000)  distinguishes endogenous labeling issued by the company itself from exogenous or third‐party labeling provided by an  independent labeling authority.  3  (http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/Boycotts/currentUK boycotts.aspx). 


understanding  of  the  production  process  of  eco‐labeled  wines  could  lead  to  confusion  about  the quality of the product and might deter some consumers from purchasing eco‐labeled wines.    In the wine industry, there are several competing eco‐labels related to organic certification and  to  biodynamic  certification  that  are  still  not  well  recognized  and  understood  by  consumers.  Organic  certification  follows  the  U.S.  National  Organic  farming  standard,  which  defines  a  farming  method  prohibiting  the  use  of  additives  or  alterations  to  the  natural  seed,  plant,  or  animal including, but not limited to, pesticides, chemicals, or genetic modification.4  In addition,  labeling standards were created based on the percentage of organic ingredients in the product:      • Organic labeled products must consist of at least 95% organically produced ingredients  and may display the USDA Organic seal.  • Made  with  organic  ingredients  labeled  products  are  those  that  contain  at  least  70%  organic ingredients.5    Looking  specifically  at  wine,  the  USDA  has  two  eco‐label  standards:  “wine  made  from  organically grown grapes” and “organic wine.” Wine made from  organic grapes is  wine made  from grapes that have been grown without pesticides. Organic wine is also made with organic  grapes  but  prohibits  sulfite  use  in  the  wine‐making  process.6  This  distinction  is  important  because sulfites affect the quality of the wine. Sulfites act as a preservative. Eliminating sulfites  can reduce the quality of the wine because the wine is not as stable and cannot be kept very  long. There is no such problem for wine made from organically grown grapes, which constitute  the vast majority of eco‐certified wines because sulfites are used in the wine‐making process.      In addition to the two USDA eco‐label categories, a third privately administered category also  exists – biodynamic. Biodynamic agriculture is a method made popular by Austrian scientist and  philosopher  Rudolf  Steiner  in  the  early  1920s.  Often  compared  to  organic  agriculture,  biodynamic farming is different in a few distinct ways. Biodynamic farming prohibits synthetic  pesticides  and  fertilizers  in  the  same  manner  as  certified  organic  farming.  However,  whereas  organic  farming  methods  focus  on  eliminating  pesticides,  growth  hormones,  and  other  additives  for  the  benefit  of  human  health,  biodynamic  farming  emphasizes  creating  a                                                          4  The U.S. National Organic Standards law was passed in 2001. Regulations require organic products and operations to 

be certified by a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)–accredited entity to assure consumers that products marketed as  organic meet consistent, uniform minimum standards. 

5  The principal display panel can list up to three organic ingredients or food groups; however, the USDA seal cannot be 

used anywhere on the package. 

6

  As  wine  harvesting  and  production  requires  specific  handling  and  processing  methods,  the  USDA  developed  explicit  regulations  regarding  sulfite  use  for  organic  wine  and  other  alcoholic  beverages.  Sulfites  are  a  natural  byproduct  of  fermentation and are often added to wine for preservation purposes. Added sulfites are prohibited in 100% organic wines  and  in  organic  wines  (95%  organic)  and  are  regulated  by  7  CFR  205.605  in  wines  made  with  organic  ingredients.  According to the USDA’s National Organic Program, an organic wine has been defined as “a wine made from organically  grown grapes and without any added sulfites.”   


self‐sufficient and healthy ecosystem. In 1928, the Demeter Association was founded in Europe  to  support  and  promote  biodynamic  agriculture.  The  United  States  Demeter  Association  certified  its  first  biodynamic  farm  in  1982. 7   In  addition  to  the  vineyard  agricultural  requirements, Demeter provides a separate set of wine‐making standards for biodynamic wine.  Since  very  few  California  wines  are  biodynamically  certified,  we  omit  this  category  from  our  analysis.   

2.2.

Wine eco­premium drivers 

  Green products have been defined as “impure public good” because they yield both public and  private  benefits  (Cornes  &  Sandler,  1996;  Ferraro,  Uchida,  &  Conrad,  2005;  Kotchen,  2006).  They consist of a private good, such as the pleasure of drinking wine, jointly produced with a  public good, like biodiversity protection due to organic farming.    On  the  private  good  side,  consumers  may  buy  eco‐labeled  wine  for  the  perceived  health  benefits.  Organically  grown  grapes  are  free  from  pesticides  and  other  potentially  harmful  chemicals. Organically produced wines have no added sulfites.8  Organic wines have no added  sulfites. Sulfites in wine have long been associated with various health problems such as asthma  (Valley  &  Thompson  2001)  and  nasal  blockages  (Anderson  et  al  2009).    Emerging  research  indicates that consumers are more likely to purchase green products if the certified practices  provide  them  additional  private  benefits.  For  example,  Magnusson,  Arvola,  Koivisto  Hursti,  Aberg, and Sjoden (2001) found that the most important purchase criteria for organic products  were related to quality rather than the environmental attribute. These include criteria such as  “taste better” and “longer shelf‐life.” Miles and Frewer (2001) reported that organic foods were  viewed  as  healthier  than  conventional  products.  Several  other  studies  showed  that  health  concerns were a major reason, along with environmental concerns, why people choose organic  food  products  (Davies,  Titterington,  &  Cochrane,  1995;  Tregear,  Dent,  &  McGregor,  1994;  Wandel, 1994; Wandel & Bugge, 1997).      On  the  public  good  side,  we  might  envisage  that  organic  certification  may  appeal  to  the  altruistic  values  of  environmentally  aware  consumers  who  would  like  to  promote  sustainable  agriculture. Altruistic customers may want to purchase eco‐wine as a substitute for donations  to an environmental organization (Kotchen, 2005). The traditional account given for pro‐social  actions (as opposed to pro‐self) is “warm glow” altruism, whereby people get a pleasant feeling  or “warm glow” from altruistic activity (Andreoni 1990). Warm glow altruism has been shown  to be a significant motivator of eco‐consumption amongst environmentally minded consumers  (Clarke et al, 2003; Kotchen & Moore, 2007; Kahn & Vaughn, 2009). If the pro‐social behavior  takes  place  in  the  public  realm,  people  may  also  engage  in  altruistic  order  to  gain  a  positive                                                          7  To achieve Demeter certification, a vineyard must adhere to requirements concerning agronomic guidelines, 

greenhouse management, structural components, livestock guidelines, and postharvest handling and processing  procedures. See Demeter USA Web site: www.demeter‐usa.org (2006).  8  All wine contains some sulfites as part of the natural fermentation process 

 


reputation  as  a  pro‐socially  minded  individual.  In  the  realm  of  green  products,  “conspicuous  conservation”, has been shown to be a significant motivator of conspicuously environmentally  friendly products (Griskevicus et al, 2010; Lessem & Vaughn, 2011).        In conclusion, consumers may be willing to pay a premium for eco‐labels if they perceive there  to be private health benefits, if they are environmentally minded, or if they can conspicuously  consume the good in the public realm.       

