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TH HE DAILY TEXAN LIFE&ARTS PAGE 14

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A look at the Wyoming game this weekend

From the garage to your glass Friday, September 11, 2009

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UT takes on carbon research

Senior research scientist Susan D. Hovorka poses at the carbon capture center in the J.J. Pickle Research Campus on Thursday afternoon.

By Lena Price Daily Texan Staff UT’s Jackson School of Geosciences received a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to train a workforce of research scientists and graduate students in carbon-capture and storage technology. The technology catches carbon dioxide emitted into the air from burning fossil fuels and funnels it underground. Funneling carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and into the ground will put less of a strain on the environment and keep fuel costs down, said the project’s senior research scientist, Sue Hovorka. States along the Gulf Coast, including Texas, are particularly well situated to reabsorb carbon

Mary Kang Daily Texan Staff

into the ground because of the ple don’t know that the Earth is multiple layers of sediment. layered, and there are imperme“Instead of putting carbon able zones where anything you back into the atinject into the m o s p h e re , w e ground will stay can put another in the ground.” building next to UT was selectthe power plant ed to receive the A lot of people and sequester it,” grant because of are afraid of Hovorka said. a long history of “That way, it’s sequestration. I think working with this making a closed type of technolthat’s ignorance.” loop.” ogy. The UniverThe process is — Sue Hovorka sity has testing similar to how sites in Texas and research scientist Mississippi. power plants deal with harm“The grant will ful toxins like primarily be a mercury. way to give peo“A lot of people are afraid of ple who are already interested sequestration,” Hovorka said. “I in entering the oil or petroleum think that’s ignorance. Most peo- industry a new skill set,” said

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Rally spreads message of equality

Marc Airhart, spokesman for the Jackson School of Geosciences. “There won’t actually be a carbon-capture facility on the UT campus.” In addition to training carbon-capture and storage personnel around the country, the grant money will allow UT to begin several outreach programs to spread the word about the process to University personnel and the general public. “Combine this research and field experience with the instructional expertise at the University, as well as the [UT] Institute for Geophysics’ strong education, training and outreach experience, and you have a training

CARBON continues on page 2

Californian professor talks diversity and health reform Visiting lecturer addresses economic inequities that create coverage gaps

Rachel Taylor | Daily Texan Staff

Cathy Setzer rallies at the West Mall Thursday with Join the Impact to draw attention to the National GLBT Equality March that will take place in October.

Despite low attendance, GLBT rally accomplishes primary goals By Pushpa Devulapalli Daily Texan Staff A small turnout at a local GLBT rally held Thursday afternoon on the West Mall to promote a national march in Washington, D.C. didn’t discourage the students, faculty and staff who attended. “Our point, really, was to tell people that

there is a march going on in D.C.,” said graduate accounting student Corina Cantu. “We had about 25 people sign up [to go to Washington D.C.] which is encouraging for us.” The National LGBTQ National Equality March, occurring Oct. 10-11, is expected to attract more than 100,000 supporters

who will advocate for legislative and social equality for those in the gay and transgendered community. “Up until now, it’s been a lot of asking — asking for civil rights, asking for little bits, but we’re tired of waiting, so now we’re

RALLY continues on page 2

By Nehal Patel Daily Texan Staff With much of the nation’s attention focused on health care reform, related issues such as a health care professional’s understanding of the socioeconomic, ideological and ethnic diversity of their patients have come into the limelight. “Diversity is a buzzword,” said Sharon Youmans, associate dean for diversity at the University of California, San Francisco’s School of Pharmacy. “It’s something people are paying a lot of attention to now. Diversity is culture plus communication, not just appearance.” Youmans led a discussion at the 2009 Diversity Forum on Thursday at the UT College of Pharmacy about a pharmacist’s role in addressing the health care needs of patients on a case-by-case basis. Youmans said nonracial, socioeconomic barriers to health care in the U.S. create inequalities in the system. “Some of the health care issues are parallel in developing countries and here in the U.S.,” Youmans said. “It’s frustrating that even people here can’t get what they need when they need it.” Youmans said establishing rapport with patients is paramount to improving the quality of health care. “We have to let patients teach us how they take care of their own health,” Youmans said. “We have to ask them, ‘What is going to work for you?’ Then we can try to help them help themselves.” Understanding how different groups view health care is complex, particularly because patients from a lower socioeconomic background are less likely to ask questions about their medication than upper-class patients, said pharmacy professor Carolyn Brown, chair of the UT College of Pharmacy’s

DIVERSE continues on page 2

Austin artists feel pressure in stagnant economy By Rachel Platis Daily Texan Staff The clouds gathering outside mirrored the discussion Thursday night at City Hall as panelists shed light on the effects of the economic climate on the Austin art scene. An audience of artisans attended “Weathering the Economic Storm” to gather advice on how to continue to promote arts, culture and creativity in Austin as the local economy struggles to pull out of the recession. Panelists discussed options other than traditional fundraisers for local artists and non-profits to stay afloat. “I don’t know anyone who hasn’t been affected by the economic storm over the past year,” said panel moderator Robert Faires, senior arts editor for The Austin Chronicle. “We’re not anything special, but maybe we can help local artists keep contributing in this local climate.”

trepreneur hits struggles and challenges,” Goswami said. “But if you get through it, you find the nirvana of growth. Then, you discover that there are even more valleys ahead.” But the valleys that entrepreneurs fall into are places where innovation and creativity occur, he said. Panelist Kevin Patterson, general director of Austin Lyric Opera, said by sharing services, artists — individually and as an organization — can build collaboration and marketing cohesion to go to local vendors and set prices as a group. “Companies value artists banding together because they’re trying to build market share,” Patterson Scott Squires | Daily Texan Staff said. “The goal is to set the prices Robert Peterson waits for customers on a slow Thursday afternoon as con- instead of take them.” Patterson said that instead of struction continues at the 24th St. Renaissance Market. competing for subscribers, the Bijoy Goswami, founder of Boot- go through slow times that are in- arts community could expand their reach through collaborative strap Austin, a resource for entre- fluenced by the economy. preneurs, said that artists, musi“There is a period of time called ART continues on page 2 cians and theaters in Austin often the ‘valley of death’ where an en-

Elizabeth Walker | Daily Texan Staff

Professor Sharon L. Youmans speaks to a class of pharmacy students at the Pharmacy Building on Thursday.


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Friday, September 11, 2009

RALLY: Demonstrators hope to plant seeds of national movement From page 1

Schada Sutasirisap | Daily Texan Staff

Stavana Strutz, right, and Mike Cowin invited people on the West Mall to join the national GLBT march in Washington, D.C.

CARBON: Texas

geologists green up fossil fuels From page 1 program poised to make a significant impact on creating a well trained carbon-sequestration workforce,� said project manager Hilary Olson. Carbon-capture technology has existed for almost 40 years. It is a good alternative for a society that can’t quit using fossil fuels cold-turkey, Hovorka said. “A lot of people are excited about no longer using fossil fuel,� she said. “But a lot of people haven’t tried it. I have.� When Hovorka was younger, her parents owned a completely sustainable beach house in Mexico. “It was great, except on a cloudy day when the wind was blowing in the wrong direction,� Hovorka said. “You couldn’t open the refrigerator without using all the power.�

demanding,� Cantu said. She will fly to D.C. for the event. “We’re going to create a national movement.� The last comparable rally was held in the early ‘90s, so Cantu said she is excited to play a part in her generation’s history. “We’re making signs; we’re making T-shirts; we’re going to be together as a Central Texas community,� she said. The campus event lasted from 11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and continued indoors with an information session. Cantu is one of about 10 members of Join the Impact, the Central Texas branch of a grassroots GLBT group created after Proposition 8. The proposition passed in November 2008, banning gay marriage in California. The entire group plans to either drive or fly to Washington D.C. Cantu said that by marching in D.C., or what she referred to as the legislators’ “front yard,� she hopes to gain the attention of politicians who have made “empty� promises of equality to those in the GLBT community. The march has various sponsors, but the effort really began as a grassroots movement in the GLBT community. The inspiration for the movement, she says, is Cleve Jones, a human rights activist and author. Communication studies graduate student Robert McDonald said local support for the Washington march has been building for some time. “We are all organizing all over the country, from here to San Francisco,� McDonald said.

