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Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation | Spring 2019

IMPROVE YOUR PASTURE PLUS: OUR SHOW SEASON GIFT GUIDE

MUST-SEES

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Palm Beach Point - 4BR/5.5Bth home on 7.71 ac. in a prime location just a quick hack to WEF. 8 stall center-isle barn with studio apartment and large riding arena. The home boasts: marble & wood floors, ctrisland kitchen with Thermador gas range, 1,100 bottle wine cellar. Stunning pool & patio with cabana room. Adjacent 5.7 acres also for sale. Offered at $4,950,000

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CONTENTS FEATURES 68 YOUR DEFINITIVE LRK3DE GUIDE

Make the most of the 2019 event

82 SHOW SEASON GIFT GUIDE

68

For your tack truck and your closet

Pasture management strategies

DEPARTMENTS 8 Partners 10 Sponsors 14 Marketing/Media 16 Letter from the President 18 Snapshot

82

20 USEF News

90

28 Seen & Heard 30 Learning Center Cover: Kelly Prather and Truly Wiley on cross-country at the 2018 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event Photo: Wendy Wooley/EquiSport Photos

34 Pro Tip Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation | Spring 2019

IMPROVE YOUR PASTURE PLUS: OUR SHOW SEASON GIFT GUIDE

42 Juniors’ Ring 46 My First 52 Hot Links

MUST-SEES at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event Presented by Mars Equestrian

56 Trending 60 Horse Health 102 For the Record

4 SPRING ISSUE 2019

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE) ALEX BANKS/US EQUESTRIAN, MEGAN ANDERSON, COURTESY OF HORSEWARE

90 GREENER GRASS


Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation

US EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE Volume LXXXIII, Spring Edition PUBLISHED BY The United States Equestrian Federation, Inc. CHIEF MARKETING & CONTENT OFFICER Vicki Lowell | vlowell@usef.org EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Glenye Cain Oakford | goakford@usef.org CREATIVE DIRECTOR Candice McCown | cmccown@usef.org ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kim Russell | 859 225 6938 | krussell@usef.org DIRECTOR OF SPONSORSHIP & SALES Layson Griffin | lgriffin@usef.org DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL & VIDEO CONTENT Andrea Evans | aevans@usef.org ASSISTANT DESIGNER Kate Strom | kstrom@usef.org EDITORIAL STAFF Kathleen Landwehr, Julian McPeak, Jane Ohlert, Kim Russell, Ashley Swift CONTRIBUTING WRITER Margaret Buranen, Hope Ellis-Ashburn, Nancy Jaffer Equestrian Magazine (ISSN 1548-873X) is published five times a year: Horse of the Year Special Edition, Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter, by the United States Equestrian Federation®, 4047 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, KY 40511; Phone: (859) 258-2472; Fax: (859) 231-6662. (ISSN:1548-873X). NOTE: Effective Spring issue of 2018, Equestrian magazine will be published and provided electronically and only four editions will have printed copies and be provided by U.S. Mail. The Winter issue will only be provided electronically. The Horse of the Year issue will be mailed only to competing members as of the date of publication and the year immediately prior to the date of publication. USEF is not responsible for the opinions and statements expressed in signed articles and paid advertisements. These opinions are not necessarily the opinions of USEF and its staff. While the Federation makes every effort to avoid errors, we assume no liability to anyone for mistakes or omissions. It is the policy of the Federation to report factually and accurately in Equestrian and to encourage and to publish corrections whenever warranted. Kindly direct any comments or inquiries regarding corrections to Glenye Cain Oakford goakford@usef.org or by direct dial 859-225-6941. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to US Equestrian, 4047 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, KY 40511. Canadian Publications Agreement No. 40845627. For Canadian returns, mail to Canada Express, 7686 #21 Kimble Street Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5S1E9. (905) 672-8100. Reproduction of any article, in whole or part, by written permission only of the Editor. Equestrian: Publisher, United States Equestrian Federation®, Chief Executive Officer, William J. Moroney (859) 225-6912. Director of Advertising, Kim Russell (859) 225-6938. Copyright © 2018. Equestrian is the official publication of the United States Equestrian Federation, the National Governing Body for Equestrian Sport in the USA, and is an official publication of USEF.

Published at 4047 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, Ky 40511 USequestrian.org

#JointheJoy Follow us on social media @USequestrian 6 SPRING ISSUE 2019


PARTNERS Proud partners of US Equestrian

Official Timepiece rolex.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Show Jumping Team netjets.com

Official Saddle prestigeitaly.com

Official Vehicle Title Sponsor of the U.S. Eventing Team landrover.com

Official Blanket of the U.S. High Performance Teams horseware.com

Official Footwear & Apparel ariat.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Para-Equestrian Dressage Team and Official Joint Therapy adequan.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Hunter Seat Medal Final doversaddlery.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Dressage Team Official Equine Air Transportation Provider timdutta.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF/USDF Emerging Athlete Program discoverdressage.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Program platinumperformance.com

Gold Level Sponsor of the Learning Center smartpakequine.com

Official Partner of US Equestrian marsequestrian.com

8 SPRING ISSUE 2019


EACH PILOT FOCUSES ON F LY I N G O N E A I RC RA F T T Y P E

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SPONSORS Proud sponsors of US Equestrian

Official Cold Therapy Products icehorse.net

Official Sponsor deere.com

Official Performance Horse Boot and Leg Wear equifit.net

Official Helmet Supplier Official Safety Partner charlesowen.com

Official Horse Transportation salleehorsevans.com

Official Automobile Rental Agency hertz.com

Presenting Sponsor of the USEF Pony Finals collectinggaitsfarm.com

Official Awards Blanket buildyourownblanket.com

Official Ribbon Supplier hodgesbadge.com

Official Therapy Plate

Title Sponsor of the North American Youth Championships and National Championship for Para Dressage

Official Saddlepad Toklat.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Young & Developing Horse Dressage National Championships horseinsurance.com

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Official Feed of US Equestrian triplecrownfeed.com

adequan.com

Official Shock Wave Supplier pulsevet.com

The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

10 SPRING ISSUE 2019


First of its kind. Still one of a kind. After 30 years, Adequan® i.m. (polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) is still the only FDA-Approved 1, 2 equine intramuscular PSGAG prescription available. And still the only one proven to:

Restore synovial joint lubrication Repair joint cartilage Reverse the disease cycle Reduce inflammation Adequan® i.m. actually treats degenerative joint disease, and not just the signs. Ask your veterinarian if Adequan® i.m. is the right choice for your horse. Learn more at adequan.com.

BRIEF SUMMARY: Prior to use please consult the product insert, a summary of which follows: CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS: Adequan® i.m. is recommended for the intramuscular treatment of non-infectious degenerative and/or traumatic joint dysfunction and associated lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. CONTRAINDICATIONS: There are no known contraindications to the use of intramuscular Polysulfated Glycosaminoglycan. WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption. Not for use in humans. Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children. PRECAUTIONS: The safe use of Adequan® i.m. in horses used for breeding purposes, during pregnancy, or in lactating mares has not been evaluated. For customer care, or to obtain product information, visit www.adequan.com. To report an adverse event please contact American Regent, Inc. at (800) 734-9236 or email pv@americanregent.com. Please see Full Prescribing Information at www.adequan.com. 1 Adequan® i.m. Package Insert, Rev 1/19. 2 Burba DJ, Collier MA, DeBault LE, Hanson-Painton O, Thompson HC, Holder CL: In vivo kinetic study on uptake and distribution of intramuscular tritium-labeled polysulfated glycosaminoglycan in equine body fluid compartments and articular cartilage in an osteochondral defect model. J Equine Vet Sci 1993; 13: 696-703. Adequan and the Horse Head design are registered trademarks of American Regent, Inc. © 2019, American Regent, Inc. PP-AI-US-0214 02/2019


SPONSORS Proud sponsors of US Equestrian

Official Sponsor Title Sponsor of the Junior Jumper National Championship nsbitsusa.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Pony Medal Championship marshallsterling.com

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Official Sponsor Official MemberPerk geico.com

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Official Equine Pharmacy hagyardpharmacy.com

The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

12 SPRING ISSUE 2019

Official MemberPerk goodyear.com


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MARKETING/ MEDIA Proud partnerships of US Equestrian

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The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

14 SPRING ISSUE 2019


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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Our Members Are Making It Happen This year’s USEF Annual Meeting theme was “Members Make It Happen.” Together our community has stepped up to address some very serious issues over the past year. Safety and welfare of horse and human must always be our number-one priority. To make this happen, we engage our members through committee, council and board service, by meeting them in the field, and by listening when they contact us. From member feedback, we identify topics relevant to our mission and vision and develop ways to improve our sport for both horse and athlete so that our current and future members will be able to enjoy the unique connection between horse and human.

In order for our sport to be sustainable, all of us must evolve our thinking and continually be open to new ideas, new strategies, and new directions. Staying relevant takes a continuous commitment and a tremendous amount of work. I can assure you that your US Equestrian Board of Directors, volunteers, and staff are dedicated to meeting our mission of bringing the joy of horse sports to as many people as possible. This issue of Equestrian magazine features two outstanding equestrians who are making their mark on our sport in a meaningful way. Ryan Melendez did not let a diagnosis of leukemia stop him. Ryan founded an amazing charity known as Warrior Horses for Warrior Kids. As you’ll see in Juniors’ Ring, his unique program partners pediatric cancer patients across the nation with the healing nature of horses, supported by the horse community. Warrior Kids are matched to Warrior Horses that live nearby so that, if possible, these kids will get to meet their Warrior Horses, watch them compete at shows online, and get updates by email, text, social media, and videos throughout the year. Our second equestrian is Justin Zenn. Justin started by volunteering at a local stable in Texas, and now he’s competing in endurance rides. In our My First section, you’ll meet Justin and his trainer Darolyn Butler and find out how this remarkable young man is making a name for himself in equestrian sport. These two individuals are an excellent example of how equestrians and horses can make a difference in our lives. The equestrian community excels at providing assistance to others. From offering aid after natural disasters to improving the health and well-being of our friends and their horses, it is truly inspiring to see how responsive we can be to help those in need. As you head into the spring competition season, take a minute to think about how you can be part of a community that supports each other and our horses. Members can make it happen, and together we can bring the joy of horse sports to as many people as possible. Sincerely,

Murray S. Kessler

16 SPRING ISSUE 2019

PHOTO: ISABEL J KUREK PHOTOGRAPHY

Dear USEF Members,


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SNAPSHOT

MADISON GOETZMANN pats Prestigious prior to the awards

ceremony for the $10,000 FEI Young Rider Nations Cup at the Palm Beach Masters CSIO in Wellington, Fla., where the U.S. Young Rider Jumping

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

Team won gold.

18 SPRING ISSUE 2019


USEF NEWS

SafeSport Training Now Required for Adult Competing Members As part of the United States Equestrian Federation’s commitment to creating and maintaining an equestrian community free of all forms of emotional, physical, and sexual misconduct, as of Jan. 1, 2019, all competing members aged 18 and older must complete SafeSport training in order to be eligible to participate in USEF activities, including competitions. To access the training, click My USEF at the top of the usef. org homepage, which will take you to your Member Dashboard. For FAQs about the training, the USEF Safe Sport policy, and more—including information about reporting misconduct and about the 24-hour helpline (866-200-0796) for survivors of sexual assault—visit usef.org’s Safe Sport page by clicking Safe Sport on the homepage’s main menu.

Equestrian activities from training to trail riding to competing can help you get your equestrian letter.

20 SPRING ISSUE 2019

US Equestrian’s Lettering Program is open to equestrian athletes in all breeds or disciplines who are current US Equestrian members, and it’s helping schools and universities recognize and honor student equestrians. This year, we’ve streamlined the process to make it easier than ever for student equestrians in grades 5-12 to get involved. Under the updates, kids can get started by providing proof of enrollment in school with a current report card, transcript, or certification of home-school enrollment. Then simply record 100 hours of equestrian activity, such as riding, driving, training, vaulting, trail riding, and more or provide verification of competing in three competitions. See the Lettering Program FAQs at usef.org/start-riding/ youth-programs/lettering for details and more information about eligible activities and competitions. The Lettering dashboard also has changed. When manually logging their hours of equestrian activity, members will now see a button that says “Submit Total Hours” once they hit the program’s required 100 hours. Once a member has submitted their required activity reports and proof of school enrollment, they’ll see a “Reviewing” notice next to each item; once the requirements have been verified, that message will change to “Requirements Met,” or, if additional information is still needed, “Needed.” Explore the new look by clicking “Manage Lettering Program” on your Member Dashboard.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF AMHA

US Equestrian Lettering Program Gets Updates


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USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 21


USEF NEWS

USEF Announces New Therapeutic Use Exemption Status for Pergolide

22 SPRING ISSUE 2019

The most common treatment for PPID is pergolide, a dopamine agonist. PPID results from degeneration of dopaminergic nerve cells in the hypothalamus of the brain, which causes an increased production of the hormone ACTH and other peptides. Increased ACTH concentrations stimulate the adrenal glands to increase release of corticosteroids into an affected horse’s blood stream. Epidemiologic studies have shown that one in five horses over 15 years of age has PPID, and one in eight of these horses may also suffer from founder. In fact, horses with PPID are four times more likely to founder than horses without PPID.

One in five horses over age 15 has PPID, which often is treated with pergolide

Untreated PPID poses a significant threat to the welfare of the horse population in general and can compromise or end the competitive career of equine athletes. At this time, there are no plans to add additional medications to the TUE process, but that may change in the future. For more information, please read the pergolide FAQs at usef.org/faqs. For questions regarding pergolide or other drugs and medications, please email medequestrian@aol.com or call 1-800-633-2472.

PHOTOS: KEN BALL/US EQUESTRIAN

Pergolide has been the mainstay treatment of equine Cushing’s disease, also known as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, for several decades. Due to the class of drug that pergolide represents, it is a prohibited substance under Fédération Équestre Internationale and United States Equestrian Federation rules. Currently, under USEF GR411, “Conditions for Therapeutic Administrations of Prohibited Substances,” pergolide can be administered but requires a 24-hour withdrawal from treatment prior to competition that can represent a hardship to competitor and horse. Effective December 1, 2018, horses that are granted a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for pergolide can remain on the medication with no withdrawal of the drug prior to competition, and there is no need to file a Medication Report Form each time they compete. The USEF recognizes the benefit of this medication in the treatment of PPID-affected horses to normalize the endocrine feedback mechanisms disrupted by the disease. Modeled after TUEs that are used for human athletes and approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency, the USEF TUE process is intended to sanction the daily administration of pergolide to PPID-affected horses. To obtain a TUE for pergolide, owners/trainers should obtain the required medical records and results of specific diagnostic testing for PPID from a treating veterinarian, then submit that information via the updated electronic Medication Report Form; in filling out the form, click the new check box that says, “I would like to be considered for a pergolide therapeutic use exemption.” A veterinary review panel will decide whether the information submitted supports the diagnosis of PPID. The review process might take up to 30 days to complete once all relevant information has been submitted. Upon approval, the horse will receive a TUE for up to three years. At the conclusion of that period, the owner/trainer can request an extension of the TUE. PPID is a common disease of geriatric horses. Affected horses show a variety of clinical signs, including excessive hair growth with reduced to no seasonal shedding, frequent urination and drinking, immunosuppression, muscle wasting, and founder.


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USEF NEWS

US Equestrian Announces Inaugural Endurance National Championships at 2019 North American Endurance Championship US Equestrian will host its inaugural Endurance National Championships at the 2019 North American Endurance Championship, which will take place November 14-16 at the Broxton Bridge Plantation in Ehrhardt, S.C. Hosted by Central Florida Horse Shows, top U.S. endurance combinations will vie for USEF National Champion and Reserve National Champion honors at the CEI1*/CEIYJ1* and CEI2*/CEIYJ2* levels. The 2019 North American Endurance Championship CEI1*/CEIYJ1* and CEI2*/CEIYJ2* is an unofficial FEI team competition, with a similar competition format to that of FEI Nations Cups™, open to teams from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The FEI will recognize the overall

order of finish. All entries must be qualified to compete in a CEI1*, CEIYJ1*, CEI2*, or CEIYJ2* according to the FEI Rules for Endurance, effective January 1, 2019. USEF national and reserve national champion titles also will go to the two highest-placed competitors in the senior and young rider competitions. Find full details about the championship at usef.org. Keep up with U.S. endurance by following USA Endurance on Facebook and US Equestrian on Twitter and Instagram. Use #USAEndurance. The USEF International High Performance Programs are generously supported by the USET Foundation, USOC, and USEF Sponsors and Members.