2.3.

Wine quality and eco­penalty 

  Organic wine may deliver private benefits in terms of health, but for the most part it will offer  less  private  benefits  in  terms  of  diminished  quality.  This  is  because  organic  wine  prohibits  sulfite use in the wine‐making process. Eliminating sulfites can reduce the quality of the wine  because the wine is not as stable and cannot be kept very long. There is no such problem for  wine  made  from  organically  grown  grapes.  However,  consumers  may  not  recognize  the  difference  between  the  two  eco‐labels.  In  our  survey  of  940  respondents,  we  find  that  even  though  82%  of  respondents  were  familiar  with  “organic  wine”  and  54%  had  knowledge  that  they had tasted organic wine, only 33% were familiar with the difference between organic wine  and organically grown grapes. Similar results were obtained in a survey of consumer attitudes  towards  organic  and  biodynamic  wines  conducted  at  the  University  of  California  (UC),  Santa  Barbara in 2006 (Delmas 2008). Because the distinction between organic wine and wine made  from organic grapes is not readily known, people might associate both with lower quality.    In addition, consumers may associate both of the USDA eco‐labels with biodynamic wine. In the  same survey mentioned above, Delmas (2008) found that few respondents actually understood  what the term biodynamic meant, and most (77%) had an initial negative reaction to the term9.  This negative association in the minds of consumers could be carried over to wine eco‐labels in  general.      Finally  because  some  of  the  early  generations  of  eco‐labeled  products  were  associated  with  lower  quality  products,  some  consumers  might  still  associate  eco‐labels  with  lower  quality  products  and  be  reluctant  to  purchase  them  (Galarraga  Gallastegui,  2002;  Peattie  &  Crane,  2005).   

                                                        9  Before being presented with any information about biodynamic farming practices, individuals were asked what word  came to mind about “wine from biodynamically grown grapes.” Among the respondents who had never heard of wine  from biodynamically grown grapes, the single most common response was related to genetic engineering or genetic  modification of the grapes (Delmas, 2008). 


3. A Model of Wine Choice      Imagine a consumer going to a store and having to choose from a number of bottles of wine  they have never seen    or tried before. They do not recognise any of the brands, nor have they  read  reviews  on  any  of  the  bottles.  For  many  wine  consumers  this  is  the  exact  scenario  they  face  every  time  they  buy  a  bottle  of  wine  (Chaney,  2000)10.  These  consumers  will  make  a  decision  based  on  a  combination  of  price  and  the  bottle’s  label,  which  will  have  both  information about the wine and an aesthetic appeal. The utility that such a consumer expects  to obtain from a bottle of wine will depend on the wine’s quality and its price. If the consumer  is “green” they will get added utility if the wine is organic.    Thus the utility for consumer i of bottle j is:    U ij = γ i ∗ O j + q j − α i p j   where: O j   is a dummy for organic

p j   is the price of the bottle.

α i   is a measure of price sensitivity γ i   is  an  indicator  for  green  consumer.  If  the  consumer  is  green  then  γ i > 0 ,  otherwise  γ i = 0. q j is the quality of the wine     

3.1.

Additive Model   

  To make a decision the consumer will need to make an inference about the quality of the wine  from  its  label.  To  simplify  our  analysis,  we  abstract  away  from  wine  descriptions  and  differentiated label aesthetics, and focus purely on price, eco‐label and region. Region refers to  the  region  where  the  wine  was  produced,  otherwise  known  as  the  appelation.  Numerous  studies find region to be a significant indicator of quality and price (Bombrun & Sumner, 2001;  Ling & Lockshin, 2003).            Thus expected wine quality qj will be:    q j = q − βO j + f ( p j ) + λ j r j                                                           10  Chaney found that consumers undertook very little external search prior to entering a store to purchase wine, with  point of sale materials and wine labels ranking as the two most important information sources 


where:  β   enters in negatively, since organic wine is perceived as being of lower quality p j   is  a  signal  of  quality,  but  this  signal  diminishes  with  price,  so  that  f ' ( p j ) > 0   and  f '' ( p j ) < 0.    

r j is a regional dummy    λ j   is premium or discount      Price has been shown to be a reliable indicator of quality (Bombrun & Sumner, 2001; Delmas &  Grant 2010).11  We are interested in the case, where at low enough prices, the increased quality  from a change in price outweighs the disutilty of having to pay the price. Thus we restrict the  model  so  that  f ' ( p j ) > α i   ∀p j < p i .  This  assumption  essentially  says  that  there  are  decreasing  marginal  quality  returns  to  price,  which  seems  intuitively  reasonable  when  one  thinks  of  an  increasing  marginal  cost  curve.  We  are  also  interested  in  positive  eco‐label  premiums thus we will assume that for the segment of the market that we label green  γ i > β Substituting quality into our utility function we get:      U ij = (γ i − β ) ∗ O j + f ( p j ) − α i p j + λ j r j     Since organic enters into the utility function linearly, this model predicts that those whose taste  for  organic  produce  outweighs  the  quality  signal  will  prefer  to  buy  organic  regardless  of  the  price. This is shown graphically in figure 1.

3.2.

Multiplicative model:

In  the  additive  model  we  assumed  that  organic  effects  quality  equally  at  every  price  level.  However, there are numerous situations where organic may dilute the price‐quality signal. For  example if organic farming and production increase costs, this will be reflected in a higher price.  Or  if  ecolabels  do  collect  a    price  premium  (amongst  wine  drinkers  unaware  of  quality  differences), this will increase price withouth a change in quality. To reflect this, we can interact  organic with price, such that:

                                                        11  If price is an indicator of quality, one may be inclined to think that profit motivated wine producers can produce low  quality wines under a variety of labels and sell them over and over again to unknowing consumers at high prices. This  would perhaps be possible if consumers purchased wine directly from the producers. However, most consumers buy their  wine from third parties such as wine stores or supermarkets, who will have specialized wine buyers who decide whether  the wine is price‐bracket appropriate.           