ART: Recession dries up gallery donations, patrons DIVERSITY: From page 1 marketing initiatives. “The creative class in Austin is vital to the continuing growth of the corporate community and to the growth of this city,� Patterson said. Many organizations feel the economic climate when they realize that funding is scarce, said Peter Frumkin, director of the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. “What we’ve seen is a tremendous decrease in net wealth,� Frumkin said. “Funding is tight at the state and local level, and there’s not a lot of money floating around.� This creates financial stress at the nonprofit level, but there are ways in which organizations can work through the challenge, Frumkin said. “Non-profits avoid getting into trouble by using sound financial management,� Frum-

THE DAILY TEXAN Permanent Staff

This newspaper was written, edited and designed with pride by The Daily Texan and Texas Student Media.

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jillian Sheridan Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stephen Keller Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .David R. Henry, Ana McKenzie Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeremy Burchard, Dan Treadway, David Muto, Lauren Winchester News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Beherec Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pierre Bertrand, Austen Sofhauser Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viviana Aldous, Bobby Longoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rachel Platis, Lena Price Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Kreighbaum Enterprise Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hudson Lockett Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Green Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cristina Herrera, Nausheen Jivani, Matt Jones Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thu Vo Assistant Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shatha Hussein Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Fausak, Lynda Gonzales, Olivia Hinton Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May-Ying Lam Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bryant Haertlein, Peter Franklin Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Kang,Tamir Kalifa, Caleb Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Peyton McGee, Sara Young Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leigh Patterson Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Barry, Francisco Marin Jr. Senior Features Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey Gale Campbell, Lisa HoLung, Ben Wermund Senior Entertainment Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Doty, Mary Lingwall, Robert Rich Senior DT Weekend Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amber Genuske Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin Talbert Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Anderson, Wes DeVoe, Blake Hurtik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dan Hurwitz, Laken Litman, Michael Sherfield, Chris Tavarez Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carolyn Calabrese Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annika Erdman Associate Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Erik Reyna Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juan Elizondo Associate Multimedia Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kara McKenzie, Rachel Schroeder Senior Videographer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dane Hurt Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard Finnell

Volunteers

Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ariel Min, Cameron LIndsay, Elizabeth Walker, Scott Squires, Jesus Montelonap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Earnest, Benjamin Miller, Nehal Patel, James Perez, Hannah Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Suchada Sudarsirisap, Kelly Webeck, Eric Ou, Kari Kosenrelio, Rachel Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pushpa Devulapalli, Jordan Haeger, Katrina Munez, Ben Williams, Eric Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veronica Rosalez, Stacey Long, Katie Smith, Cameron Boudstin, Amelia Giller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jin Kwon, Ryan Hailey, Katheryn Menedee, Sydney Fitzgerald, Megan Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Morgan, Jacque Rauschubs, Kelsey Crow, Susannah Jacob ....................................................................................................

Advertising

Director of Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Retail Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Corbett Account Executive/Broadcast Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus/National Sales Consultant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Assistant to Advertising Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.J. Salgado Student Advertising Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Abbas Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ford Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Aldana, Anupama Kulkarni, Ashley Walker, Natasha Moonka Taylor Blair, Tommy Daniels, Jordan Gentry, Meagan Gribbin, Jen Miller Classified Clerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teresa Lai Special Editions, Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elena Watts Web Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danny Grover Special Editions, Student Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kira Taniguchi Graphic Designer Interns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amanda Thomas Senior Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez

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kin said. “There’s no substi- it doesn’t have to rely on sales tute for good management and and admission charges to continue operation. strong governance.� Women and Their Work is a non-profit art gallery locatGalleries feel the crunch ed on Lavaca Street that exhibGalleries across Austin have its contemporary art created also felt the efby women livfects of the ecoing and worknomic climate. ing in Texas. “There have As a non-profbeen many it, the group spaces in Ausbrings art to tin that have the community closed since through exhibit h e e c o n o m - The arts push culture tions and peric downturn,� forward. I’m sure the formances. Yet said Lisa ChoChoinacky said art scene will ride inacky, operathat she has not tions manager the economy out. It seen much of a at Women and change in the always does.� T h e i r Wo r k . amount of vis“Arts are the — Frank Parker itors since the quickest thing artisan recession. to be hit by such “We’ve seen things. I know no decline in galleries that visitors because have closed and w e ’ re a f re e many friends gallery, so it’s that have had actually a fun to leave their thing for peoart jobs.� ple to do to come and see us,� Since it is free to the public, Choinacky said. “It’s an interChoinacky said that her gallery esting shift.� may not suffer like some of the The Renaissance Market locommercial galleries because cated on the Drag is seeing

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small effects from the recession but larger effects from the construction occurring in the market space, said artisan Frank Parker. “Since people are going through harder times, and we’re inexpensive, people stop and take a look,� Parker said. “Sometimes people won’t buy a lot, but it’s a steady stream.� Parker said that he gets the majority of his business during football season. “It’s always consistent from year to year,� Parker said. “I’m sure the art scene will ride the economy out. It always does.� Rent at the Renaissance Market is $200 a year but can be up to $5,000 a month at commercial galleries, Parker said. But the arts are something that are worth the funding, Choinacky said. “The arts push culture forward,� Choinacky said. “I understand that a lot of people’s money is going to food banks and social services because that’s where people put their money in times like these. But art and art education are things that I hold close to my heart and that I’m always going to hold a torch for.�

Pharmacy students share views From page 1

Cultural Proficiency Committee. The committee’s core purpose is to create and maintain a learning, research and work environment that promotes diversity of people, beliefs and ideas, according to the college’s Web site. “[Pharmacists] have to be careful of individualizing and customizing,� Brown said. “You can’t truly tailor your care if you don’t understand the nuances of the patient. Generalizing is a starting point, but it can lead to the danger of stereotyping.� During the forum, pharmacy students were asked to share their views on and experiences with diversity both in the college and the health care field. “Understanding diversity is practicing empathy and not sympathy,� said third-year pharmacy student Saadia Ali. “It’s understanding that people are different.�

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T HE DAILY TEXAN

Battle in Yemen rages on despite mutual cease-fire

Bebeto Mathews | Associated Press

In this photo taken Wednesday, a passerby takes a picture of a tree uprooted in Central Park after a fast-moving storm in New York. Americans planned save-the-tree fundraisers, packages for soldiers and beach cleanups along with familiar remembrances in three cities to mark the eighth anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11. This year was the first time the anniversary was named a national day of service.

Community service marks 9/11 By Suzanne Ma The Associated Press NEW YORK — Americans planned beach cleanups, packages for soldiers and save-the-tree fundraisers along with familiar remembrances in three cities to mark eight years since the attacks of Sept. 11, the first time the anniversary was named a national day of service. “Instead of us simply remembering the horrible events and, more importantly, the heroes who lost their lives on 9/11, we are all going to turn into local heroes,� said Ted Tenenbaum, a Los Angeles shop owner who offered free handyman services Thursday and planned to do so again Friday. Similar donations of time and labor were planned across

the country after President Barack Obama and Congress declared the day would be dedicated to service this year for the first time. Some Americans are suspicious about the new commemoration, though, fearing it could overshadow a somber day of remembrance for nearly 3,000 people killed aboard four jetliners and at the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon, and a field in western Pennsylvania. “When I first heard about it, I was concerned,� said Debra Burlingame, whose brother was the American Airlines pilot of the hijacked jet that crashed into the Pentagon. “I fear, I greatly fear, at some point we’ll transition to turning it into Earth Day where we go and plant trees

and the remembrance part will become smaller, and smaller and smaller.� In a column in American Spectator magazine last month, conservative commentator Matthew Vadum wrote that the push for volunteerism was an attempt “to try to change 9/11 from a day of reflection and remembrance to a day of activism, food banks and community gardens.� Sue Katz, a tour bus guide in New York City, planned a walking tour in Central Park to raise money to repair damage after hundreds of century-old trees were toppled by a recent storm. Katz called the park “New York City’s lungs� and said of the fundraiser, “This is my way to give back.� A Boston group founded by

victims’ family members — two of the four planes left from Boston — planned to write letters to U.S. soldiers overseas and pack CARE packages. In San Diego, Dave Matthews Band bassist Stefan Lessard is sponsoring a cleanup of Ocean Beach. Volunteers who made firefighters’ meals or helped remove tons of debris from the World Trade Center site planned to join family members to read names of more than 2,700 victims killed when hijacked jetliners crashed into the towers on Sept. 11, 2001. In New York, thousands planned moments of silence four times — twice for when jetliners crashed into the Trade Center towers, and for the moment each of the towers collapsed.

By Ahmed Al-Haj The Associated Press SAN’A, Yemen — Yemen’s government launched a new offensive against Shiite rebels in the north of the country, destroying many of their vehicles and hideouts, an army statement said Thursday. Both sides claimed victory, however, in the intense day’s fighting, which came just a week after the government declared a unilateral cease-fire that fell apart in hours. The five-year-old rebellion is led by Shiite tribesmen who complain they are discriminated against by the government. The rebels have also accused the state of allying with hard-line Sunni fundamentalists, whom consider Shiites as heretics. The fighting has raised fears that increased lawlessness could provide cover for al-Qaida militants who have sought sanctuary in the impoverished nation.