The US Equestrian Jumping Sport Committee has approved modifications to the 2019 Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals based on recommendations from the Talent Search Task Force. As a result of an assessment of the 2018 Talent Search Finals – East and West and feedback collected from key constituents, the following changes are in effect beginning in 2019: • Finals fence height 1.15m (previously 1.20m) • A trot fence, not to exceed .90, may be permitted prior to the first gymnastics exercise • Judges will have the ability to develop their own gymnastics courses with the approval of the designated Talent Search Finals Technical Delegate  Qualifying criteria for the 2019 Talent Search Finals will remain the same; however, the Talent Search Task Force will continue to outline modification recommendations to the Jumping Sport Committee for consideration regarding the 2019/2020 Talent Search Finals qualifying classes. The Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Program plays an important role in developing jumping athletes by encouraging Junior and Young Riders to develop the skills that lay the groundwork for future international success. For more information, visit usef.org/talentsearch.

24 SPRING ISSUE 2019

PHOTO: ©THE BOOK LLC

US Equestrian Jumping Sport Committee Approves 1.15m Height for 2019 Talent Search Finals


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Stud; a location of desirability

three-bay workshop, and Poly-

$2,380,000

derful history! $2,249,000

for a lovely setting! $1,700,000

& convenience. $1,600,000

track riding ring. $1,350,000

COLE ROAD | 71± acres (only

MCCOWANS FERRY | 61±

DUNN LANE | 38± acre farm

GRIMES MILL │ Bucolic 94±

COMBS FERRY | 50± acres

acres conveniently-located just

just off 127 in Mercer County

acre tract with lovely trees & a

located only minutes from

5-miles off the BG Parkway)

minutes from Downtown Ver-

with a fabulous 5BR/4BA

large equipment shed. Situated

Hamburg & an easy drive to

with 2 barns, a very nice 3BR

sailles, the BG Parkway, Keen-

home. Well-located with beau-

just over 1-mile from the Iro-

the KY Horse Park, with a

main residence and pictur-

eland, and the Airport, with a

tiful views and a functional

quois Hunt Club and close to

lovely 3BR/1.5BA home, barn

esque creek frontage. Excellent

unique 4BR/2BA ca. 1913 resi-

barn/workshop. Convenient to

the Interstate. Additional

w/horse stalls, & frontage on

soils and a wonderful setting!

dence. DIVISIBLE! $825,000

Keeneland/Airport. $844,000

acreage available! $695,000

two roads. $690,000

$599,950

Let ’s talk.

www.kirkfarms.com │ telephone (+1) 859.576.8195 │ zach@kirkfarms.com


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SEEN AND HEARD

In & Around the Ring We’re identifying athletes who will become the future team riders for the U.S. in world championships.

Talent, temperament, and longevity are all a part of that. And we’re seeing how [the program] is making a difference, as past participants like Jenny Caras, Hallie Coon, and Caroline Martin are taking steps up.” –USEF Eventing Emerging Athlete Coach Leslie Law after recent Emerging Athlete

Left: Adrienne Sternlicht and Toulago share a reflective moment in the warmup at the Palm Beach Masters CSIO in Wellington, Fla. Right: TA Ocala +/ and Alex Archuleta pose after finishing fourth in the Showmanship Championship Junior to Handle 10 years & under class at the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show in Scottsdale, Ariz.

28 SPRING ISSUE 2019

PHOTOS: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN (LEFT), OSTEEN/SCHATZBERG (RIGHT), ANDREA EVANS/US EQUESTRIAN (OPPOSITE TOP), TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN (OPPOSITE BELOW)

Eventing 25 Program and the Eventing 18 Program training sessions


Right: Steve Wilson piloted Favory Fantom and Favory Fáraó around the marathon course on his way to winning the USEF Advanced Pairs Combined Driving National Championship at Live Oak International in Ocala, Fla. Below: Chef d’Equipe Robert Ridland leads the NetJets® U.S. Jumping Team in the parade of nations before the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ USA in Wellington, Fla., where the team earned bronze.

“The whole process for developing the team and having team competitions is to give them experience in the earliest stage possible, and these riders are 12 to 14 years old.

We believe if we educate, promote, and give plenty of opportunity to our youngest riders, we will end up in 2028 with our top riders. –Children’s Chef d’Equipe DiAnn Langer after the U.S. Children’s Jumping Team won gold in the Palm Beach Masters $5,000 Children’s Team competition

USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 29


LEARNING CENTER

Rider’s Toolbox:

The Side Pass

The side pass in Western horse sports is similar to—but not the same as— the leg yield in English riding. And, like its English cousin, the side pass is useful in any discipline, says trainer Michael Damianos.

Leg Yield: A Stepping-Stone to Side Pass “The leg yield is a segue to the side pass. The leg yield is essential to teach the horse, because it teaches the horse to move away from pressure; by nature, when horses are young and untrained, they move into pressure. “The leg yield is going lateral and forward at the same time; when we ride young horses, we start them in a circle, and we teach them to bend their spine around our inside leg, and then from there we teach them to go laterally, to push out from that inside leg. When they can handle that, we start in a straight line and do a traditional leg yield. We know the horse is 30 SPRING ISSUE 2019

sensitive to the leg enough that he knows to move away from it. “Once we get that far, we take the degree of difficulty a little higher and ask the horse to move laterally without going forward. That’s a side pass. Some horses from the arena work that I described can step into a side pass right away, and other horses you have to put their nose in front of a fence to give them an aid. That’s important, because you have to be able to teach them the side pass without capturing their face so hard; they’ll never be soft at it if you have to pull hard to get them to do it.” Tips for Starting the Side Pass “You have to tailor this a little bit to the individual horse, but, generally speaking, you can segue into it by slowing your rhythm down in the leg yield. For some horses, a nice way to go from the leg yield to the side pass is by a sort of half-pass, where you put your leg on and instead of the horse bending his spine around it and going laterally and diagonally, their shoulders and hips go the direction that you’re going laterally. That takes more strength from the horse, and they naturally slow down. When you slow that rhythm down, you can capture them, take a hold a little, and slowly go from lateral and forward to straight lateral. “You’ve got to ride in a deeper seat when you ask the horse to perform a side pass. When you are asking a horse that is performing forward motion, and

PHOTO: LESLEY WARD

In horsemanship, a lot of wisdom and strategies apply across breeds and disciplines, and many foundational principles are the same whether you’re riding or driving or your style is English or Western. One example: Western sport’s side pass, in which a horse moves laterally without moving forward, shares some similarities with the English leg yield. Pro trainer Michael Damianos says the similarity is much more than skin deep—and, like the leg yield, the side pass can be a useful tool, whether you’re training a horse for a competitive career or a lifetime of pleasure riding. “In our disciplines, whether it’s saddle seat or dressage or reined cow horse, we have more in common than we have differences,” Damianos said.


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USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 31


LEARNING CENTER

Measuring Progress “You’re looking for how easily you can do the required task, whatever you’re trying to achieve. The easier it is for you to accomplish, and the less the rider has to do while using the same cues as before, that tells you where that horse is at in his progress. Someone once said this, and I never forgot it: ‘Our goal is to train a horse to perform intricate body maneuvers, and we have accomplished that goal of training that horse when he can do intricate body maneuvers with a relaxed attitude.’ “We try to use good dressage principles; we just don’t use all the same terms dressage people use! In dressage, the rider knows where the horse’s feet are all the time, whether they’re doing a 20-meter circle, a 10-meter circle—they always know exactly where their horse’s footfalls are. They understand tempo, they understand cadence, they understand the difference between cadence and rhythm. I think that is indicative of any intuitive horseman, and dressage people focus on it.” What About Bend? “For me, in the ultimate side pass, like what I want to see when a horse is in a ranch-riding class or in a trail class, at that point there should be no bend. There will be bend during the training process, but the ultimate goal is for the horse to be able to do this straight: stay straight and go sideways, not forward.” A Multi-Disciplinary Tool “What the side pass does, first of all, is serve as a big step in developing a relationship of communication between you and a horse. You want your horse to understand that your seat and your legs are devices for communication. No horse can give you a safe, pleasurable ride—whether you’re on the trail or in the arena—if they cannot bend their spine to your request. With a side pass, you’re teaching them to do that. “Many of my cow-horse trainer friends, when one of their young horses gets anxious, they don’t want to reprimand that horse, but they want him to settle down. So they’ll just side pass along the fence, and when the horse calms down, they do some turns and other maneuvers. If the horse gets excited again, they go right into side-passing along the fence again. It’s a mechanism to establish that rapport, where you can say, ‘I’m in control, okay?’ It also is a great exercise—all lateral movements are—for conditioning your horse. And when a horse is in condition, it’s easier for him to do things without getting frustrated. “Thirdly, and most importantly, it’s a huge step in teaching a horse collection. Collection is a phenomenon that’s necessary in every horse-show discipline that I have ever been involved in, either 32 SPRING ISSUE 2019

as a judge or a trainer or an exhibitor. Proper collection is imperative. If a horse can’t lift his back and telescope his neck and engage his hindquarters, he can’t be effective. The side pass is a building-block towards that.” Michael Damianos is a self-employed professional horseman from Ojai, Calif. He trains Arabians and half-Arabians for regional and national competitions in all Western classes, and his stable has trained over 50 national champion or reserve national champion horses. He has been a USEF-licensed judge for more than 30 years. He also holds judge’s cards with the American Quarter Horse Association, Appaloosa Horse Club, Arabian Horse Association, National Snaffle Bit Association, National Reining Horse Association, and National Reined Cow Horse Association. Damianos has judged horse shows in Europe, South America, Australia, and Japan. He is a two-time winner of the Arabian Professional & Amateur Horsemen’s Association Working Western Professional of the Year Award and a past recipient of the USEF Barbara Worth Oakford Award.

Find More Training Resources in the Learning Center Explore the online Learning Center at usef.org/learn for videos and articles on more training topics, from “Dressage Basics: Straightness Exercises” with Adrienne Lyle and “How to Teach a Flying Change” with Laura Graves, to “Top Three Cross-Training Exercises” with Kim Severson, to “Handy Hunter Exercises” with Hope Hobday Glynn, and other valuable tips, exercises, and skills. Whether you’re a beginning rider or a seasoned competitor looking to sharpen some skills, the Learning Center has top tips that will help. Watch more than 70 videos with top experts and athletes across various breeds, disciplines, and subjects, including horse care, training tips, and more.

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

then you’re either asking them to slow their rhythm or change their momentum from forward to lateral or from forward to stop, as with a reining horse, your seat has to get deeper and deeper. It’s almost as if you’re doing curl-ups in the gym. “When you’re in the leg-yield stage, a horse has to develop a rhythm, and he has to understand where his feet are going. So if you push it too fast, his front feet, in particular, are going to get tangled up or they’ll start hitting themselves. So the ultimate goal is, if you’re going to the right, you want the left leg to cross over the right leg. That takes a level of confidence and a level of conditioning for a horse to do it consistently. I think young and old trainers alike—any enthusiastic trainer—has to keep themselves in check that when things start to go well, not to push it too far too fast.


WELCOME TO  THE HORSE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD AND  ITS STORIED PROPERTIES  

No one  understands  Central  Kentucky's  equine  real  estate  quite  like  the  team  at     JUSTICE REAL ESTATE. Since 1980, JUSTICE REAL ESTATE has established itself as the  most  knowledgeable  and  respected  brokerage  in  the  area  when  it  comes  to  estate  proper�es and farms of all si�es.  JUSTICE  REAL  ESTATE  is the gold standard when it  comes  to  customer  service  with  unparalleled  industry  insights.  "One  of  the  major     factors in our success is that all our agents at JUSTICE REAL ESTATE are, in some way,  involved in different facets of the equine industry," says Bill  �us�ce, whose firm has  sold  more  farms  than  anyone,  year  a�er  year,  for  almost  four  decades.  "Thoroughbreds,  hunter‐jumpers,  saddlebreds,  standardbreds,  and  eventers  —  we  have  our  finger  on  the  pulse  of  everything  that’s  happening.  Because  of  this  direct   involvement,  we  are  much  more  capable  to  soundly  advise  our  clients  with  their  needs  and  wants."  Adding  to  our  understanding  of  the  horse  community,  we  at     JUSTICE  REAL  ESTATE  a�end  major  horse  sales,  race meets,  and  horse  shows  in  an  effort to con�nually cul�vate and develop rela�onships. "We are uniquely qualified to  assist clients, whether buying or selling."    

Over the  years,  �us�ce  and  his  team  have  handled  most  of  the  major  sport  horse  farms in Central Kentucky, including Spy Coast, Kessler Show Stables, Ashland Farms,  Group C, and Nick Larkin’s farm here.     

Whether buying or selling — small farms, estates, or a major equine opera�on —  JUSTICE REAL ESTATE is well‐equipped to make your dreams come true.  

Allen Kershaw—859‐333‐2901  Amber Siegelman—859‐948‐0068  Bill Bell—859‐621‐0607  Marilyn Richardson—859‐621‐4850  Mary Sue Walker‐Hughes—859‐619‐4770  Mike Morrison—859‐340‐0302  Muffy Lyster—859‐229‐1804  Bill �us�ce—859‐294‐3200  JUSTICE REAL ESTATE  www.kyhorsefarms.com  USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 33 518 East Main Street • Lexington, Kentucky 40508 • (859) 255‐3657 


PRO TIP

Feed Room Best Practices by Nancy Jaffer

A good storage, feeding, and tracking regimen can help prevent an accidental positive test or identify the source of an equine allergy

Keeping detailed track of what you feed your horses— from grain to supplements and treats—can pay off if you ever have to deal with a positive drug test at a show or with a pre-purchase exam. It is also helpful when horses show signs of an allergy or illness that might have been caused by something they ingested. Finding the culprit substance so you know what is causing a problem can save a horse’s life, or, at the least, ease their discomfort. Even treats that are “all natural” may contain an ingredient that seems healthy but isn’t allowed under U.S. Equestrian Federation or Fédération Équestre Internationale rules. And even though you have never intentionally given prohibited substances to your horses, it’s possible to register a positive from something that inadvertently was contaminated. Naturally, in such circumstances you want to find out what is going on, with the highest interest

34 SPRING ISSUE 2019

being the welfare of your horses. And should you need to mount a defense when faced with the possibility of a fine and suspension for a medication or drug violation, this practice also will be very helpful, as some detective work may be needed to discover the source of contamination. That’s what happened to Olympic veteran and FEI World Equestrian Games™ dressage medalist Adrienne Lyle when her mount, Betsy Juliano’s Horizon, tested positive for ractopamine at a February 2017 competition in Florida. Lyle and Juliano had never even heard of ractopamine, a feed additive banned in many countries, which promotes lean muscle mass in animals raised for their meat. It tests similar to the bronchodilator clenbuterol. Lyle and Juliano had no idea how it got into Horizon’s system, but they were determined to find out. Lyle acknowledged that even before the ractopamine situation, “We’d always been very, very careful. Always, my CDI (international competition)

PHOTO: ARND.NL/PAULA DA SILVA

Limit who has access to your horses, as residues from medicine, hair-growth products, and even foods like chocolate can transfer from people to horses through even casual contact like petting.


