US Equestrian Magazine

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Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation | Spring 2020

IN USEF NEWS:

Need Health Benefits? We’ll Get You Covered

SAFE SPORT

Introducing New Online Resources

#HOMEWITHHORSES Stay Engaged with Our USEF Content Guide


he P The Pesky Outlaws ul w This nasty gang of irritating, disease-spreading pests is on a mission. For flies, mosquitoes and ticks, the sole mission is survival. Unfortunately, the battleground is your horse’s turf. It’s time to draw the line. Go ahead, Pesky Outlaws, give it your best shot, but your days are numbered. Farnam’s arsenal of pest-fighting weapons is just too tough for the likes of you. Blanche Buzz Freda McFly

Sticky Stan


NO FLY ZONE: DE I love crawling around your horse’s face and ears. Yum, such tasty areas! That dreaded SuperMask® ruins all my plans.

65 The number of diseases and infections house flies are known to transmit.

Exhaled carbon dioxide and to me. Your big sweaty h

!

KNOW THE FACTS

{

A physical barrier keeps bloodsucking, biting flies and pests off your horse’s face and ears.

}

Protect against ticks: • Limit your horse’s access to wooded sections and boundary areas around woods • Keep pasture grass mowed • Apply anti-tick repellent to your horse and yourself • Do full body checks after riding

12

The average number of h

I’m blind, but that doesn’t matter. I’m just looking for a meal. Given the chance, I’ll hitch a ride on your horse — or you.

BLOCK

Trusted by millions of horse owners since 1986! SuperMask® II Horse Fly Mask protects against insects, glaring sunlight, dust and debris. Available in five sizes to fit any horse, and the customizable Double-Latch Closure keeps it in place. For extra protection, use SuperMask® with mesh ears.

Like an invisible fly swatter, SWAT® Clear Fly Repellent Ointment keeps flies off wounds, sores, scratches and abrasions. Just as effective as the original pink formula, this version goes on white and turns clear. Great for dogs as well!

© 2020 Farnam Companies, Inc. Built to fit, Built to last, Built to stay on!, Dual Defense, Endure, Equi-Spot, EquiVeil, Farnam with design, LarvaStop, LarvaStop Fly Growth Regulator with design, RepeLock, SimpliFly, Super Mask and SWAT are trademarks of Farnam Companies, Inc. MM#300529073

When you’re not there to spray, Equi-Spot® Spot-On Protection for Horses is the ideal pest control for pastured horses including mares and foals. One application delivers two weeks of protection against biting flies, gnats, mosquitoes and ticks that can carry Lyme disease.


EFENSE IN 3 EASY STEPS — They may be tiny, but mosquitoes carry a variety of dangerous diseases and are associated with more deaths than any other insect on earth.

d body temperature are oh so attractive horse makes quite a tempting target.

20

f eggs a female house fly lays at a time

{

!

KNOW THE FACTS

Most adult female mosquitoes

live for two to three weeks

and it’s only females that bite...they need that blood meal to reproduce.

Use products that repel/kill flies and pests on your horse and also in his environment.

}

Ugh, bright sun and dry places aren’t my thing. I prefer hanging out in thick, shady, brushy areas waiting to latch onto your horse, your dog, or you.

REPEL

Even sprays upside down!

For lasting protection, nothing works better. Endure® Sweat-Resistant Fly Spray for Horses won’t sweat off and works for up to two weeks. The unique formulation binds to hair for enduring protection against nuisance flies, gnats, mosquitoes, deer ticks and more.

{

Peace-of-mind pest protection. Dual Defense® Insect Repellent for Horse & Rider protects you and your horse for up to 12 hours against mosquitoes that may transmit West Nile Virus, and dangerous ticks that can carry Lyme disease.

The power is in your hands to end the mission of the Pesky Outlaws. Visit Farnam.com/noflyzone to save on these problem-solving products and learn more about Farnam’s complete arsenal of pest control management.

}


BLOCK, REPEL, REDUCE. Oh no, foiled again! When these horses are on SimpliFly®, all my egg-laying is wasted effort. My precious larvae just can’t develop in treated manure.

&

BUILD YOUR

NO FLY ZONE

SAVE!

Flies play a key role in the development of “summer sores” — those nasty, weeping skin lesions. A rigorous fly control and manure removal program, along with proper deworming protocols, can significantly reduce the risk of horses developing summer sores.

There’s no single Silver Bullet powerful enough to take out this gang on its own. It takes a multi-zone approach.

BLOCK REDUCE

{

Decrease the fly population in the barn and on the whole farm by using feed-through fly control.

}

+ REPEL

+ REDUCE

Break the fly life cycle. SimpliFly® Feed-Thru Fly Control with LarvaStop™ insect growth regulator prevents larvae from developing into mature adults. When horses are continually treated, stable and house fly larvae can’t develop in their manure, so you’ll see a significant reduction in the fly population.

= BEST DEAL! Visit farnam.com/noflyzone and start saving today!


CONTENTS FEATURES 58 #HOME WITH HORSES

Stay fit, informed, and entertained with US Equestrian

68 SAFE SPORT

58

Explore our new online resources, plus myths v. facts

76 SPRING GIFT GUIDE The season’s best day-brighteners

DEPARTMENTS 6 Partners 8 Sponsors 12 Marketing/Media 14 Letter from the President

68

16 Snapshot

76

18 USEF News 26 Seen & Heard Cover: Young Liam Duncan embodies the joy we all find with our horses and ponies. Photo: Kim Russell/ US Equestrian

28 Learning Center Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation | Spring 2020

IN USEF NEWS:

Need Health Benefits? We’ll Get You Covered

SAFE SPORT

Introducing New Online Resources

32 Pro Tip 38 Juniors’ Ring 42 My First 46 Trending

#HOMEWITHHORSES Stay Engaged with Our USEF Content Guide

52 Horse Health 84 For the Record

2 SPRING ISSUE 2020

PHOTOS: KIM RUSSELL/US EQUESTRIAN, PHELPSPHOTOS.COM, COURTESY OF CALVERRO



Official Magazine of the United States Equestrian Federation

US EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE Volume LXXXIV, Spring Edition PUBLISHED BY The United States Equestrian Federation, Inc. CHIEF MARKETING & CONTENT OFFICER Vicki Lowell | vlowell@usef.org EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Glenye Cain Oakford | goakford@usef.org CREATIVE DIRECTOR Candice McCown | cmccown@usef.org ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kim Russell | 859 225 6938 | krussell@usef.org DIRECTOR OF SPONSORSHIP & SALES Layson Griffin | lgriffin@usef.org ASSISTANT DESIGNER Kate Strom | kstrom@usef.org EDITORIAL STAFF Kathleen Landwehr, Jane Ohlert, Leslie Potter, Kim Russell, Ashley Swift Equestrian Magazine (ISSN 1548-873X) is published five times a year: Horse of the Year Special Edition, Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter, by the United States Equestrian Federation®, 4001 Wing Commander Way, Lexington, KY 40511; Phone: (859) 258-2472; Fax: (859) 231-6662. (ISSN:1548-873X). NOTE: Effective Spring issue of 2018, Equestrian magazine will be published and provided electronically and only four editions will have printed copies and be provided by U.S. Mail. The Winter issue will only be provided electronically. The Horse of the Year issue will be mailed only to competing members as of the date of publication and the year immediately prior to the date of publication. USEF is not responsible for the opinions and statements expressed in signed articles and paid advertisements. These opinions are not necessarily the opinions of USEF and its staff. While the Federation makes every effort to avoid errors, we assume no liability to anyone for mistakes or omissions. It is the policy of the Federation to report factually and accurately in Equestrian and to encourage and to publish corrections whenever warranted. Kindly direct any comments or inquiries regarding corrections to Glenye Cain Oakford goakford@usef.org or by direct dial 859-225-6941. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to US Equestrian, 4001 Wing Commander Way, Lexington, KY 40511. Canadian Publications Agreement No. 40845627. For Canadian returns, mail to Canada Express, 7686 #21 Kimble Street Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, L5S1E9. (905) 672-8100. Reproduction of any article, in whole or part, by written permission only of the Editor. Equestrian: Publisher, United States Equestrian Federation®, Chief Executive Officer, William J. Moroney (859) 225-6912. Director of Advertising, Kim Russell (859) 225-6938. Copyright © 20120 Equestrian is the official publication of the United States Equestrian Federation, the National Governing Body for Equestrian Sport in the USA, and is an official publication of USEF.

Published at 4001 Wing Commander Way, Lexington, Ky 40511 USequestrian.org

#JointheJoy Follow us on social media @USequestrian

4 SPRING ISSUE 2020



PARTNERS Proud partners of US Equestrian

Official Timepiece rolex.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Show Jumping Team netjets.com

Official Saddle & MemberPerk prestigeitaly.com

Official Vehicle & MemberPerk Title Sponsor of the U.S. Eventing Team landroverusa.com

CHARLES ANCONA N E W

Official Blanket of the U.S. High Performance Teams horseware.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Hunter Seat Medal Final & Official MemberPerk doversaddlery.com

Offical MemberPerk Gold Level Sponsor of the Learning Center smartpakequine.com

6 SPRING ISSUE 2020

Official Footwear & Apparel ariat.com

Official Partner of US Equestrian marsequestrian.com

Official Partner of US Equestrian Official Training Support Device of US Equestrian & Member Perk movensee.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Para-Equestrian Dressage Team and Official Joint Therapy

Y O R K

adequan.com

Official Show Coat Supplier of US Equestrian Teams charlesancona.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Program

Official Equine Air Transportation Provider

platinumperformance.com

timdutta.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF/USDF Emerging Athlete Program

Official Hay Steamer of US Equestrian Official Supporter of Equine Respiratory Health of US Equestrian & Member Perk haygain.us

discoverdressage.com

Title Sponsor of the U.S. Dressage Team


EACH PILOT FOCUSES ON F LY I N G O N E A I RC RA F T T Y P E

PILOTS AVERAGING WELL ABOVE THE INDUSTRYREQUIRED FLIGHT HOURS

INDUSTRY-LEADING INVESTMENT IN SAFETY

S A F E T Y F I R S T. F O R E V E R Y F L I G H T. F O R E V E R Y O W N E R . At NetJets, we don’t just have certificates on our walls and recurring training. Every day, every team member in our organization is responsible for making smart decisions about safety. When the accountability is spread throughout an operation like this, it becomes a part of doing business, and it becomes a part of the company culture. Call 1-866-JET-7022 or visit netjets.com

NetJets is a Berkshire Hathaway company. Aircraft are managed and operated by NetJets Aviation, Inc. NetJets is a registered service mark. ©2020 NetJets IP, LLC. All rights reserved.


SPONSORS Proud sponsors of US Equestrian

Official Saddlepad Toklat.com

Official Academic Sponsor upperechelonacademy.com

Official Sponsor & MemberPerk deere.com

Official Performance Horse Boot and Leg Wear equifit.net

Official Helmet Supplier Safety Education Partner Learning Center Content Partner charlesowen.com

Official Equine Ground Transportation of US Equestrian salleehorsevans.com

Official Automobile Rental Agency & MemberPerk hertz.com

Presenting Sponsor of the USEF Pony Finals collectinggaitsfarm.com

Official Awards Blanket & MemberPerk buildyourownblanket.com

Official Ribbon Supplier hodgesbadge.com

Official Sponsor & MemberPerk ridetv.com

Title Sponsor of the North American Youth Championships and National Championship for Para Dressage adequan.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Young & Developing Horse Dressage National Championships horseinsurance.com

Official Feed & MemberPerk triplecrownfeed.com

Official Shock Wave Supplier pulsevet.com

Official MemberPerk bigassfans.com

The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

8 SPRING ISSUE 2020


NUTRITION

BEYOND COMPARE Congratulations

to Suzy Stafford and PVF Peace of Mind (”Hunny”)

FEI Single Horse Division Champion at Live Oak International Triple Crown is a proud sponsor and wishes Suzy continued success in 2020. triplecrownfeed.com | 800-451-9916


SPONSORS Proud sponsors of US Equestrian

Official Sponsor Title Sponsor of the Junior Jumper National Championship nsbitsusa.com

Title Sponsor of the USEF Pony Medal Championship marshallsterling.com

Official Training Treat of US Equestrian and Official Supplier of US Equestrian Teams gumbits.com

Official MemberPerk choicehotels.com

Official MemberPerk ridewithequo.com

Official Sponsor Official MemberPerk geico.com

Official Horsebox stadiumhorsebox.com

Official Fly Control Products & MemberPerk absorbine.com

Official Barn Management Software & Member Perk barnmanager.com

Official Member Perk usrider.org

Official Equine Pharmacy hagyardpharmacy.com

Equine Veterinary Education Partner of US Equestrian hagyard.com

Official Member Perk goodyear.com

Official Member Perk uncle-jimmys.com

Official Sponsor honorhillfarmsa.com

The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

10 SPRING ISSUE 2020


THE WORLD’S BEST SHOWJACKETS AND TAILCOATS

GET FITTED OVER THE PHONE! CALL 212 727 3435 OR VISIT CHARLESANCONA.COM

CHARLES ANCONA N E W

Y O R K

CUSTOM FIT & DESIGN


MARKETING/ MEDIA Proud partnerships of US Equestrian

Official Media sidelinesnews.com

Official Media eqliving.com

heels down MAGAZINE

Official Media heelsdownmag.com

Official Media eq-am.com

Official Media puissanceamerica.com

Official Marketing equineaffaire.com

The United States Equestrian Federation does not endorse or recommend any commercial product or service. Therefore, designations as official suppliers of the USEF of any commercial product or service cannot be construed as an endorsement or recommendation by the United States Equestrian Federation.