Figure 1: Additive model of utility 

Figure 2: Multiplicative Model of Utility Utility 

Utility 

Organic: Green 

Organic: Green

Organic: Brown 

Organic: Brown 

Not Organic 

Not Organic 

Price 

Price 

q j = q − βO j + f ( p j ) − βO j ∗ f ( p j ) + λ j r j Therefore :  U ij = (γ i − β ) ∗ O j + f ( p j )(1 − βO j ) − α i p j + λ j r j     In  this  multiplicative  model,  environmental  consumers  prefer  organic  at  all  prices  less  than  ^

^

^

pi   but prefer non‐organic at all higher prices, where  pi :  (1− β ) f ' ( p j ) > α i ∀p j < p i .    This is illustrated graphically in figure 2, above. 

  3.3.

Regional Model 

  In the models presented above, we assumed that the regional premium was the same whether  the wine was organic or not. In reality, the reputation of the region is likely to have an effect on  how consumers interpret the quality signal given by the wine being organic. However, it is not  clear a priori which direction such an interaction would go in. A prestigious region’s reputation  for  quality  could  be  so  strong  that  the  negative  signal  given  by  organic  is  attenuated.  Alternatively, the less prestigious regions reputation could have such a strongly negative signal  that organic status matters less relatively. Putting in such an interaction into the multiplicative  model yields:            U ij = (γ i − β + τ j r j ) ∗ O j + f ( p j )(1 − β O j ) − α i p j + λ j r j     Where the sign of  τ j   is uncertain a priori.   


4. Methodology   

4.1.

Discrete Choice   

  Data  on  consumer  choices,  behaviors,  attitudes  and  demographics  were  collected  using  an  online  survey.  Preceding  the  survey  was  a  discrete  choice,  or  choice‐based  conjoint  (CBC)  exercise. CBC is a useful analytic technique for evincing consumer preferences in that it mirrors  real‐world  choices  as  closely  as  possible.  CBC  is  a  hypothetical  choice  exercise,  where  consumers are shown descriptions or even images of several real or hypothetical products and  asked  to  choose  between  them.  Consumers  can  also  choose  not  to  purchase  any  of  the  products on display, again making the exercise more realistic (Louviere et al. 2000). Along with  this  real‐world  functionality,  CBC  allows  the  experimenter  to  randomize  across  prices  and  product  attributes  in  a  way  that  is  not  possible  with  real‐world  data.  Moreover,  the  experimenter can abstract away from extraneous attributes to focus on those most relevant to  the study at hand. A very similar experiment is conducted by Lockshin et al (2006) who examine  consumer sensitivity to brand, region, price, and awards in wine choice.    In our survey, respondents were asked to complete seven choice tasks. In each choice task the  respondent was asked to imagine that he/she was attending a seated dinner party with family  and friends and needed to choose a bottle of wine to bring along for the occasion. Respondents  were then presented with images of four different bottles of wine, each with a different price.  The  images  were  truncated  to  put  focus  on  the  wine  bottle  labels.  Subjects  were  asked  to  choose  which  bottle  of  wine  they  would  purchase,  with  the  option  of  choosing  to  purchase  none  of  them.  Respondents  selected  their  prefered  option  by  clicking  on  it.  An  example  of  a  choice task is shown in figure 2 below.    Figure 2: Wine choice task 

 

 


4.2.

Attributes used in the experiment 

  Each  bottle  of  wine  had  four  attributes:  brandname,  price,  type,  region.  Brandnames  were  randomly made up using a list of popular French lastnames. None of these names corresponded  to existing wine brands. Four different brands were used, Chesnier, Challoner, Rutherfields, and  Louis Devere. Prices ranged from $8 to $29 in discrete $7 intervals. These bands were chosen  after a brief survey of the wine buying behavior of UCLA Anderson business school faculty and  students.    Type  consisted  of  organic,  made  with  organic  grapes  and  not  organic.  Only  the  organic  and  made with organic grapes wines were labelled as such. Two Californian wine regions were used:  the prestigious and well known Napa Valley and the lesser known and less‐prestigious Lodi.  To simplify the analysis, all bottles were of the same varietal ‐ cabernet sauvignon. We selected  caberbet sauvignon since it is the leading red wine varietal in US sales of Californian wine (Wine  Institute,  2010).  We  wanted  a  red  wine,  since  the  eco‐label  quality  tradeoff  would  be  more  pronounced than for a white wine since red wines are typically kept longer before drinking.   

4.3.

Choice Experiment Design 

    Each  respondent  completed  seven  choice  tasks.  Increasing  the  number  of  choice  tasks  faced  would  have  helped  to  better  identify  interactions  between  wine  attributes.  However,  this  would have come at the cost of greater attrition, especially since the respondents were unpaid  volunteers. Instead, we offered four different versions of the survey, each with its own seven  choice  tasks  and  unique  attribute  combinations.  This  has  the  same  effect  as  increasing  the  number of choice tasks (after we control for individual attributes).      Each  bottle  of  wine  had  one  level  of  each  of  the  four  attributes.  The  levels  of  the  attributes  were  randomized  across  the  28  different  choice  tasks  (4x7)  using  Sawtooth  Software’s  Choice‐Based Conjoint Software. An algorithm was used to insure each level of each attribute  appeared an equal number of times across all surveys, but did not repeat in the wine bottles  within each choice task. This was done to make sure that the respondent did not see the same  level,  (e.g.,  the  same  price)  across  all  the  choices  in  one  task.  With  complete  randomization  there  is  always  the  chance  that  almost  identical  concepts  might  appear  together.  To  ensure  that  the  choice  set  was  not  dominated  by  eco‐label  wines,  we  doubled  the  number  of  non‐organic wines. Thus every choice set has one organic wine, one made with organic grapes  wine and two non‐organic wines.       

4.4.

Survey Questions 

  Survey  questions  were  designed  to  capture  knowledge,  behaviors  and  demographic 


information. Respondents were asked whether they knew the difference between organic wine  and wine grown with organic grapes. They were asked about their habitual purchasing behavior  of  both  wine  and  organic  products.  Finally,  they  were  asked  a  number  of  demographic  questions including age, gender, education, income and location. The survey questions followed  the  discrete  choice  exercise  so  as  to  not  bias  the  discrete  choice  responses.  The  survey  questions are more focused on existing behaviors than attitudes, thus there was less concern  about biasing these results.     