Central Kentucky’s Horse Farms Hill & Regan Parker 859-608-8039 WWW.LEXHORSEFARMS.COM

Real Horse People Helping Real Horse People 5222 Paris Pike, Lexington Sporting one of the finest homes in Kentucky! This 447 acre, historic horse farm is located on one of the best horse streets in the world. The sellers will consider division of the farm. The estate features 74 stalls in 5 barns, 4 auxiliary residences/offices, multiple equipment barns, a lake, tree-lines paved roads, gated entries, spring house, European style walker, double fenced paddocks with stately trees, frontage on 2 roads. The circa 1830 mansion has been lovingly restored with no expense spared. The home has the finest detailed millwork that you can find, original ash floors, coffered ceilings, intricately detailed built-ins, paneled office, tons of finely crafted wainscoting, first floor owner's suite, commercial grade electric, hand crafted shutters that retract into the walls, a 48 foot long great room, and numerous amenities. Will divide $9,750,000

4875 Bryan Station Road, Paris This 260 acre horse farm sports 31 stalls in 2 barns, 2 auxiliary residences, multiple equipment barns and run-in sheds, a lake, tree-lines paved roads, gated entry, European style walker, double fenced paddocks with stately trees, and some of the best soils. Kentucky Oaks winner Luv Me Luv Me Not and multiple other grade 1 winners were born and raised here! Additional acreage available. $4,750,000 338 Russell Cave Road, Paris Exceptionally well kept horse farm with a lovely home - complete with ideal views of grazing horses. This farm includes 17 stalls in 2 paddocks, tack room, hay storage, automatic waterers, 7 paddocks, and 4-board fencing. The house has a redone eat-in kitchen which opens to both the dining room and great room, marble in owner's suite and virtual first floor living. Easy commute to Lexington, Georgetown and Paris. Seller will divide. $599,000 7240 Russell Cave, Lexington 10 acre sport horse farm close to the Kentucky Horse Park. There is a wonderful 6 stall barn with large stall and large windows, wash rack, tack room, paved center aisle, lacquered wood work & equipment shed on one side. The farm has 5 paddocks, automatic Varnan waterers, and a 200’ x 70’ ring. The House features 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large family room, hardwood floors, and a full unfinished basement. $579,000 405 Iron Works Road, Paris A gorgeous 12 acre farm nestled in a valley of horse farms. The views cannot be beat. There is an enchanting wooded area around a small creek on the East boundary of the farm. The land is gently rolling with a wonderful building site on a small knoll in the middle of the farm. The property has perimeter 4-board fencing, additional land is available. $199,000 USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 35


PRO TIP

Groom Morgan Klingensmith in the international competition horses’ feed room at Betsy Juliano’s Havensafe Farm.

horses have their grain made in a completely different room (from the other horses). Everyone has to wear gloves when mixing feed, and the stirrer is only for the CDI horses. Stalls at shows are cleaned and bleached before the horses go in there.” Everything the horses consume also is cleared by Dr. Rick Mitchell, who was the U.S. Dressage Team veterinarian for many years. Know the Origin—and Keep Samples Even these precautions were no guarantee against contamination, and that experience led Juliano and Lyle to develop a detailed procedure that would make it possible to trace everything their horses ingested. It’s a system that can benefit anyone’s operation. “What we learned from this (experience) was how to retain samples and the importance of saving receipts so we could tell what bag was bought on what date,” said Lyle, who could have faced a suspension for as long as two years for the ractopamine positive. That might have kept her out of the 2018 WEG at Tryon, where she was part of the silver medal team after the contamination case was resolved. “One of the big surprises was that we weren’t notified until two months after (the test), so we realized it’s not good enough to test the grain the horses are eating at the time you’re told of the positive test. It’s two months later,” said Lyle. “If you’re going to a CDI (international dressage competition), you need to retain samples of everything.” That should apply to USEF competition as well. It was lucky that Lyle and Juliano at least had receipts for their grain and supplements, but it was a lot of work to 36 SPRING ISSUE 2019

Keep a Detailed Log Previously, Lyle pointed out, “I never logged everything.” That has changed. Now she makes sure that about a month before a competition, “I start retaining things, keeping track of the date the bags were opened, the lot number, where purchased,” she said. “Even traveling around Europe, I have a trunk full of samples. I retain them for three months after every competition, because it took them [FEI] two months to notify me, so I give myself an extra month.” “Keeping tight controls and records regarding what, when, and how you feed your horses is very important,” said Sam Silver, the attorney for Lyle and Juliano in the ractopamine matter. “It will provide the best evidence to show that you are innocent in a case like this one,” Even though a sport governing body “may nonetheless pursue sanctions, having such evidence should impact the degree of those sanctions,” he said. Here are tips from Juliano and Lyle about how to keep track of what your horses ingest. To begin with, they advise that every type of feed, supplement and medication you feed your horse is cleared by a veterinarian who is familiar with USEF rules or FEI rules, in the case of international competitors. Start a log for everything your horses consume, including treats. Be sure to list: »» The date the item was purchased »» Where it was purchased »» The lot number (you’ll find it on the bag or container) »» The date you started feeding it and the last date your horses ate it Take samples from each bag of feed or treats and keep them in small sealed plastic baggies for three months after you finish using them.

PHOTO: NANCY JAFFER

find out where the feed had been purchased, which distributors had sent it to the store, and where it was made. A more complete logbook would have made the process of tracking down the contamination easier. Through research, it was discovered that an ingredient in a supplement given to Horizon had been contaminated with ractopamine during manufacture. The company that produced the supplement owned up to the mistake, which helped in defending the case with the FEI. An expert witness wrote that the amount of ractopamine detected in Horizon would have been on the order of 22,000fold less than the dose administered to animals to produce the effects for which the drug is marketed. But even though the quantity was so infinitesimal that it would have had no effect on the horse’s performance, that is not a complete defense in case of drug positives, though it can be a factor in determining the appropriate sanction as well as determining intent.


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PRO TIP

Know Your Treats

Juliano and Lyle have other protective procedures built in to their system that can benefit any horse owner or barn manager, too. These include: 1. Make sure feed and water buckets are indelibly marked with horses’ names and don’t switch them. 2. Keep a separate stirring spoon for feed given to competition horses and/or competing in international classes. 3. Wear disposable gloves when mixing feed. 4. If space permits, have a separate room for storing the feed given to competition horses or those competing in international classes, and do not keep medications in that room. 5. Try to limit who is allowed to pet your horses. There have been positives in both racing and show jumping, for instance, involving horses touched by people who used a hair-growth product or drugs for cancer treatment. Traces left on their hands were transferred to horses they petted. 6. Make it known to grooms, braiders, and others with access to your horses that it is forbidden for anyone to relieve themselves in the stalls. If a person who does so has been on drugs or prescription medication, that can result in a positive test on your horse if the horse ingests contaminated hay or straw. In a case like the one she faced, Juliano said, “I think people feel they have one of two choices. One is to capitulate and say, ‘I’ll take the suspension because I can’t afford (to fight) this.’ Or they’ll do what we did and really fight it. That was very, very hard but it was worth it. It was important to do as much as we could to demonstrate that we were not at fault.” She and Lyle also did it “for our own peace of mind,” Juliano observed. “We wanted to know what happened, mostly because we didn’t want our horses to be hurt. We wanted to make sure we weren’t feeding or exposing them to something that could hurt them. “I can assure you if someone ever gets tested and encounters what we did, they will wish they had done this, because it could save them.” 38 SPRING ISSUE 2019

If you like to reward your horse with edible treats, remember to be mindful of exactly what you’re feeding: some natural ingredients, like honey and licorice, can cause an accidental drug positive. “You may think something sounds familiar and benign, but you don’t necessarily know what’s in it,” said Dr. Stephen Schumacher, DVM, chief administrator of US Equestrian’s Equine Drugs and Medications Program. “You know the plant, but you might not know what its active constituents might be.” A variety of common and innocent-sounding ingredients can cause unexpected positives. Any tea extract can contain caffeine, even those that have been “decaffeinated.” Some honey can also contain caffeine. Poppy seeds can contain amounts of morphine that can be enough to trigger a positive. The forbidden substance eugenol occurs naturally in such foods as licorice, cloves, vanilla, nutmeg, and celery. “We don’t want to discourage people from doing this for their horses, but you have to be careful,” said Schumacher. “Not sure about your treats? Call the Equine Drugs and Medications Program at 1-800-633-2472, give them the complete list of ingredients, and they’ll check it out. “We’d rather educate than adjudicate! No question is too silly to ask—just give us a call. If you submit a list, we can look at the individual ingredients and respond back to you. It’s all part of being a United States Equestrian Federation member.”

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

Tips to Prevent Contamination


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Saddle Up for Savings You love the equestrian sport. Well, it just got better.

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Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO contracts with various membership entities and other organizations, but these entities do not underwrite the offered insurance products. Discount amount varies in some states. One group discount applicable per policy. Coverage is individual. In New York a premium reduction may be available. GEICO may not be involved in a formal relationship with each organization; however, you still may qualify for a special discount based on your membership, employment or affiliation with those organizations. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. Š 2017 GEICO


JUNIORS’ RING

WARRIOR HORSES Raising Spirits and Funds to Treat Pediatric Cancer

by Glenye Cain Oakford

Ryan Melendez (right) introduces Warrior Kid Cate (center) and her mom Stephanie to Warrior Horse BR Heir Afires, an Arabian nominated to the Warrior Horse program by Cathy and Sophia Yih.

42 SPRING ISSUE 2019

Ryan Melendez knows a lot about the comfort and strength people derive from their connection with horses. Ryan, the son of judge and trainer Bill Melendez and rider Kristal Raiger, grew up riding and showing Arabian horses. After he was diagnosed with Very High Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in 2015 at age 17, the younger Melendez found that the equestrians and horses in his life supported him and gave him a welcome escape from the stresses of his treatment. “Horses have always been a great therapy for me, and there are a lot of great people in the horse industry,” Melendez recalled. “When I was diagnosed with cancer, my mom would put posts on Facebook to keep everyone in the loop with what was going on, and within the first month of being diagnosed I had received hundreds of get-well cards and things to help me get through my treatment. They held a big fundraiser at U.S. Nationals. It was really special and impactful to see how much horse people care about people inside their community. “My horses, of course, were an outlet for me to escape what I was going through.” “About five months after Ryan was diagnosed, one of his trainers, Jessica Bein, allowed him to ride one of her horses in the freestyle reining at Scottsdale,” recalled Raiger. “Ryan enjoyed reining and being with the horses because it was something he could control and also win at. It was something that gave him the drive to continue to fight. He’d still show up in the show ring and compete. It was always in his blood to compete, and that’s served him well in his cancer fight.” Melendez’s own experience was the inspiration behind Warrior Horses, the 501(c)(3) charity he has founded last year. The charity raises funds for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society while also matching “warrior horses” with “warrior kids”—children undergoing treatment for cancer.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF WARRIOR HORSES

“Any horse is therapeutic!” says charity’s founder, US Equestrian member and cancer survivor Ryan Melendez.


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Top to bottom: Ryan Melendez founded Warrior Horses during his own battle with leukemia. Warrior Kid Dylan with his Warrior horse, Yeager, an American mustang owned by Molly Jenks. Warrior Horse Lapaz NA, an Arabian owned by Anna Filleti, meets Warrior Kid Kimi.

44 SPRING ISSUE 2019

To participate in the Warrior Horses program, an owner nominates a horse and begins fundraising toward a goal of $1,000 donations to LLS. Once the owner raises $1,000, the horse is considered a fully funded Warrior Horse and is eligible for matching with a Warrior Kid. That’s when the fun begins, both for the horse’s connections and the Warrior Kid. As the Warrior Horses website puts it, “Once matched with their horse, the Warrior Kid will receive special access to his/her Warrior Horse, through direct connection with the rider/owner. The Warrior Kids will get to follow their Warrior Horse throughout the year, receiving updates, their show schedule, photos of their Warrior Horse showing, and, at times, the ability to watch the live feed of their Warrior Horses battling in the show ring.” Special Warrior Ribbons also are awarded to Warrior Horses at national competitions, and the horses’ Warrior Kids receive both the ribbon and a photo. Best of all, Warrior Kids who are able can also meet their Warrior Horses in person. “I feel like that experience allows them to escape all the scary things that go on in the hospital, like it did for me,” Melendez said. “I was one of the older patients at my hospital by quite a few years, because a lot of the cancers seem to hit kids in their earlier years of life. Just having the opportunity to be around animals, I feel like that has a really big impact. It’s interesting: if they haven’t been around horses or any large animal before, a lot of times they’ll be a little timid and nervous around the animal. But after they give them a carrot or something, they’ll get this big smile on their face and just become instantly attached, and all that fear kind of goes away. It truly helps build up their confidence. Seeing that connection being made between the Warrior Horse and Warrior Kid really is remarkable. “All the Arabian horses I’ve ever been around, they just seem to connect with people on a more personal level,” he continued. “It’s almost like they have a sense of when someone is in pain or really needs them—they just seem to understand somehow, and they’re very personable. In my mind, they give off the ideal of a Warrior Horse. But, really, any horse is therapeutic!” Although Warrior Horses began in the Arabian community due to Melendez’s connections there, he emphasizes that the program is open to horses and ponies of all breeds, and a horse doesn’t have to be a show or competition horse in order to participate.

The Warrior Horses program currently has about 300 participating horses, and about 200 of those have been matched so far with Warrior Kids. “Pretty much everybody who owns a horse has a huge heart, and they want to share their horses with people, especially with young kids who are battling a horrible disease,” said Raiger. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which protects the privacy of patients’ medical information, limited Warrior Horses’ ability to identify eligible children through their physicians and hospitals, but the California-based charity recently began expanding its reach through a group of regional Arabian Horse Association volunteers who help identify children through personal connections and word of mouth. “It’s easier for people in local areas to actually visit hospitals and explain the program,” said Raiger. “Last year, for example, with the help of a lady who asked if she could help, we started the Northwest Warrior Horses, and she’s been able to match 10-15 Warrior Horses and Warrior Kids in that area. She reached out to children’s hospitals and was able to contact one family, and from there the word spreads like wildfire.” Melendez is nearing the end of his own treatment and is currently enjoying his junior year at the University of Southern California, where he’s studying political science but hopes eventually to become a commercial pilot. He also kept showing Arabians during his treatment, most recently at U.S. Nationals, where he earned two reserve national championships on the five-year-old half-Arabian Khing of Diamonds, a horse Melendez’s family bred and owns. The LLS recently honored Melendez’s work with Warrior Horses. The society presented Melendez with its Vision for Life Award, which recognizes creativity in developing new campaigns with national fundraising potential. It’s the second award that Melendez has received from LLS; he also was named an LLS National Man of the Year in 2017 in honor of his fundraising on behalf of LLS, which receives 100% of every dollar donated through the Warrior Horses program. “It was great to be able to give back after everything that I’ve gone through,” Melendez said. “I’ve received so much support from everyone, and I felt that the only way I could repay them is to pay it forward to other people who are going through similar struggles. I was just happy that there was something I could do to make the world a little better.”

PHOTOS: HOWARD SCHATZBERG (TOP), COURTESY OF WARRIOR HORSES (CENTER AND BOTTOM)

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MY FIRST

My First FEI Ride

by Glenye Cain Oakford

“When I crossed the finish line I thought, ‘Okay, I’ve got this,’” said Justin Zenn.

46 SPRING ISSUE 2019

It was pure chance that Justin Zenn grew up not far from trainer Darolyn Butler’s Cypress Trails Arabian ranch near Houston, Texas. And at the age of 12, Zenn used his own initiative to turn that chance into a competitive equestrian career that took him to his first Fédération Équestre Internationale event last year, the Bellis Summer Sizzler in Alberta, Canada. Just three years ago, Zenn had never been close to a horse, let alone ridden one or even dreamed of competing. But he was curious about the horses he could see from a distance on Butler’s farm. “I used to pass by there every day,” Zenn, now 15, recalled. “When I was 12, I got my nerve up and went to the farm and asked if they needed volunteers. They said yes, so I started coming out there every weekend. “I loved horses before, but I’d never really been around them much,” he added. “I was very scared and excited, because I didn’t know anybody, and the horses were kind of scary—they were so big! And they were Arabians, so they were pretty quick. When I first walked up, I saw this beautiful gray horse. Later on, I found out that his name was Argonne and he was a stallion.” Butler, a team and individual medalist in international endurance competition, operates a thriving business leading adventure trail rides, and she also trains, conditions, and sells trail and endurance horses. It didn’t take her long to spot Zenn’s potential. “We have a lot of kids who come up, and some stick and some don’t,” Butler said. “Justin was small for his age then; at age 12, he looked like he was maybe 10. So I kept a pretty close eye on him. Right from the beginning he moved with a lot of confidence, and he was the hardest little worker you’ve ever seen. He just had a fabulous work ethic. I thought, ‘If I had three adults like him, that would be all I’d need on this ranch.’”

PHOTO: ©JOHN NOWELL/REMUDA PHOTOGRAPHY

Justin Zenn first rode a horse at age 12. Three years later, he’s crewed and ridden at FEI-level endurance events.