12 SPRING ISSUE 2020


Complete Joint Support To Maintain Soundness & Longevity Overall Wellness

Advanced Joint Support

A wellness formula with all the benefits of Platinum Performance® Equine, designed to support your horse from head to hoof.

Includes a powerful combination of ingredients to support healthy cartilage, joint lubrication and a normal inflammatory response for joint longevity.

Research

Show Safe

More than 30 veterinary research projects have supported the effectiveness and development of Platinum formulas.

All formulas are subjected to extensive testing for over 200 banned substances for horse safety and athlete protection.

Quality

Results

We choose quality and efficacy over low-cost ingredients, ensuring formula protection, potency and purity.

Developed by veterinarians in clinical practice, to ensure results in horses from Olympic contenders to pet ponies.

Platinum Colic Coverage™ Eligible

Platinum Performance CJ

Recommended for:

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The Only Formula of Its Kind

As the most comprehensive combination of joint supporting ingredients available, Platinum Performance® CJ contains omega-3 fatty acids, ASU (Avocado/Soy Unsaponifiables), HA (Hyaluronic Acid), cetyl myristoleate, MSM, Boswellia serrata and more to help maintain soundness.

• Performance horses and prospects • Horses with joint health needs • Horses with soft tissue concerns • Senior horses

PlatinumPerformance.com 800-553-2400 © 2020 PLATINUM PERFORMANCE, INC.

Platinumare Performance® only available from your licensed equine veterinarian or direct from Platinum Performance®. Platinum formulas only availableformulas from yourare veterinarian or direct from Platinum Performance®.


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Victories and Challenges As I write this letter, the world is experiencing an unprecedented challenge due to the COVID-19 disease outbreak, and our horse sports community is no different. I don’t believe any of us could have imagined a level of uncertainty that could bring our sport to such an abrupt halt. None of us wanted to be subjected to “stay at home” orders, wondering about the safety and welfare of our friends and families and our communities. However, this is what we are doing to play our part in flattening the outbreak curve. As you have heard from all public health authorities, social distancing is proving to be one of the most, if not the most, important factors in the fight against the continued growth of coronavirus cases. I thank you for doing your part in social distancing and encouraging those who have not adhered to the guidelines to do so immediately. Competitions and competing have all but stopped, and on behalf of US Equestrian, I also thank you for your support of our position on this topic. We recognize that this decision has negatively impacted many of our members, organizers, and service providers, as well as our staff members and our organization. This reality makes our decision all the more difficult, but all the more important. In the short run, we will all have to sacrifice and compromise, but in the long run, we will have been part of the movement to save lives, to find a vaccine, and to bring us all back to participating in the sport we love as soon as possible. To help you, your family, and your friends, we offer a stable full of valuable discounts and benefits, including three free mental health consultations for our members through our member assistance benefit. Additionally, we offer individual and group health insurance policies with well-known providers at significantly reduced rates and with guaranteed issue. The process of enrolling is simple, and the benefits are easily accessed through our website using the Membership tab. There are many more opportunities, as well, so take a few minutes while you are home and get to know the resources US Equestrian has created for you. I also encourage you to take advantage of the financial relief being provided by federal and state governments. I have heard from many of you and greatly appreciate your support and strength during this time of crisis. It gives us the energy to persevere and keep moving forward with solutions to our challenges. Many of you have commented that you are taking this time at home to get to know your horse better and to work on your riding skills and your horse’s training and performance. With adversity comes opportunity, and well done to those of you who are using this time to learn more about your horse, yourself, and the people around you (even if that has to be virtually). 14 SPRING ISSUE 2020

If you are looking to learn more about the COVID-19 outbreak, we have created a dedicated Coronavirus Disease Resource webpage. This resource includes links to reliable health organizations such as the CDC, WHO, and Department of State, as well as the latest information from US Equestrian and many of our recognized affiliate organizations. Like all of you, I look forward to returning to the sport we love in the very near future. I promise you that US Equestrian will do its part to help restart the competitions in the USA when public health authorities give us the go-ahead. We intend to be flexible, waive mileage rules for major events, modify qualifying procedures for major events, and be fair in adjusting our international selection procedures for delayed events like the Olympics. We also want to continue to hear from you as we do this. This is new territory for all of us. Be safe and see you soon,

Murray S. Kessler President

PHOTO: ISABEL J KUREK PHOTOGRAPHY

Dear USEF Members,


BORN TO RIDE

Introducing Ascent, the ultralight, ultra-breathable paddock and chap system from Ariat. ariat.com/ascent

ÂŽ

Š2020 Ariat is a registered trademark of Ariat International, Inc. All rights reserved.

Proud Proud Sponsor Partner


SNAPSHOT

STEFFEN PETERS

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

cheers after earning a personal best score of 77.106% with Suppenkasper in the CDI5* Grand Prix Special at the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival Week Seven in Wellington, Fla.

16 SPRING ISSUE 2020


First of its kind. Still one of a kind. After 30 years, Adequan® i.m. (polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) is still the only FDA-Approved 1, 2 equine intramuscular PSGAG joint treatment available. And still the only one proven to:

Reduce inflammation Restore synovial joint lubrication Repair joint cartilage Reverse the disease cycle Adequan® i.m. actually treats degenerative joint disease, and not just the signs. Ask your veterinarian if Adequan® i.m. is the right choice for your horse. Learn more at adequan.com.

www.adequan.com BRIEF SUMMARY: Prior to use please consult the product insert, a summary of which follows: CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS: Adequan® i.m. is recommended for the intramuscular treatment of non-infectious degenerative and/or traumatic joint dysfunction and associated lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. CONTRAINDICATIONS: There are no known contraindications to the use of intramuscular Polysulfated Glycosaminoglycan. WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption. Not for use in humans. Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children. PRECAUTIONS: The safe use of Adequan® i.m. in horses used for breeding purposes, during pregnancy, or in lactating mares has not been evaluated. For customer care, or to obtain product information, visit www.adequan.com. To report an adverse event please contact American Regent, Inc. at (800) 734-9236 or email pv@americanregent.com. Please see Full Prescribing Information at www.adequan.com. 1 Adequan® i.m. Package Insert, Rev 1/19. 2 Burba DJ, Collier MA, DeBault LE, Hanson-Painton O, Thompson HC, Holder CL: In vivo kinetic study on uptake and distribution of intramuscular tritium-labeled polysulfated glycosaminoglycan in equine body fluid compartments and articular cartilage in an osteochondral defect model. J Equine Vet Sci 1993; 13: 696-703. All trademarks are the property of American Regent, Inc. © 2020, American Regent, Inc. PP-AI-US-0373 03/2020


USEF NEWS

New Guaranteed Insurance Benefits Program for USEF Members US Equestrian has launched a new benefits program for members, offering access to expansive coverage, including medical, dental, vision, business, pet, and liability insurance for all competing USEF members and USEF subscribing fan members. Currently, promotional fan members are not eligible to enroll in the benefits program, but upgrading your membership is simple—simply click the Membership tab at the top right at usef.org, then scroll down to find the Join or Renew tile. Finding affordable health insurance coverage for individuals and businesses can be a daunting process. We have customized our new insurance benefits program to best fit the needs and interests of our diverse membership. US Equestrian does not accept royalties or payments of any kind. The insurance benefit program is available to all USEF competing members and USEF subscribing members, with discounts ranging from 35% or more off current market pricing. Benefits for individuals include access to free mental health counseling, discounted short-term medical coverage plans provided by United Healthcare, and dental and vision coverage provided by Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield. Guaranteed-issue insurance plans are also available for critical illness and accident coverage provided by MetLife; emergency medical transportation; personal liability and disability coverage provided by Equisure; and legal and financial protection plans supported by Financial Lock. Teladoc insurance coverage is also available through the member benefits program, giving you access to a licensed physician 24/7 via telephone. For small businesses of any industry, the current benefits program offers group discounted medical plans for business owners and companies with two employees or more. Each plan is customizable to help you find the right plan for your business needs and only requires a manageable, reoccurring monthly payment. 18 SPRING ISSUE 2020

Well-known providers Cigna and Aetna Signature administer the plans. The benefits program also includes the option to enroll in a small-animal pet insurance plan from providers Figo and Nationwide. Pet insurance offers flexible coverage for illnesses and injuries to small pets and includes coverage of visits to veterinarians, emergency rooms, and specialists.

US Equestrian competing and subscribing fan members can access medical, dental, vision, business, and liability insurance, as well as pet insurance. “This was a really pleasant surprise,” said USEF member John Ladley, a pleasure rider near St. Louis, Mo., whose wife competes in the hunter jumper discipline. “Most associations don’t do this. It sounded too good to be true, and when they gave me the numbers, I thought, ‘This can’t be right. What’s the catch?’ I’m paying less for this than I paid for COBRA. It’s a tremendous benefit that makes the United States Equestrian Federation a really good association.” “I am now pre-enrolled in the USEF health plan with a premium of only $320 for pretty darn good coverage!” said

Arizona trainer and barn manager Laura Borghesani, who said she cut her insurance premium by more than 50% with the new coverage. “It is such a weight off my shoulders to know that I will soon be having good health care coverage, and it is actually affordable!” Not a member yet? Through June 1, you can use the promo code RELIEF and join as a paid fan for just $20 to access these benefits. We believe our members should have the opportunity to access affordable health coverage and are proud to offer this comprehensive benefits plan to all paid US Equestrian members. With the rollout of this new program, US Equestrian has created a dedicated 24/7 member benefit hotline, where trained specialists can help you navigate the different coverage plans and find plans that best fit you and your business. “USEF is proud to have worked to negotiate the amazing benefits that our member individuals and business owners deserve,” said US Equestrian Director of Human Resources Kelly Bolton. “Affordable insurance benefits are now available to all members at rates typically only given to large companies and employers. This brings opportunity for affordable health care to our diverse membership, including people who may be self-employed, or have no other access to benefits. Whether it is a competitor, a fan member, a small stable owner, a farm worker, a business owner, or a family member, access to a wide range of services is now available at extremely low rates. Our Teladoc service is an example of this at only $8.95 per month or free with purchase of an individual health care plan. Members have 24/7 access to a physician for the same cost as their morning coffee-shop trip.” To learn more about US Equestrian’s new member benefits, please visit usef.org/insurance or call our 24/7 dedicated member benefits hotline at 1-800-349-1082.