The fighting takes place just across the border from oil-rich Saudi Arabia, a close U.S. ally. The rebel spokesman, Mohammed Abdel-Salam, said his movement was able to repel the army assault, destroying their tanks and causing a “large loss of life.� The rebels said they have been able to keep the government from entering the town of Saada, which has been the rebellion’s epicenter. On Wednesday, however, 17 rebels were killed in an air strike, according to a government statement, which said they were caught sneaking through the mountains near Saada. Four men survived the attack and are in custody. Aid agencies warn the fighting is causing a humanitarian disaster and they have been unable to send emergency aid to the already impoverished region.

Courtesy of the Yemeni Army and The Associated Press

In this photo released Monday by the Yemeni army, Yemni armored vehicles are seen in Saada province, Yemen.

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OPINION

4

Friday, September 11, 2009

Editor in Chief: Jillian Sheridan Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Jeremy Burchard David Muto Dan Treadway Lauren Winchester

T HE DAILY TEXAN

GALLERY

VIEWPOINT

Sustaining Austin

Austin has a reputation for being an environmentally conscious city. Solar panels pepper the roofs of buildings and homes, bikers zip alongside cars in specially drawn lanes and the city plans to be carbon neutral by 2020. It is surprising, then, that in a town so concerned with sustainability, there is no city position that oversees environmental initiatives. That could change when the City Council votes on its budget Monday, the Austin American-Statesman reports. Despite the city’s current hiring freeze and budget cuts due to the recession, council members will vote to establish an “environmental stainability officer” who will focus on ways to conserve energy and natural resources and help Austin implement new environmental policies. The city has environmental leadership, to be sure — there is the Austin Climate Protection Plan and an inter-departmental Climate Action team that sets and helps reach environmental goals for the city government’s separate departments. But there is no single position to help integrate and streamline the efforts of these different entities. A leader to supervise these environmental efforts and create new ones would be a step toward efficiency and accomplishing environmental goals. Furthermore, the stainability officer would report to City Manager Marc Ott, suggesting that the position could wield considerable influence and not just become another bureaucracy-mired post. Austin is ahead of many other Texas cities in terms of sustainability, according to rankings published by SustainLane.com. But nationally, it lags behind other cities such as Denver, Portland and San Francisco. Austin has even dropped in the rankings from No. 6 in 2005 to No. 14 in 2008. We’ve come a long way in terms of environmental policy, but we can’t stop here. There are still urgent issues to be addressed, such as water conservation, which has become an even more salient problem in light of the severe drought. The position will also have the effect of not only conserving natural resources, but saving taxpayer money through initiatives such as energy efficiency. Budget cuts are an unfortunate consequence of the economic downturn, and the city’s proposed slashing of $30 million has been painful — even the police and fire department are not immune to the cuts. It may seem counterintuitive to create a new job in this economic climate, but even though money is scarce, council members should look beyond the recession and consider the long run, and make an investment that will help keep our rapidly growing city sustainable. — Lauren Winchester for the editorial board

GALLERY

SPOTLIGHT ON COLLEGE COUNCILS

A new degree plan By Mykel Estes Daily Texan Guest Columnist The semester has just started, and the College of Liberal Arts is already making some noteworthy noise on a campus buzzing with back-to-school excitement and BCS dreams. Whether you check the UT Web site, pick up an edition of The Daily Texan or just walk around campus, the enthusiasm surrounding the largest academic body on campus is hard to ignore, and the changes provide opportunities for everyone. One of those opportunities is the longawaited arrival of the International Relations and Global Studies major to the college this semester. Students originally proposed this major in 2005. Shortly after the Senate of College Councils passed a resolution in support of the new major, a subcommittee was formed to lay the foundation for the degree program. Because of diligent support and hard work by students, faculty and administration, the International Relations and Global Studies major is finally here. This is an exciting opportunity for all

students to explore a growing field in a hands-on, interdisciplinary way by taking courses in the arts, sciences, communications and public affairs. Students will also be required to participate in a studyabroad program and complete a capstone research project, making this a truly unique opportunity for UT students. I encourage you to be proud of your individual college that has worked to ensure that the University maintains its status as one of the top public institutions. We have some of the best faculty, students and resources in the nation, and every college’s contributions are admirable. By getting involved in your college through your individual council, speaking out at both Senate and Student Government meetings or working with your advisor, you will be able to make your own contributions to our community — just like the students who advocated the International Relations and Global Studies major. There is a place for you to make your mark on the University, and there is no better time to do it than now. Mykel Estes is a rhetoric and writing major and president of the Liberal Arts Council.

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Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan by placing it in a recycling bin or back in the burnt-orange stand where you found it.

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SUBMIT A COLUMN

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the editorial board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. All Texan editorials are written by the editorial board, which is listed in the top right corner of this page.

Have someting to say? Say it in print, and to the entire campus community. The Daily Texan Editorial Board welcomes submissions for guest columns. Columns must be between 500 and 700 words. Send columns to editor@dailytexanonline.com. The Texan reserves the right to edit all columns for clarity and liability if chosen for publication.

The way to spend summer By Daniel Earnest Daily Texan Columnist UT’s vibrant diversity can be seen in the ways its students spend their summer vacations. Some students spend their summers at home relaxing, reading books or laying out by the pool. Others stay in Austin in to gain course credit or just waste away while enjoying the always-lively nightlife of West Campus. More ambitious students trek to cities like Chicago, New York or Washington, D.C., seeking to bolster their resumes or stuff their pockets. Others travel abroad, immersing themselves in an unfamiliar culture. One group of UT students spends its time volunteering at youth camps, working for non-profit organizations or traveling abroad to serve on mission trips. In my opinion, these students are among the elite. While their contemporaries are searching for ways to fulfill their desires, these altruistic students are working to change the world. Sure, summer for these students may not have been as lucrative or resume-enhancing, but it was not worthless. Rather, their abstinence from a typical college student’s summer is admirable. Josh Coulter, a Plan II and business senior at UT, has what it takes to net an impressive internship or high-paying job over the summer. But Coulter chose to live with 15

high-school-aged students in a cabin without air conditioning during a 10-week stay at a youth camp. When asked why he chose to spend his summer living in conditions that few of us could endure, Coulter said, “I really wanted to seize the opportunity to leave a lasting impression on the kids, because I remember how impactful older influences were on my life growing up.” As far as giving up what could have been a more comfortable or profitable summer, Coulter remarked that he was more interested in “life-building, and not just resume-building.” He added, “I feel like I grew more personally and spiritually than I would have had I been working at a real job.” Similarly, marketing junior Kelsey Matschek journeyed to Ethiopia over the summer with a group of college students, hoping to live with the local people. “I really wanted to go to bring hope to a people that I knew had very little,” she said. “It really was great getting to show a completely different group of people the love and mercy that I so passionately believe in,” Matschek said. “Coming back, I was glad to realize that I had been part of something way bigger than myself. I couldn’t have experienced that sitting in a cubicle.” There are plenty of occasions to serve Austin while you are here. You do not have to journey to an

exotic location to change the world. There is no better place to start than exactly where you are standing. Austin has a needy homeless community, and there are several student groups and non-profit organizations that reach out to this often-ignored group. But you do not even need to do that. If you are willing, just pick someone up off the Drag and take him to lunch. Ask about his day. Smile at him. Learn who he is. You have no idea how these little things might make someone’s day. Getting involved with a community school is also a great — not to mention easy and fun — way to donate your time. Having volunteered at an elementary school in East Austin last year, I can testify not only to how much need there is for volunteers, but also to the impact a college student can make on a young kid’s life. We are at a stage of life where giving our time and energy can have deep, lasting effects. As Bill Clinton said in his book “Giving,” “The gift of time can sometimes be more satisfying and more valuable than money.” In other words, the fact that you are poor or on a budget is simply no excuse to not get involved. So go out and find your niche in some sort of community service. You may never have such an opportunity to make a difference again. Earnest is a finance junior