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MY FIRST

48 SPRING ISSUE 2019

Zenn both rides and crews at endurance rides, and he often jogs Butler’s horses at the rides’ routine veterinary checks.

and Justin was going with us wherever we went,” Butler explained. “It was a 5,000-mile round trip from Texas, probably the longest trip I’ve ever taken. As the date got closer and we were sure we were going, I had room in the trailer and Justin had been bugging me to go on and get his FEI status. “He’d crewed for me for two years at FEI rides, so he’s got the clothing protocol down, and he knows everything has to be by the book,” she added. “The transition to being there as a rider was maybe a little easier for him, because he’d had that FEI crewing experience.” Because he was so young, Zenn needed a sponsor to accompany him during the ride. Lining one up wasn’t difficult. “People have heard about him and his good record—this young man’s reputation precedes him!” Butler said. “So he wasn’t tough to get a sponsor for.” “It’s courtesy to let them finish in front of you, because they’re your sponsor, and they’re the boss,” Zenn explained. “They can let you lead or you can ride side by side—it kind of depends on what horse you’re on or the horse they’re on. Sometimes, if they drop something or if you’re at a gate that’s closed, then you should get off your horse and pick

PHOTO: ©JOHN NOWELL/REMUDA PHOTOGRAPHY

Working on a ranch with 60-70 horses who need feeding, grooming, and exercising is a challenge, but Zenn found the work rewarding, and he quickly overcame his initial nerves about the big animals he was handling. “I didn’t see it as work,” he said. “I saw it as something fun to do. And it was really fun, because I got to know the horses’ names and their characters. When I first started, there were a lot of different people at the ranch, and they helped me while I was there. When I had volunteered about a week, they let me get on a horse and walk around the yard for about 30 minutes, which was really exciting. And I saw everyone else riding horses, so I thought, ‘Yeah, I can ride them.’ The adrenaline when you’re on the horse is really fun.” Zenn—who now rides 60 miles or more each week during training—entered his first endurance competition, a 50-mile race, in 2017. Zenn rode one of Butler’s horses, DJB Sanctuarys Legacy, and Butler served as Zenn’s sponsor during the race, competing alongside him for the duration of the ride. Butler finished fifth with Zenn in sixth. “The day after the race, I couldn’t even walk!” Zenn recalled. “It was very exciting when I got on the horse. You see every rider with a crew wishing them good luck, taking pictures, and cheering them on. It was really fascinating for me. “He’s a lot of horse,” he said of Legacy. “He’s a spicy gelding. He’s competitive, he’s strong, and he’s pretty. If another horse looks at him, he’s like, ‘I’m prettier than you!’ He has a 14 mileper-hour trot, and if you look at him from behind, he looks like he’d be uncomfortable to ride, but he’s not. He has a wide trot, so his hind legs go out wide as he trots. He’s really smooth.” Zenn wasn’t just learning in the saddle. By the time he was 14, he also had become a valuable member of Butler’s crew—the support team that helps endurance competitors and their horses with everything from paperwork, to cooling and hydration, to assistance at the sport’s routine veterinary checks, and more. He had crewed for Butler at FEI events for two years when the opportunity to ride in an FEI event finally came up last summer when Butler traveled with another rider to Bellis Lake, Canada, for the Summer Sizzler competition. “A member of the Mexican endurance team was here with us to get her final qualification ride for the World Championships,


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MY FIRST

up what they’ve dropped or get the gate for them.” Competitor Jessica Yabis agreed to serve as Zenn’s sponsor, and the pair completed the ride in fourth and fifth place, respectively. Zenn, aboard DJB Sanctuarys Legacy again, was the only junior in the ride, but that didn’t bother him a bit. “I think the adults know more than kids, so they can give me tips and advice about what to do and what not to do, how to pace your horse, how to change your leads, stuff like that,” he said. “I was excited to finish my first FEI race, and when I crossed the finish line I thought, ‘Okay, I’ve got this. All I’ve got to do now is trot out and pass [the routine post-ride veterinary inspection].’ And I did. When they said I had passed, I was very, very happy.” After his ride, Zenn was on to his next duty at the Bellis Summer Sizzler: crewing for Butler and Magali de la Rosa Selim, the Mexican endurance team member, for the 100-mile competition. “I was just a little tired, but not too much, because I had to crew for Miss Darolyn and Maga for their ride,” Zenn explained. “After I put my horse up, I went straight to the crew area and made the horses’ feed, put out water for them and for the people.” He felt more pressure crewing for Butler and Maga than he did riding in his own race, Zenn said. Maga qualified for the World Championships, and after the race Zenn trotted Butler’s horse for the final veterinary inspection. That’s all in a day’s work for Zenn, says Butler. “From the start he had a natural maturity about him that you don’t usually see in a 12-year-old,” she explained. “That has blossomed even more. He understands that his actions can produce positive or negative outcomes, and you’ve got to really stay on top of things, as far as the feeding regimen and your tack. He’s light years ahead of other kids his age. To come into this at 12 with no prior knowledge and never even having been around horses, it’s pretty amazing. We’re all constantly impressed by his ability and maturity to handle what’s going on around him.”

Want to Know More?

To learn more about the Arabian breed and the sport of endurance, visit Arabian Horse Association arabianhorses.org US Equestrian’s Arabian page usef.org/compete/breeds/arabian US Equestrian’s endurance page usef.org/compete/disciplines/endurance

50 SPRING ISSUE 2019

PHOTO: COURTESY OF DAROLYN BUTLER

“Just being on a horse for a long time and getting dressed up to ride, meeting all the nice people and seeing all the other beautiful horses at the rides—that was all really fascinating for me,” Justin said of endurance riding.


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HOT LINKS

Joy Tour 2019 is Underway

by Glenye Cain Oakford

US Equestrian’s Joy Tour welcomes equestrians and fans and celebrates horse sports at venues around the country. Come visit our booth at these tour stops to get your ShopUSEF gear, meetand-greets with equestrian athletes, and more!

April 25-28 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Mars Equestrian Kentucky Horse Park Lexington, Ky. kentuckythreedayevent.com May 2-5 Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association National Championships New York State Fairground Expo Center Syracuse, N.Y. ihsainc.com July 12-14 BreyerFest Kentucky Horse Park Lexington, Ky. breyerhorses.com 52 SPRING ISSUE 2019

July 8-9 USEF Junior Hunter National Championships – East Coast Devon Show Grounds Devon, Pa. brandywinehorseshows.com July 24-28 Adequan® North American Youth Championships presented by Gotham North Eventing Rebecca Farm Kalispell, Mt. usef.org/events/youth-championships July 30-August 4 Adequan®/FEI North American Youth Championships presented by Gotham North Dressage and Jumping Old Salem Farm North Salem, N.Y. usef.org/events/youth-championships

Log In to Learn with US Equestrian Our website at usef.org is your onestop resource for everything from horse services to free SafeSport training to news. Join US Equestrian or renew your membership and click over to our online Learning Center to discover a new breed or discipline, get training tips, and learn more about US Equestrian. Sign up for our free weekly e-mail newsletter, Equestrian Weekly, at usef.org/ tune-in/equestrian-weekly to stay top of veterinary and horse-care information, original stories, and equestrian news. Now that show season is heating up, check out our comprehensive competition resources under the Compete tab on the homepage. You’ll find an event calendar, rankings and results, handy resources and forms, the Rulebook, and more!

PHOTO: US EQEUSTRIAN

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April 25-28 Lexington, Ky. Kentucky CSI3* Invitational Grand Prix April 26-27 Lexington, Ky. International Equestrian Association Hunt Seat National Finals April 26-28 Harrisburg, Pa. Intercollegiate Horse Shows Association National Championships May 2-5 Syracuse, N.Y. Paso Fino Horse Association Pre-Spectrum & Spectrum Horse Show May 22-26 Miami, Fla.

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Devon Horse Show & Country Fair May 23-June 2 Devon, Pa. Upperville Colt & Horse Show June 3-9 Upperville, Va. USEF Junior Hunter National Championships – East Coast July 8-9 Devon, Pa.

USEF Saddle Seat Adult Amateur Medal Final July 10 Lexington, Ky. USEF Junior Hunter National Championships – West Coast July 22-23 Petaluma, Calif. Adequan® North American Youth Championships presented by Gotham North

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TRENDING

A NOD TO DRESSAGE by Glenye Cain Oakford

Add some dressage detailing to your ride for instant—and effortless—elegance

Palladium Show Coat Divino Dress Tall Boot

Piaffe Sunstopper Capriole Boot

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ARIAT

You don’t have to be a Grand Prix dressage rider to borrow from this beautiful discipline’s classic style—so why not add a little dressage to your wardrobe? That’s what several pieces in Ariat’s new spring line propose, applying touches of dressage styling to versatile English boots, smart show coats, and subtly sparkling shirts— without sacrificing comfort and performance. Palladium Show Coat The Palladium’s sleek, tailored look and four-button styling add a whisper of dressage’s formality to any show ring. But beneath the classical drape lies modern technology, like performance stretch fabric and Moisture Movement Technology™ for greater comfort in the heat of competition. And the lightweight, stretch poly twill fabric is machine-washable. Divino Dress Tall Boot The Divino’s Spanish topline and classic European square toe pair seamlessly with luxurious features like butter-soft premium Italian calf leather, a full-length elasticized panel on the lateral side, and a mobility notch—giving you the best of both old-world style and new-world comfort. Piaffe Sunstopper Like the highly collected, cadenced gait that gives it its name, the Piaffe Sunstopper adds a little sparkle to any ride. The decorative embroidery at the shoulders are studded with crystals, adding a dramatic flair to the simple, flattering lines of this shirt. The cut is classic, but the Piaffe Sunstopper offers all the mod cons, including a lightweight piqué knit, breathable mesh underarm paneling, and sun-protective finishing. Marquis Vent Show Shirt Floral mesh sleeves and inset paneling bring a note of romance to the show wardrobe, like a breath of fresh spring air. The wrap show collar is fashion without the fuss: the magnetic closure and stock-tie loop keeps your look pulled together with ease. And you’ll be able to keep your cool in and out of the ring, thanks to the shirt’s Icefil® technology for active cooling. Capriole Boot The new Capriole is a show-stopper. The high Spanish topline creates a flattering, elongated silhouette that would fit right in at the Spanish Riding School, but this boot’s attitude is anything but strait-laced. The full-front lacing, back zipper, premium full-grain leather upper, ATS Pro® technology, and Duratread™ outsole with ridertested traction zones all contribute to outstanding fit, stability, and durability.

Marquis Vent Show Shirt Breeches shown on this page are Ariat Tri-Factor breeches.

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HORSE HEALTH

VACCINES:

A Good Investment for a Healthy Horse

by Margaret Buranen

Discuss both core and risk-based vaccines with your veterinarian

Before Vaccinating If your horse or pony is taking steroids or some other antiinflammatory drug, ask your veterinarian about stopping the drug a day or two before the horse will be vaccinated. This ensures that the horse develops the full level of immunity the vaccine delivers. It’s always best to consult your veterinarian about what vaccines your particular horse or pony needs and when those vaccines and boosters should be scheduled. Martinez stressed that vets and horse owners are partners in keeping horses healthy and that owners should ask their vets to administer 60 SPRING ISSUE 2019

vaccinations. The vet has the opportunity to examine your horse prior to vaccinating him, and the vet’s vaccines are always properly stored. (Vaccines will lose their efficacy if they are not kept constantly at the correct temperature.) If your horse has an illness and is diagnosed with the disease and requires treatment after receiving a vaccination, the vaccine’s manufacturer may cover the costs of diagnosis and treatment, but only if the vaccine was administered by a veterinarian. Before the vet arrives, the horse’s coat needs to be cleaned. The owner (or barn manager) should have records of past vaccinations available and keep records up to date. The Core Vaccines The core vaccines—West Nile, Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis, rabies, and tetanus—are recommended annually for every horse. As the American Veterinary Medical Association describes it, these vaccines protect from diseases that are endemic to a region, have potential public health significance, are required by law, are virulent/highly infectious, and/or pose a risk of severe disease. “Core vaccines have clearly demonstrated efficacy and safety, and thus exhibit a high enough level of patient benefit and low enough level of risk to justify their use in the majority of patients,” according to the AVMA. “These vaccines have a great track record. They work together well. They’re very efficacious,” said Martinez. Vaccines lose their efficacy if they’re not kept constantly at the correct temperature. Asking your veterinarian to vaccinate your horse will help ensure the vaccine has been stored properly.

PHOTO: VCHALUP/ADOBESTOCK

Whether your horse or pony travels to compete or is strictly a stay-at-home companion animal, you’ll need to talk to your veterinarian about an annual plan and schedule for vaccinations—a key to horse health. When you do, be prepared to discuss both core vaccines (considered essential for the majority of horses) and risk-based vaccines (which may or may not be essential given your horse’s location and other potential factors). The so-called “core vaccines” form the core of good health for virtually every horse. These vaccines protect horses from five terrible diseases: West Nile virus (WNV), Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis (EEE and WEE), rabies, and tetanus. If a horse contracts one of these diseases, “treatment and recovery can be very difficult. The course of treatment is expensive and the horse may not fully recover, and rabies is a zoonotic disease and could be spread to humans,” explained Dr. Ernie Martinez of the Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky.


OSPHOS® (clodronate injection) Bisphosphonate For use in horses only. Brief Summary (For Full Prescribing Information, see package insert) CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. DESCRIPTION: Clodronate disodium is a non-amino, chlorocontaining bisphosphonate. Chemically, clodronate disodium is (dichloromethylene) diphosphonic acid disodium salt and is manufactured from the tetrahydrate form. INDICATION: For the control of clinical signs associated with navicular syndrome in horses. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Horses with hypersensitivity to clodronate disodium should not receive OSPHOS. WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption. HUMAN WARNINGS: Not for human use. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children. Consult a physician in case of accidental human exposure. PRECAUTIONS: As a class, bisphosphonates may be associated with gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Sensitivity to drug associated adverse reactions varies with the individual patient. Renal and gastrointestinal adverse reactions may be associated with plasma concentrations of the drug. Bisphosphonates are excreted by the kidney; therefore, conditions causing renal impairment may increase plasma bisphosphonate concentrations resulting in an increased risk for adverse reactions. Concurrent administration of other potentially nephrotoxic drugs should be approached with caution and renal function should be monitored. Use of bisphosphonates in patients with conditions or diseases affecting renal function is not recommended. Administration of bisphosphonates has been associated with abdominal pain (colic), discomfort, and agitation in horses. Clinical signs usually occur shortly after drug administration and may be associated with alterations in intestinal motility. In horses treated with OSPHOS these clinical signs usually began within 2 hours of treatment. Horses should be monitored for at least 2 hours following administration of OSPHOS.

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As with all drugs, side effects may occur. In field studies, the most common side effects reported were signs of discomfort or nervousness, colic, and/or pawing. OSPHOS should not be used in pregnant or lactating mares, or mares intended for breeding. Use of OSPHOS in patients with conditions affecting renal function or mineral or electrolyte homeostasis is not recommended. Refer to the prescribing information for complete details or visit www.dechra-us.com or call 866.933.2472.

CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of licensed veterinarian. * Freedom of Information Summary, Original New Animal Drug Application, NADA 141-427, for OSPHOS. April 28, 2014. Dechra Veterinary Products US and the Dechra D logo are registered trademarks of Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC. © 2018 Dechra Ltd.

Bisphosphonates affect plasma concentrations of some minerals and electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium and potassium, immediately post-treatment, with effects lasting up to several hours. Caution should be used when administering bisphosphonates to horses with conditions affecting mineral or electrolyte homeostasis (e.g. hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, hypocalcemia, etc.). The safe use of OSPHOS has not been evaluated in horses less than 4 years of age. The effect of bisphosphonates on the skeleton of growing horses has not been studied; however, bisphosphonates inhibit osteoclast activity which impacts bone turnover and may affect bone growth. Bisphosphonates should not be used in pregnant or lactating mares, or mares intended for breeding. The safe use of OSPHOS has not been evaluated in breeding horses or pregnant or lactating mares. Bisphosphonates are incorporated into the bone matrix, from where they are gradually released over periods of months to years. The extent of bisphosphonate incorporation into adult bone, and hence, the amount available for release back into the systemic circulation, is directly related to the total dose and duration of bisphosphonate use. Bisphosphonates have been shown to cause fetal developmental abnormalities in laboratory animals. The uptake of bisphosphonates into fetal bone may be greater than into maternal bone creating a possible risk for skeletal or other abnormalities in the fetus. Many drugs, including bisphosphonates, may be excreted in milk and may be absorbed by nursing animals. Increased bone fragility has been observed in animals treated with bisphosphonates at high doses or for long periods of time. Bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption and decrease bone turnover which may lead to an inability to repair micro damage within the bone. In humans, atypical femur fractures have been reported in patients on long term bisphosphonate therapy; however, a causal relationship has not been established. ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions reported in the field study were clinical signs of discomfort or nervousness, colic and/or pawing. Other signs reported were lip licking, yawning, head shaking, injection site swelling, and hives/pruritus.

Distributed by: Dechra Veterinary Products 7015 College Boulevard, Suite 525 Overland Park, KS 66211 866-933-2472 © 2018 Dechra Ltd. OSPHOS is a registered trademark of Dechra Ltd. All rights reserved. NADA 141-427, Approved by FDA


HORSE HEALTH Giving the annual booster vaccines in spring is essential, because WNV, EEE, and WEE are transmitted by mosquitoes. Spring inoculation gives the horse’s immune system time to develop full protection before mosquito season starts. Martinez recommends that the horse’s owner schedule the core vaccines as part of the spring wellness exam. That saves the expense of a second vet visit. Horses who travel where mosquitoes are active during the winter can have a second booster shot later, but Martinez says that “isn’t necessarily recommended. The immunity lasts for 12 months. It would be more for the owner’s peace of mind.”