USEF NEWS

Informational resources about the novel coronavirus disease are available at usef. org/media/coronavirus-resources US Equestrian is closely monitoring the information regarding the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the novel coronavirus. Our number-one priority is the safety and welfare of our members, staff, and their families. We recognize the growing concerns of our community with respect to the potential for an increase in cases in the coming weeks. The USEF executive team meets regularly to review the communications about this illness issued from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, United States Olympic and Paralympic 20 SPRING ISSUE 2020

Committee (USOPC), and other organizations. We have created this resource hub so that you can stay up to date on the most current information available. Be sure to scroll down and read the Additional Resources section of the page, too, for valuable information from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about coronavirus emergency loans, payroll protection, and more under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. You can also read an overview of the CARES Act at horsecouncil.org/ wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Tax-Bulletin-March-20202-3-3.pdf. “Managing your risk of exposure to the coronavirus is essential to maintaining good health,” US Equestrian CEO Bill Moroney said in a March 5 letter to members. “At this time, it is appropriate

to be cognizant of proper hygiene and incorporate common-sense actions into your everyday activities in order to prevent the spread of this virus. Practices such as regularly washing your hands with soap and water or using an alcoholbased hand sanitizer; practicing good sneeze and cough hygiene; avoiding touching your mouth, nose, and eyes with unwashed hands; avoiding close contact with people who are sick; and disinfecting and cleaning often-touched objects and surfaces can help reduce your risk of exposure. We will continue to monitor this issue and provide updates as needed.” For more information about US Equestrian’s resources for equestrians during the coronavirus, please see “Stay at #HomeWithHorses and US Equestrian” on page 58.

PHOTO: ©PETERSCHREIBER.MEDIA/ADOBESTOCK

US EQUESTRIAN OFFERS ONLINE RESOURCES ABOUT COVID-19 OUTBREAK


WWW.REMIBLOT.COM

Inspiration. Education. Competition. Ar t.

Contact: Joan Mack Cell: 616.402.2238 info@discoverdressage.com A Florida 501c3 non-profit organization

Title Sponsor of the Emerging Dressage Athlete Program through the United States Equestrian Federation Sponsor of Global Dressage Festival in Wellington, Florida "2020 Sponsor of American Equestrians Got Talent", for the benefit of the United States Equestrian Federation.


USEF NEWS

Emerson Burr Horsemanship Grant Competition Season Nears

Under a new sponsor partnership, US Equestrian has designated GumBits as the Official Training Treat of US Equestrian and an Official Supplier and Sponsor of US Equestrian. GumBits are made of FDA-approved, competition-legal ingredients including sugar, wheat flour, and beeswax. When given as a treat before a ride or training session, GumBits help to promote chewing and salivation in horses and ponies. Initially made popular in the dressage community, the use of GumBits has quickly expanded into other disciplines and breeds and is used prominently as a helpful training aid. “We’re pleased to have GumBits on board as an Official Sponsor and Supplier for US Equestrian,” said Bill Moroney, Chief Executive Officer of US Equestrian. “Many of our members and top-level athletes are already enjoying the benefits of the GumBits product as part of their training routines. We appreciate GumBits’ continued support of US Equestrian and look forward to introducing this innovative product to our membership.” The all-natural product allows exhibitors and riders to feel comfortable and safe using the products, while GumBits have also been shown to relieve dry mouth and teeth grinding in horses competing and training in an array of disciplines. “I started GumBits in 2005 and have been developing and manufacturing them ever since,” said Shereen Fuqua, Principal of Gambit Atlanta, Inc. “We immediately received positive feedback and testimonials as to how well the product works. I know we are catching on with almost all horse disciplines and I love being able to help people achieve their goals and dreams. There is no better feeling!” GumBits can be purchased directly through Dover Saddlery, an Official MemberPerk Partner of US Equestrian. 22 SPRING ISSUE 2020

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

US Equestrian Announces GumBits as Official Training Treat

Are you a hunter jumper rider aged 17 or under? Then the Emerson Burr Horsemanship Grant could be perfect for you. The program offers grants for education- or equestrian-related expenses to youth through a series of horsemanship competitions at the United States Hunter Jumper Association zone and national levels. Read the complete list of zone competitions and get more information about the program on US Equestrian’s Emerson Burr Horsemanship Grant page at usef.org/compete/ disciplines/hunter/emerson-burr-horsemanship-grant. Riders competing in the Regular Hunter Pony, Green Hunter Pony, Pony Medal, Pony Jumpers, or Children’s Hunter Pony sections are eligible. Participants are divided into four age groups: eight and under, nine to 11, 12 to 14, and 15 to 17. Each participant takes a short, written multiple-choice test on horsemanship. At the zone level, individuals grants are awarded based on the results of the exam and their response to a short essay question. Each winner at the zone level will received a $100 grant to be used towards educational or equestrian-related expenses. The four individuals in each age group who score the highest on the written test move on to the hands-on horsemanship test, which takes place Aug. 3-9 in Lexington, Ky., during the USEF Pony Finals presented by Collecting Gaits Farm. The hands-on portion consists of a series of questions in which the participant is asked to demonstrate various skills and knowledge, ranging from how to brush a horse to deciphering signs of colic. After the hands-on test, winners are chosen from each age group based on their horsemanship skills and knowledge. Each Emerson Burr winner during Pony Finals will receive a $500 grant to be used towards education-related expenses.



USEF NEWS

Youth athletes are invited to apply to the Adequan FEI North American Youth Championships for Dressage and Jumping. The NAYC is a historic annual event aimed to provide aspiring elite athletes with the opportunity to gain valuable team competition experience in a championship atmosphere while representing their region or zone alongside a group of their peers. This year, the NAYC for Dressage and Jumping will take place at the Great Lakes Equestrian Festival in Traverse City, Mich., from August 4-9, 2020, concluding their six-week summer series. All NAYC competitions will be streamed live on USEF Network, with highlights featured on social media. Application Information To access the application, visit US Equestrian’s online sport application search tool at athletes.usef.org/sport-apps/search. For jumping athletes, the deadline to submit applications and the end of the qualifying period for all categories is June 15, 2020. The deadline to earn and submit Certificates of Capability is June 22, 2020 (exception Zone 10 Juniors and Young Riders). For dressage athletes, the final deadline for applications is May 12, 2020. The qualifying period ends on June 22, 2020. Dressage Information The NAYC for Dressage is open to athletes FEI ages 14-21 competing in the FEI Junior and FEI Young Rider divisions. Applications and fees submitted online on or prior to March 17, 2020, will be charged $50 per application. Applications and fees submitted online between March 18, 2020, and April 28, 2020, will be charged $100 per application. Applications and fees submitted online between April 29, 2020, and May 12, 2020, will be charged $300 per application. Qualifying scores for this event are earned at designated USEF/NAYC qualifying competitions. Information about NAYC and the qualifying process for Dressage can be found 24 SPRING ISSUE 2020

on the NAYC Dressage page at usef.org. Simply hover your cursor over the Compete tab near the top left of the home page, click Breeds & Disciplines, then Dressage, then Championships (National & FEI), and finally NAYC. Jumping Information NAYC for Jumping is open to riders ages 12-21 and has categories for Children, PreJuniors presented by Pinecone Shavings, Juniors presented by Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, and Young Riders, based on rider age and fence height. This year, the NAYC for Jumping will feature expanded prizes, including $50,000 in the Junior Jumping Championship and $75,000 in the Young Rider Jumping Championship. More information on applying for the NAYC for Jumping is available on the NAYC Jumping page at usef.org. Simply hover your cursor over the Compete tab near the top left of the home page, click Breeds & Disciplines, then Jumping, then Youth-FEI Jumping North American Youth Championships. New! Pre-Junior Jumping New for 2020, the Pre-Junior Jumping Championship presented by Pinecone Shavings is open to riders ages 14-16, and fence heights will be up to 1.30m. This new classification was created as a bridge between the Children’s Jumping Championship at 1.20m and the Junior Jumping Championship at 1.40m. Thank you to valued sponsors Adequan, Ariat, Equestrian Canada, Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, Hodge’s Badge Company, Pinecone Shavings, Prestige Italia, United States Dressage Federation and the United States Hunter Jumper Association for their continued support and contributions to the 2020 Adequan FEI North American Youth Championships.

Eventing Champion Ballynoe Castle RM Is BreyerFest’s 2020 Celebration Horse Breyer Animal Creations, which hosts the annual celebration BreyerFest at the Kentucky Horse Park each summer, has named the former three-day eventing horse Ballynoe Castle RM as its Celebration Horse for the 2020 BreyerFest event July 10-12. Carl and Cassie Segal’s Ballynoe Castle RM, known affectionately as Reggie, was the Land Rover USEF CCI5* Eventing National Champion in 2013. He retired from eventing in 2017 as U.S. eventing’s all-time leading points-earner, with six CCI4* (now CCI5* under the new event classification system instituted by the Fédération Équestre Internationale) completions to his credit, including finishes at Kentucky, Badminton, and Burghley. Now 19, Ballynoe Castle RM is scheduled to make an appearance at BreyerFest, which has the theme of Celtic Fling this year. In honor of this year’s Celebration Horse, Breyer Animal Creations’ model of Ballynoe Castle RM will be exclusive to the BreyerFest Celtic Fling and is included with the purchase of the event’s three-day ticket package. The Ballynoe Castle RM model will not be available in retail stores.

PHOTOS: ANDREA EVANS/US EQUESTRIAN, SHANNON BRINKMAN PHOTO

Athlete Applications Open for 2020 Adequan® FEI North American Youth Championships for Dressage and Jumping


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SEEN AND HEARD

In & Around the Ring

“I Opposite: Carina Waggoner guides Hollywood Sunset in the Arabian/Half-Arabian/ Anglo-Arabian Western Trail Horse Junior to Ride Walk/ Jog 10 & Under class at the 65th Annual Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show in Scottsdale, Ariz. Below: Roberta Greeno and her American Shetland ponies on their way to winning the USEF Preliminary Pair Pony Combined Driving National Championship at the Florida Spring Fling CDE in Ocala, Fla.

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t was such a different atmosphere running with the CDI. We had so many people engaging with the program and our athletes. I think the competition schedule was very beneficial, not only for our competing athletes, but also it successfully brought more exposure and interest in the program, which is very promising.” - Chef d’Equipe Michel Assouline commenting on how the Adequan® U.S. Para Dressage Team competing at the 2020 Adequan Global Dressage Festival gave the program positive exposure


PHOTOS: PICSOFYOU.COM, OSTEEN/SCHATZBERG, ANDREA EVANS/US EQUESTRIAN

“O

NetJets® U.S. Jumping Team of Margie Engle, Laura Kraut, Chef d’Equipe Robert Ridland, Beezie Madden, and Jessica Springsteen topped the podium in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ USA at the Palm Beach Masters in Wellington, Fla.

ur Children’s Team [athletes] from the past few years all aged out this year, so [this is] a brand new group coming on. For them to step up and jump this height at this time in their career is amazing. I’m so proud of them, and their parents for getting them here, and their trainers for making it happen. I can’t tell you how proud we are of them and how excited for the future with them.” - Chef d’Equipe DiAnn Langer on the U.S. Children’s Team on winning the $3,500 Children’s Team Competition at the Palm Beach Masters

USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 27


LEARNING CENTER

Ways Vaulting Can Improve Your Ride

by Glenye Cain Oakford

Vaulting promotes core strength, a better seat, harmony with your horse, and more. Vaulting—gymnastics on horseback—is one of the world’s oldest equestrian sports. And while it might look exotic to those of us more used to riding or driving, the sport of vaulting offers a wealth of great training for any equestrian, regardless of discipline. Not surprisingly, many vaulters have fast-tracked into other disciplines, like dressage, jumping, and eventing, after building a strong foundation in vaulting. So what can you get from vaulting? We asked two vaulting pros what their sport can teach all equestrians. Carolyn Bland, a gold medalist at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games and bronze medalist at the 2017 Junior World Championships, was the American Vaulting Association’s Trainer of the Year in 2006 and 2010 and holds the FEI Level One Coaching Certificate; based in Woodside, Calif., she conducts clinics nationwide. Andrea Selch coaches vaulting athletes at Triangle Equestrian Vaulting in Hillsborough, N.C., whose vaulters range in age from seven to 53. She holds the FEI Level One Coaching Certification for Equestrian Vaulting.