4.5.

Survey Distribution 

  Research assistance on the survey and conjoint analysis was given by a team of undergraduate  students  at  UCLA.  This  group  of  students  was  integral  in  both  implementing  the  project  and  distributing  the  survey. Flyers  advertising  the  survey  were  placed  in  seven  wine  stores  across  the  greater  Los  Angeles  area  and  advertisements  were  placed  on  Facebook  wine  interest  groups  with  membership  totaling  almost  100,000  people.  Multiple  emails  were  sent  by  both  the  authors  and  research  assistants  to  professional  and  social  contacts,  with  4,845  people  directly  contacted.  These  primary  contacts  were  asked  to  forward  the  survey  to  secondary  contacts, although quantifiable information on the success of this strategy was not available to  the authors. To motivate respondents a case of fine wine was offered as a prize to a randomly  drawn completed survey. Respondents were unable to take the survey more than once. Over  1,100 people attempted the survey, and after removing foreign respondents12  and incomplete  surveys,  we  were  left  with  883  valid  responses.  Although  the  majority  of  responses  were  centered in Los Angeles County specifically (57 percent) and California in general (82 percent),  the remaining respondents were drawn from 31 other U.S. states.     

4.6.

Survey results 

 

As  could  be  expected  given  the  survey  distribution  methodology,  the  survey  sample  is  over‐represented  by  students.  This  can  be  seen  in  Table  1,  below.  This  results  in  a  lower  average age for the sample than the population. The sample is also over represented by college  graduates  and  in  particular  those  with  graduate  or  professional  degrees.  Given  higher  education  levels,  it  is  unsurprising  that  the  average  income  in  our  sample  is  one  third  higher  than  that  of  the  California  population.  This  income‐education  bias  is  possibly  alleviated  somewhat in that the true wine buying population of California is possibly wealthier and better  educated than the population average. Some support for this is given by a 2009 Gallup poll that  showed  that  a  small  majority  of  college  grads  preferred  wine  over  beer,  whereas  the  vast  majority of those who did not attend college preferred beer to wine (Gallup 2009). Lockshin et  al (2006) similarly find that the wine buying population in Australia is better educated than the  general  population.  The  same  Gallup  poll  reported  that  65  percent  of  Americans  consumed  some alcoholic beverage in the past week, which is comparable to the 65 percent of our sample                                                          12  Foreign respondents were removed since it is uncertain what the dollar purchase prices mean to them 


who report drinking wine at least once a week.    Table 1: Summary Statistics 

 

      Looking  further  at  wine  buying  behavior,  we  find  that  93  percent  of  respondents  spend  less  than $30 on average, with the majority (50 percent) spending in the $10 to $20 range. This can  be  seen  in  figure  3  (below).    These  numbers  are  in  line  with  national  averages:  the  average  Californian bottle of wine, sold in the U.S. in 2009, retailed for just under $8. Wines produced in  California  accounted  for  61  percent  of  the  U.S.  market  by  volume  in  2009  (Wine  Institute,  2010). Both the survey data and the national sales data accord well with the consumer choice  exercise, where wines were priced from $8 to $29 in $7 increments.      Figure 3: Average Expenditure on a Bottle of Wine Respondents  report  that  on  average  they  purchase  organic  products  one  out  of  every  50 three trips to the grocery store, with 36 percent  of  respondents  purchasing  organic  products  on  40 at  least  half  of  store  visits.  Similarly,  about  20  percent  of  the  sample  reports  being  members  30 of an environmental organization. By the nature  of  the  population  (young,  students)  20 respondents  are  probably  more  environmentally  friendly  or  “greener”  than  10 average, although it should be noted that green  consumerism is an increasingly important trend  0 in  the  developed  world.  According  to  the  0 10  20  30  40+ Expenditure in $10 Increments  Organization  for  Economic  Co‐operation  and  Development (OECD), “27% of consumers in OECD countries can be labeled ‘green consumers’  due to their strong willingness‐to‐pay and strong environmental activism” (OECD, 2005). In the 


U.S.  retail  sales  of  organic  foods  increased  from  US$3.8  billion  in  1997  to  US$26.6  billion  in  2010 (Organic Trade Association, 2010). Finally, one third of respondents know the difference  between organic wine and wine made with organic grapes.    In  conclusion,  our  sample  population  is  most  likely  younger,  richer,  better  educated  and  greener than the California wine buying population. These attributes will however be controlled  for in the regression analysis.   

5. Econometric Specification    We utilize a mixed logit model to analyse our discrete choice experiment data. The mixed logit  model allows for both product specific and individual specific attributes and corresponds  exactly to the consumer choice data that we generated.      Consumer Choice Experiment  Each subject was given 7 discrete choice tasks to complete ( C ∈1..7] ). In each task the subject  was presented with 4 different bottles of wine, each with a different price. Subjects were asked  to choose which bottle of wine they would purchase, with the option of choosing to purchase  none  of  them.  No  bottles  of  wine  were  repeated  for  a  given  consumer.  The  ordering  of  the  discrete choice tasks were randomized across consumers, although within a given choice task  the four bottles always appear in the same order (which resulted from an initial randomization).      Each  bottle  of  wine  is  designated  W jC ,   j ∈ [0..4, ], C ∈ [ A..G ],   where  j = 0   indicates  the  none option. Each bottle consists of a vector of four attributes, hence  W jC = [W jnC,W jpC , W jtC , W jrC ] ,  where  n   is name,  p   is price,  t   is type and  r   is region.   Utility Maximisation  The aim of our econometric specification is to estimate how individual level attributes, product  level  attributes  and  the  interaction  between  the  two,  influence  the  decision  to  purchase  a  particular  bottle  of  wine.  The  outcome  variable  yijC ,  is  a  dummy  variable  indicating  whether  the bottle was purchased or not. Each  subject,  i  has  m  attributes.  These  attributes  form  the  vector  X i , i ∈ [1..N ]. Thus  X i = [

X i1 ,..., X im ].   The interaction between subject and product attributes is  Z ijC = vec[W jC' X i ]'     The utility subject i gets from bottle j is:    


U ij = X i B'X + W jC BW' + Z ijC BZ' + ε ijC = VijC ,V + ε ijC Where 

ε ijC

is an individual‐specific taste shock.