Pregnant mares should receive their core vaccine boosters in their 10th month of pregnancy. When a mare’s foal is born a month later, the mare’s immunity is transferred through colostrum, which should protect the foal until time for his or her first shots at four months of age. For the older horse, Martinez says that the core vaccines “may be even more important. Their immune system doesn’t mount as strong a response, so the antibody levels produced may be lower. A lapse in these vaccinations puts the horse more at risk.” The American Association of Equine Practitioners has more information on core vaccines here. Risk-Based Vaccines Risk-based vaccinations might or might not be appropriate for a particular horse or pony, depending on a number of factors, including the animal’s geographic 62 SPRING ISSUE 2019

Broodmares’ and foals’ vaccination needs can differ from those of other horses. Whatever age your horse or pony is, it’s important to discuss a vaccination plan with your veterinarian.

location, level of contact with outside horses, travel schedule, and/or competition requirements. Under its rule GR845 (the Equine Vaccination Rule), the United States Equestrian Federation requires that horses and ponies competing at USEF-licensed competitions be accompanied by documentation confirming they’ve had equine influenza virus and equine herpesvirus (rhinopneumonitis) vaccinations within six months prior to entering the stables. Vaccines for equine influenza and herpesvirus are “almost considered to be core vaccines,” Martinez said, particularly for horses that have the stress of traveling. A horse receives two annual boosters for each disease. Martinez notes that “the intranasal flu vaccine is very quick-acting.” It’s important to ask your vet to assess your horse’s risk for contracting other diseases—like anthrax, botulism, equine viral arteritis, leptospirosis, Potomac horse

PHOTO: ALEXIA KRUSCHEVA/ADOBESTOCK

The rabies vaccine is given by itself. It can— but doesn’t have to be—given at the same time the combined vaccine for the other four diseases is administered. The initial series of shots for each of the five diseases varies in number. When there is documentation that the horse has had all shots in each initial series, he needs only two annual booster shots. The two injections (one for rabies and one for the combined four other core vaccines) are commonly given on opposite sides of the neck. “Timing is important,” cautions Martinez. “They should be given by the end of April at the latest.”


— Todd Minikus

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HORSE HEALTH

Dr. Ernie Martinez recommends giving the horse or pony a day or two off from work after vaccination.

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disease is, because the products [vaccines] carry some risk, so discuss your needs with your vet.” If the horse already has been exposed to strangles, do not vaccinate; vaccinating during an outbreak can cause the horse potentially to develop a different disease, called purpura hemorrhagica, or bastard strangles. “Good barn husbandry—keeping pitchforks, water buckets [and other tools] separate and doing a nasal wash screening on new arrivals, because they may be carriers—is important in preventing strangles. Biosecurity and isolation are the key,” he added. The American Association of Equine Practitioners has more information on risk-based vaccinations here. To Work or not to Work? Martinez suggested that after a horse is vaccinated, his owner should “plan on [giving the horse] a day or two off. Perhaps have the vet give the shots before a weekend off.” Horse owners sometimes worry about reactions to vaccines, but “some reaction is good,” said Martinez. “It shows that the vaccine is working.” Soreness at the injection site varies with horses. Martinez recommended that owners “refrain from giving the horse anti-inflammatory medicine, because it will suppress the immune response and protection provided by the vaccine. Apply a warm compress or hot towel to the area instead.” He added that if the lump at the injection site feels hot, the owner should let the vet know. Other reasons to call the vet include a lump that increases in size over two or three days or a horse not wanting to move his head in that direction.

PHOTO: ARND.NL/AMY DRAGOO

fever, rotaviral diarrhea, and/or strangles—and the need for vaccinating against them. Such risks include traveling where disease outbreaks have happened or being around unknown horses at shows or at the horse’s home farm. For anthrax, most horses are “at low risk,” Martinez said. But the vaccine can be indicated for horses pastured where anthrax is endemic, according to the American Association of Equine Practitioners. Martinez said the vaccination for botulism is “recommended for broodmares and young foals. An adult horse may be at risk of botulism if he eats hay from round bales. These bales may have moisture and mildew [that allow botulism to develop].” Martinez also noted that foals are the most at risk for equine rotavirus. The mare needs a three-shot series prior to foaling to boost the colostral antibody levels and pass on protection to the foal. For equine viral arteritis, Martinez said, “I wouldn’t worry about it unless the horse is involved in breeding.” Horses may need the leptospirosis vaccine only if they are in an area where an outbreak of uveitis has occurred or where leptospirosis has been implicated in equine abortion or acute liver failure. Horses are most at risk for Potomac horse fever in the Eastern U.S. or if they routinely graze near freshwater creeks or rivers or in irrigated pastures. But Martinez said that there are many types of PHF and cautioned that the vaccine “is not always effective, as it only provides protection for one serotype.” Martinez advised against vaccinating for strangles “unless the horse is at risk going where the


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LRK3DE: THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE

PHOTO: EQUISPORT PHOTOS

The Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Mars Equestrian offers topof-the-line equestrian sport, a national championship, a chance to make lifelong memories, superior shopping, and more. Whether you’ll be at the Kentucky Horse Park or streaming the action online, our guide sets you up for a winning experience.

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USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 69


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PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

For equestrians, springtime in the Bluegrass means one thing above all: it’s time for the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event in Lexington, Ky. Presented this year by Mars Equestrian, North America’s only 5* event will draw top-class horses and riders, along with tens of thousands of spectators, to the Kentucky Horse Park April 25-28 for one of the sports world’s most exciting competitions—including the Land Rover/USEF CCI5* Eventing National Championship for the top-placed American rider. There’s a lot at stake, with the national championship, more than $400,000 in purse money and prizes, and more on the line. In addition to $130,000 in prize money and other awards, the overall event winner receives a 12-month lease of a 2019 Land Rover Discovery from title sponsor Land Rover. They’ll also get a shot at winning the $350,000 Rolex Grand Slam of Eventing, which goes to any rider who wins LRK3DE and England’s five-star events, the Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials and the Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials, in succession. The five-star designation is new this year, following the Fédération Équestre Internationale’s approval last year of a new eventing category system. Officially a CCI5*, the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Mars Equestrian remains a pinnacle event for the global sport of eventing and is one of only six annual 5* events in the world. Among the criteria for a CCI5* is that the event’s cross-country phase be 6,270-6,840 meters in length, taking 11-12 minutes to complete, with 40-45 jumping efforts. The three-day event isn’t the only competition with jumping efforts this year. During LRK3DE, you can also get a taste of show jumping with a pair of jumping classes—a $36,000 1.45m FEI Welcome Speed Cup/Ranking Class on Friday and the $225,000 Kentucky Invitational CSI3* Grand Prix presented by Hagyard Equine Medical Institute on Saturday—taking place in the Rolex Stadium in conjunction with LRK3DE. LRK3DE presents a challenge for spectators: how to pack in everything that LRK3DE has to offer, from the competition to the shopping to the special online content? Never fear: we’ve got your go-to guide to make the most of this spectacular event, whether you’ll be at the Kentucky Horse Park or hosting a watch party at home.


Need a livestream schedule? We’ll get you tuned in. Want ideas for must-see spots on the grounds? We’ve got you covered with everything from hidden gems around the grounds to top stops in the vendor village. Details about the new 5* designation? We’ve got them for you.

FIVE ESSENTIALS

Get your game plan ready! These five tips will set your LRK3DE experience up for success from the get-go and make sure you’re ready to enjoy all the competition action and news. Got Tickets? If you’re headed to Kentucky, line up your tickets now! Single-day and multi-day tickets, hospitality packages, and add-ons (including headsets for commentary during the dressage and jumping phases) are all available online at kentuckythreedayevent. com/tickets. Stay Tuned to USEF Network USEF Network’s livestream at usef.org/network, presented by Mars Equestrian, will carry the entire competition—from the dressage test ride on Thursday, April 25, to the awards ceremony on Sunday, April 28—and a lot more. USEF Network’s coverage will also include special features like a cross-country course preview, behindthe-scenes interviews, and an archive of individual performances from the dressage, cross-country, and jumping phases. While you’re on USEF Network, check out the complete 2018 LRK3DE coverage on demand to get in the spirit! Get the News US Equestrian will produce special daily editions of its Equestrian Weekly digital newsletter during the event. Subscribe now—it’s free!—at usef.org/tune-in/ equestrian-weekly. During LRK3DE, you’ll get a daily update on the leaderboard and competition news, plus original content from the event. At the venue? Pick up orders of go, updates on cross-country walks, and general information at the two information booths on the grounds. You’ll find one in the Rolex Stadium grandstand’s breezeway, at the end closest to the statue of Bruce Davidson and Eagle Lion on USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 71


the way to Sponsor Village; the other is inside the trade fair, directly underneath the media center. Learn More About Eventing Check out the United States Eventing Association (useventing.com) and US Equestrian’s eventing page to learn more about this sport, its three phases, and how you can get involved as a fan or an equestrian. And stop by our online Learning Center at usef.org/learn for video tutorials with top riders and experts on such topics as preparing for an event, riding cross-country, cross-training tips, and more! You Are Here Plan your shopping expedition with maps of Sponsor Village, a new vendor area called The Hill (behind Rolex Stadium), and the trade fair, available at kentuckythreedayevent.com. Maps include company profiles, links to vendor websites, and more. For more information on the trade fair and Sponsor Village, visit kentuckythreedayevent.com/shopping-2.

MUST-SEES

Whether you’re on the grounds or watching from home, you can take in a number of unique opportunities around LRK3DE. The US Equestrian Demonstration Arena The arena will host demos highlighting some of US Equestrian’s 29 breeds and disciplines, from Connemaras to vaulting, on Thursday and Saturday afternoons. There will be meet-andgreets with horses and equestrians, as well as opportunities to learn how various US Equestrian breeds and disciplines compete. For the demo schedule, stop by US Equestrian’s booth in the Sponsor Village, next to the Land Rover Ultimate Stable, across Nina Bonnie Blvd. from the iconic Bruce Davidson statue and Rolex clock at the west end of the Rolex Stadium.

Land Rover Experiences These are always a popular draw, and no wonder! Take your own cross-country challenge with Land Rover’s off-road experiences, which allow drivers to take the wheel and get a feel for Land Rover vehicles’ combination of luxury and rugged ability over purpose-built off-road courses. There’s also a teen version, the Start Off-Road Teen Driving Experience, located across from the Test Drive Course, where young adults age 14 and up can drive a multi-terrain course under the close supervision of a trained Land Rover driving instructor. Also in the Sponsor Village: Land Rover’s Junior Drive Experience, where kids aged four to eight can drive mini electric vehicles around a specially created course. Also check out the Land Rover Ultimate Stable next to the US Equestrian booth on Nina Bonnie Blvd., across from the Rolex Stadium, to take a close look at Land Rover vehicles, snag a snack, and watch a blacksmith make your own branded horseshoe. US Equestrian will host daily autograph signings with LRK3DE athletes in the Land Rover Ultimate Stable—stop by the Land Rover Ultimate Stable or US Equestrian’s booth for a schedule. For tailgaters, the Land Rover Tailgate Experience offers a chance to show off their classic British tailgate style—and to win an exclusive ticket package and tailgate spot for the 2020 LRK3DE. So break out the Pimm’s, unfurl a Union Jack, and put your own unique spin on the quintessential British bigevent tailgate. Cross-Country Course Walks Keep your eyes and ears open for late-breaking chances to walk the XC course with athletes and experts. SmartPak often hosts a course walk on Friday afternoon; check the

LRK3DE Live on USEF Network Provisional Schedule

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 8 a.m. Dressage Test Ride Rolex Stadium

1:30 p.m.–3:40 p.m. Dressage Tests continue Rolex Stadium

1:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m. Dressage Tests continue Rolex Stadium

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Cross-Country Test

8:30 a.m.–Noon Dressage Tests begin Rolex Stadium

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 8:30 a.m.–Noon Dressage Tests resume Rolex Stadium

6 p.m. Kentucky Invitational CSI3* $36,000 Welcome Speed Cup 1.45m Rolex Stadium

4:30 p.m. $225,000 Kentucky Invitational CSI3* Grand Prix Rolex Stadium

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PHOTO: ALEX BANKS/US EQUESTRIAN

THE LAND ROVER/USEF CCI5* EVENTING NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP IS ON THE LINE FOR U.S. PAIRS


whiteboard at the SmartPak booth in the Sponsor Village for timing and other specifics. Other course-walk opportunities can crop up on relatively short notice, so listen for announcements on Thursday, April 25, and Friday, April 26, and check the LRK3DE information booth in the Rolex Stadium’s breezeway. The Jogs The competition’s two horse inspections provisionally are scheduled for Wednesday, April 24, at 3 p.m. and Sunday, April 28, at 8 a.m.; check kentuckythreedayevent.com/ competition/schedule for updates. Both take place on the High Hope Inspection Lane beside the steeplechase course, between the steeplechase judges’ tower and the Kentucky Horse Park Amphitheatre. The inspections, known as “the jogs,” offer a rare opportunity to see the powerful equine athletes without their tack as they trot up and down a lane for the inspection team. It’s also a chance for their riders to show off their sartorial splendor! The Dressage Test Ride Provisionally scheduled for 8 a.m. on Thursday, April 25, in the Rolex Stadium, the dressage test ride is an FEI standard for all CCI events. It’s performed by a horse and rider who are not entered in the event but perform the required dressage test as if they are competing, with judges scoring them. “This test ride provides an opportunity to establish communication between the judges, allowing them to discuss the requirements and subtle aspects of the test and agree upon what is expected from combinations in competition,” Marilyn Payne, a two-time Olympic eventing judge, explained.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Jumping Test Rolex Stadium

Times subject to change. Check usef.org/network for the most up-to-date schedule. For the complete event schedule, visit KentuckyThreeDayEvent.com.

USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 73


EXPLORE

SPECIAL EVENTS

LRK3DE is about more than the competition—it’s also about celebrating horses and equestrians as athletes and learning more about high-level equestrian sport. Go Jumping After dressage on Friday and cross-country on Saturday, respectively, add a different flavor of jumping with the $36,000 1.45m FEI Welcome Speed Cup/Ranking Class and the $225,000 Kentucky Invitational CSI3* Grand Prix presented by Hagyard Equine Medical Institute. More details are available at kentuckythreedayevent.com/grand-prix. Both jumping classes will take place in the Rolex Stadium. Seats are $5, with $1 of each seat sold going to the Bluegrass Land Conservancy, LRK3DE’s official charity in 2019. To learn more about the sport of jumping, visit US Equestrian’s jumping page and the United States Hunter Jumper Association. Champions Live This moderated panel discussion on Sunday after the second horse inspection features prominent equestrians from the three Olympic

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You’re never far from horses when you’re in the Bluegrass. If you find yourself with an opening in your schedule, why not catch a tour or rub elbows with local horsemen and -women? Horse Country has suggested multi-day itineraries, including Family Fun in Horse Country and the horse- and bourbon-themed

Spirit of the Bluegrass, as well as behind-the-scenes tours at such operations as the Fasig-Tipton auction company, Hallway Feeds, and individual farms. Availability can be limited, so book early at visithorsecountry.com. Keeneland on Versailles Road in Lexington is a National Historic Landmark, as well as one of the nation’s premier Thoroughbred racecourses and auction houses. Visit keeneland. com for formal tour options, as well as a do-it-yourself tour with Keeneland’s self-guided walking tour—a handy list of stops that include the racetrack, barn area,

PHOTOS: GLENYE OAKFORD/US EQUESTRIAN, (INSET) KELLY VAN DELLEN/ADOBESTOCK

For the test rider and horse, it’s also an opportunity to perform a high-level test at one of the most prestigious events in the world. This year’s dressage test rider is Lexington native and eventer Erin Pullen, who will ride the test on her horse Tag, an off-the-track Thoroughbred who made 46 starts before retiring from the races. Today, he and Pullen compete successfully at the 4*/Advanced level in eventing. During their test, Pullen and Tag will wear a Hylofit heart-rate monitoring system that will show the horse and rider’s heart rates and other key metrics in real time on the Rolex Stadium’s large screen. The test ride will stream live as part of USEF Network’s coverage of the event.

THE BLUEGRASS


sale pavilion, and track kitchen, where you can pick up breakfast or a cup of coffee while mingling with owners, trainers, jockeys, and stable employees. If equine sporting history is your bag, make a stop at the Keeneland Library, too. The collections hold books, art, and more on a huge array of topics, such as equine

art, horse care, farriery, veterinary medicine, and equine law. Kentucky is best known for horses, but another historic, homegrown industry also makes for an interesting tour opportunity. The Bourbon Trail serves up a variety of tours through Bluegrass distilleries. Check kybourbontrail.com for details. Or visit two of the area’s famous historic houses—Waveland and Ashland, the Henry Clay Estate—for a look back in time. For more information on Waveland, visit parks.ky.gov, and check out henryclay.org for more about Ashland.

disciplines on display during the LRK3DE competition—dressage, eventing, and jumping—engaging in a fun and wide-ranging conversation about their sports. The panel takes place in the spectator seating tent located on The Hill behind the Rolex Stadium grandstand. Former eventing Olympian Jimmy Wofford will moderate the discussion, which is free and open to anyone with a Sunday LRK3DE grounds admission ticket. Stop by to glean behind-the-scenes knowledge of Olympic equestrian sport at one of LRK3DE’s highlights, co-hosted by Equestrian Events, the United States Dressage Federation, the United States Eventing Association, and the United States Hunter Jumper Association.