1. A Deeper Appreciation for Longeing “Before I got involved with vaulting, I thought of longeing as merely a way of getting a horse to warm up quickly or blow off steam or a way to check for bucks,” said Selch. “I knew there were some longeurs that were better than others, but I did not know there was such an art or science behind it. “After five years of longeing, I have learned that longeing is a special and very important activity with the horse. Longeing helps the horse be a better riding horse, and the longeur can learn a lot about the horse from longeing it. Some things about the horse that you can only feel as a rider, you are able to see when you are longeing the horse: impulsion, engagement, collection, stretching long and low, stiffness or suppleness, and the different shapes of different frames. “The most important part of learning to longe, though, is building a stronger relationship with your horse. My horses and I are deeply related. They watch and listen to me even when they are off the longe line—my old trot horse Prince will listen to my voice even when someone

PHOTO: SHANNON BRINKMAN PHOTO

Vaulting athlete Tessa Divita and Romeo competing with longeur Christoph Lensing

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LEARNING CENTER 5. Trust Think you’re too old to try a little vaulting? Think again. A basic vaulting class can help you learn to trust both the horse’s motion and your own seat, as well as hone or improve your skills. “Many adult riders become nervous and tense, and vaulting can help with the forward feel and balance, because the vaulter can grip the handles at any stage, so they begin to gain trust in their abilities and trust in their seat,” explained Bland. The longeur is also part of the trust that forms between horse and vaulter. “The longeur has complete control of the horse,” said Selch. “The vaulter needs to trust that the longeur has the horse completely in his or her control—that the horse knows the aids and the commands for transitions up and also down.” 6. Team Skills Even an individual vaulter is part of a three-way team that includes vaulter, longeur, and horse. The team gets even bigger when a group of vaulters performs together—and that takes excellent communication, mutual responsibility, and the ability to step up to the plate for your teammates. “There is nothing quite like being held aloft by two teammates on a cantering horse to teach trust and bravery!” said Selch. 7. Harmony with the Horse Vaulters use all these building blocks— core strength, flexibility, balance, trust, and an independent seat—to create deep harmony with their horses. That’s something every equestrian wants, whether they’re competing or riding for pleasure. Performing without stirrups or reins, vaulters must achieve it. “Sitting all three gaits, without access to reins or stirrups, allows the rider to feel and join with the horse’s motion,” explained Bland. “Accomplished vaulters are extremely harmonious, and so the horses just go for them,” Selch said. “Both horse and vaulter look happy.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT VAULTING Visit the American Vaulting Association at americanvaulting.org to find a vaulting club, start a program, and get an overview of the sport. And check out vaulting videos in US Equestrian’s online Learning Center at usef. org/learning-center, including exercises that can improve your riding, pre- and postride exercise routines from vaulting athletes Mari Inouye and Ali Divita, and more. 30 SPRING ISSUE 2020

PHOTOS: ARND BRONKHORST/ARND.NL, SHANNON BRINKMAN PHOTO

else is riding him out in the field. That may not be a good thing all the time, but it does demonstrate the way that longeing forges the connection between horse and human.” 2. Core Strength and Flexibility “Equestrian vaulting can be a great advantage when used for cross-training for a rider,” Bland said. “Vaulting classes begin with a fitness portion—running, jumping, and strength training—and fitness can greatly improve riding in all disciplines.” Vaulting’s compulsories and freestyle moves, as well as the warm-up and fitness training, all build an equestrian’s core strength, in particular. Core strength, in turn, is what allows the rider to develop an independent seat and hand, keys to good equestrianism. 3. Balance—and Confidence An independent seat is impossible without balance, and vaulting presents great opportunities for an equestrian to develop and improve balance. In vaulting, the longeur controls the horse, and the vaulter uses handles and a big, comfortable pad—but no stirrups or reins. “Exercises in all gaits without stirrups or reins will help with an independent balance,” Bland said. “Vaulting will help with a rider’s balance—that’s kind of a no-brainer to me,” said Selch. “But I also think being able to recover from losing your balance, which you can do while vaulting, as well as falling or jumping off—all these things build a rider’s confidence.” 4. A Better Seat “The basic seat in vaulting is very similar to the riding seat: shoulder, hip, and heel are aligned, the back is straight, chest up, eyes forward,” explained Selch. “The seat is probably the first vaulting lesson that everybody gets. I ask my beginning vaulters to get into position, then I ask them to do various things with their arms, such as making big circles or reaching for the sky. These motions temporarily undermine their seat and so they must learn to correct it.”

Vaulting develops physical strength, trust, and teamwork, as shown here by Haley Smith and Daniel Janes, competing on Diva 506. “The basic seat in vaulting is very similar to the riding seat: shoulder, hip, and heel are aligned, the back is straight, chest up, eyes forward,” said vaulting coach Andrea Selch.



PRO TIP

FIVE TIPS

for a Better Video by Glenye Cain Oakford

Being thoughtful about location, set-up, and audio can give your video a more professional feel.

Robotic camera technology is making it easier than ever for equestrians to record their training sessions and competition performances. The camera work is automatic, but getting optimal shots and incorporating video successfully into your equestrian training still takes a little thoughtful planning. So we asked Eric Willemenot, founder of Move ’N See and inventor of the Pixio and Pixem robotic video systems, for his top video-making tips and for his thoughts on how video technology can help coaches and athletes analyze performance. Incorporating Video into Training Willemenot’s background is in competitive skydiving, where video is so ubiquitous that videographers are part of the team and even share in medals. In freestyle skydiving, Willemenot says, the competitors’ videos have artistic qualities and are considered in the scoring. “Would similar things be possible in equestrian sport?” he asked. “I really don’t know, but it’s interesting to think about it.” In the meantime, Willemenot said, video presents excellent opportunities for equestrian athletes to fine-tune their training, because it

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provides an objective (and repeated) view of performance. In skydiving, Willemenot noted, coaches typically will ask students to describe their experiences immediately after a jump, without the benefit of the video. The students then review the tape with the coach, who analyzes each jump, before repeating the exercise. This sort of training, whether in individual or group sessions, can help students see more detail, understand through visualization, and recognize elements of the jump that might have escaped them in the rush of the actual performance. That kind of exercise, Willemenot says, might work well for equestrians, too. Another option: your trainer can provide real-time comments during your training or competition. Pixio and Pixem’s Live Lesson app also allows subscribers to live stream their rides, and trainers can respond simultaneously via headset such as the Ceecoach system. “The best moment to watch the video, and so to progress, is the moment right after the exercise has been done,” Willemenot said. “That’s the time the athlete’s proprioception [the perception or awareness of the body’s

PHOTO: COURTESY MOVE ‘N SEE

Whether you’re taping for yourself, for training, or for your horse’s potential buyer, these quick tips can help you get the most out of your video.


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PRO TIP

VIDEO PROVIDES TRAINERS AND ATHLETES WITH AN OBJECTIVE, REPEATABLE VIEW OF PERFORMANCE. position and movement] is the most tractable and he can learn the most. Because he just did the exercise, he will remember what he did and how he felt.” Whether you’re taping your equestrian activity for training purposes or just for fun, good video quality is a plus. 1. Choose your location thoughtfully. Regardless of the camera and set-up you’re using, you’ll want to make sure you’re not shooting into bright light or from an area where someone is likely to jostle the camera. If you’re taping outside, make sure the sun is behind the camera. If you’re in an arena, consider closing the arena doors or setting up your shots to avoid open doors as much as possible to reduce the chance of sudden backlighting; when crossing in front of an open arena door, the horse will become a silhouette and you’ll lose color and detail. For users of the Pixio/Pixem system, each robot cameraman comes with three micro-beacons on small tripods that you’ll place around the ring or arena; the robot device (for use with your own camera and tripod); and a watch. The watch (which can be worn as an armband or kept in a pocket) is a position sensor that allows the robot to track the wearer’s movement and also serves as the record/stop button so the wearer can control when the camera is recording. The beacons are numbered and should be set up so that Beacon 1 is farthest from the camera, Beacon 2 is to Beacon 1’s left (from the robot device’s point of view), and Beacon 3 is to Beacon 1’s right. “You can go outside the area set up by the beacons and still be framed,” Willemenot said. “And, of course, if you go too far, the camera will lose you, and it will find you again when you come back.” The beacons will communicate by radio, so be sure there are no large obstacles between the beacons, and also make sure the beacons are at least 30 centimeters from anything metal. And remember that the system’s range is 100 meters. 34 SPRING ISSUE 2020

For more information on setting up the Pixio and Pixem systems, Willemenot suggests checking out the video tutorial at youtube. com/watch?v=wZAkJSmqBt4. 2. Set up your camera for success. Before you start recording, make sure your tripod’s legs are adjusted so the camera is level. If you’re taping in a location where the camera/tripod is likely to shake (e.g., in windy conditions), you can try bracing the legs with something heavy. Some tripods also have a hook on the central pole that allow you to hang a weight, such as a camera bag or backpack, to help prevent camera shake. If you’re using the Pixio/Pixem system, Willemenot said, make sure your camera is tightened properly on the tripod, which also will help prevent camera shake. And be sure to center Beacon 1 so that the robot and camera will center you in the video. Before shooting, make sure the camera angle isn’t too high or too low; on the Pixio/Pixem robots, you can modify the angle by adjusting a screw on the back of the robot. Willemenot also recommends turning your camera’s power-save mode off if you’re using the Pixio robot. “Some cameras have a power-save mode that will turn the camera off if you haven’t touched the buttons in a certain amount of time,” he explained. “Turn that off so the camera doesn’t turn itself off while the robot is filming your ride.” 3. If you’ll have an audience, sound quality matters. If you’re shooting a video for an audience— say, for a vlog or a live stream—you can add polish to your content with good sound. Many video cameras and cell phones allow you to connect an external microphone, which is worth exploring if you are doing interviews or doing voiceover recording that you plan add to your video in the editing process. If you’re taping in a quiet place and do not have an external microphone, your cell phone’s


USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 35


PRO TIP own memo recording function might well suffice. If your phone doesn’t have a built-in voice/ sound recorder, there are also a number of audio-recording apps, including a variety of free ones, that will allow you to use your phone as a recorder. And if you’re recoding using the Pixem system, the Pixem app also will allow you to use your phone as a recorder. 4. Be careful about using music. If you are making video for an audience, music can spice things up, but it isn’t always necessary. Two things to consider before putting tunes to your footage. First, does it add to the video or distract the audience from what’s happening? And, most importantly, do you have permission to use the music? To avoid breaking federal copyright law, it’s important to use royalty-free music or to buy a license to use any music you want to include in your video. Luckily, there are a lot of services available online to help guide you through this process. Sites like PremiumBeat, Music Vine, and others can help you legally source music for use in your video.

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

Using video during training can help coaches and students alike analyze performance in more detail.

5. Advertising a horse? Raise the bar on quality. If you’re advertising a horse, a few easy elements can add professionalism and viewer interest. For example, switch views to make the video look “alive and interesting,” Willemenot suggests. This also gives the viewer a

better overview of the horse. If you’re using the Pixio or Pixem systems, use the tracking watch’s stop/start function to record clips that showcase the best and most important parts that you want to showcase. This also will save time in editing, as you can pull together only the clips you want to use. Use the highest-quality camera you can, as opposed to a cell phone or tablet, Willemenot suggests, in order to record the richest, most detailed image. “It’s also important to have a good zoom if you want to show details,” Willemenot noted. If you’re using Pixio, you can check out their list of compatible cameras by visiting shop.movensee.com/en/ content/23-pixio-robot-cameraman-support. Want to add a little extra polish? Use editing software to correct contrast and colors so that colors are rich but not saturated and blacks are true black without losing too much detail. You might also consider making an intro and an outro; including clips of the horse loading, being clipped, or being groomed, as well as at work; and including unobtrusive text with basic details like the horse’s name and how to contact the seller for additional information. One final tip: test your camera and your robot system to get familiar with how they work and to explore their options, and other factors. That will help you shoot with confidence, Willemenot says, and will help you make the most of your video.

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JUNIORS’ RING

US Equestrian Lettering Program Inspires Recognition and Respect

Lake Effect Equestrian’s Interscholastic Equestrian Association team signed up as a group to join US Equestrian’s Lettering Program.