    Each consumer faces seven choice tasks. In each choice task the consumer chooses between 4  different  bottles  of  wine  and  the  option  of  no  purchase.  We  normalise  the  utility  from  no  purchase  to  zero.  A  consumer  will  choose  a  bottle  of  wine  (or  the  none  option)  if  it  yields  a  higher  utility  than  the  other  four  choices  that  are  presented.  Since  there  is  a  random  component to utility we can estimate the probability that each of the five options is chosen: so  the probability of choosing bottle j, in choice task c is:  Pr ( y ijC = 1) = Pr (VijC + −ε ijC ≥ VikC + ε ikC ∀k ≠ j ) = Pr (VijC − VikC ≥ ε ikC − ε ijC ∀k ≠ j )) ~C

 

~ C

Let  ε ikj = ε ikC − ε ijC     and  V ikj = VikC − VijC ~C

~

C

Therefore  Pr ( y ijC = 1) = Pr (ε ikj ≤ − V ikj ∀k ≠ j ) ~C

If we assume that within choice C,  ε ikj   is i.i.d and distributed extreme value type 1, we get

Pr ( yijC = 1) =

exp(VijC )

  

4

∑exp(V

C ik

)

k =0

where we have normalised the utility of the none option to zero so that  exp(Vi C0 ) = 1 N

7

4

L = ∏ ∏ ∏( The likelihood function is thus:  i =1 C =1 j = 0

exp(VijC ) 4

∑exp(VikC )

)

yijC

N

7

4

= ∏ ∏ ∏ ( pijC ) i =1 C =1 j = 0

C yij

 

k =0

Therefore maximimise:  N

7

4

N

7

4

4

Ln( L) = ∑ ∑ ∑ y ln( p ) = ∑ ∑ ∑ y ∗ V − log[∑exp(VikC )] C ij

C ij

i =1 C =1 j = 0

C ij

i =1 C =1 j = 0

C ij

k =0

 

6. Results  6.1.

Basic Specification 

  In the basic specification we pool together organic and organic grapes as ‘eco‐label’ wines. The  product characteristics, W jC , we estimate are:  W jC = [ price j , brandname j , region j , type j ]  


Where:  typej= eco‐label, no eco‐label  pricej= cubic of price*type  regionj= napa dummy*type    Individual characteristics, X i , are all allowed to vary across type. The individual characteristics  encompass  demographics,  income,  education,  wine  drinking  behavior  and  environmentalism.  To obtain a measure of environmentalism we included the League of Conservation Voters (LCV)  environmental rating for each state in 2010. The results from the basic specification are shown  in table 2 below:   


Table 2: Marginal effects of product and individual characteristics on probability of purchase. 

Coefficients on the product characteristics do not vary across choices, except for  the coefficents on the price polynomial and Napa. Coefficients on individual  characteristics are all choice specific. Eco‐Label No Eco‐Label None Product Characteristics Price 0.138*** 0.0630*** (0.0156) (0.0154) Price squared ‐0.00815*** ‐0.00280*** (0.000959) (0.000903) Price cubed 0.000133*** 0.00003* (0.00002) (0.00002) Rutherfields 0.00195 0.00186 (0.00662) (0.00632) Challoner ‐0.00114 ‐0.00109 (0.00601) (0.00573) Louis Devere 0.00939 0.00896 (0.00664) (0.00633) Napa 0.0864*** 0.162*** (0.00972) (0.0103) Individual Characteristics  Male ‐0.00592 0.00382 0.00445 (0.0114) (0.0115) (0.0185) Age 0.00004 ‐0.000833* 0.00155** (0.000479) (0.000468) (0.000625) College Graduate ‐0.0263 0.0293* ‐0.00452 (0.0162) (0.0173) (0.0268) Graduate degree ‐0.0510*** 0.0528*** ‐0.000725 (0.0165) (0.0174) (0.0275) Income ‐0.000461*** 0.000274*** 0.000391**  (0.000100) (0.000102) (0.000157) Drinks wine frequently ‐0.0247* 0.0350*** ‐0.0189 (0.0129) (0.0123) (0.0209) Spends on wine ‐0.00348*** 0.00164** 0.00382***  (0.000667) (0.000671) (0.00102) Doesn't buy wine  ‐0.115*** ‐0.0787** 0.386*** (0.0320) (0.0392) (0.123) Organic as percent of purchases  0.197*** ‐0.188*** ‐0.0284 (0.0200) (0.0208) (0.0285) Informed  ‐0.00848 ‐0.00559 0.0281 (0.0131) (0.0132) (0.0202) Environmental Organization 0.0416*** ‐0.0455*** 0.00545 (0.0137) (0.0131) (0.0201) LCV Score  0.00000 0.000206 ‐0.000399 (0.000281) (0.000296) (0.000421) Observations  6181 6181 6181 *** p<0.01, ** p<0.05, * p<0.1 marginal effects reported  unreported coefficents: missing income, missing lcv score

 


Since price is a cubic polynomial, it is difficult to interpret numerically. However, it is important  to note that all of the coefficients on price are significant, and there is a significant difference  between the eco‐label and non‐eco‐label coefficients for like terms.    Figure 4: Probability of purchasing organic verse non‐organic wine

 

.1

Purchase Probability .2 .3

.4

Figure  4  (left)  gives  a  graphical  representation  of  the  average  purchase  probability  at  various  prices.  As  can  be  seen,  eco‐labels  are  preferred  at  lower  prices,  but  no eco‐label at higher prices. This is  congruent  with  the  multiplicative  model  presented  earlier,  whereby  the  signal  from  organic  attenuates  the  price‐quality  signal.  As  stated  earlier,  differences  in  slopes  are  statistically  significant.  In  the  8 15 22 29 Price theoretical model differences in the  All Organic Not Organic price  slope  came  about  from  perceptions  of  quality,  however  organic  also  affected  the  consumer  utility  directly.  In  the  model  we  speculated  that  green  consumers would get increased utility from eco‐labeled wine, whereas brown consumers would  not. Looking at table 3, we can see that members of an environmental organization are more 4  percentage points more likely to buy a wine if it is organic. Likewise, someone who buys some  organic products on every grocery trip is 19 percentage points more likely to buy an eco‐labeled  bottle  of  wine  than  someone  who  never  purchases  organic  products.  Figure  5  below  displays  this  graphically.  If  we  interpret  organic  grocery  purchases  as  environmentalism,  then  our  theoretical predictions bear out nicely. Those less environmentally minded get no utility from  eco‐labeled wine and only see its negative effect on quality. As environmentalism increases, so  does the utility from eco‐labeled wine.      Looking at other product characteristics, we can see that the wine brands have no significant  effect on choice. This was the intention when designing the survey. The prestigious region Napa  always has a large and significantly positive effect on the probability of purchase.    However,  this Napa premium is cut in half for eco‐label wines. One possible way to interpret this is that  organic attenuates the Napa quality signal.           In  terms  of  other  individual  characteristics  we  can  see  that  having  a  graduate  degree  and  a  higher income both significantly reduce the probability of purchasing organic wine. Those who  spend  more  on  wine  are  also  less  likely  to  buy  organic  and  more  likely  to  buy  none.  This  is  consistent  with  some  of  the  comments  we  received  from  wine  aficionados  who  felt  that  the  price range we offered was not sufficient.   