The stench of freshness with their high school sweethearts, or think college is going to be a 24-7 pants party — and they’re the ones issuing the invitations. My fellow classmates, The freshmen are filled with school spirit in a Welcome to the fall semester of 2009 here at UT. I way that others can only emulate. Shout “Texas!” to trust you’ve already shifted your mindset from the a group of them and nearly every single one will stream of summer debauchery to the river of scholas- shout “Fight!” right back at you. Aside from the tic intemperance. No longer will every day be a ca- usual chants, any of them will confess, at the slightrousal through the night, moving you a step closer est provocation, their deep and heartfelt loathing to cirrhosis of the liver, doing things of the University of Oklahoma and you’ll regret the morning after and Texas A&M. sleeping until 6 p.m. Instead, you’ll Perhaps most shockingly of all, have to limit those activities to Thursthese newcomers still have faith in UT day through Saturday. Student Government. While we were As you walk to your new classrocked by the corruption and cronyes and settle into the familiar rouThis is the ism of last year ’s SG elections, the tine, you may have noticed something first-years were mostly seniors in high species that has different about this semester — even school, more worried about the prom invaded: the more disturbing than the plus/minus and being in the top 10 percent than grading system. If you aim your nose what was going on at a school they freshman, who carefully, you should be able to pick did not yet attend. Without these scanthink that they up a particular odor that’s been growdals in mind, freshmen are still willing ing stronger ever since the freshman to place their trust (and student fees) can maintain a orientations during the summer, one into the hands of an organization they relationship with that has now reached overpowering assume is both representative of the proportions. I am, of course, referring their high school student populace and a body that acto the unmistakable stench of firstcomplishes enough to make it worth sweethearts. year students. its high cost to the University. Everywhere you go, they crowd Now that the long semester has around you, taking the parking space finally begun, we’ll be seeing a lot you wanted, blocking the sidewalk more of these freshmen littering our as they look quizzically at their camUniversity. A new herd of first-years pus maps, committing unsolicited acts of friendliness has been corralled onto campus, a fresh set of Longand, above all, emitting a pungent odor of freshness. horns, with the smell to prove it. It’s the smell of exThough some of them try to blend in with the rest of citement about school, unadulterated idealism about the students at UT, they are easy to pick out of the what college is going to be like and a seemingly uncrowd. They are widely known to be much shorter breakable optimism about the state of their own futhan regular undergraduates. tures. It smells disgusting. This is the species that has invaded: the freshman, who thinks that he or she can maintain a relationship Miller is a women’s and gender studies sophomore. By Benjamin Miller Daily Texan Columnist


5 UNIV

5

NEWS

Friday, September 11, 2009

ACC Police Department earns state recognition Award is evidence of excellence, service, says ACC Police Chief Waller By Rachel Platis Daily Texan Staff The Austin Community College Police Department is one of 19 state law enforcement agencies and the only community college in Texas to receive “Recognized Status� from the Texas Police Chiefs Association Foundation recognition program. Police departments voluntarily enter themselves into an internal review process conducted by program officials, said program coordinator Marlin Price. Departments must meet 161 standards, ranging from Taser usage training to properly securing evidence rooms. ACC entered the program last August. “It’s a pretty prestigious award at this point,� Price said. “The program is very similar to the national accreditation program but is directed specifically at police departments in Texas using Texas law and practices.�

This is the first time the police department has earned an accreditation. “I think the recognition shows a commitment to excellence and service to all things that we do,� said ACC Police Chief Frankie Waller. “It’s a commitment to professional accountability.� There are 40,000 students enrolled at ACC this semester, and the police department deals with many common crimes that occur at other college campuses, Waller said. “The major crimes are similar to a lot of campuses and include things like vehicle burglaries,� he said. “One thing that’s different is that we don’t have fraternities and sororities, so we don’t have near the level of crime [as larger universities].� Other law-enforcement offices, such as the UT Police Department, are accredited by national agencies such as the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies and the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators. UTPD has no plans to apply for the ac-

creditation from the Texas Police Chiefs Association, though the UT Health Science Center and the UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center are both recognized. “When an agency achieves this status, it reassures the citizens of a city and the administration and students at a college that their police department is doing everything the right way,� Price said. “It involves the whole department and requires training in areas that maybe they haven’t had training in before.� The program also provides police departments with parameters and guidelines for interdepartmental affairs, including suggestions for a more efficient way for citizens to file complaints against the department. ACC student Lauren Einck is studying to become a dental hygienist and has taken classes at various campuses for two years. “I think a police department should provide an overall feeling Mary Kang | Daily Texan Staff of safety and security at a college campus, which I think the ACC Officer Alvin Thompson checks reports at the Austin Community College police office on Thursday. The ACC Police Department received “Recognized Status� from the Texas Police Chiefs Association Foundation. police officers do,� Einck said.

Journalist serves oppressed despite violence, threats threats and pressure from the CoBy Hannah Jones lombian government and other Daily Texan Staff Colombian journalist Hollman groups to stop his work. In 2000, Morris says serving those who he was exiled from Colombia but are oppressed is worth the danger returned after living in Spain for a year. posed to journalists. “It is very difficult to see this The room at the Jesse H. Jones Communications Center was full kind of pain and not tell the stoof intent listeners as Morris spoke ry,� Morris said. The Knight Center for JournalThursday of listening to those victims of long-running upheaval in ism in the Americas sponsored the lecture. Rosenhis home country. tal Alves, jourMorris has nalism professor covered corrupand Knight Cention and violence ter director, orgain Colombia as a Many times, we nized the event broadcast news journalists are and acted as Morjournalist and reris’ translator. porter for the past arrogant. We must “It’s real15 years. His onaccept and have ly touched my line television coffee in these heart,� said Alves, show, Contravia who is originally (Countercurrent), very poor houses.� from Brazil. “I’m f o l l o w s M o rris into poverty— Hollman Morris from the region.� Morris’ efforts stricken areas of Colombian journalist have earned him the country that the 2007 Human are usually avoidRights Watch Deed by the media fender Award where guerrilla and the International Press Freewarfare and crime are prevalent. “In the past 30 years in Colum- dom Award in 2006. When asked how people trust bia, 100 journalists have been assassinated. All except for two [of and confide in him as a journalist, those cases] have been unpun- he responds with one word, “Resished,� Morris said. “It would be peto,� or respect. He went on to say easy for us [journalists] to leave, that one must enter the environobviously, but that can be more ment of ordinary citizens in order painful than enduring the prob- to form relationships with them. “Many times, we journalists are lems in our country.� Contravia has not been distrib- arrogant,� he says. “We don’t listen, we forget to listen. We must uted in Colombia. “It disturbs and is too much of accept and have coffee in these an inconvenience,� Morris said very poor houses.� To view Morris’ reports from Coduring the lecture. “People don’t lombia in English and Spanish, go to want to hear about this.� Morris recalled receiving death www.contravia.tv.

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Hollman Morris spoke to students Thursday about his experiences as a journalist in Colombia and the danger of reporting.

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6 S/L

6

UNIVERSITY

Friday, September 11, 2009

Conservatives talk facts and fiction of health care By Katrina Munez Daily Texan Staff The College Republicans at Texas hosted guest speaker Liz Young, a UT alum and former chair of the Young Conservatives of Texas, Thursday to discuss the myths and rumors surrounding President Barack Obama’s health care plan. Young, a policy analyst for the Texas Public Policy Foundation, addressed various concerns about the bill, including the consequences of the proposed public option and Obama’s mid-October Congressional deadline, which may be difficult for lawmakers to meet. “I hope [Young] will bring to light the fact that, yes, we need health care, but we need a longer time to think about it,� said Jeremy Grodin, College Republicans at Texas treasurer. “We shouldn’t have to rush into a decision like that.� Mikael Garcia, president of College Republicans, hopes to make the public more aware of the damages of reform by expressing the Republican argument, a perspective he feels has not been given enough attention. “Our objective is not to tear down the President,� Garcia said. “We want to show our side, so we’re not going to say too many nice things, but we’re going to say what we believe.� Young presented a “Fact Versus Fiction� segment in which she denounced the promises Obama and some congressmen have made, including an increased,

rather than an unchanged, deficit and the eventual extermination of Medicare. She also proposed a patient-driven health care plan in which individuals would buy their own insurance rather than recieve it through their employers. “I believe in health care reform, but I also believe in public opinion,� said Grodin. “Politicians and the President just need to listen.� Students in attendance hoped the meeting would give them a more well-rounded understanding of the risks and benefits of the bill. “I want another perspective,� said freshman Matt Eastman. “I have my own view, I have Obama’s view and I have views of various newspeople, but you can never have too much information.� Speakers were also ready to address opposing viewpoints during a question-andanswer session following the presentation. “We encourage debate from the University Democrats and those from all sides of the political spectrum,� Garcia said. “Opponents have valid points. Who are we to take away from their cause?� Garcia said that even though the views discussed come from the minority party in Congress, they are no less credible. “No matter who you talk to, you’re going to get different answers from everyone, whether they’re Democrats or Republicans,� Garcia said. “People will listen to what they want to hear, but we want people to know the facts.�

Rachel Taylor | Daily Texan Staff

Adam Rosen makes an announcement at a College Republicans meeting Thursday. The meeting discussed Obama’s proposed health care plan. Students in attendance hoped the meeting would give them a more well-rounded understanding of the risks and benefits of the bill.