Lake Effect Equestrian in Edinboro, Pa., isn’t just teaching kids to ride; they’re also helping them earn junior-high and high-school letters for their commitments to equestrian sport. Lake Effect has a competitive Interscholastic Equestrian Association team that’s open to riders in grades 4-12, and both coaches and parents at Lake Effect are active in encouraging riders on the team and in the lesson program to join US Equestrian’s Lettering Program. “When you’re in school a lot of times equestrian sport isn’t recognized as it should be,” said trainer Lindsay Filley. “When you’re in a school sport, typically it’s an every day commitment to practice, and it’s the same with riding, except equestrian sport is all year ’round. The schools don’t really recognize these kids for the hard work, time, and commitment that they put into it, so this is a really good segue to that recognition. The Lettering Program also encourages a team environment and a team feel, and that’s something else we don’t always get that much in our sport. It gives something to work towards and attain, and the program helps to keep them striving for the next level. There were many different threads that led to me encouraging the kids and their parents to do this. “We have an IEA team, and it’s a group that encompasses the beginner through advanced levels. I encourage all of them to participate in the Lettering Program as part of their development as an equestrian.” “It’s a goal for them,” agreed Pru Shaw, whose daughter Grace is a high-school junior at McDowell High School and a Lettering Program participant at Lake Effect. “And I do think it’s making people more aware that this is a sport, and a sport that requires a lot of athleticism and dedication.” About the Lettering Program The Lettering Program is open to equestrian athletes in grades 5-12 who are members of US Equestrian and are involved in any 38 SPRING ISSUE 2020

breed or discipline. Students can earn a letter in equestrian sport either through general equestrian activity, including lessons and pleasure riding, driving, or vaulting, or through competition. To complete the requirements for a letter, a student must do one of the following: • record a minimum of 100 hours of riding, driving, vaulting, or training • compete in at least three USEF-licensed or non-USEFlicensed competitions at any level or type during a year Students also can apply retroactively for previous years if they are still in grades 5-12 and can provide verification of their activity for each year. Students in their senior year must provide all documentation to US Equestrian by June 15 of their high-school graduation year. A Team Effort Filley said that Lake Effect students have been involved in the Lettering Program for the last five or six years, and one of the program’s appeals is that it’s open to kids at a variety of levels, whether they’re actively competing or not. “They get a feeling of accomplishment, even if they’re not competing at the bigger shows,” she said. “I’m always trying to find ways to give our students a path to success, and I think the Lettering Program is one of those. This really is a program where, if you put in the time, which most kids do, you’ll get recognized for that.” Lake Effect’s coaches, Filley and Lori Hermann, have promoted the Lettering Program to their students by informing them and their parents about the program and putting information about it in their IEA team handbook. Parents also pitch in for the team, taking on a variety of assignments. When the coaches asked Shaw if she’d spearhead promotion of the Lettering Program to Lake Effect students, she readily agreed. “It’s good to have a parent within the team promote it, someone

PHOTO: RON SCHWANE PHOTOGRAPHY

Lake Effect Equestrian has signed up a bumper crop of students to US Equestrian’s popular Lettering Program, making the kids’ riding activity eligible for juniorhigh and high-school letters



JUNIORS’ RING

Lettering Program patches and merchandise are available for both junior-high and highschool students. Lettering Program participants also can collect a range of Lettering Program apparel, backpacks, and more.

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“IT’S MAKING PEOPLE MORE AWARE THAT THIS IS A SPORT.” —PRU SHAW Getting Schools’ Attention The Lettering Program also is helping spread the word to school administrations that equestrian sport is as beneficial, important, and demanding as any other sport. “I think when it’s promoted to school administrations, they see the hours and the effort that go into equestrian sport, the physical and mental skills, and what a well-rounded sport it is,” said Filley. “You have to have a multitude of skills to be good or successful at it. So many people are unaware of all it entails.” Shaw and her daughter Grace saw that first-hand. “They did recognize her and give her a varsity high-school letter, thanks to US Equestrian,” Shaw said of Grace’s school, McDowell High. “For quite a long time, we had realized, and Grace had talked about it, that her older sister got a varsity letter from McDowell for the tennis team; she went to the banquet and got recognized with all her friends. Then her trainers told us that Grace could get her athlete letter from her high school and be recognized by US Equestrian, and they talked to us about the program.” Shaw says that having equestrian accomplishments recognized at the school’s athletics banquet is also important to Grace. “It’s such an accomplishment, and then to be recognized with your peers when they’re getting letters for swimming or basketball—it’s neat to be included in that exclusive group based on your hard work.” Shaw noted that US Equestrian, which provides a letter of support and certificate of accomplishment for Lettering Program participants, also helped the McDowell High administrators see her daughter’s involvement in horse sports as a serious athletic endeavor. “We’ve had so many school districts come on board,” she said. “Some of our IEA team members come from almost two hours away to participate on an IEA team and ride with our trainers, so quite a few school districts are represented on the team. And I think we’ve had four or five school districts come on board, thanks to the Lettering Program.” Grace’s equestrian varsity letter is also helping to inspire younger and less experienced riders to stay involved and reach for new goals. “Grace has her US Equestrian patch on her jacket, and the younger kids go, ‘Oh, look at that!’ It’s one of the things that makes them want to be involved,” Shaw said. “Grace loves equestrian life, and I think for these kids it’s a real passion that also teaches them responsibility. It teaches them concern and love and friendship and hard work, and being on a team also has taught my daughter things like how to be a good teammate and care about your team members. It’s so all-encompassing, and I don’t think kids get as much of that from most other sports.”

PHOTO: TAYLER BICANDI/US EQUESTRIAN

who can answer questions and explain to other parents that it’s super-simple to apply and it’s inexpensive, but there are so many benefits to it,” Shaw said of the Lettering Program. “In 2018, we had a get-together at my house where we had the team over for pizza and salad, and we had three laptop computers up, and we walked everyone through the process.” Getting everyone to sign up as a group also helps promote team spirit, and it’s helped spread the word about the lettering opportunity to incoming kids and parents. “Now that we’ve started it, I think it starts a snowball effect, because the younger kids look up so much to the older ones, and they look up to US Equestrian with that beautiful lettering patch,” Shaw said. “Our coaches want the kids to do it, and they realize what a good idea it is, and the kids and parents really listen to that, too.”


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MY FIRST

My First Five-Star

by Glenye Cain Oakford

Rider Chris Talley galloped across the cross-country finish line at the 2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event with his right arm raised in triumph and tears streaming down his face. He and his horse Unmarked Bills had just finished their CCI5* cross-country debut, a demanding 12-minute journey over the Kentucky Horse Park’s undulating terrain and 28 testing fences. And they had done it without any jumping penalties. “The first emotion that came to mind was that I had just jumped clean around my first CCI5* cross-country course,” recalled Talley, a veteran of the USEF Emerging Athlete Eventing 25 program who is based with his trainer and business partner, Hannah Salazar, at Zaragoza Acres in Jeffersonton, Va. “I went for the experience, not necessarily to jump clean. That was something that was so special to me, that we jumped all the jumps on the first try. It solidified for me what an amazing horse he is. I was relieved and exhilarated and wanted to do it again, to be honest!” Talley and Unmarked Bills went on to finish 27th in their CCI5* debut on a score of 76.4 after the event’s three phases of dressage, cross-country, and show jumping. But it wasn’t really about the final score for Talley. It was about going clear on cross-country, successfully completing the entire event, and reaching a goal he’d had since he was eight. “I still have DVDs from Kentucky that go back to about 2000,” he said. “I used to sit and watch those DVDs for hours on end, and it became a dream of mine to compete there.” 42 SPRING ISSUE 2020

Talley, now 25, first climbed into a saddle at age four and began by riding hunter ponies in his native Pennsylvania. But the lure of eventing’s cross-country phase proved too much, and by 10 he was riding in small horse trials. “I’ve always been a little bit of a thrill-seeker,” he said. Talley first competed Unmarked Bills in 2015, when the Thoroughbred gelding was just six and fresh off the racetrack. They had a breakout year in 2016, including a reserve championship in the USEF Young Horse Eventing National Championship at The Dutta Corp. Fair Hill International, and progressed from there. “He has this natural desire for the cross-country fences,” Talley said. “Dressage and show jumping have always been a little bit of a struggle because he has some tension, but once he gets to the start box, all that tension seems to leave his body and mine, because I live for the cross-country day, too. “He’s always picked up for me when I’ve had a green moment, and I’ve always picked up for him when he’s had a green moment. It’s a unique partnership, in that we pick up the pieces for each other, and neither one of us holds mistakes against the other.” Talley won hearts at LRK3DE as soon as he appeared at the first horse inspection, before the competition began. He turned heads in a stylish suit embellished with custom embroidery by Wedded Embroidery that included the word “love” stitched on the jacket’s left lapel, a daisy chain winding down the left trouser leg, and a blue jay flying across Talley’s shoulder blades.

PHOTOS: SHANNON BRINKMAN PHOTO, ALEX BANKS/US EQUESTRIAN

Chris Talley fulfilled a childhood dream when he and Unmarked Bills completed the 2019 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Mars Equestrian.


The eye-catching stitches were, he explained, in honor of his late maternal grandmother, Margaret Sarmento. “She was one of the most amazing women I’ve ever met and had such an influence on my life,” he said. “My family sees blue jays as a significant sign, and they’re a reminder of her, because my grandmother started the blue jay thing. My mother had a twin who died when they were 14, and my grandmother always said whenever there was a blue jay, that that was my mom’s sister coming to visit her. When my grandmother passed away, there were blue jays everywhere I went. I’d be at a horse show walking a course, and I’d look off into the distance, and there would be a blue jay sitting on the next jump. I always thought of that as my grandmother being with me all the time.” The entire LRK3DE experience was exciting, Talley says, but the highlight was cross-country. “I went later in the day, so I got to watch a little bit in the morning,” he recalled. “That was maybe a mistake, because the first three riders out of the box fell off, which was not very encouraging! When I was going to the start box, Allie Sacksen and Sparrow’s Nio had just finished and jumped clean, and she said how great it was. He’s a small horse that I’ve always admired, so I thought, ‘He just jumped around here, and there’s no reason Unmarked Bills and I can’t do that.’ “My parents were at the start box, and Hannah always puts me in the box. We have a little ritual, and I say a prayer to my

grandmother. I always ask her to watch over me. As I left the box to go to the first fence, I had this overwhelming amount of emotion. I’d watched so many people leave that start box since I was seven or eight. So many people had done so much to help us get there, and my family and team were all there—it was just overwhelming.” There were some hairy moments on course, Talley acknowledges, but they ultimately revealed the strength of his partnership with Unmarked Bills. “He actually slid coming into the second part of the Head of the Lake and got his hind legs caught on the brush, which threw me forward,” Talley said. “I put my leg on and was like, ‘I don’t really know the option here, so the only way out is the direct route.’ I relied on him to help me out. I was out of the tack and he was a little bit flustered, but he just kind of went, ‘Oh, forget it—let’s keep on going!’ He jumped out incredibly well, and I told him, ‘I freaking love you!’ He’s just such an honest, clever cross-country horse, and he tries so hard for me. “The whole way around, we both were green, but we both continued to get more confidence with every fence that we jumped. “To complete is truly an honor, and to walk out of the stadium and get handed the completion plaque was so special,” he concluded. “I’d dreamed of having that stall plate that says ‘Land Rover Kentucky CCI5*’ on it since I was eight years old. And now we’d done it: He was a five-star horse, and I was a five-star rider.” USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 43


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TRENDING

Saddle-Ready Style Ariat combines technology and tradition to take you from the schooling ring to the show grounds. Spring’s in full swing at the barn— and while you’re dusting off those winter cobwebs, why not also stock up for the season with styles that are as fresh as a cool breeze? Ariat’s springto-summer looks are crisp and tailored for that classic feel—but they also sport the latest in apparel tech to maximize your comfort. We’ve got some suggestions to get your spring-thinking started. For more details and designs, check out these looks and more at ariat.com.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ARIAT

Instant Classics The double-vented Galatea show coat (left) features stretch double-knit construction for an elegant fit and an ideal weight from early spring in Thermal, Calif., through fall in Devon, Pa. Contrast 3-D fabric paneling in all the right places is as stylish as it is strategic. And here’s a smart secret: the three-button front features a zip closure underneath to maintain a clean front all through your ride.

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TRENDING Style and Substance You’ll have everything well in hand with Elite Grip gloves (top left). They’re uniquely designed to protect your hands and enhance grip without restricting movement or impeding your use of the reins—all must-haves for the equestrian athlete. The highlights include technical performance fabric that works as hard as you do, sheepskin-reinforced stress points, a stretch insert across the knuckles for mobility, and a perforated palm for maximum breathability. Bonus point: they offer UPF 50+ sun protection. The Nitro Max tall boot (top left) is a standout with good looks and great comfort, thanks to Ariat’s built-in premium NITRO™ and revolutionary Shock Shield® technologies. Shock Shield® diffuses heel-strike impact for superior shock absorption. This lightweight combination of flexibility and support cushions and stabilizes the foot for optimal performance, and the rider-tested Duratread™ outsole adds traction. The premium full-grain leather upper has an oiled calf inner panel and a full-length elasticized panel that makes this boot’s fit and comfort just right for you.