AROUND THE PARK

While you’re at the Kentucky Horse Park, take advantage of the many sights to see there, including US Equestrian’s office and the headquarters of US Equestrian affiliates the American Hackney Horse Association, American Saddlebred Horse Association, United States Dressage Federation, United States Hunter Jumper Association, and Paso Fino Horse Association. While you’re there, get in touch with equestrian sports history at the American Saddlebred Museum, the Rolex Stadium’s USHJA Show Jumping Hall of Fame display of Hall of Famer plaques, and the USHJA Wheeler Museum at the USHJA’s headquarters. Explore the horse-human connection and its role in history, art, and more at the 60,000-square-foot International Museum of the Horse, which has a broad array of collections and exhibitions, including online exhibits. The Horse Park also presents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see many horse breeds in a single location. Why not start with a visit to the Parade of Breeds show? The show takes place daily at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. The Breeds Barn’s residents include representatives from such breeds

USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 75


as the Arabian, Friesian, Morgan, and Paso Fino, as well as breeds like India’s Marwari, rarely seen in the United States. And don’t miss the Hall of Champions, where you can rub shoulders with Kentucky Derby winners like Funny Cide and Go For Gin, among other greats.

LANDMARKS

Statues, memorials, and quiet spots of historic significance are dotted across the Kentucky Horse Park’s 1,224 acres.

Places to Remember There are other notable spots around the grounds, too. Visitors to LRK3DE will want to make a stop by one of the event’s most famous and picturesque combinations on the cross-country course—the Head of the Lake, located at the east end of the Rolex Stadium and adjacent to the lake that borders the stadium. On the slope overlooking the Head of the Lake is another worthwhile spot to visit—memorial plaques to a number of notable horses, including the beloved 1982 Kentucky ThreeDay Event winner The Gray Goose and the popular pony and two-time Kentucky Three-Day veteran Theodore O’Connor. Piloted by Olympic medalist Karen O’Connor, the 14.1-hand

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PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

Bronze Icons At LRK3DE, sculptor Jean Clagett’s large statue of eventing legend Bruce Davidson on Eagle Lion is a selfie hot-spot, and it also serves as a handy meeting-place between the Rolex Stadium and the Sponsor Village. Near it is the pretty Rolex Clock, an elegant nod to Rolex’s role as LRK3DE’s official timepiece. There are 16 other statues around the park, too. There’s the dramatic, life-sized Edwin Bogucki depiction of the Arabian stallion Bask++ in the International Museum of the Horse’s lobby. Famed American Saddlebreds Roxie Highland, Supreme Sultan, and CHWild Eyed and Wicked dazzle visitors to the American Saddlebred Museum. Gwen Reardon’s proud “The Spirit of the American Morgan” is a spark of lively energy between the Visitor Information Center and the International Museum of the Horse. The Korean War pack horse Sergeant Reckless—in the form of a bronze by Jocelyn Russell unveiled in 2018—still carries her load of ammunition in front of the International Museum of the Horse, while in his nearby garden spot Herbert Haseltine’s iconic Man o’ War bronze stands over the legendary racehorse’s grave.


IT’S ABOUT CELEBRATING EQUINE AND HUMAN ATHLETES Thoroughbred/Arabian/Shetland cross known as Teddy was the first pony ever to compete at the Kentucky Three-Day Event when he finished third in 2007. During the dressage and jumping phases, consider a trip to the warm-up ring outside the Rolex Stadium, where a hushed crowd assembles to watch horses and riders make their lastminute preparations. You might hear a bit of coaching advice, too. On cross-country day, the walk to the start box is worth it. Get a feel for the intense focus and athleticism of the equine and human athletes, and thrill to the cheers of the crowd as horse and rider begin their cross-country run.

SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP

Sponsor Village, The Hill (behind the Rolex Stadium), and the trade fair offer an unparalleled opportunity to fill your wish list, whether you’re on the hunt for equestrian fashion, eventrelated souvenirs, or quality items to stock your tack trunk, barn, or farm. Maps for both the Sponsor Village and the trade fair are available on the LRK3DE website at kentuckythreedayevent.com/sponsor-village-map and kentuckythreedayevent. com/trade-fair-map-2, respectively. In Sponsor Village, ShopUSEF (booth 2), located in the US Equestrian booth across Nina Bonnie Blvd. from the Rolex Stadium, is your exclusive outlet for official Ariat Team gear and US Equestrian logo-wear. We’ll also have free fan memberships

and more in the booth (see sidebar below). We also recommend visits to our sponsors, partners, and MemberPerk providers in Sponsor Village: Ariat (booth 22), Charles Owen (booth 38), Horseware (booth 35), Platinum Performance (booth 12), SmartPak (booth 37), AIM Equine Network (booth 8), and John Deere (booth 28), which will be giving away your choice of a mower or a Gator™ during LRK3DE. In the trade fair in and around the Covered Arena, you’ll find another rich seam of shopping possibilities, including such US Equestrian sponsors and/or partners as Hagyard Equine Medical Institute (booth 171), Triple Crown Nutrition (booth 152), and Prestige Italia USA (booth 158). While you’re exploring the delights of Sponsor Village, the trade fair, and their environs, keep your attention tuned to whiteboards outside booths, as well as announcements on the PA system—many vendors will be lining up autograph signings or course walks during LRK3DE or holding special sales, so it’s worth staying informed. Now that you’ve got your game plan set and a list of mustsees, go forth and enjoy! LRK3DE is a great chance to mix and mingle with fellow equestrians, experience the power and grace of horses and the human athletes who work with them, and share the joy of horse sports.

Join the Joy

With US Equestrian US Equestrian will be bringing the joy to LRK3DE—get in on the fun! We’ve got giveaways, exclusive US Equestrian and Ariat Team gear, and much more in the US Equestrian booth in Sponsor Village. We’ll be next door to the Land Rover Ultimate Stable, across Nina Bonnie Blvd. from the Rolex Stadium and the bronze statue of Bruce Davidson on Eagle Lion.

While you’re visiting, be sure to check out our interactive video storytelling area—and bring a friend! Snap a photo and share a favorite memory or moment from your life as an equestrian or horse sports fan. Selected two-minute stories will be included in Equestrian Weekly’s special LRK3DE daily editions. US Equestrian also will be offering athlete signings next door

at the Land Rover Ultimate Stable. Not a US Equestrian member yet? Sign up for a free fan membership and explore our MemberPerks program while you’re visiting. During Saturday’s cross-country phase, check out the US Equestrian tailgate at spot #A15, directly across Nina Bonnie Blvd. from the glamping area. Stop by for refreshments, giveaways, and fun!

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MARS EQUESTRIAN A LON G H ISTO RY W I T H H O RSES

Mars Equestrian’s (left to right) Zack Berry, Marketing Manager; Bridgett McIntosh, Director; Deidra Pitts, Sponsorship Manager; and Geoffrey Galant, Vice-President

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Mars Equestrian’s arrival as presenting sponsor of the Land Rover Kentucky ThreeDay Event is fitting, given the deep connection Mars has had with the horse world. For generations, Mars has celebrated a rich, century-long equestrian heritage, and through its partnerships with events like LRK3DE, the family-owned business is dedicated to an enduring equestrian legacy. It’s also committed to sustainability and the well-being of horses, pets, and people who love them. Mars Equestrian’s portfolio of brands includes Buckeye™ Nutrition, combining science, innovation, and a genuine passion for horses to produce the highest quality, safest feed possible; Nutro™ Brand pet food, a leading brand of natural pet food products sold in-store and online at both pet specialty and major grocery and mass retailers everywhere; Ethel M® Chocolates, the premier chocolatier based in Nevada, crafting locally made, preservative-free confections since 1981; and American Heritage® Chocolate, developed in 2006 by Mars Wrigley Confectionery to help educate consumers about the history of our multi-cultural nation through the engaging story of chocolate! American Heritage Chocolate is an artisanal chocolate experience based on historic recipes and is sold in over 200 fine gift shops at historic sites, museums and historic inns across the USA and Canada.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF MARS EQUESTRIAN

LRK3DE’s new presenting sponsor is creating a better world for horses, pets, and the people who love them.


“We have this incredibly diverse portfolio of brands,” said Geoffrey Galant, VicePresident of Mars Equestrian Sponsorship at Mars Incorporated. “We produce great, high-quality, nutritious products for horses, for pets, and for their owners. It’s a great intersection of all those segments.” Mars Equestrian’s support for horse sports is only the latest in the multi-generation equestrian heritage at Mars going back to company founders Frank and Ethel V. Mars. In the late 1920s, they created an equine haven in Pulaski, Tenn. They named the property Milky Way Farm, in honor of one of their best-selling candy

“Mars has really stood behind sustaining equestrian sport and horse well-being.” --DR. BRIDGETT MCINTOSH, DIRECTOR, MARS EQUESTRIAN SPONSORSHIP bars, and followed up in 1930 by naming their new SNICKERS® Bar after one of the family’s beloved horses. A decade later, Gallahadion carried the Mars silks into the winner’s circle at the 1940 Kentucky Derby. Today, the Mars family is involved in a range of horse sports, including breeding top-class and Olympic level eventing horses, internationally competitive Quarter Horses and Arabians, and caring for retired service horses. That love of horses and pets is part of Mars Incorporated’s DNA, a heritage that’s strongly reflected today in the core values and priorities Mars shares with equestrians, such as compassion, innovation, education, and accessibility to the sport. In the horse world alone, Mars for decades has contributed to training leaders in the equine industry through collaborative partnerships with universities in the US, UK, and Australia. Some of the industry’s most innovative and sciencebased equine nutrition and management practices have been a result of Mars and Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition supported studies that have resulted in over 500 scientific publications. “Mars has really stood behind sustaining equestrian sport and horse well-being,” said Dr. Bridgett McIntosh, Director, Mars Equestrian Sponsorship. “For example, high-fat and fiber diets that you see today that helped make the horses perform so well in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics was largely due to Mars supported research in innovative ways to feed horses that would improve their health and well-being in Atlanta’s heat and humidity. Today, Mars continues to work with multiple universities around the globe to carry out unbiased scientific research to better the world for horses and promote environmental sustainability.” “We think in terms of generations, not quarters,” said Galant. “That’s the beauty of being a private company: we have the freedom to plan over a long period of time, and that’s what makes this company so much fun. We want to give back, but beyond just being a sponsor of an event—which we’re proud to do—we’re also asking ourselves how we can make a difference in people’s individual lives.” That dedication hasn’t just created a legacy of great service to equestrians, their horses, and their other animal companions. It’s also built bridges and shared joy between communities of equestrians and pet owners. “It’s not just about elite-level competitions,” McIntosh said. “We know that horses have an amazing effect on people, and we want to spread that joy with people, from newcomers to international competitors.”

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Your pasture isn’t only about the grass. It’s about root and soil health, too. These pasture strategies can also help conserve water, reduce mud, and more. STORY BY HOPE ELLIS-ASHBURN

A Path to Better Pasture PHOTO: DRIK70/ADOBESTOCK

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Rotating pastures and the prevention of overgrazing can help your pastures provide ample forage.

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University, recommend several strategies to encourage and maintain healthy soil, conserve water, and protect the environment while potentially reducing the amount of labor required, as well. Increasing soil organic matter Organic matter is composed of decaying plant and animal residues, cells and tissues of soil organisms, and substances synthesized by soil organisms. Some examples of plant residues include stems, leaves, seed pods and heads, pasture grass that has been mowed, trampled grass, and strewn hay. Manure is a good example of animal residue. “Soil organic matter increases the waterholding capacity of soils, which can reduce drought stress and the need for irrigation during droughty periods,” Dillard explained. “Prevention of overgrazing will also help maintain healthy plants and roots, and as they go through natural dieback and growth cycles, they will contribute greatly to soil organic matter.” “However, in some areas of the country, proper irrigation will still be necessary and can be the key ingredient in growing healthy turf,” noted Reynolds. “It is best to irrigate in the morning (before 10 a.m.), when the sun is not going to dry out the soil so quickly. There are a few ways to quickly ‘test’ if a pasture needs water. “If the grass has taken on a dull green or grayish coloring or if foot prints don’t quickly disappear, it needs water. Because cool-season and warm-season grasses have different watering recommendations, it is always best to consult your local extension agent to see what your grass needs. When watering an established turf area, it is recommended to irrigate until the top six to eight inches of soil are wet, but be sure not to over-water.” Rotational grazing Rotational grazing is another practice that helps maintain and grow soil organic matter. “This practice prevents overgrazing and allows plants time to recover before being grazed again,” Dillard said. Should bare spots develop or persist, Reynolds recommends seeding. “Treat bare spots with seeds. Also, over-seed your pastures during to the spring and fall to replenish grasses,” she added. “Rotational grazing also has the benefit of allowing pastures to rest, which allows them

PHOTOS: MEGAN ANDERSON

We’ve all been told that first impressions are important, and that’s never truer than for stable owners hoping to attract clients for their business. Healthy horses at turnout on a nutritious pasture can make your facility an attractive option. In addition, pastures can play a significant role in meeting your horse or pony’s needs for socialization and exercise. A number of factors go into supplying high-quality pasture to horses. “Healthy grass starts at the root, which needs healthy soil,” says Alex Reynolds, director of marketing and product registration at Mirimichi Green, which specializes in environmentally friendly, cost-effective turf management and the production of revolutionary, sustainable soil amendments, biostimulants, fertilizers, and pesticides. Reynolds and Dr. Leanne Dillard, assistant professor and extension specialist at Auburn


“IT’S BEST TO IRRIGATE IN THE MORNING.”

Careful attention to the prevention of overstocking allows for lush, green grass.

to heal, recover, and establish roots with growth of the plant. Finally, it will reduce the amount of time and costs of repairing overused pastures and will provide extended forage for the horses.” Forage selection and overstocking “In regards to selecting forages, perennial forages such as orchardgrass, bermudagrass, and alfalfa have a more extensive root growth than annual forages and are typically more droughttolerant, therefore reducing or eliminating the need to irrigate,” Dillard said. “Your local extension service can help with the selection of forage species adapted to your area. “Correct stocking rates are also important,” she added. “While this also relates back to the prevention of overgrazing, having too many animals in a pasture will make plants more susceptible to other stressors, like drought. Make sure to use stocking rates appropriate to your area.” Overstocking animals can lead to more than stressors for plants. Along with equipment traffic, it can also destroy vegetation and lead to soil compaction. “One of the easiest ways to reduce and prevent soil compaction is to limit animal and equipment traffic when the ground is excessively muddy,” Dillard said.

Dealing with high-traffic areas Dillard also recommends allocating a “sacrifice” pen, if possible, for turnout and feeding hay during the winter. “This prevents damage to all pastures and limits the areas which may need to be reseeded during the spring,” she said. “This also reduces the amount of land that is susceptible to soil compaction.” Remember to budget appropriately if you’re using a sacrifice area. “Providing and setting up sacrifice areas can increase costs, with an increase in hay provided to horses,” said Reynolds. “But it does provide time for grass to rejuvenate.” Reynolds recommends relocating hightraffic areas if they are showing signs of excessive mud. “I advise clients to consider entering and exiting pastures in a different location,” she said. “Feeding in different spots can also be helpful, as can prepping hightraffic areas with straw or gravel. It is likely that muddy spots are compacted and have sparse ground cover.” Soil compaction is typically diagnosed when areas of no vegetation are present and soil is “as hard as a rock.” “While the extent of the compaction can be measured using a penetrometer, this is not USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 93


necessary for treatment,” Dillard explained. “If soil compaction is evident, lightly till the affected area to break up the soil prior to planting. This increases soil-to-seed contact and helps new roots be able to get water and nutrients.” When choosing forages for these areas, use perennial, deep-rooted plants as much as possible. If it is a heavy-use area, such as an alleyway or a location near a barn, opt for species that are sod-forming. Turf grasses such as bermudagrass or zoysia will be able to tolerate traffic more than bunch grasses like orchardgrass or tall fescue— although endophyte-infected tall fescue poses a risk for pregnant mares and their fetuses. “While it can help with immediate soil compaction, we do not recommend soil aeration,” Dillard said. “It ultimately makes the problem worse.” Areas with compacted soil can be repaired with seed. In addition, there are soil-carbonizing products available that improve soil efficiency. Dorothy Matthews owns and operates a 30-acre boarding stable, Hanlen Farm, in Versailles, Ky. She uses Mirimichi’s soil enhancer product in her paddocks and near her cross-country jumps, where she finds that frequent use and fence-walkers cause 94 SPRING ISSUE 2019

soil compaction. Her reasoning extends beyond the repair of these areas. “My favorite aspect is that with the soil enhancer I see a reduction in labor in that the newly seeded grass doesn’t require straw or intensive management to grow, and the grass comes up faster,” she said. Fertilization is key component Whether you are encouraging new or established grass to grow, fertilization is also important. Soil testing, with a lab that also requires information about the species of grass you intend to plant, can help make the most accurate recommendations. “We recommend soil testing pastures and lawns every two years and hay fields every year,” said Dillard. “This may differ in your state. It’s a good idea to check with your local extension service for timing and locations of soil labs.” Both over- and under-fertilization can be costly. Over-fertilization, in particular, can lead to environment problems. “Excessive nitrogen will leach into the ground water and can cause nitrate toxicity in livestock and humans, while excessive phosphate can end up in surface water and lead

PHOTOS: MEGAN ANDERSON, ALEX REYNOLDS/MIRIMICHI GREEN (OPPOSITE)

A beautiful pasture that has not suffered from overstocking.


to algae blooms that are dangerous to wildlife (fish kills) and can release toxins, harming animals consuming the water,” Dillard explained. Under-fertilization, meanwhile, “limits plant growth and reduces plant yield and nutritive value in pastures and hay fields, which increases your need for hay or grain,” Dillard said. “It can also negatively impact a pasture’s carrying capacity, or how many animals you can graze at one time.” Which fertilizer you should use will depend on the type of grass you desire to have or the type that is already established, said Reynolds. “It is important to note that fertilizer does not necessarily have to be high in nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium to be effective,” she said. “There are many states that have banned the use of phosphorous or have nitrogen blackout months due to the potential for leaching and runoff, particularly during the rainy season. It’s important to research your state’s fertilizer regulations to comply with state laws.” Natural fertilization Horse manure, with its good supply of nutrients, can make a good fertilizer, whether it is composted barn manure or spread across a field. “If you are composting or stacking your manure pile, sample the pile to determine its actual nutrients,” Dillard recommended. “The nutrient composition of all livestock manures differs based on the diet of the animal. Supplemental synthetic fertilizer may be necessary to ensure proper pasture fertilization.” Composting can be a great method of dealing with barn waste—a common concern among horse owners—because it allows for storage of manure until the correct time for application. It also kills any pathogens or parasites that might be present in the manure and prevents the spread of disease. “However, some states, such as Maryland and Pennsylvania, have strong regulations on the use of animal manures as fertilizers,” Dillard cautioned. “It is a good idea to check your local regulations and with your extension service to apply any manure appropriately.”