Figure 5: Probability of purchasing organic verse non‐organic wine by environmental behavior Often Purchases Organic

.2

.3

.4

.5

Occasionally Purchases Organic

.1

Purchase Probability

Never purchases organic

8

15

22

29

8

15

22

29

8

15

22

29

Price All Organic

Not Organic

   

6.2.

Informed model 

  Organic wine undergoes a different production process to non‐organic wine often resulting in  inferior quality. The same is not true of wine made with organic grapes. This wine undergoes  the same production process as non‐organic wine, but is made with a superior quality input –  organically  grown  grapes.  Thus  it  should  not  suffer  from  the  same  quality  penalty  as  organic  wines.  However,  this  will  only  be  the  case  when  consumers  are  actually  aware  of  this  difference.  We  call  respondents  who  know  the  difference  between  organic  wine  and  wine  made  with  organic  grapes  ‘informed’.  About  one  third  of  the  sample  is  informed.  In  the  specification below, we allow for three types of wine: organic, made with organic grapes and  non‐organic. Once again we allow for separate price effects for each type.      Our  hypothesis  is  that  amongst  those  who  are  informed,  there  will  be  no  attenuation  on  the  price signal for wine made with organic grapes, as is the case with organic wine. To test this, we  allow  the  cubic  on  price  to  vary  across  those  who  are  informed  and  those  who  are  not  for  organic and made with organic grapes. The results are shown in table 3, below:     


Table 3: Marginal effects of product and individual characteristics on probability of purchase  Coefficients on the product characteristics do not vary across choices, except for the  coeeficents on price and Napa. Coefficients on individual characteristics are all choice  specific. Organic Product Characteristics Price: Informed Price: Uninformed Price squared: informed Price squared: uninformed Price cubed: informed Price cubed: uninformed Rutherfields Challoner Louis Devere Napa Individual Characteristics Male Age College Graduate Graduate degree Income Average zipcode home value Drinks wine frequently Spends on wine Doesn't buy wine Organic as percent of purchases Environmental Organization LCV Score

0.160*** (0.0435) 0.159*** (0.0317) ‐0.00928*** (0.00265) ‐0.00960*** (0.00194) 0.000156*** (0.00005) 0.000161*** (0.00004) 0.00498 (0.00702) ‐0.00217 (0.00634) 0.00766 (0.00679) 0.103*** (0.0132)

Organic Grapes Not Organic 0.0324 (0.0345) 0.148*** (0.0315) ‐0.00119 (0.00210) ‐0.00884*** (0.00195) 0.00001 (0.00004) 0.000142*** (0.00004) 0.00496 (0.00700) ‐0.00216 (0.00634) 0.00764 (0.00678) 0.0654*** (0.0121)

None

0.0618*** (0.0158) 0.0618*** (0.0158) ‐0.00272*** (0.000926) ‐0.00272*** (0.000926) 0.00003 (0.00002) 0.00003* (0.00002) 0.00486 (0.00687) ‐0.00212 (0.00620) 0.00748 (0.00663) 0.165*** (0.0104)

‐0.00259 ‐0.00899 0.00362 0.00456 (0.0150) (0.0161) (0.0118) (0.0188) ‐0.00110 0.00114* ‐0.000840* 0.00158** (0.000701) (0.000661) (0.000478) (0.000633) ‐0.00615 ‐0.0462** 0.0296* ‐0.00502 (0.0234) (0.0234) (0.0176) (0.0271) ‐0.0270 ‐0.0748*** 0.0532*** ‐0.00137 (0.0228) (0.0241) (0.0177) (0.0278) ‐0.000347*** ‐0.000587*** 0.000278*** 0.000395** (0.000132) (0.000134) (0.000104) (0.000160) ‐0.0324* ‐0.0181 0.0360*** ‐0.0193 (0.0181) (0.0171) (0.0126) (0.0212) ‐0.00428*** ‐0.00272*** 0.00163** 0.00384*** (0.000983) (0.000839) (0.000683) (0.00103) ‐0.124*** ‐0.106** ‐0.0815** 0.388*** (0.0346) (0.0430) (0.0401) (0.123) 0.176*** 0.222*** ‐0.191*** ‐0.0278 (0.0248) (0.0263) (0.0213) (0.0289) ‐0.223 0.506* ‐0.128 ‐0.0348 (0.196) (0.260) (0.0844) (0.0434) 0.0667*** 0.0191 ‐0.0471*** 0.00537 (0.0200) (0.0185) (0.0133) (0.0204) ‐0.000168 0.000118 0.000232 ‐0.000399 (0.000430) (0.000354) (0.000302) (0.000428) 6181 6181 6181 6181

Observations *** p<0.01, ** p<0.05, * p<0.1 marginal effects reported unreported coefficents: missing income,  missing lcv score

 


Empirically we find some important differences between informed and ignorant respondents:    For informed:  • Price coefficients are statistically significantly different between organic and made with  organic grapes  • Price  coefficients  are  statistically  indistinguishable  between  made  with  organic  grapes  and non‐organic  For ignorant:  • Price  coefficients  are  statistically  indistinguishable    between  organic  and  made  with  organic grapes  • Price  coefficients  are  statistically  significantly  different  between  made  with  organic  grapes and non‐organic      This is displayed graphically in figure 6 below.    Figure 6: Probability of purchasing organic wine, wine made with organic grapes    and non‐organic wine            Informed

.4 .2 0

Purchase Probability

.6

Uninformed

8

15

22

29

8

15

22

29

Price Organic Not Organic

Organic Grapes

    Thus consumers who know that wine made with organic grapes is produced in the same fashion  as non‐organic wine do not put a quality penalty on wine made with organic grapes. Consumers  who  are  unaware  of  this  tend  to  treat  organic  wine  and  wine  made  with  organic  grapes  similarly, imposing a perceived quality penalty on both.     