A Breath of Fresh Air Ariat’s mid-weight Keats tech fleece hoodie (below) is breathable and stretchy, and its AriatTEK® Cold Series technology helps ward off spring’s early-morning chill at the barn. Best of all, horsehair and sawdust don’t cling to it! Details include a corded drawstring and rubberized heat-transfer logo. Pair it with the women’s Tri Factor Grip knee-patch breech (shown below in ebony) and the Tri Factor 1/4 Zip (shown in red clay), both favorites of equestrian athletes. The top also has Sun Protection Fabric™ with UPF rating of 50+ to provide protection from ultraviolet rays.

48 SPRING ISSUE 2020

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ARIAT

High-Performance Hybrid Peak performance and pristine style join forces in the new Hybrid jacket (bottom left). It’s loaded with superior, comfortable protection against the elements, including zoned insulation, welded quilt core, and stretch fleece placed where it matters most. It features AriatTEK® Cold Series technology to keep the body core warm, and it’s also wind- and water-resistant, blocking spring’s sharper breezes and offering protection from light rain. EcoDry™ finish offers earth-friendly protection against the elements. Zippered hand and chest pockets give you options for keys, cards, and phone. You’ll be ready to ride in the Tri Factor Grip knee-patch breech (bottom left). Its cooling technology, compression, and silicone grip combine to make it a winner for everyday or competition use. The compression fabric provides a sleek fit and retains its shape, while the Ariat® Hex Grip knee patch gives you an extra edge in the saddle. And the Moisture Movement Technology™ and Freeze Point™ cooling technology work together to keep you drier and cooler. Paired here (bottom left) with the men’s Nitro Max tall boot.


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TRENDING Top to Toe The new Hybrid insulated jacket (top right) goes beautifully with the Eos kneepatch riding tight (top right). This tight offers flattering support with its compressive nylon/spandex fabrication and 21st-century style-meets-function details, like knee patch grip and two conveniently placed thigh pockets. Featuring AriatTEK® Heat Series technology and the Ariat® Tread Silicone Grip knee patch for optimal grip in the saddle, this tight also has a zippered pocket in back. Whether you’re in the saddle or on foot, you’ll find the Ascent paddock boot (top right) a revelation. Its flexible, lightweight construction and innovative compression knit collar provide more comfort and support than ever, and touches like a reinforced panel for spur strap protection will quickly make this your go-to for schooling and more. Cap off the look with Ariat’s Team II cap in sporty U.S. colors. Top-Notch Sunstopper Ariat’s popular Sunstopper show shirt (bottom right) is back and better than ever. Version Pro 2.0 offers the same great performance features, but now with a raglan-cut sleeve for extra comfort and breathable tech mesh paneling in all the places you need it most. Choose from a variety of print linings at the poplin collar and cuffs to complement your individual style. AriatTEK® Heat Series technology keeps you cool when the competition heats up, and Moisture Movement Technology™ keeps you drier. And it’s called the Sunstopper for a reason: Sun Protection Fabric™ with a UPF rating of 45 provides protection from ultraviolet rays.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ARIAT PHOTO: THESE ARE ALWAYS IN THE GUTTER IN DEPARTMENTS

Blooming Colors Celebrate spring’s cheerful colors with Ariat’s Tri Factor 1/4 Zip (bottom left, shown in nautilus). It’s an ideal baselayer but so pretty you’ll want to show it off as spring bursts into full bloom. For the perfect marriage of form, function, and fun, mix it with the Tri Factor knee-patch breech (here in ebony) and the One Rail woven belt, which also comes in a variety of colors, all with stretch-fit comfort.

50 SPRING ISSUE 2020


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SAVINGS US Equestrian Federation members could unbridle their auto insurance with a special discount. Get a quick quote today to see how much more you could save.

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. GEICO contracts with various membership entities and other organizations, but these entities do not underwrite the offered insurance products. Discount amount varies in some states. One group discount applicable per policy. Coverage is individual. In New York a premium reduction may be available. GEICO may not be involved in a formal relationship with each organization; however, you still may qualify for a special discount based on your membership, employment or affiliation with those organizations. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image Š 1999-2019. Š 2019 GEICO


HORSE HEALTH

Managing Your Horse or Pony’s Weight by Margaret Buranen Unlike people, horses don’t have to worry about their weight. They have owners to do that. Is your horse overweight? Underweight? Or at the weight he should be? Determining where a horse stands on that scale (pun intended) can tell an owner about the horse’s health. The scale to start with, the Henneke Body Condition Scoring System, is a visual one. It was developed by Don Henneke at Texas A&M University in the early 1980s. The Henneke Body Condition Scoring System rates a horse’s overall body condition from one to nine. Normal weight is generally four to five but can vary a bit by breed standards. Thoroughbreds, especially those who are racing, often are lighter, while warmbloods tend to be heavier. Progressively lower numbers indicate lower weight, down to a state of emaciation at one. The numbers from seven upward assess a horse’s increasing degree of overweight, with nine indicating a horse is “extremely fat.”

Horses that are mostly outside tend to gain weight in the spring and summer when grass is lush and lose weight in fall and winter.

52 SPRING ISSUE 2020

Assessing the horse’s body condition involves considering fat deposits in certain standard areas of the horse’s body. These areas include the top of the neck, top of the withers, behind the shoulders, around the tail, and the crease along the back, while protruding ribs indicate that a horse is underweight. Dr. Nimet Browne, associate veterinarian, internal medicine, at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky., said that several factors must be taken into consideration to determine the best weight for a particular horse. These include the horse’s age; amount of exercise, competition, and turnout time; and whether or not the horse has any underlying medical issues that affect weight. A pregnant or nursing mare needs extra calories, for example, as does a yearling that is still growing. For owners watching their horses’ weights, Browne said, “Weight tapes can be really helpful. Use them once a week or every other week, and use them in the right place. The horse should be standing square. Put the tape snugly around the chest, at the highest point of the withers and directly behind the elbows.” A horse’s weight, Browne explained, “largely depends on its level of exercise, as well as nutrition.” She estimated that 20-25% of the horses she sees are overweight, and she sees about the same percentage of underweight horses. If a horse has a visible weight gain or loss when his exercise routine and amount and type of food have not changed, Browne advises consulting a veterinarian. “You want to be sure there is no underlying medical issue to cause the weight change,” she said. Horses that are mostly outside tend to gain weight in the spring and summer when grass is lush and lose weight in fall and winter. When grass becomes sparse, the owner can supplement the horse’s diet with hay or grain.

PHOTO: TAMARA KULIKOVA/ADOBESTOCK

Assessing Body Condition


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Soaking the hay for an hour in cold water and dumping out the water before feeding it can lower its carb content.”

The concept of the word “grain” has evolved considerably in the past few years. Today, it means much more than “sweet feed” and typically now includes all concentrated horse feeds that are commercially available. Browne said there are many different types and brands of feed available for horses. Some are designed for various life stages and others for performance, and the nutritional content of feed tends to differ based on these formulations. Carbohydrates and fats tend to provide more calories, so they may be better suited for an underweight horse, while feed with fewer calories is more suited for a horse who needs to lose weight. “One thing people forget is that a horse can live without grain or sweet feed,” Browne said. “But if no good-quality hay or forage is available, the horse may require a ration balancer that provides the vitamins and nutrients horses need.” The Overweight Horse Horses and ponies who are prone to gaining weight easily are known as “easy keepers,” but extra pounds predispose horses to several health problems. “Equine metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance predispose horses to gain weight on just a little feed,” Browne explained. “A horse with high insulin resistance is more susceptible to laminitis, or founder—therefore, in these cases, it is important to have certain tests done to determine if the [overweight] horse is insulin resistant.” Overweight horses and horses with equine metabolic syndrome may concurrently have pituitary pars intermedia disorder, also known as PPID or equine Cushing’s disease. Usually found in older horses, this disease results from an overactive pituitary gland, which can lead to chronic infections and laminitis. Extra weight also puts more stress on a horse’s joints. If the horse also has arthritis, the extra weight can contribute to joint pain and limit athletic ability. He may have to be restricted to flat work or trail riding. 54 SPRING ISSUE 2020

If a horse or pony is uncomfortable or in pain from what appears to be arthritis, Browne suggests a veterinary evaluation “to determine the extent of the problem and formulate a treatment plan that may include prescription medication and/ or supplements. There are many supplements that can help. “But make sure you have a diagnosis first,” Browne added, “because the horse may need additional medicine for an underlying medical condition.” A general rule for feeding hay is that a horse needs 10 to 20 pounds of hay a day for each 1,000 pounds he weighs; ideally, you should weigh each flake to know how much your horse or pony is getting. Consider getting your hay analyzed, too. To start a horse or pony’s weight-loss program, Browne suggests first trying to limit the animal’s access to grass with a grazing muzzle or by turning him out on a dry [grassless] lot. “Carbohydrate content is really important in weight loss,” Browne said. “You can get your hay analyzed for its carb content. Soaking the hay for an hour in cold water and dumping out the water before feeding it can lower its carb content.” The Underweight Horse Horses who have trouble maintaining normal weight are known as “hard keepers.” The first place to look for solutions is in the horse’s mouth; a dental problem could be the culprit. “If a horse eats grain or hay and it hurts his mouth to chew, he will eat less of it and not get enough calories,” Browne said. Equine behaviors that indicate dental problems include a horse who eats eagerly but drops a lot of his food or one who turns his head while he’s eating. You may find quidding—balls of half-chewed hay—on the ground or barn floor. Parasites also can keep a horse from getting full nutrition even if he eats a normal amount of calories. Inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and mild colic all can have weight loss as a symptom, too, so it’s important to consult your vet if a horse shows signs of weight loss. Browne said that after a vet rules out any underlying medical condition, an underweight horse probably needs to switch gradually to a food with more calories. A complete feed, such as a senior feed, is a good choice, because it contains both hay and grain and offers more calories from fat than from carbohydrates. You can also try adding a fat supplement, like corn oil, to the horse’s grain, but get your veterinarian’s advice before changing your horse’s diet. “Timothy hay is safe to feed an underweight horse, and alfalfa hay is safe in most situations,” Browne said. But she cautions against adding a lot of sweet feed. Sweet feed contains structured carbohydrates from sugar, just like lush grass—and too much structured carbohydrate increases the horse’s risk of metabolic disorders that can lead to laminitis. Browne cautioned that if you have an emaciated horse in your care, such as one rescued from neglect, call the vet immediately. “Don’t just start feeding the horse lots of food. He could develop an illness called refeeding syndrome. These horses need a [feeding] plan from a vet [to regain their weight and health]. A safe approach for these horses is to increase their body condition score by no more than one number per month. It may take even longer for them to regain the weight they need. “Whenever a horse’s weight issue is serious, get a vet involved,” Browne urged. “A vet can help more than you think.”

PHOTOS: US EQUESTRIAN, NIGEL BAKER/ADOBESTOCK

A complete feed, such as a senior feed (shown), offers more calories from fat than from carbohydrates and can be helpful in feeding the underweight horse or pony.


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PHOTO: KIM RUSSELL/US EQUESTRIAN

US Equestrian’s resources can help you maintain a connection to your equestrian life even as you practice social distancing.


Keep fit, learn more, and engage with equestrian life through the US Equestrian’s many online resources.

Stay home and stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic—and stay connected with your equestrian life, too. US Equestrian offers members a stable full of ways to maintain physical, mental, and emotional well-being in these trying times. We’ve put together your definitive guide to US Equestrian resources, lessons, news, and social happenings to help you stay in tune with horses and the equestrian community while we’re all waiting for horse sports to resume. Looking for health insurance or mental health benefits? Need some at-home exercises to stay in shape? Shopping online to restock your tack trunk? Searching for some equestrian entertainment while you’re at home? We can help. Get started with our guide below, and share what you’re doing to stay in touch with equestrian life by visiting @USequestrian on social media and using #HomeWithHorses.