University Democrats bring students into health care debate At health care town hall, all eyes are on the largest uninsured group: youth

Eric Ou | Daily Texan Staff

David Warner, professor of Health and Social Policy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, listens at a UT town hall health care reform meeting.

By Regan Mathias Daily Texan Staff Young adults make up the largest portion of the uninsured in the United States. A health care town hall meeting, hosted by the University Democrats and The Roosevelt Institution, a non-partisan think tank, was held on campus Thursday night and aimed to get that same group of Americans involved in the health care reform debate. “We wanted to educate students,� said University Democrats President Melessa Rodri-

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guez. “This partnership provided a good way to start the conversation for students. We wanted to focus on issues, not ideology.� Handouts that were distributed during the event said that young adults aged 19 through 29 are the largest population of the uninsured in the United States. Public policy professor David Warner urged students to get involved in the political process in his opening remarks. “I hope that students will become more knowledgeable about the issue,� Warner said. “Hopefully, they will take part in the debate or in other political processes, either nationally or in Texas.� He detailed the bills currently before Congress and the specific

impacts health-care reform would have on Texans. Warner said Texas provides practically no care for the unemployed unless they are single mothers, disabled or elderly. He said if a bill passes, a huge number of adults in Texas will get coverage. In Texas, insurance companies can get information about the age, gender and previous health conditions of employees at small companies before agreeing to cover them. Reform would make it illegal for insurance companies to discriminate based on that information, Warner said. After Warner’s speech, the students broke into groups to discuss their concerns. Warner sat with the groups to answer their

questions. Students brought up a claim involving a variety of issues, including the debunked death panels, the deficit and reproductive rights. “Getting access to coverage for everyone is my primary goal,� said University Democrats Vice President Andy Jones. “Equal access to health care is not simply a national issue of economics and politics. It is an issue of social justice and civil liberties.� While there were varying opinions, the discussion remained civil. “I am concerned about the deficit,� said economics junior Steve Karson. “We are going to bet that [Americans] will be able to pay for this by ourselves. I fear that bet might be too great.�


7 NEWS

7

UNIVERSITY

Friday, September 11, 2009

Group aims to up number of black graduate students By Jordan Haeger Daily Texan Staff The Black Graduate Student Association will make increasing the number of black graduate students at UT a top priority for the upcoming academic year. About 40 people attended the organization’s kick-off event Thursday evening at the Union. Association Secretary Richelle Thomas said the association aims to “be a social outlet as well as offer professional networking among graduate students of the African Diaspora.� Only four percent of UT’s graduate students are African American, said association President Nick Gatlin . The association plans on using various recruiting tools such as undergraduate fairs and promotional videos to boost those numbers, Gatlin said. He said students who are struggling to pay for a graduate degree may be going to institutions with better graduate student funding. The association, which was started in 2002, claims about 35 active members, but at times hosts events with upwards of

100 attendees, Thomas said. At Thursday’s event, the association welcomed back students and got to know some of the African American faculty members on campus, she said. “It’s a medium for black graduate students to come together to see faces similar to their own because there are so few in each discipline,� Gatlin said of the organization. Celina Dozier, an environmental engineering graduate student, was a member of the Black Graduate Student Association at the University of CaliforniaBerkeley. She said she will likely join the organization to meet and interact with students from similar backgrounds. Amber Chenevert, an advertising doctoral student, said she is looking to meet graduate students with similar experiences as hers. “I’ve always been in diverse environments, but it’s nice to have a group of people who look like you when there aren’t that many,� Chenevert said. The association will hold its next event, the Know Your Rights Forum, on Oct. 1.

Eric Ou | Daily Texan Staff

Rian Carkhum socializes with fellow Black Graduate Student Association members and new graduate students at their kick-off event.

Ariel Min | Daily Texan Staff

Daniella Martinez, the membership director of the Senate of College Council, listens to propositions made during the second meeting on Thursday.

Council passes GPA calculation By Viviana Aldous Daily Texan Staff A new communications director and 15 new members joined the Senate of College Councils at its meeting Thursday. It approved resolutions to support the creation of college-bridging programs and to create a Universitywide GPA calculator. The senate appointed Christopher Fox to serve as the communications director after the former director resigned over the summer. The new members were chosen to serve as at-large representatives on the senate after applying during the first weeks of class. “He has proven leadership on campus,� said Senate President Lauren Ratliff. “Obviously, we wanted to have one at the beginning of the year, but he’s ready.

He’s really passionate, and he’s hitting the ground running.� Fox said his plans include maintaining a consistent newsletter and expanding the list of students and organizations that receive Senate e-mails. At the meeting, the assembly unanimously approved legislation to support the creation of a University-wide GPA calculator. The College of Liberal Arts is the only UT college with a GPA calculator, but the resolution supports the expansion of the service and its adjustment to the new plus/minus grading system. “A lot of our comparison schools have them, and since we implemented plus/minus grading this year, a lot of students expressed confusion on how to calculate their grades,� said resolution co-author

Allie Smith, curriculum vice chair and history and journalism sophomore. “I think a calculator would calm a lot of their fears and anxieties, especially those who want to apply to be in an honors program or go to graduate school. It’ll help them know where they stand.� Senate members also passed a resolution introduced last week to support the creation of collegebridging programs, or courses of study that involve degrees or certificates combining coursework from more than one school or college. Members will hold an open forum on the programs at 5:30 p.m. next Tuesday in room 4.110 of the University Teaching Center. Adam Hagerman, Democratic Education at Texas agency director, proposed legislation to create small, one-hour seminar cours-

es led by students. The courses, led by faculty advisers, would provide an elective credit. “Students aren’t really learning to read critically, write cognitively or speak persuasively, and DemTex would teach them this,� said Hagerman, a music and European studies senior. “When it’s an open discussion, students are more confident and more learning is achieved.� The classes would be available to any undergraduate student but would be targeted at first- and second-year students, Hagerman said. “As a lower division student, you end up in a lot of large lecture classes, and you don’t really get to interact on a smaller level,� he said. Members will vote on the introduced legislation at the next meeting on Sept. 24.

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8 SPTS

SPORTS

8

Friday, September 11, 2009

Sports Editor: Austin Talbert E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY TEXAN

BIG 12 FOOTBALL

Iowa St. goes Texas to go where it’s never been for another upset against instate rival

By Wes DeVoe Daily Texan Staff It may not be obvious to the naked eye or stand out to the casual fan, but the Iowa State-Iowa matchup means bragging rights are on the line in The Daily Texan’s Big 12 game of the week. Both teams enter Saturday’s contest 1-0 after two mediocre performances against North Dakota State and Northern Iowa. The Cyclones beat the Bison 34-17, while the Hawkeyes downed the Panthers 17-16 in what was almost a huge upset. It was the first time in 10 years that the Cyclones have won a season opener. Iowa, a proven Big Ten program, on the other hand, had expectations of competing for the Big Ten crown along with Ohio State and Penn State. But the Bison came into Kinnick Stadium with an upset on their minds. The Hawkeyes were forced to block two late field goals with under 10 seconds left in the game to preserve the victory and save themselves an embarrassment on their own turf. The consequence for such a close call: no ranking in this week’s Top 25. But now, the state of Iowa’s Super Bowl is here, and rankings and records can be thrown out of the window. The Cyclones and Hawkeyes will renew their rivalry for the 57th time at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames on Saturday. Iowa holds a 37-19 lead in the alltime series, but Iowa State has claimed seven of the last 11 meetings. The coaching edge would seem to go to Kirk Ferentz of Iowa, but first-year head coach Paul Rhoads has opened eyes for the Cyclones’ faithful after securing their first opening game win of the millennium. “Iowa State has a very experienced football team coming back,” Ferentz said. “We’ve only seen one exposure of them this year with the North Dakota State ball game. And they have a lot of returning players, and an excellent coaching staff. They played very, very well in their opener. So it looks like a much-improved team from a year ago, and we know we’re going to have our hands full.” Ferentz is 71-53 in 11 seasons for the Hawkeyes and has proven to be a big-time coach after recent upsets, most notably against Penn State last season. But playing in Jack Trice Stadium has not been kind to Kirk, as he only has one career win in Ames. “Obviously, this is a big game for both teams,” Ferentz said. “We’re excited about playing in it, and it’s been a tough game the last ten years. It’s been a tough game each and every time out there. It’s a tough rivalry.” The game will be a battle of the trenches, as the Cyclones put up 204 yards in last week’s contest, while the Hawkeyes only allowed 84 yards against the run. Kickoff is set for 11 a.m. Saturday.