7. Reputation    Both  the  model  that  we  presented  and  the  discrete  choice  exercise  are  over  wines  that  are  unknown to the consumer. Previous discrete choice exercises such as Lockshin et al (2007) have  focused  on  real,  recognizable  brand  names.  Since  a  discrete  choice  exercise  generates  wines  with random attributes, this can be confusing to consumers familiar with the brands and they  may make suppositions over attributes based on their own knowledge of the brand (e.g. it is an  expensive bottle, therefore it must be part of the brand’s reserve collection). Thus we chose to  use  fictitious  brands  so  as  to  better  be  able  to  infer  consumer  preferences  over  our  chosen  attributes. However brand names do raise a very interesting point when looking at eco‐labels  and  quality  –  reputation.  Do  brands  well  know  for  quality  products  have  the  capability  to  credibly  introduce  organic  wine?  Or  will  the  poor  quality  perceptions  of  an  eco‐wine  contaminate  the  brand’s  other  offerings?  Results  that  we  obtain  for  our  regional  coefficients  are suggestive of an answer to this question. Napa and Lodi appellations act like meta‐brands  for  all  the  wines  in  the  region,  giving  an  indication  to  consumers  of  quality.  Napa  is  a  strong  indicator to consumers of quality, and we found that consumers are 16 percentage points more  likely to buy a wine from Napa than Lodi (see table 2). Similar to the brand question above, we  can ask, will a Napa wine have the credibility to signal that an organic wine is of high quality? In  our  regressions  we  find  that  this  is  not  so.  The  Napa  premium  halves  when  the  wine  has  an  eco‐label.  In  regressions  not  shown  we  find  that  when  we  run  separate  price  coefficients  for  Napa and Lodi, the slopes are similar across regions and different from non‐eco‐labeled wine.  Thus the Napa brand alone does have the credibility to convince consumers that an eco‐labeled  wine is of high quality. This result is likely shared to a greater or lesser extent with individual  brands and thus additional credible information such as point of sale materials provided by a  disinterested third party.         

8. Discussion and Conclusion    Eco‐labels  act  as  a  signal  that  goods  have  been  environmentally  friendly  attributes.  If  an  eco‐label is effective it will command a premium amongst environmentally minded consumers  and  thus  allow  manufacturers  to  recoup  the  additional  costs  of  cleaner  manufacturing  practices. This will increase the share of green products in the market (Mason, 2008). However,  there are many conditions under which eco‐labels can fail to produce an eco‐premium, even if  consumers are willing to pay a premium for eco‐labeled goods. One such scenario is if there is  an abundance of similar eco‐labels that confuse consumers. In the wine industry we find that  most  consumers  are  unaware  of  any  difference  between  the  eco‐labels  “wine  made  from  organic grapes” and “organic wine”. Wine made from organic grapes is wine made from grapes  that  have  been  grown  without  pesticides.  Organic  wine  is  also  made  with  organic  grapes  but  prohibits sulfite use in the wine‐making process. This distinction is important because sulfites  affect the quality of the wine. Sulfites act as a preservative. Eliminating sulfites can reduce the  quality of the wine because the wine is not as stable and cannot be kept very long. There is no  such  problem  for  wine  made  from  organically  grown  grapes.  We  find  that  consumers  have  a 


preference for organic wine, but also perceive it to of low quality. This results in the preferring  it  to  non‐organic  wines  at  low  prices,  but  being  unwilling  to  pay  for  it  at  higher  prices.  Even  though  the  majority  of  eco‐labeled  wines  are  made  with  organic  grapes,  consumers  for  the  most part are unaware of any difference between the two and incorrectly associate wine made  with organic grapes with low quality. This results in the high end of the market for wines being  made  with  organic  grapes  being  destroyed,  since  products  in  this  space  are  essentially  unsellable.  This  highlights  the  danger  of  creating  unclear  eco‐labels  or  of  over‐filling  the  eco‐label space. The good news for this market is that informed consumers, who are aware of  the difference between the two eco‐labels, do not incorrectly infer that wine made with organic  grapes  is  low  quality.  Thus  a  remedy  exists  for  this  market  in  terms  of  education of  the  wine  buying population about the distinction between the two labels.      The lessons from the wine industry for other eco‐labeling initiatives are clear. An eco‐label  premium is essential for an eco‐industry to sustainably exist. Thus any eco‐labeling initiative  needs to ensure that it will deliver such premiums. Failure to do so can risk the viability not just  of that eco‐product market, but also of associated markets. Moreover, eco‐labels need to be  clearly differentiated to the general public to avoid confusion between standards. In the case of  the wine industry we find that quality concerns over one eco‐standard contaminate another.  Given limited attention spans by consumers, fewer labels may be better, even if it potentially  eliminates classes of organic products.      Our study has important policy implications. It shows the dangers of issuing eco‐labels that are  misunderstood by consumers and can potentially lead to negative reactions. Our paper  indicates that successful implementation of eco‐label programs requires complementary  information instruments and complementary skills. Successful eco‐labels are programs with  strong emphasis on marketing. This suggests that policy makers invest in marketing knowledge  and tools, which were not traditionally part of the environmental policy tool kit.              