STAY INFORMED WITH OFFICIAL

USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 59


Stay informed and get useful, practical information by visiting US Equestrian’s coronavirus resource page at usef.org.

COVID-19 INFORMATION US Equestrian’s coronavirus resource page at usef. org/media/coronavirus-resources gives you direct access to timely, reliable information, including direct links to the CDC’s coronavirus FAQs and to the World Health Organization. The page also features the latest COVID-19 updates from US Equestrian and our breed and discipline affiliates; information from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee and the Fédération Équestre Internationale; resources specifically for high-performance sport; and more. Be sure to scroll down and read the Additional Resources section of the page, too, for valuable information from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about coronavirus emergency loans, payroll protection, and more under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. You can also read an overview of the CARES Act at horsecouncil.org/wp-content/ uploads/2020/03/Tax-Bulletin-March-20202-3-3.pdf. There is also application information available at home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/ top-priorities/cares-act/assistance-for-small-businesses. And non-profit organizations can learn more about applying for non-profit relief funds under the CARES Act at independentsector.org/resource/caresact/.

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MANAGEMENT RESOURCES COVID-19 is not the same as equine coronavirus, and so far there is no evidence that COVID-19 causes disease in horses or other animals. Equine coronavirus (ECoV) is a distinct RNA virus that is different from the virus that causes COVID-19. ECoV spreads from horse to horse by fecal contamination or from contact with items contaminated with feces. Learn more about ECoV at the Equine Disease Communication Center’s ECoV page at equinediseasecc.org/coronavirusresources, where you’ll find information about ECoV and biosecurity. You’ll also find tips from the American Association of Equine Practitioners, including strategies for preventing the spread of COVID-19 in equestrian facilities, an infographic about COVID-19 and barn safety, tips for equine businesses during COVID-19, and more.

PHOTOS: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN, KIM RUSSELL/US EQUESTRIAN

US Equestrian members who have paid-fan or competing memberships can access health and insurance member benefits by calling the 24/7 hotline at 1-800-349-1082. Not a paying member yet? Use the promo code RELIEF and join as a paid fan for just $20 (that’s $5 off the regular cost) and access those guaranteedissue benefits with discounts up to 35% off market prices. The promo code is available through June 1. US Equestrian members also can access a 24/7 mental health first aid hotline at 1-800-633-3353. Join now to get started.


TAKE LESSONS IN THE LEARNING CENTER

TUNE IN TO USEF NETWORK USEF Network’s more than 7,500 hours of on-demand programming lets you bring the joy of horse sports into your home even while competitions are on hold. The 2020 Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event presented by Mars Equestrian has sadly been cancelled, but you can relive all the glorious highlights from LRK3DE 2019, plus bonus coverage from the previous decade of competition, including special features, winning rides, and full programs from each phase. Watch on-demand streams from around US Equestrian’s 29 breeds and disciplines. Whether your bag is the 2019 American Shetland Pony Club/American Shetland Pony Registry’s National Congress or the USEF American Vaulting Association Vaulting National Championships, we’ve got video from your favorite breed and discipline competitions. Catch up on special features, too, like RIDETV’s documentary about the USEF Pony Finals presented by Collecting Gaits Farm. And what better time to explore a new breed or discipline? Our on-demand stream from the Devon Horse Show and Country Fair is a great place to start: it’s got hunters, jumpers, saddle seat, carriage pleasure driving, American Saddlebreds, Hackneys, Welsh ponies, and more! Even if you’re sheltering in place at home, you can still learn from the best in the business through USEF Network’s on-demand clinics. Check out the Rutledge Farm clinic series for dressage, jumping, and cross-country riding with such stars as Ali Brock, Phillip Dutton, Stacia Madden, Boyd Martin, Debbie McDonald, Will Simpson, and Peter Wylde. The Robert Dover Horsemastership dressage clinics also offer a wealth of insight that can benefit riders in any discipline. Stop by usef.org/network and press play.

Talk about news you can use: US Equestrian’s online Learning Center brings 80+ educational videos and supplemental material featuring elite athletes, trainers, grooms, veterinarians, and industry experts directly to your living room or tack room with information on just about every equine topic under the sun. From Breeding 101 with Spy Coast Farms’ Lisa Lourie to Horse Retirement at Madden Mountain with Beezie Madden, the Learning Center has insights into every phase of your horse’s development, tips for better equine care, and introductions to a world of equestrian disciplines and breeds. Learn more about Friesians, Arabians, Morgans, Saddlebreds, and more. Or explore a new discipline like endurance, Western dressage, or carriage pleasure driving. Find out how para-equestrians can get onto the pathway to para-equestrian dressage. Get the pros’ top tips on everything from common hoof problems to proper saddle-fitting to disinfecting in the barn. And learn what to expect from your first riding lesson. Visit usef.org/learn to get started now.

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Vaulting athletes Mari Inouye and Ali Divita can help you keep fit with their exercise videos in the Learning Center.

The Learning Center also features health and fitness videos specifically tailored for equestrians. Watch vaulters Mari Inouye and Ali Divita demonstrate lower-body exercises, upper-body exercises, and a pre- and post-ride routine that you can do at home or at the barn. For those who are able to spend some time in the saddle, U.S. Vaulting Team Assistant Chef d’Equipe Jennifer Arntsen demonstrates four vaulting exercises that can help improve riding in any discipline.

BE SOCIAL ONLINE Social distancing doesn’t mean you have to give up your barn family or your social life online. Get social with other equestrians on US Equestrian’s social media channels. We’re @USequestrian on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, where we’re staying #HomeWithHorses. Use the hashtag and share your equestrian goals, your special moments with your horses, and how you’re plugging in to the horse world from home. And stay tuned to our social channels for some special content this spring. We’ll be sharing virtual LRK3DE jog fashion with some of equestrian sport’s top U.S. eventing athletes, favorite clips from USEF Network, member photos, pro tips, and smileworthy news from around the equestrian world.

READ THE MAGAZINE ARCHIVE Did you know you can read previous issues of US Equestrian magazine online? Visit our archive at usef.org/media/equestrian-magazine to start exploring such timeless topics as toxic pasture plants or land preservation basics for equestrians, plus horse health stories and training tips.

DO SOME ONLINE SHOPPING While you’re #HomeWithHorses, what better time to stock up on the things you need for your barn or tack trunk? And what better way to save than by using your US Equestrian MemberPerks? Whether you’re researching a new tow vehicle, planning to spruce up your home with a new paint job, or shopping for a new saddle, you can score significant discounts with your US Equestrian membership. Tack supplies, horse clothing, feed and supplements, car rental, liability insurance, and many more goods and services are available with special perks for our members. Click over to usef.org/join-usef/memberperks for participating partners and details. 62 SPRING ISSUE 2020

PHOTOS: J.B. ZIMMERMAN, TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN, KIM RUSSELL/US EQUESTRIAN, LIBBY LAW PHOTOGRAPHY

DO AN EQUESTRIAN-SPECIFIC WORKOUT


TAKE YOUR SAFESPORT TRAINING It’s easy to catch up on your SafeSport training online. Start in our Safe Sport resource center at usef.org/safe-sport and click on the red Take SafeSport Training button to begin your course. While you’re on US Equestrian’s Safe Sport page, take a look at our new resources, which are customized specifically by role in horse sports, for owners, trainers, competitors, parents, affiliates, licensed officials, and organizers. You’ll also find handy links to the U.S. Center for SafeSport Code, US Equestrian’s Safe Sport Policy, and the Minor Athlete Abuse Prevention (MAAP) policies, sample consent language for MAAP policies, and educational videos about Safe Sport and its importance to our entire equestrian community.

PRACTICE GRATITUDE Looking for a little inspiration? The Joint Leadership Council— which includes representatives from US Equestrian affiliates the American Hackney Horse Society, American Morgan Horse Association, American Saddlebred Horse Association, and American Road Horse and Pony Association, as well as the United Professional Horsemen’s Association—suggest three simple but meaningful steps that can make a difference to equestrian facilities and service providers in this difficult time. TIP-YOUR-GROOM TUESDAY To help the unsung heroes of our show horse community, we want to encourage everyone to help support the support team that makes every show-ring appearance possible: the grooms! If you are able, reach out to your barn managers, trainers, or instructors and ask how you can help make sure the grooms are taken care of and supported during these trying times.

Even if you can’t be at the barn to feed treats in person, consider contributing toward the feed, care, or supplies for your favorite lesson horse.

FEED YOUR FAVORITE LESSON HORSE Lesson horses are not just the foundation of your riding abilities, but they are often the backbone of the barn business. If you are looking for a way to help a lesson horse in your life, reach out to your barn today and make a contribution to go towards the care, feed, or supplies needed to provide your favorite lesson horse the best care while barns are closed to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. BUY A MEAL FOR THE BARN Your barn may be closed to the public, but the dedicated trainers, instructors, and staff are reporting daily to take care of our beloved horses. Normally we may be going to Saturday Barn Family lunches or at a horse show buying a well-deserved dinner for our dedicated grooms. Let’s not forget them during these days of social distancing. Call your barn and find out what afternoon you can support them and another local business by ordering delivery! Even though we’re all intent on social distancing, our collective sense of community will see us through this difficult time. Stay tuned in to horses and horse people, and know that we’re all #HomeWithHorses together. USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 63


Washing your hands often and thoroughly, using soap and water for at least 20 seconds, is critical to preventing transmission of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

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“This pandemic is unparalleled in any of our lifetimes,” said Dr. Mark Hart, a practicing cardiologist in Portland, Ore., who also serves as the USEF’s Team Physician and Chair of the Fédération Équestre Internationale Medical Committee. “Our own personal, individual actions now to contain the spread of COVID-19 will have a significant impact on the overall societal outcome. I can’t emphasize this enough. “The internet is a double-edged sword,” he continued. “It can be used to disseminate information quickly, but, unfortunately, not all of that information is accurate. It’s important to use trusted sites like the CDC and WHO, where experts are responsible for producing and reviewing the content. Those sites, along with state and regional websites, are where the guidelines are listed that we all must follow. It is also important to pay attention to local authorities for information regarding closures and local specific restrictions.” Here are some key points to remember about COVID-19:

PHOTOS: MAST3R/ADOBESTOCK, US EQUESTRIAN

COVID-19: What You Need to Know


HAND-WASHING AND SOCIAL DISTANCING ARE CRUCIAL. Two measures, in particular, are key to preventing COVID-19’s spread: thorough and frequent handwashing and social distancing (sometimes also called physical distancing). “These measures are based on medical and public health best practices, and they work,” said Hart. “These are proven measures to reduce the transmission individually for a person and to reduce the chance that they will transmit the virus to somebody else. What’s unique about COVID-19 is that there appears to be a longer latency period between becoming infected with COVID-19 and when you show symptoms, which is estimated to be two to 14 days, which is quite longer than most other viruses. Unfortunately, that means one can be incredibly contagious long before they show any symptoms of being sick or know that they are infected. This is why many more people are being exposed and infected than with the usual flu viruses and accounts for why we’re seeing an exponential rise in communities at different times. “This isn’t just an inconvenience,” Hart added. “It’s a matter of life and death on a scale we have not seen in over 100 years, since the Spanish flu outbreak in 1918 that infected approximately one-third of the world’s population and killed an estimated 50 million to 100 million people. The sacrifices we’re making now, individually and as a community, will pay huge dividends in the future in terms of lives saved and how quickly we can return to our normal activities. Again, this can only be accomplished by all of us following the guidelines. We will get through this pandemic, but it will take patience and preservation most likely to some degree over the next 12 to 18 months as new treatments and vaccinations are developed.” The CDC recommends maintaining a six-foot distance between yourself and any other person. “The reason it’s six feet is because droplets which carry the virus from a sneeze or cough usually fall within that distance,” Hart said. “But remember, too, that people are also walking where those droplets fall, and we’re all walking over contaminated surfaces, along with hundreds of other people. When you come home and don’t take off your shoes, you’re potentially walking around and contaminating your whole house.” Staying at home and isolating from other people protects both you and others not only by preventing transmission directly between people, but also by reducing the number of people touching shared surfaces like doorknobs, countertops, faucets, and, in barns, even halters and lead ropes.