Jeffrey McWhorter | Daily Texan file photo

Linebacker Roderick Muckelroy and the Longhorns will go north, leaving the hot weather to take on the Cowboys in their first ever game in Wyoming.

Longhorns look to remain undefeated traveling to unfamiliar territory By Michael Sherfield Daily Texan Staff Earl Thomas doesn’t know much about the state of Wyoming. Aaron Williams confesses that he has never been there, either. Other than a forecast somewhere in the 60s or lower, Williams doesn’t know what to expect when the Longhorns make their farthest trip north since a 1975 journey to Washington. Linebacker Roddrick Muckelroy isn’t even sure what city he’s going to be playing in on Saturday. “It’s up north, that’s about all I know about Wyoming,” Muckelroy said when questioned. It’s a feeling that echoes through most of the Texas team on the eve of its first confrontation with the Cowboys in 31 years. But while all the sights and sounds will be new,

the Texas defense should see a few familiar things the architect of the Missouri [offense], and he did a on the field. On the opposing sideline will be new great job with Chase Daniel. They moved the ball against everyone,” said Texas head coach Mack Brown. “Wyoming is running the Missouri offense. It is play for play.” Yet, while the schemes and playbook might look similar, Christensen won’t have the benefit It’s up north, that’s about all of 2008 Heisman Trophy nominee Daniel or NFL I know about Wyoming.” Draft picks Jeremy Maclin and Chase Coffman to — Roddrick Muckelroy, linebacker move the ball. Instead, he’ll be relying on less-heralded names to help the Cowboys out of an offensive slumber that saw them rank last in scoring in the NCAA in head coach Dave Christensen, the former offensive 2008, averaging only 12.7 points a game. The early signs were good for the Cowboys coordinator for Big 12 rival Missouri, who is bringing the Tigers’ offense with him to Laramie. “We’ve seen Dave for 12 straight years. He was HORNS continues on page 11

‘‘

SOCCER

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Game of the week features two top ten teams in Ohio

Revenge on the minds of two Kentucky teams After losses in California, Longhorns look to beat Kentucky and Louisville By Ben Freed Daily Texan Staff The women’s soccer team will look to bounce back Friday and Sunday after a difficult trip to the West Coast. Texas dropped both games to their California opponents and is hoping for better results when two teams from Kentucky visit Austin. Last year, Texas traveled to

Kentucky to face Louisville and the University of Kentucky in back-to-back road games. This year, the teams from the Bluegrass State will be the visiting teams, but Texas is hoping for similar results. Last year in Kentucky, the Longhorns beat both teams, taking the Wildcats down 3-0 and using double overtime to defeat the Cardinals 1-0. But the team looks much different this year. A strong group of underclassmen has taken over

SOCCER continues on page 11

Peyton McGee | Daily Texan Staff

Despite poor results so far this season from the Horns, Courtney Goodson has excelled, scoring two of the team’s six goals.

MEN’S GOLF

Longhorns take fourth place in Japanese tournament Charlie Holland shot a teambest 4-under 68 on Thursday to finish Texas’ week at the Topy Cup in Tanagura, Japan.

Michelle Connolly Daily Texan file photo

By Sameer Bhuchar Daily Texan Staff After three hard-fought days of neck-and-neck play, the Texas Men’s Golf team finished fourth at the Topy Cup in Tanagura, Japan on Thursday. Texas had numerous individual standout performers during the tournament, and on Thursday, it was senior Charlie Holland who took center stage. Holland scored a Texas best 4-under 68, and secured a top-10 individual finish as he tied for eighth. He was on fire all afternoon as he made seven birdies and finished with a one-under 215 for the tournament. Coach John Fields was extremely pleased with Holland’s performance. “Charlie Holland came back today with an outstanding 68. His play gave us a chance to finish in the top five,” Fields said. In his first varsity start with the Longhorns, junior Chris Causey

also had a breakthrough tournament. On Thursday, he carded a 2-over 74 in the final round. He racked up birdies at the eighth, ninth, 11th, 14th and 18th holes, ultimately helping him finish 11th overall with a one-over 216. “Chris Causey had a solid event and narrowly missed the top-10 in his first varsity event as a Longhorn. I am proud of his spirit and devotion to our team,” Fields said of the junior. “He will challenge our players to continue to get better, which is exactly what a very good team needs.” Sophomore Alex Moon posted his lowest round of the tournament on Thursday with a 1-over 73. Moon finished in a tie for 24th. Texas’ other two golfers, Lance Lopez and Dylan Fritelli, finished 20th and 27th, respectively. Out of the 60 total participants, all of the Longhorn participants

GOLF continues on page 9

By Matt Hohner Daily Texan Staff Ohio State will host Southern California in Columbus this Saturday in a battle of college football’s two elite programs and coaches. The two teams played each other last season in Los Angeles, in what was supposed to be a competitive and close game. USC was the topranked team in the country, while the Buckeyes were ranked fifth at the time. But the highly anticipated game was just about over by halftime with the Trojans running away with the contest 35-3. Ohio State has not performed well on the national stage the past three years, giving the Big Ten a bad reputation as a weak conference. The Buckeyes were routed by Florida at the 2006 national championship game and lost again to LSU in the 2007 national title game.

Last season, the Buckeyes played against USC, Penn State and Texas, who all defeated the scarlet and gray faithful on primetime national television. But the Buckeyes are out to silence their critics and get revenge on the Trojans. The nation is no stranger to Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor. Expectations are high for Pryor this year, as Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel has handed him the keys to the offense. Overall, Ohio State has many aspects of their game to improve on. Ohio State barely escaped with a victory against Navy in their season opener. An interception by the Buckeyes during a two-point conversion secured the victory. The four-point win didn’t impress the college football voters, as the Buck-

USC continues on page 9

Jeffrey McWhorter | Daily Texan file photo

Ohio State looks for revenge at “The Horseshoe” against the Trojans who defeated the Buckeyes 35-3 last year in California.


9 SPTS

GOLF: Coach

pleased with results in Japan

9

SPORTS

Friday, September 11, 2009

VOLLEYBALL

Longhorns to give Italy a taste of Texas

From page 8 finished in the top half of the golfers at the Topy Cup. Prior to the tournament, Holland made note of how important the Topy Cup was to starting the year off right. “We can really set the pace for the season if we do well,� he said. Overall, Coach Fields believes that the team did get off on the right foot and that the Longhorns can only hope to expand upon this early success as they move forward. “Finishing fourth in our first event of the fall is a precursor for the rest of the season,� Fields said. “Over the course of the fall season, our tournament rosters will change based upon our home qualifying. Those that step up will lead this team to a very good year.�

‘‘

USC: Freshman

quarterback leads Trojans From page 8

eyes dropped a couple spots in the standings. “Our guys gave excellent effort to prepare, to come into the game,� Tressel said. “But we’re going to need to get much, much better. We know that.� The Buckeyes got a heaping dose of Midshipmen quarterback Ricky Dobbs, who carried Navy on his back the entire game. Dobbs threw for two touchdowns and ran for two more. Matt Barkley doesn’t have to put the Trojans on his shoulders to guarantee a victory. Barkley made a solid start to his collegiate career, throwing for 233 yards and a touchdown. But it should be interesting to see how he will react to the hostile environment in Columbus. Trojan fans will sleep better once they know whether Barkley can prove himself against a top team, while Pryor can use this game to remind the college football nation and Ohio State fans why he is expected to be a Heisman candidate this season. Southern Cal stomped San Jose State 56-3 in their season opener. The Trojans got off to a slow start after kickoff, but quickly picked up pace during the game, racking up 620 yards of real estate, while only allowing 121 yards. The Buckeyes must watch out for the depth and talent of the USC running game. Joe McKnight ran for 105 yards last year against Ohio State. Expect McKnight to improve his numbers during this year’s game, as the Buckeyes lost linebackers James Laurinaitis and defensive back Malcolm Jenkins to the NFL. But will the game live up to the hype, unlike last year? The Daily Trojan reported that Saturday’s USC vs. Ohio State game has price listings starting at $1,000. With Oklahoma looking from the bottom up early in the season, expect the loser of USC or Ohio State to join the Sooners in an uphill battle to climb back to the top of the rankings.