Above: Taken prior to the application of Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN Soil Enhancer. Below: After the application of Mirimichi Green’s CarbonizPN Soil Enhancer. The application has improved the turf in the pasture of one of Mirimichi Green’s clients.

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The 4 Rs Whether you’re using a synthetic fertilizer or manure, there are “four Rs” to consider when applying fertilizer: »» Right Rate. This can only be determined by getting a soil test and testing your manure (synthetic fertilizer will be labeled) and only applying the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium required by the soil test. »» Rate Time. Applying fertilizer when there is snow on the ground won’t be very beneficial. “Make sure you are applying the fertilizer when the plants are actively growing,” Dillard advised. »» Right Place. Make sure to keep nutrients where your pasture can use them. “Avoid applying when you have excessive rainfall, because this will increase nutrient runoff, reducing the fertilizer efficacy and causing environment problems,” Dillard said. »» Right Source. Match your fertilizer needs to your pasture’s needs.

For More Information »» Mirimichi Green mirimichigreen.com »» Natural Resources Conservation Service nrcs.usda.gov

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The elimination of weeds also leads to a healthy pasture. There are many herbicides available, each treating a different group of weeds—making the process challenging, at best. In addition, not all herbicides are labeled for livestock. For example, many herbicides that can be used on lawns are not labeled for livestock. “Since horses will come in close association with barn lawns, I suggest only using pasture-labeled herbicides in pastures and on barn lawns,” Dillard recommended. Glyphosate (i.e., Roundup®) is the most commonly used herbicide. It is not specific and will kill any actively growing plant species within seven days. It is most useful for spot-spraying lawns and pastures with minimal weed infestation. “Conversely, where there is a larger forage weed problem, herbicides labeled for use in grass should be considered,” said Dillard. “Each herbicide will indicate which pasture forage it is labeled to be used in and under what conditions (e.g., established tall fescue). It is illegal to use any herbicide off label.” The label also will include what weeds the herbicide is labeled to kill. Therefore, correctly identifying your weeds is very important. Your local extension agent can help identify any problematic weeds. “Many broadleaf weeds can be eradicated using 2,4-D or similar products. Most weeds in the Eastern U.S. are broadleaf weeds,” Dillard said. “These products can typically be sprayed onto a grass pasture and will eliminate most broadleaf species. Unfortunately, this may also include desirable plants. If this is the case, you must determine if the weed problem is bad enough to sacrifice these or if spot-spraying may be an option. You can also look for alternative herbicides that may control the weed without damaging the desirable species.” Follow the herbicide label’s instructions for livestock. Horses can be rotated off or withheld from pasture during the time noted on the label. Your local extension agent can help you with the identification of harmful or invasive weed species that may appear on your farm. In addition to herbicides and some of the other pasture management recommendations included here, there are other weed-reducing solutions. “Mowing weeds down to keep them at a level so that they do not produce seed and keeping a good stand of turf can help,” Reynolds said. “As a bonus, a consistent mowing schedule can also aid in the prevention of pasture overgrowth.” Pasture management can be a complicated subject, but it doesn’t have to be. Even for those living in more arid parts of the country where supplemental hay is required due to the poor nutritional quality of the grasses found there, a commitment to quality can help you meet your pasture management goals.

PHOTO: ANGELA CHANDLER

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FOR THE RECORD

Hearing Committee Rulings and Administrative Penalties OFFICIAL NOTICES Contributed by the Regulation Department unless otherwise indicated. The following official notices are only intended to give penalty information for a given case and not to disclose the factual basis for each violation or penalty. The Hearing Committee decides each case based on the evidence presented at the hearing and takes into account many factors that may raise or lower a given penalty. For example, the Hearing Committee takes into account such things as whether the violation was intentional or unintentional, the nature of the violation, the credibility of witnesses, penalties in similar cases, past violations of Federation rules by a respondent, and many other mitigating factors. US Equestrian members can access and search the United States Equestrian Federation Suspension List online at USequestrian.org. Hover over the Compete tab on the homepage. In the menu that appears, click Suspension List under Rules & Regulations. HEARING COMMITTEE RULINGS Below are the official rulings reached by the Hearing Committee following hearings held in these matters and/or plea agreements made. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on September 6, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Ocala Tournament Horse Show held February 27-March 4, 2018; the Ocala Winter Finals Horse Show held March 6-11, 2018; and the Ocala Winter Celebration Horse Show held March 13-18, 2018, wherein DEBORAH CONNOR and DC SALES & ENTERTAINMENT, LLC, both of Reddick, Fla., violated Chapter 9, GR913.3, of this Federation, in that they were reported three times for making non-negotiable payments towards entry fees. For this violation it was determined that DEBORAH CONNOR and DC SALES & ENTERTAINMENT, LLC, each be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and collectively fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on September 10, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Southeastern Charity Horse Show held September 20-23, 2017, wherein JOHN D. GARDNER, of Pendergrass, Ga., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1e, of this Federation, in that he behaved in a disrespectful manner and used profanity towards other exhibitors and Competition Officials. 102 SPRING ISSUE 2019

For this violation of Federation Rules it was determined that JOHN D. GARDNER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 5, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Ox Ridge June Horse Show held June 12-17, 2018, wherein DAVID LAKS, of Brooklyn, N.Y., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1d and GR702.1e, of this Federation, in that he demonstrated improper and unsportsmanlike behavior by speaking in a rude tone to several Licensed Officials. Furthermore, he showed little remorse for his actions when the Officials initially brought this to his attention at the Competition. For these violations of Federation Rules it was determined that DAVID LAKS be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 5, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the I Love New York Horse Show held July 4-9, 2017, wherein BRENDAN WILLIAMS, of East Aurora, N.Y., violated Chapter 4, GR411, of this Federation, in that as trainer, he failed to properly submit an Equine Medication Report Form to document the valid therapeutic administration of clenbuterol to the horse, CYRINA Z, which was appropriately withdrawn for the requisite 24-hour period before competing.

For this violation of Federation Rules it was determined that BRENDAN WILLIAMS be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 23, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Island Hills Stable February I Horse Show held February 3, 2018; Island Hills Stable February II Horse Show held February 10-11, 2018; and the Island Hills Stable February IV Horse Show held February 24-25, 2018, wherein ISLAND HILLS STABLES, LLC, of Deer Park, N.Y., violated Chapter 7, GR706.1b, GR706.1c, GR706.1m, and GR706.1o, and Chapter 12, GR1210.5, GR1210.6, and GR1210.9, in that as Competition Management, they failed to submit the Post Competition Reports and associated fees to the Federation. For this violation it was determined that ISLAND HILLS STABLES, LLC, be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1, and that they shall submit to the Federation the Post Competition Reports and associated fees for the aforementioned competitions. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 29, 2018. SAWYER GILKER, of Elkridge, Md., violated Chapter 9, GR913.3, of this Federation, in connection with the Cavalier Classic Horse Show held July 12-16, 2017; the Winston National Horse Show held August 16-20, 2017; the Constitution Classic Horse Show held August 23-27, 2018; and the Culpeper Finals held September 27-October 1, 2017, in that she

was reported four times for making non-negotiable payments toward entry fees. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that SAWYER GILKER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 29, 2018. JETMIR RUSIDOVSKI of Austin, Texas, violated Chapter 7, GR706.1j, and Chapter 13, GR1301.4b, of this Federation, in that he was reported three times for making non-negotiable payments to the Federation and has failed to submit proper payment for the indebtedness owed to the Federation for his 2018 USEF and USHJA Memberships. Before reaching its decision, the Hearing Committee considered the written submissions received into evidence. Mr. Rusidovski did not attend the hearing, but he did submit email responses on this issue. Mr. Rusidovski was given proper notice of the non-negotiable payments and an opportunity to cure his indebtedness. As of the date of the hearing, Mr. Rusidovski was not under automatic suspension following his compliance with a payment plan offered by the Federation wherein he paid off half the outstanding balance several days before the hearing. The partial payment allowed him to come off suspension pending further payments under the ongoing payment plan. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee unanimously ruled that the following penalties are appropriate for the violation. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that JETMIR RUSIDOVSKI be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and be fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j.


This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 29, 2018. WEST MILFORD EQUESTRIAN CORP. of Newfoundland, N.J., violated Chapter 7, GR706.1c, GR706.1m, and GR706.1o, and Chapter 12, GR1210.5, GR1210.6, and GR1210.9, of this Federation in connection with the West Milford Equestrian Center Horse Show held on October 22, 2017, and the West Milford Equestrian Center Horse Show held on November 11, 2017, in that West Milford Equestrian Corp., as Competition Management, failed to submit the Post Competition Report and appropriate fees to the Federation. Before reaching its decision, the Hearing Committee considered the written submissions received into evidence and noted that no one attended the hearing on behalf of West Milford Equestrian Corp. Based on the written submissions, the Hearing Committee determined that West Milford Equestrian Corp. violated Federation rules as charged by failing to submit the Post Competition Report and appropriate fees to the Federation for the two licensed competitions set forth above. In considering the proper penalty for the violation, the Hearing Committee noted that West Milford Equestrian Corp. was given proper notice of these issues and an opportunity to cure. Although they promised to resolve the matter, as of the time of the hearing it still has not rectified the violations. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee ruled unanimously that the following penalty is appropriate for the violation. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that WEST MILFORD EQUESTRIAN CORP. be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and be fined $500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. The Hearing Committee further directed that, effective January 4, 2019, WEST MILFORD EQUESTRIAN CORP. is suspended from membership and forbidden from privilege of taking part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition, including as Licensee and/or Competition Management for any Licensed Competition until such time as it has tendered the missing Post Competitions Reports and fully paid the fees associated with each report. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 30, 2018. LEIGH SEMILOF, DVM, of Sodus, N.Y., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with the NY Morgan Regional Horse Show held on September 13-16, 2017, in that she, as trainer and owner, exhibited the horse STARSHINE EPSILON AURIGAE after it had been administered and/or contained in its body acepromazine and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide. The Hearing Committee noted that the evidence in the record established the presence of acepromazine as charged. In determining the proper penalty, the Hearing Committee noted that Dr. Semilof did not attend the hearing but rested on her written submissions. Dr. Semilof acknowledged that she administered acepromazine to calm the horse after it became agitated on the trailer and trapped its right foreleg over the stall divider. In deciding the proper penalty for the violation, the Hearing Committee considered the purpose for which acepromazine was administered and further considered Dr. Semilof’s claim that she did not consider the implications of using acepromazine since the horse would not be showing until the next day. The Hearing Committee further noted that acepromazine is a forbidden substance and is

a central nervous system depressant that has a sedative effect on horses. Due to its obvious potential to affect the performance of competing horses, the Hearing Committee takes the presence of this drug very seriously. Based on the evidence in this case, the Hearing Committee ruled unanimously that the following penalty is appropriate for the violation. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, LEIGH SEMILOF, DVM, be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The two-month suspension shall commence on August 1, 2019, and terminate at midnight on September 30, 2019. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c. The Hearing Committee also directed that LEIGH SEMILOF, DVM, be fined $2,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for these violations of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by STARSHINE EPSILON AURIGAE at said competition must be returned for redistribution pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on November 30, 2018. MICHAEL HOCHSTETLER of Plympton, Mass., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the HITS on the Hudson IV Horse Show held on July 19-23, 2017, in that as trainer, he exhibited the horse ROCKETEER after it had been administered and/or contained in its body caffeine, theophylline, and paraxanthine. The Hearing Committee noted that there was no challenge to the Federation’s case with regard to the alleged violation. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee noted that the evidence in the record established the presence of caffeine, theophylline, and paraxanthine as charged. In determining the proper penalty, the Hearing Committee noted that Mr. Hochstetler did not attend the hearing and rested on his written submission. The Hearing Committee did not find that the administration in this case reflected an intentional act to improperly gain a competitive advantage. The weight of the evidence pointed to Mr. Hochstetler, as trainer, as the individual who administered Crystal Light as part of his care and custody of the horse. The Hearing Committee determined unanimously that Mr. Hochstetler fit the definition of trainer of ROCKETEER with respect to this administration of caffeine. The Hearing Committee determined that this violation corresponded to a Category I rule violation under the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines and further noted that this must be considered a second offense for Mr.

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FOR THE RECORD Hochstetler, given a prior 2014 violation that also involved the administration of caffeine. Based on the evidence in this case and the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines, the Hearing Committee ruled unanimously that the following penalty is appropriate for the violation. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that MICHAEL HOCHSTETLER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. The Hearing Committee noted that in connection with this penalty and pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by ROCKETEER at said competition were returned for redistribution prior to the hearing. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on December 4, 2018. LINDSEY CANESI, of New Bedford, Mass., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1d, and Chapter 13, GR1301.4, of this Federation in that she was reported four times for making non-negotiable payments to the Federation and has failed to submit proper payments to the Federation for two of the four reported incidents. Before reaching its decision, the Hearing Committee considered the written submissions received into evidence. Ms. Canesi did not attend the hearing or submit any evidence to rebut the Charge. At the time of the hearing, Ms. Canesi was still on automatic suspension for failing to resolve two of the four reported incidents. Ms. Canesi was given proper notice of these matters. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee unanimously ruled that the following penalties are appropriate for the violation. For these violations of the rules, the Hearing Committee member present directed that LINDSEY CANESI be fined $2,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. The Hearing Committee further directed that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, LINDSEY CANESI be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation, or held 104 SPRING ISSUE 2019

in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The two-month suspension shall commence on July 1, 2019, and terminate at midnight on August 31, 2019.  However, should Ms. Canesi not resolve her automatic suspension prior to the two-month suspension set forth above, her two-month suspension shall run in full beginning the day following the termination of her automatic suspension. Any horse or horses, completely or in part owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same time period. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on December 4, 2018. MARGARITE ERRICOE DWA R DS (a . k . a . M A RG I E EDWARDS and MARGUERITE ERRICO) of Marina Del Rey, Calif., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1d, GR702.1g, GR702.1k, and GR703.1b of this Federation in that she registered herself under three different memberships using variations of her name, address, and date of birth, which circumvented an active suspension imposed in 2006 against her for violations of Federation rules. The Hearing Committee noted that the evidence demonstrated that Ms. Edwards 1 was automatically suspended on April 23, 2004, for a violation of Federation rules. Despite her suspension, Ms. Edwards was subsequently charged by the Federation and sanctioned for competing while suspended. To date, Ms. Edwards continues to be on automatic suspension pending resolution of both of these matters. Ms. Edwards stipulated to the proof that she more recently sought new registrations under two new names in an effort to circumvent her automatic suspensions and continue to compete in Licensed Competitions. The Hearing Committee was deeply concerned with Ms. Edwards’s repeated efforts to avoid her suspension by way of creating aliases. Increasingly severe suspensions by the Hearing Committee have not caused a change in her behavior. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee determined unanimously that Ms. Edwards violated Federation rules as charged and that expulsion from membership is necessary. For her violations of Federation Rules, the Hearing Committee directed that MARGIE EDWARDS (including all of her alias names) be found not in good standing and that effective February 1, 2019, and 1 For simplicity, Respondent will be referred to as “Ms. Edwards” herein.

until further notice, she is hereby expelled from membership with the Federation and is denied all the privileges of membership, including the ability to hold or exercise office in the Federation, attend or participate in Federation meetings, hold license(s) as an USEF or FEI official, compete in international competitions or receive USEF automatic insurance coverages, or participate in USEF group insurance programs pursuant to Chapter 7, GR702.1f. Ms. Edwards shall, effective February 1, 2019, also be suspended from competing or taking any part whatsoever in Licensed Competitions as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1b, and any horse or horses, completely or in part owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1c. The Hearing Committee also directed that it retains jurisdiction, and no sooner than one year from February 1, 2019, may Ms. Edwards apply to the Federation for reinstatement based upon affirmative proof of total rehabilitation, including proof that she has truly accepted responsibility for her actions, has taken steps to reform herself, has made restitution for her actions, and has performed community service to benefit the welfare of horses. As a further condition of her reinstatement, the Hearing Committee directed that the total indebtedness owed to the Federation must be paid in full before she can seek reinstatement. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on December 4, 2018. NICOLE MINGORANCE of Wellington, Fla., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1g, GR702.1j, GR702.1k, GR703.1b, and GR703.1f, of this Federation, in connection with the WEF 6 Equestrian Sport Productions, LLC Horse Show held on February 13-18, 2018, in that she was on competition grounds and competed while suspended, thereby failing to obey a penalty imposed by the Federation. Furthermore, she has failed to submit proper payment to the Federation for the indebtedness related to the suspension. Before reaching its decision, the Hearing Committee considered the written submissions received into evidence. Ms. Mingorance did not attend the hearing or submit any evidence to rebut the Charge. She was given proper notice of her underlying violation that caused her to be automatically suspended, as well as proper notice of this subsequent violation.