 


9. Bibliography    Anderson, M., Cervin­Hoberg C. & L Greiff (2009): “Wine produced by ecological  methods produces relatively little nasal blockage in wine­sensitive subjects”, Acta  Oto­laryngologica 129:11,   Andreoni, J. (1990): “Impure Altruism and Donations to Public Goods: A Theory of  Warm‐Glow Giving.”, Economic Journal, vol. 100  Bombrun, H., & D. Sumner (2001): “What determines the price of wine?” AIC Issues Brief,  18, pp. 1‐6.  Cason, T. N., & L. Gangadharan (2002): “Environmental labeling and incomplete con‐ sumer information in laboratory markets”, Journal of Environmental Economics and  Management, 43, 113‐134.  Chaney, I. M. (2000): “External search effort for wine”, International Journal of Wine  Marketing, 12(2), 5–21.  Clarke C., Kotchen M. & M. Moore (2003): “Internal and external influences on  pro‐environmental behavior: Participation in a green electricity program”, Journal of  Environmental Psychology, vol. 23  Cornes, R., & Sandler, T. (1996): The theory of externalities, public goods, and club goods  (2nd ed.), Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.  Crespi, J. M., & Marette, S. (2005): “Eco‐labelling economics: Is public involvement  necessary?” In S. Krarup & C. S. Russell (Eds.), Environment, information and consumer  behavior (pp. 93‐110). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.  Davies, A., Titterington, A. J., & C. Cochrane (1995): “Who buys organic food?A profile of  purchasers of organic food in Northern Ireland”, British Food Journal, 97, 17‐23.  Delmas, M. (2008): “Perception of eco­labels: Organic and biodynamic wines” (Working  Paper). Los Angeles: UCLA Institute of the Environment.  Delmas M. & L. Grant (2010): “Eco‐labeling Strategies and Price‐Premium: The Wine  Industry Puzzle”, Business and Society      Delmas, M., Montes, M., J. & Shimshack (2009): “Information disclosure policies:  Evidence from the electricity industry”, Economic Inquiry. Published Online: June 2  2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1465‐7295.2009.00227.x  http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi‐bin/fulltext/122421781/PDFSTART  Ferraro, P., Uchida, T., & J.M. Conrad (2005): “Price premiums for eco‐friendly  commodities: Are “green” markets the best way to protect endangered ecosystems?”,  Environmental and Resource Economics, 32, 419‐438.  Galarraga Gallastegui, I. (2002): “The use of eco‐labels: A review of the literature”,  European Environment, 12, 316‐331.  Gallup (2009): “Drinking Habits Steady Amid Recession”, http://www.gallup.com/  Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J.M., & B. Van den Bergh (2010): "Going Green to Be Seen:  Status, Reputation, and Conspicuous Conservation", Journal of Personality and Social  Psychology, Vol 98(3), pp.392‐404  Grodsky, J. (1993): “Certified green: The law and future of environmental labeling”, Yale  Journal of Regulation, 10, 147‐227.  Hamilton, S., & Zimmerman (2006): “Environmental regulations, illicit behavior, and  equilibrium fraud”, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 52, 627‐644. 


Ibanez, L., & G. Grolleau(2008): “Can ecolabeling schemes preserve the environment?”,    Environmental Resource Economics, 40, 233‐249.  Kahn M. & R. Vaughn (2009): “Green Market Geography: The Spatial Clustering of Hybrid  Vehicles and LEED Registered Buildings”, The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy,  vol.9 issue 2, article 2  Kirchhoff, S. (2000): “Green business and blue angels”, Environmental and Resource  Economics, 15, 403‐420.  Kotchen, M. J. (2005): “Impure public goods and the comparative statics of envi‐ ronmentally friendly consumption”, Journal of Environmental Economics and  Management, 49, 281‐300.  Kotchen, M. J. (2006): “Green markets and private provision of public goods”, Journal of  Political Economy, 114, 816‐845  Kotchen, M. & M.R. Moore (2007): “Private provision of environmental public goods:  Household participation in green‐electricity programs”, Journal of Environmental  Economics and Management, September 2007. 53, pp. 1‐16  Leire, C., & A. Thidell (2005): “Product‐related environmental information to guide con‐ sumer purchases—A review and analysis of research on perceptions, understanding  and use among Nordic consumers”, Journal of Cleaner Production, 13, 1061‐1070.  Lessem N. & R. Vaughn (2011): “A Renewable Reputation” (Working Paper). Los Angeles,  UCLA department of Economics    Ling, B. H., & L. Lockshin (2003): “Components of wine prices for Australian wine: How  winery reputation, wine quality, region, vintage and winery size contribute to the price  of varietal wines”, Australasian Marketing Journal, 11(3), 19–32.  Lockshin L., Jarvis W., d_Hauteville F., & J. Perrouty (2006): “Using simulations from  discrete choice experiments to measure consumer sensitivity to brand, region, price,  and awards in wine choice”, Food Quality and Preference, 17 166–178  Loureiro, M. L., & J. Lotade (2005): “Do fair trade and eco‐labels in coffee wake up the  consumer conscience?”, Ecological Economics, 53(1), 129‐138.  Loureiro, M. L. (2005): “Rethinking new wines: Implications of local and environmentally  friendly labels”, Food Policy, 28, 547‐560.  Louviere, J. J., Hensher, D. A., & Swait, J. (2000): “Stated choice methods analysis and  application”, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press  Magnusson, M. K., Arvola, A., Koivisto Hursti, U.­K., Aberg, L., & P.O. Sjoden (2001):  “Attitudes towards organic foods among Swedish consumers”, British Food Journal, 103,  209‐227  Mason, C. F. (2006): “An economic model of ecolabeling”,. Environmental Modeling and  Assessment, 11, 131‐143.  Mason. C.F. (2008): “On the Economics of Eco‐Labeling”, working paper. University of  Wyoming, Department of Economics and Finance  Miles, S., & L. Frewer (2001):” Investigating specific concerns about different food  hazards”, Food Quality and Preference, 12, 47‐61.  OECD (2005): “Effects of eco‐labeling schemes: compilation of recent studies”, Joint  Working Party on Trade and Environment, paper # COM/ENV/TD(2004)34/FINAL      Organic Trade Association (2010): “The OTA 2010 Organic Industry Survey” Available  from http://www.ota.com/organic/mt.html  Peattie, K., & A. Crane (2005): “Green marketing: Legend, myth, farce or prophesy?”, 


Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, 8, 357‐370.  Tregear, A., Dent, J. B., & M.J. McGregor (1994): “The demand for organically grown  produce”, British Food Journal, 96, 21‐25.  Valley H. & P.J. Thompson (2001): “Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma:  single dose and cumulative dose studies”, Thorax vol. 56: doi:10.1136/thorax.56.10.763  Wandel, M. (1994): “Understanding consumer concern about food‐related health risks”,  British Food Journal, 96, 35‐40.  Wandel, M., & A. Bugge (1997): “Environmental concern in consumer evaluation of food  quality”, Food Quality and Preference, 8, 19‐26.  Wine Institute (2010): “California Wine Industry Statistical Highlights”, available at  http://www.wineinstitute.org/files/EIR%20Flyer%202008.pdf (last accessed 18  March 2011)       


MagaliDelmas