the team’s summer trip to ItaBy Jordan Godwin ly was busy winning a national Daily Texan Staff Second-ranked Texas volley- championship in the high-jump. “I saw pictures, and I’m glad ball makes its home debut tonight against in the Italian Na- they had fun,� said senior outside hitter Destinee Hooker. tional A2 team. Hooker and the rest of her “The food is very different here,� said Italian star setter teammates have done their Manuela Di Crescenzo jokingly. fair share of traveling already “America is more fat in foods, this season with tournaments and for us, it’s strange to see in California and Hawaii. After facing nothing but Top 25 more fat people here.� ranked teams, A l e a n Te x the Longhorns as volleyball stand undefeatteam visited Ited at 5-0. aly this summer “After so as part of a EuroIt’s a much slower much travel and pean tour during such a long prewhich the Longteam than what e a s o n , w e ’ re horns faced sevwe’re used to playing sready to finaleral international here in the States. ly come home teams. Like the and have some Italians are exThere’s a lot of Engle periencing now, timing involved, and support,� said. “Our fans the Texas volleysometimes there’s a are so great, and ball players noticed differenc- little more frustration it’s going to be a lot of fun to take es between Italbecause the game’s on Italy.� ian and Amerinot happening as fast The Italian can food. team faced Tex“The pizza was as you want as A&M earliway different it to unfold� er this week. Althan I thought it was going to be,� — Jerritt Elliott though the Aggies won three said junior outhead coach of four sets, the side hitter JuliItalians’ differann Faucette. “It ent style of play was flat and kind stumped the Agof crusty, rather than the thick pizza we have gies early on. “It’s a much slower team than here. It was super good, and I what we’re used to playing here actually like it better.� Faucette’s grandmother and in the States,� said Texas head grandfather are from Italy, and coach Jerritt Elliott. “There’s both of her parents are half-Ital- a lot of timing involved, and ian. Faucette said her grandfather sometimes there’s a little more speaks Italian, but she is limited frustration because the game’s to the small vocabulary she de- not happening as fast as you want it to unfold.� veloped while touring Italy. No matter the pace, one of the Her teammate, senior setter Ashley Engle, said she hopes to highest-ranked Texas volleyball improve her Italian across the teams ever assembled expects net during the matches but did the Gregory Gymnasium crowd to electrify the game. learn one word this summer. “We’ve been away for a long “Gelato was the best thing that we ate,� Engle said. “We found a time,� Hooker said. “Coming lot of that everywhere we went, in and hearing the “Eyes of every day, and that was proba- Texas� and “Texas Fight� being played gets me excited. I’m bly my favorite thing there.� One player that missed out on ready to play.�

Paul Chouy | Daily Texan file photo

Ashley Engle enjoyed gelato when she and her teammates were in Italy over the summer. The Longhorns are excited to play their first home game of the season against the Italian National A2 team.

  

          

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10 AD


11 CLASS

11

SPORTS

Friday, September 11, 2009

HORNS: Wyoming also coming off win that’s when you come out and things don’t go your way,� Muckelroy said. “They’ve got great skill players. They’ve got great speed and tall receivers. They’ve got great players just like we’ve got great players, so we have to go out and play.� Instead, most Texas defenders have been hitting the film room to do their research, and there’s one particular game that sticks out. Under the national spotlight in Austin last year, the Longhorns faced and dominated Christensen’s offense,

From page 8 (1-0) in topping Weber State 29-22 last weekend. With the help of five interceptions by the defense, running back Darrius Terry scored twice on the ground while the twopronged quarterback attack combined to go 16-32 for 188 yards. Despite the pedestrian offensive numbers, Texas players insist they won’t be taking the Cowboys lightly. “You can’t underestimate a team, day, month day, 2008

RTISE ADVE TUDENT S ! YOUR NIZATION A ORG

holding the Tigers to three points in the first half en route to a 56-31 blowout. “It’s an advantage. We can look at the mistakes we made last year against Missouri,� Williams said. “There weren’t too many, but the ones we did make, we’re going to correct.� Meanwhile, the Longhorns could have another opponent to overcome in the mountains of Wyoming. The Cowboys’ War Memorial Stadium is the highest of any

college football venues in the country, sitting at 7,200 feet above sea level, more than 1,770 feet higher than its nearest competitor in Boulder, Colo. But Texas was quick to play down any fears of the altitude’s impact on player performance, citing last year’s trip to Colorado which Texas won 38-14 as evidence the 1 Horns can handle the shift. “We’re not worried about it,� Brown said. “It hasn’t been an issue; we’ve got a lot of depth.�

CLASSIFIEDS

SOCCER: Horns hope to recapture

momentum in home stadium From page 8 many of the spots on the roster and dominated the Longhorns’ scoring. All six of Texas’ goals this year have been scored by freshmen or sophomores, including two in a 4-2 loss to Cal by sophomore forward Courtney Goodson. The Longhorns have had a tough schedule to start the year and are hoping that they will be able to recapture some

Campus

momentum in the four-game homestand they are starting. The Longhorns’ lone win this year came at home, while they’ve lost three of four on the road. Historically, Texas enjoys a terrific home-field advantage at Myers, going 57-7-7 in the stadium since 2002. Texas faces Louisville on Friday night at 7:00 p.m. and Kentucky on Sunday at 1:00 p.m. at Mike A. Myers Track and Soccer Stadium.

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Friday, September 11, 2009


13 ENT

H1N1: How to

steer clear of swine flu this winter season

13

LIFE&ARTS

Friday, September 11, 2009

BEER: Pub nights and festivals boost brew scene

From page 14 emerged. First, there is the brash, dismissive group that waves off the threat of viral infection and shoots down anyone who expresses an inkling of concern. Then, there are those who can be heard before they are seen, with multiple keychainsized bottles of hand sanitizer rattling unfashionably from every one of their backpack straps. They berate coughers and verbally destroy repeat offenders who forget to sneeze into their elbows. They lift their shirts to cover their mouths while riding public transportation. They try very hard not to breathe. The rest of us fall somewhere between these two extremes: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather not get swine flu but see it more as a mucus-intensive inconvenience than a death sentence. With cases of H1N1 expected to occur on college campuses nationwide this semester, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to address swineflu etiquette: a few basics for everyone to keep in mind. Flubies especially.

1

2

Coughing and sneezing

This goes hand-in-hand with hand hygiene. The facts: The spread of the 2009 H1N1 virus is thought to occur in the same way that seasonal flu spreads from person to person, through people with influenza who cough or sneeze. The new fad seems to be to cough into your elbow. Health-care officials at the CDC support this practice, and so should you.

3

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

Alcohol-based hand sanitizer

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One squeeze will prevent disease,â&#x20AC;? a poster on the wall in Kinsolving Dining Center informs patrons. The Center for Disease Control in Atlanta backs up this claim: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alcohols are effective against human influenza viruses if used in proper concentration for a sufficient length of time,â&#x20AC;? it reports. Non-alcohol based sanitizer, they say, should inspire less confidence. The federal agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s copywriters had good reason to keep things vague; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be shocked to learn what people will use to sanitize their hands. In a quick skim of Web-posted comments on online articles warning of the dangers of alcohol-based sanitizer, readers touted as alternative antiseptics grapefruit seed extract, squirts of vodka and even human urine. Experts agree, though, that hand-washing is always preferable to all hand sanitizer. The Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Healthy Horns Web site links readers to an instructional video titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hands Togetherâ&#x20AC;? about proper hand-washing procedure, provided by the CDC. The bottom line: Whether or not you washed your hands is not usually detectable, but if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the irresponsible sort who turns down a squirt of hand sanitizer because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smelly and cold, you need to reform your ways.