As of the date of the hearing, Ms. Mingorance was still on automatic suspension. In considering the proper penalty for the violation, the Hearing Committee took into account, among other things, Ms. Mingorance’s age, her short length of time as a Federation member, and the fact that she was not a United States citizen and had travelled from her home country periodically to compete. Accordingly, the Hearing Committee unanimously ruled that the following penalties are appropriate for the violation. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that NICOLE MINGORANCE be fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. The Hearing Committee further directed that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, NICOLE MINGORANCE be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for one month, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The one-month suspension shall commence on February 1, 2019, and terminate at midnight on February 28, 2019. However, should Ms. Mingorance not resolve her automatic suspension prior to the one-month suspension set forth above, her one-month suspension shall run in full from the date upon which her automatic suspension is lifted. Any horse or horses, completely or in part owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same time period. Furthermore, the Hearing Committee directed that NICOLE MINGORANCE must return for redistribution all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won at said competition and must pay a $300 fee to the competition in connection with this penalty pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1g. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on December 4, 2018.


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FOR THE RECORD ANNE SHUMATE WILLIAMS (a.k.a. ANNE GOLAND) of Somerset, Va., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1a, GR702.1c, and GR702.1d of this Federation in that she entered into a Final Order on January 17, 2018, in the Circuit Court of Orange County, in the Commonwealth of Virginia, whereby, the Court agreed to the written plea agreement resolving, among other counts, multiple charges of Cruelty to Animals: Generally (Va. Code § 3.2-6570). The Hearing Committee noted that Ms. Shumate Williams a.k.a. Goland was given proper notice of the hearing yet did not participate and did not submit anything to rebut the Charge. In determining the proper penalty for the violation, the Hearing Committee noted the Charge was raised under the Federation’s reciprocity rules, GR615.1 and GR702.1m, and that Ms. Shumate Williams a.k.a. Goland entered into a plea agreement in which she admitted to multiple accounts of Cruelty to Animals: Generally (Va. Code § 3.2-6570), among other things. As terms of her plea agreement, she was incarcerated for a period of six months, with five months suspended, on each charge. Among other conditions, upon her release she is prohibited from owning or possessing any equine or pet for five years post-release. Ms. Shumate Williams’ a.k.a. Goland’s inattention and mistreatment of multiple horses and other small animals was horrific and cut deeply against the core values of the Federation. Based on the unrebutted evidence, the Hearing Committee ruled unanimously that expulsion from membership is necessary in light of her violations. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that ANNE SHUMATE WILLIAMS (a.k.a. ANNE GOLAND) be found not in good standing and that, effective February 1, 2019, and until further notice, she is hereby expelled from membership with the Federation and is denied all the privileges of membership, including the ability to hold or exercise office in the Federation, attend or participate in Federation meetings, hold license(s) as an USEF or FEI official, compete in international competitions, receive USEF automatic insurance coverages, or participate in USEF group insurance programs pursuant to Chapter 7, GR702.1f. Anne Shumate Williams a.k.a. Anne Goland shall, effective February 1, 2019, also be suspended from competing or taking any part whatsoever in Licensed Competitions as an exhibitor, participant or spectator pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1b, and any horse or horses, completely or in part owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired 106 SPRING ISSUE 2019

thereafter), shall also be suspended pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1c. The Hearing Committee also directed that it retains jurisdiction, and no sooner than five years from February 1, 2019, may Ms. Shumate Williams a.k.a. Goland apply to the Federation for reinstatement based upon affirmative proof of total rehabilitation, including proof that she has truly accepted responsibility for her actions, has taken steps to reform herself, has made restitution for her actions, and has performed community service to benefit the welfare of horses. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on December 17, 2018. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Region 9 AHA Championship and Sport Horse Show held June 1-4, 2016; the Arkansas Arabian Victory Challenge Horse Show held May 18-20, 2018; and the AHA Region 8 Lead In and Championship Horse Show held June 6-10, 2018, wherein CYNTHIA STEINER, of Aubrey, Texas, violated Chapter 9, GR913.3, of this Federation, in that she was reported three times for making non-negotiable payments towards entry fees. For this violation it was determined that CYNTHIA STEINER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. ADMINISTRATIVE PENALTIES This is official notice of the imposition of Administrative Penalties pursuant to Chapter 4, GR412, and/or Chapter 6, GR616, offered by the Federation and accepted by the following parties, and approved by the Hearing Committee in lieu of hearings. MARY BAST of Littlestown, Pa., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Mid Summer Stroller I Horse Show held on July 19-22, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse, BACHELOR’S BUTTON, after it had been administered and/or contained in its body pseudoephedrine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that MARY BAST be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by BACHELOR’S BUTTON at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g.


JOHN BRAGG of Laguna Beach, Calif., and LEE FLICK of San Juan Capistrano, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Blenheim June Classic I Horse Show held on June 6-10, 2018, in that they, as trainers, exhibited the horse ALWAYS SOCIAL after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that JOHN BRAGG and LEE FLICK be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1,a and each fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by ALWAYS SOCIAL at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. ANNA BUFFINI of San Diego, Calif., violated Chapter 9, GR907.4 and DR124.2a, of this Federation in connection with the Dressage Derby II Horse Show held June 23-24, 2018, in that she competed in class #234 (USEF Third Level Test of Choice (GAIG/USDF Q on Test Three Allowed)) using another rider’s entry number, thereby misrepresenting information on the entry blank. For this violation, it was determined that ANNA BUFFINI be

censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a and fined $250 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. HAROLD CHOPPING of Southern Pines, N.C., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation, in connection with Tryon Summer 4 Horse Show held on July 3-8, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse MOST OF ALL after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin and phenylbutazone. For this violation it was determined that HAROLD CHOPPING be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by MOST OF ALL at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. CHAD COLE of Louisville, Ky., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with Rock Creek Horse Show held on June 5-9, 2018, in that, he, as trainer, exhibited the horse I’M A DREAMBOAT after it had been administered acepromazine and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide. For this violation it was d e t e r m i n e d t h a t p u rs u a n t to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, CHAD COLE be found

not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The two-month suspension shall commence on May 1, 2019, and terminate at midnight on June 30, 2019. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of his, or shown in his name or for his reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. CHAD COLE was also fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and

monies, if any, won by I’M A DREAMBOAT at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MEAGAN COUNTS of Circle Craig, Colo., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with the USEA, AEC, Adequan Gold Cup Finals, and ATC Finals Horse Trials held on August 29-September 2, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse AVIATOR after it had been administered and/or contained in its body hydroxyzine and cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that MEAGAN COUNTS be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by AVIATOR at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. M O N I K A D UJA R D I N , o f Quakertown, Pa., violated Chapter 7, GR702.1d, and Chapter 12, GR1202.3, of this Federation in connection with the Dressage at Rhythm & Blues III Horse Show

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FOR THE RECORD held on August 16, 2018, in that she urged a Licensed Official to disregard rules and procedures during the official measuring of an equine in order to attain the desired measurement. For these violations, it was determined that MONIKA DUJARDIN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. ALIXE GARCIA of Escondido, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Showpark Summer Classic Horse Show held on August 22-26, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse TUCKER after it had been administered and/or contained in its body caffeine and theophylline. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that ALIXE GARCIA be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by TUCKER at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. STEVE GASSEN of Shelbyville, Ky., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Lexington Junior League Horse Show held on July 9-14, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse, C’MON MAN, after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that STEVE GASSEN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This fine was enhanced due to the level of flunixin detected. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by C’MON MAN at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. SERGIO GUERREIRO of Wellington, Fla., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Equestrian Sport Productions, LLC June 1 Horse Show held on June 1-3, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse MASCOT DU CACHE POT Z after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin and phenylbutazone. For this violation it was determined that SERGIO GUERREIRO be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, 108 SPRING ISSUE 2019

won by MASCOT DU CACHE POT Z at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MIA JAMES of Ketchum, Idaho, violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with HMI Equestrian Classic I Horse Show held on July 25-29, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse SONGBIRD after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that MIA JAMES be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by SONGBIRD at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. JENNIFER KOCHER, of Ocala, Fla., violated JP117.7b of this Federation in connection with the Showplace End of Summer II Horse Show held on August 15-19, 2018, in that she competed in the FEI CSI5* Jumper Classes and in the Amateur Owner Jumper Classes at the same competition. For this violation it was determined that JENNIFER KOCHER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and she must return for redistribution all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won in the Amateur Owner Jumper Division at said competition and must pay a $300 fee to the competition in connection with this penalty pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. PHOEBE (LOUGHREY) LAWSON, of Milton, Ga., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Bill Russell Memorial Horse Show held on August 30-September 2, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse MR. BOJANGLES after it had been administered and/ or contained in its body flunixin and dexamethasone, both in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted levels. For this violation it was determined that PHOEBE (LOUGHREY) LAWSON be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $2,250 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. This penalty was issued in accordance with a second offense under Category I of the USEF Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by MR. BOJANGLES at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MICHELLE MAHONEY of Watsonville, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Region III Championship Arabian Show held on July 5-10, 2018, in that

she, as trainer, exhibited the horse ZZEUS S A+++// after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that MICHELLE MAHONEY be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by ZZEUS S A+++// at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. DOROTHY MAXFIELD of Wyckoff, N.J., as Technical Delegate, and SUDDENLY FARM of Lumberton, N.J., as Competition Management, violated Chapter 10, GR1034.5, of this Federation in connection with the Suddenly Farm Dressage Horse Show held June 14, 2017; the Suddenly Farm Dressage Horse Show held July 12, 2017; and the Suddenly Farm Dressage Horse Show held May 6, 2018, in that Dorothy Maxfield officiated as Technical Delegate for three consecutive competitions run by the same governing body, Board of Directors, or Licensee. For this violation, it was determined that DOROTHY MAXFIELD and SUDDENLY FARM each be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and that they each be fined $500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. ANNE MILLER of Kennett Square, Pa., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with Summer Wind Down I Horse Show held on August 25, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse PRIOR VA after it had been administered and/or contained in its body betamethasone. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that ANNE MILLER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by PRIOR VA at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. PATRICIA (TRICIA) MOSS of Wilmington, Mass., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with the Plymouth Rock Hunter Jumper Classic Horse Show held on June 20-24, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse CANNONAO after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level.

For this violation it was determined that PATRICIA (TRICIA) MOSS be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CANNONAO at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. HUGH MUTCH of San Rafael, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Showpark Summer Classic Horse Show held on August 22-26, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse JOHNNY CASH after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that HUGH MUTCH be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1,a and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by JOHNNY CASH at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. GERARD NEWMAN of Wellington, Fla., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with Kentucky Summer Horse Show held on July 25-29, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse DANDELION after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that GERARD NEWMAN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by DANDELION at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. IGNACIO OBERTO of Miami Beach, Fla., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with WEF 10 Horse Show held on March 13-18, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse QUIBERRY after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that IGNACIO OBERTO be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by QUIBERRY at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. GAIL O’NEILL of Chester Springs, Pa., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411 and GR414, of this Federation in connection with


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FOR THE RECORD Dressage at Devon Horse Show held on September 25-30, 2018, in that, she, as trainer, exhibited the horse FALKO after it had been administered by injection within 12 hours prior to competing and contained in its body acepromazine and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide (HEPS). For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, GAIL O’NEILL be found not in good s t a n d i n g , s u s p e n d e d f ro m membership and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for three months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The three-month suspension shall commence on August 1, 2019, and terminate at midnight on October 31, 2019. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. GAIL O’NEILL was also fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by FALKO at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. RYAN PEDIGO of Chino Hills, Calif., and LINDSEY LONG, of Colton, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410 and GR414, of this Federation in connection with Blenheim June Classic III Horse Show held on June 20-24, 2018, in that they, as trainers, exhibited the horse PACIFIC after it had been administered intravenously within 12 hours prior to competing and contained in its body flunixin and dexamethasone, both in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted levels. For this violation it was determined that RYAN PEDIGO and LINDSEY LONG be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and collectively fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by PACIFIC at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. 110 SPRING ISSUE 2019

AMANDA PIERCE of Waynesburg, Pa., violated Chapter 4, GR410 of this Federation, in connection with Lexington Junior League Horse Show held on July 9-14, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse CHKING’S CARMA after it had been administered and/or contained in its body flunixin in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that AMANDA PIERCE be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CHKING’S CARMA at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. DINA PORTER of Chester Springs, Pa., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with Dressage at Devon Horse Show held on September 25-30, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse CAMEN S after it had been administered and/or contained in its body cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that DINA PORTER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CAMEN S at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. EUGENE SWEENEY of North Hampton, N.H., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with IFSHA Friesian World & Grand National Championship Horse Show held on October 2-7, 2018, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse ZERKO VAN HET ZWOANTJE after it had been administered and/or contained in its body cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that EUGENE SWEENEY be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by ZERKO VAN HET ZWOANTJE at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. WENDY LEE THOMPSON of Solana Beach, Calif., violated

Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation in connection with the Showpark All Seasons Summer Tournament Horse Show held on August 29-September 2, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse WT CHANNING after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that WENDY LEE THOMPSON be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by WT CHANNING at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. ALEC TOLLE of Morriston, Fla., violated HU107.1 of this Federation in connection with the Tryon Spring 2 Horse Show held May 9-13, 2018, in that he exhibited the horse GEPPETTO in classes restricted to Amateur/ Owners, for which he was ineligible to participate in, as he was not the recorded owner of the horse at the time of exhibition. For this violation, it was determined that ALEC TOLLE be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that ALEC TOLLE must return for redistribution all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by him at said competition on the horse GEPPETTO in all classes of the Amateur/Owner Hunter 3’3” 18-35 division and must pay a $300 fee to the competition in connection with this penalty pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 7, GR703.1g. LINDSAY YINGER of Croton, Ohio, violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation in connection with Brave Horse IV Horse Show held on July 19-22, 2018, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse DEBONAIR after it had been administered and/ or contained in its body triamcinolone acetonide. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that LINDSAY YINGER be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by DEBONAIR at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. L AU RA WO O DWA RD o f Lexington, Ky., as Steward, and FRANKIE STARK of Fayetteville, Ohio, as Competition Management and Licensee, violated

Chapter 10, GR1034.4, of this Federation in connection with the Country Heir I Horse Show held June 3-7, 2015; June 8-12, 2016; June 7-11, 2017; and June 6-10, 2018, in that LAURA WOODWARD served as the Steward for more than three consecutive years at the same competition. Furthermore, in connection with the Country Heir II Horse Show held June 10-14, 2015; June 15-19, 2016; June 14-18, 2017; and June 13-17 2018, LAURA WOODWARD served as Steward for more than three consecutive years at the same competition. For this violation, it was determined that LAURA WOODWARD and FRANKIE STARK each be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and that they each be fined $500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j.


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