Roommates

Strangely, the situation that seems to have the least amount of official protocol but requires the most energetic and dedicated display of civility is infection among roommates. James, who had a roommate before swine flu struck, still has one now. When I walked into the quarantined room, the roommate sat calmly at his desk, undisturbed by imminent illness all around him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My dad told me to take four of these with meals,â&#x20AC;? he said as he pulled out huge orange-flavored Vitamin C pills. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve sort of accepted that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to get it.â&#x20AC;? Resigned to catching the flu, he has not insisted that James sleep in the dorm hallway. The take-away message if your roommate is sick: bonne chance.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you get to [the mashing] stage, the process is pretty the reason was there was no beer much identical to what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dohere â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find any beer,â&#x20AC;? ing here,â&#x20AC;? Phelps says of home Martin says, laughing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But now â&#x20AC;&#x201D; brewing. He learned to brew at man, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just so much variety home before his brewing career now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crazy. I stand there for 20 began. minutes just looking, trying to find â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really a lot of prosomething new.â&#x20AC;? fessional training available,â&#x20AC;? he Inside the next fridge down fer- says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people get their start ments another of Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award home brewing.â&#x20AC;? winners â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the coconut porter, a North By Northwest, which celdark brew with coconut bits float- ebrated its tenth anniversary earing on top. lier this week, only serves beers â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is actually the first time brewed in-house, and Phelps overIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve remade it,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just to see sees the brewing process, which if I can repeat myself or at least do usually takes place about three a good job on it.â&#x20AC;? times a week. Martin is preparing for the Diâ&#x20AC;&#x153;I really cut my teeth here,â&#x20AC;? xie Cup in Houston next month Phelps says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The brewmaster has as well as the opened breweries Great American all over the world, Beer Festival in so I was lucky to Denver, Coloralearn from him.â&#x20AC;? do from Sept. 24 Today, Phelpsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; - 26. mash will become a Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big craft Martin beHeferweizen, a Gerbrew scene here longs to the Ausman wheat beer. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Austin.â&#x20AC;? tin Zealots, a lothe 904th of its kind cal home-brew be brewed here, â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kerry Martin to club that gathers each time yieldhome brewer ing about 30 kegsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; every other Saturday night to worth of beer. Each share their latest beer brewed here creations. rests in eight silâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big ver silos, stacked two-by-two in a craft brew scene here in Austin,â&#x20AC;? large square room, until it is sent Martin says, listing local micro- through a series of tubes to smallbreweries such as Live Oak and er, golden silos behind the bar, Real Ale, as well as Austin brew from which it is served on tap. pubs Uncle Billyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and North By The Oktoberfest brew, a dark Northwest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You kind of start to brew, has been fermenting in one see the same people at all these of the silver silos since the beginevents all the time and get to know ning of August. It will remain everybody, even if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not in there until late October, when it your club.â&#x20AC;? will be served at the pubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual celebration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool about the brewing In the pub scene in Austin is itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still an unTy Phelps stands on top of a der-served community,â&#x20AC;? Phelps raised metal platform between says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whenever a new brew pub two giant golden kettles. Steam opens, we see it as making the rises from the opening of one of community more aware of what the kettles rising off of a swirling weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing.â&#x20AC;? substance that looks like oatmeal. He says the local breweries This is how North Austin gather for a brewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; night once brew pub North By Northwest a month, and they all continue to makes its mash, trading the grow, even during the recession. chairs, ladders, pots and pans â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen 10 years of posof home brewers like Martin for itive growth,â&#x20AC;? Phelps says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I metal frameworks and tower- donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where the top is going silos. ing to be.â&#x20AC;?

From page 14

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Kerry Martin, an award-winning home brewer, adds CO2 gas to a keg inside his garage Wednesday afternoon. Martin is part of a vibrant network of home brewers and microbreweries in Austin.

STYLIST: Campus

provides dynamic, lively atmosphere From page 14 going to school there, and then when we moved back to this area and to Elgin, I started working here. I feel like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a people person, so interacting with different people every day is what I live for. This is a good place to do that. We see all kinds of people, all ages, all types. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting to see so many different individuals. We see lots of students every year, and at the same time, we have a lot of regular clientele. We always say weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting older, and our customers keep getting younger. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still going, but each year, we get Freshmen who are the same age every time. Most of our customers are guys. They come in to get what we call a clipper cut, which is the typical short haircut most guys have. When we do girls, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly just â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they come in to get a trim and clean it up,

but nothing really specific. Guys are still wearing their hair shaggy or messy but not nearly as long like it was a year or two ago. A bit more tamed, but on the longer side. Girls are still wearing it long. When you see stars or people on TV, it sets a trend. Sometimes, people ask for a celebrity haircut, or they bring a picture. I had a woman come in and she brought the picture of â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the couple that has all the kids that are getting divorced? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jon and Kate. She brought a picture of Kate and said she wanted that hair. I gave it to her. Elgin is about a 40-minute drive. I like living there because I live out in the country, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any neighbors. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great. But in Austin, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this crazy mix. You come here and you fight for parking, and there are all these people, you know how it is. I am in the best of both worlds.

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14 LIFE

LIFE&ARTS

14

Friday, September 11, 2009

Life&Arts Editor: Leigh Patterson E-mail: lifeandarts@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY TEXAN

Experienced Drag stylist remembers hairy times By Robert Rich

Hairdresser has defied the ages, the trends and the ever-youthful freshmen Joann Clements knows hair. A veteran stylist at ProCuts on the Drag, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen it all, be it the influx of students hoping to look like the latest hot celebrities or businesspeople from the Capitol stopping in to get a trim. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lived through the hair trends of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s, she has witnessed the cycles ebb and flow with the times and the tastes of the public. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked hair. Messing around with hair, just doing different things. I never tried actually cutting or styling hair before I started cosmetology school, but I said Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d try it. I went to Vogue here in Austin, and it went well, so here we are. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working at Pro-Cuts for 18 years. I started working in Waco while my husband was

STYLIST continues on page 13

Local uses garage as home brewery

garage. Below that, he sets a pot on a By Ben Wermund white plastic chair. A few feet away, Daily Texan Staff In the dingy garage of a Southwest behind his gold Chevy truck, he sets Austin home, small kegs lay strewn a large metal pot on a cubic metal across the ground amid pots, pans, burner. This is where Martin mashes buckets and empty glass containers his grains â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the first step in brewing of all sizes. Two bar stools sit in an beer, which is the process of heating aisle formed between three refrigera- grains to the point that the starches in them break down into fermenttors and two meat lockers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I brew, therefore I am,â&#x20AC;? reads a able sugars. This is where the alcohol comes from. magnet on the fridge Eventually, after closest to the open gaa series of straining, rage door. heating and cooling, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather be home adding water, hops brewing,â&#x20AC;? reads anLots of people and yeast to the liqother. uid that comes from This is the fromhave really fancy mashing, Marscratch home brewery store-bought stuff; I the tin will have his of Kerry Martin. just use a ladder beer, which he will â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing place in one of three this for about 12 years and a chair.â&#x20AC;? refrigerators to cool now â&#x20AC;&#x201D; more hard and heavy in the last â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kerry Martin and ferment for half of that,â&#x20AC;? Martin home brewer several weeks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Set it and forsays as he opens one get it, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I of the two meat locksay,â&#x20AC;? Martin says, ers to reveal eight opening the far-left kegs full of a variety of lagers and ales. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really been fridge. The space inside is occupied exclusively by a large glass bottle full snowballing.â&#x20AC;? He lifts the short black hose from of dark amber. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a Weisenbach,â&#x20AC;? he says. one of the kegs, points its spout toward the bottom of a glass and fills â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about ready. In fact, I need it with creamy foam and rich, gold- to keg it up tonight. After the two en liquid. This is Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Ger- weeks, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll throw it into one of those man light lager. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s won competi- kegs I serve out of, put CO2 gas in it tions by infusing ancho peppers into and let it carbonate.â&#x20AC;? The Weisenbach will then sit in his a similar brew. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lots of people have really fancy meat lockers, just another option in store-bought stuff; I just use a lad- his own personal brew pub. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started brewing, part of der and a chair,â&#x20AC;? Martin says, placing an orange cooler on top of a ladder in the driveway just outside his BEER continues on page 13

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

Derek Stout | Daily Texan Staff

Kerry Martin stands in front of his home brewery Wednesday in Southwest Austin. Martin began his home brewery 12 years ago.

Chronicles of swine flu: the fearless and the flubies Kari Rosenfeld | Daily Texan Staff

Joann Clements relaxes in the Pro-Cuts barbershop where she has worked for 18 years. Over the years, she has watched hairstyle trends and fads come and go.

By Susannah Jacob Daily Texan Columnist There were murmurs that James, down the hall, was sick with swine flu. Which James? With uncharacteristic fearlessness, I made it my business to find out.

He answered the door. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are you Swine-Flu James?â&#x20AC;? I inquired with as much tact as I could muster without inhaling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, but I feel fine,â&#x20AC;? he said, not sounding entirely convincing. Turns out heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely new to

    

all forms of flu â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a flubie â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and has never even had a normal, seasonal case of the flu. If that had been the case this time around, there wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been considerably less noise. Instead, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been strictly quarantined to his bedroom and

given the most unfriendly label of â&#x20AC;&#x153;H1N1 positive.â&#x20AC;? People digest the threat of swine flu differently. As a result, two distinct categories of people have

H1N1 continues on page 13

  



  

   

  





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One coupon per visit per table. Present this coupon at time of purchase to receive discount off your total purchase. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Unauthorized internet distribution or resale is strictly prohibited. Not refundable or redeemable for cash. Excludes tax, alcohol, gratuity and purchase of gift cards. Valid for dine in or Buca To Go. Expires 10/31/09. 

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