Proper hand-washing is critical to preventing transmission. According to the CDC’s guidance, that means • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public space or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. • If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS THAT CAUSES COVID-19 IS MORE LETHAL THAN NORMAL FLU. Hart also emphasized that the virus is not “just like other flus.” “It appears to be 10 times more lethal than a seasonal flu virus is,” he explained. “This is a novel coronavirus and still has many unknowns.”

THE YOUNG ARE NOT IMMUNE. “Youth is not protection,” explained Hart. “Approximately 40% of the people currently hospitalized in New York with COVID-19 are under the age of 50, which appears to be different than the experience in China or northern Italy. Luckily, younger patients continue to have a significantly better survival rate than the elderly, but it isn’t just older people who are getting sick enough to be hospitalized.” To keep up with COVID-19 information, bookmark USEF’s coronavirus resource page and regularly check there for updates.

Many barns have instituted new rules, including social-distancing policies, to help protect staff and clients. You should also adhere to federal, state, and local guidance. USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 65


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a

winning partnership...

“My saddle is one of the proudest achievements of my career. I believe we have created the perfect seat for you and unprecedented comfort for your horse.” Isabell Werth The deep seat in the Isabell Saddle is unique sitting you in a central and balanced position, and with the Adjustable Ergonomic Stirrup Bar, correct alignment is effortless. The CAIR Cushion System and EASY-CHANGE Fit Solution offer the greatest flexibility in achieving a customised fit and fluid cushioning ensuring your horse’s absolute comfort and your peace of mind. Experience the ultimate connection with your horse and become a winning partnership in a Bates Isabell Saddle.

For more information visit batessaddles.com USEQUESTRIAN.ORG @batessaddles 67


US EQUESTRIAN LAUNCHES

NEW ONLINE SAFE SPORT RESOURCE CENTER FOR MEMBERS Have questions about Safe Sport? US Equestrian is helping members with a new resource center whose materials are tailored to your specific role in horse sports, whether you’re a trainer, owner, competitor, parent, affiliate, licensed official, or competition organizer.

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STORY BY AUTHOR NAME

PHOTO: TAYLOR PENCE/US EQUESTRIAN

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USEF is committed to working with members and ensuring everyone understands the role they play in creating a safe environment for our competitors.

What is Safe Sport? Recognizing, Reducing, and Responding to Misconduct and Abuse in Sports Why Safe Sport Exists What Safe Sport Means for Members Misconceptions: Safe Sport 101 How Does the Investigatory Process Work? You can also read Safe Sport FAQs, get step-by-step instructions for completing the required SafeSport training, read the U.S. Center for SafeSport’s updated SafeSport code, and discover the facts versus the myths about Safe Sport. Explore the new Safe Sport resources by visiting usef.org/safe-sport or by clicking the Safe Sport tab near the usef.org home page’s upper left corner.

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FIVE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SAFE SPORT Since its inception in 2017, the U.S. Center for SafeSport has received over 4,600 reports of alleged abuse in sports across the Olympic and Paralympic disciplines, including equestrian. The Center continues to work diligently to provide resources and resolution for survivors of abuse across the wide range of sports embodied by the Olympic movement and the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee. The U.S. Center for SafeSport has exclusive jurisdiction over reports of sexual misconduct or child abuse within the breeds and disciplines governed by the USEF. 1. In February 2018, the Protecting Young Victims from Sexual Abuse and Safe Sport Authorization Act of 2017 was signed into law. Among the provisions in the law was Congressional authorization for the U.S. Center for SafeSport to ensure athletes could report allegations of abuse to an independent entity for investigation and resolution. The Center works with NGBs, including US Equestrian and other Olympic disciplines, to enforce the SafeSport Code (which is available at usef.org/ safe-sport), aimed at protecting athletes from abuse. The Center ensures all NGBs follow strict standards for child abuse prevention and detection.

PHOTOS: PHELPSPHOTOS.COM, HOWARD SCHATZBERG

In January, US Equestrian unveiled improved Safe Sport navigation and webpages as part of its online Safe Sport page at usef.org/safe-sport. Each page leads with educational videos, easy-to-navigate icons, need-to-know information, and specialized resources that are relevant to the specific role you have in equestrian sport. Each page also is tailored toward a specific audience, with dedicated pages for trainers, owners, competitors, parents, affiliates, licensed officials, and competition organizers. And there are also links to take SafeSport training, to report misconduct or abuse, and to access a 24-hour helpline at safesporthelpline.org or 1-866-200-0796 and McLaughlin Young mental health resources at 1-800-633-3353. In addition to the new website content, this spring US Equestrian also will launch a targeted social media campaign that will address common Safe Sport misconceptions. The previously announced Safe Sport town halls are postponed until further notice due to the COVID-9 outbreak. The new online Safe Sport resource center also features five introductory videos about Safe Sport, its aims and value to sports communities, and its procedures:


2. SafeSport training is required for USEF Competing Members aged 18 or older and is essential in creating a safer environment for our competitors. Regardless of whether your engagement with equestrian sport brings you into everyday contact with young participants or not, SafeSport training is required. SafeSport training gives all of us the knowledge to be part of the solution to keep our young people and our sport safe. The online SafeSport course lasts approximately 90 minutes and only needs to be completed once. Thirty-minute refresher courses must be completed annually thereafter. If you are a victim or a survivor of abuse and believe the SafeSport training could be an emotional trigger, please contact Teresa Roper at troper@usef.org, Sonja Keating at skeating@ usef.org, or the U.S. Center for SafeSport at exemptions@safesport.org before accessing the SafeSport training course. 3. USEF’s Minor Athlete Abuse Prevention (MAAP) Policies are aimed at creating an atmosphere free of emotional, physical, and sexual misconduct and limit one-on-one interactions between minor participants and adults who are not their parent/legal guardian. Per the policies: • One-on-one interactions with minors must be observable and interruptible, with

• •

exceptions requiring written consent from a legal guardian. Sample consent language is available at usef.org/safe-sport. Adults must include another adult on all electronic communications with a minor in connection with USEF-sanctioned activity. An adult may travel with a minor in the presence of another adult or two other minors, or with written consent from the minor’s legal guardian. Sample consent language is available at usef.org/safe-sport. Working students under 18 years of age who travel or live with a trainer also must have written consent from the working student’s legal guardian to do so. Sample consent language is available at usef. org/safe-sport.

4. Within 24 hours of learning of suspected or alleged sexual misconduct, USEF members must make a report to the U.S. Center for SafeSport, and local authorities if a minor is involved. Reports to the Center can be made electronically through the Center’s website at uscenterforsafesport.org/report-a-concern. Individuals should not investigate or attempt to evaluate the credibility or validity of allegations involving sexual misconduct; the Center will determine whether a violation of the Code occurred. 5. USEF is committed to working with members around these issues and ensuring everyone understands the role they play in creating a safe environment for our competitors. The USEF website features a number of resources to help members maintain a culture that does not tolerate abuse. Our representatives are available to answer questions and clarify misconceptions. Ultimately, we are all on the same team, working to keep our members safe and striving to be part of the solution. We all have a role to play to ensure our members —especially our young ones—are safe.

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MYTH Trainers can be banned based on false allegations made to the U.S. Center for SafeSport by one disgruntled client.

FACT While false allegations are unlikely, they unfortunately do happen, and the U.S. Center for SafeSport has highly experienced investigators who are skilled and trained to recognize false claims. The accused will have an opportunity to be heard by the case investigator. This affords the accused with the opportunity to provide their story, learn what evidence the investigator has gathered, and provide their own evidence, including the identity of witnesses who may have relevant factual information. This process occurs before any disciplinary action is taken. Further, there are consequences for knowingly making a false report, as it may violate state criminal law and civil defamation laws.

MYTH Due to SafeSport, trainers cannot touch students at all, including demonstrating proper leg position or offering a supportive or celebratory hug.

FACT Trainers can touch students in appropriate ways, such as adjusting leg and hand position or posture, and can hug students in celebration or support.

MYTH Every person who is reported to the U.S. Center for SafeSport is temporarily suspended until an investigation is conducted.

FACT Temporary suspensions are very rare. The vast majority of reports—more than 99%—do not result in a temporary suspension. In fact, only 0.5% of reports in our sport have resulted in an immediate temporary suspension.

MYTH Under the U.S. Center for SafeSport’s process, you are guilty until proven innocent. This is unfair and does not provide the accused with due process.

FACT The U.S. Center for SafeSport follows a thorough investigative process, led by trained investigators, to ensure the accuser and accused are fully heard. To protect both parties, the process is confidential, and once a decision is issued by the Center, the accused has the opportunity to request a hearing before an independent arbitrator. The arbitrator’s decision is final.

MYTH The U.S. Center for SafeSport is on a witch hunt.

FACT It often can take years, if not decades, for survivors of abuse to come forward and share their stories. There is no statute of limitations on the pain and suffering they have endured, and their abusers must be held accountable for their actions. State policymakers have come to understand how physical, emotional, and psychological effects of sexual abuse can influence how and when a survivor comes forward. Several states have abolished statutes of limitations for some sex crimes to allow a perpetrator to be prosecuted at any point.

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PHOTOS: ANDREA EVANS/US EQUESTRIAN, TAYLOR PENCE/USEQUESTRIAN

SAFE SPORT MYTHS V. FACTS


MYTH SafeSport investigations are not done by trained experts.

FACT All investigators working for the U.S. Center for SafeSport receive training developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on how to conduct forensic interviews, as well as other investigatory training. Training is conducted annually to ensure investigators are well equipped and resourced to conduct thorough investigations.

MYTH All reports received by the Center result in formal investigation and disciplinary measures.

FACT When a report is made, the Center conducts an initial review to determine whether it has jurisdiction over the matter. If the Center does have jurisdiction, it enters a fact-finding period that can lead to one of three actions: formal resolution (i.e., an investigation), informal resolution, or administrative closure when there is insufficient information to move forward. Even when the Center pursues an investigation, measures are determined by the facts of the case and can range from warnings to bans.

MYTH Accused individuals have no opportunity to have their voices heard.

FACT The investigatory process allows the accused the opportunity to defend themselves.

MYTH US Equestrian is solely administering Safe Sport as a matter of compliance.

FACT There is nothing more important to US Equestrian than protecting our equestrians, especially our young equestrians. We share this goal with our members, other National Governing Bodies, and the U.S. Center for SafeSport. US Equestrian has had a Safe Sport program since 2013.

MYTH Strict sanctions, such as bans, require criminal convictions.

FACT Sanctions do not require criminal convictions and are dependent upon the facts of the case and whether a violation of the SafeSport Code has occurred.

MYTH Trainers are not bound by certain restrictions if they sign paperwork with parents.

FACT Parents can give signed written consent for one-on-one training, but all trainers are bound by the MAAP Policies as well as the SafeSport Code.

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Calverro Schooling Shirt This stylish shirt features wicking, cooling, antimicrobial fabric with mesh underarms. The collar with magnetic closures keeps the sun off your neck, while the elbow patches add style to take you from barn to brunch. calverro.com $128

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STYLE

ON SHOW

The days are getting longer, frost gives way to balmy weather—it’s spring, when an equestrian’s thoughts turn to the competition season and all the fun it brings. Whether you’re signing up to show, enjoying a ringside view as a spectator, or simply enjoying a hack or drive for pleasure, our show season gift guide has plenty of options to suit every eye and every budget.

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Hunter Vintage Varsity Sweatshirt Show off your classic style in this adorable sweatshirt. Long-sleeve, raglan crewneck with a relaxed fit. Made in an ultra-soft blend. Bonus: it’s machinewashable. shoplevade.com $60

Lusitano Stirrup Bangle Bracelet This narrow, solid steel stainless stirrup bangle with interlocking hook closure is the perfect modern touch for any occasion. Available in black or silver with the engraving “don’t let them tame you.” ateliercg.com $120

REFLECT 24™ Gloves A great combination with high visibility. The outside panel and closure light up with reflective material. The Digital® palm offers feather touch, durability, and breathability. ssgridinggloves.com $31.95

Mare Goods Zipper Pouch This super-cute and handy pouch is available in lots of fun patterns. Handmade in Ohio from eco-friendly bespoke fabric and fully lined. maregoods.com $25

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Prestige Leather Care Kit With the Prestige Leather Care Kit, you will have everything you need to take proper care of your tack to increase the durability, cleanliness, and suppleness. Kit includes a cleaner, an oil, a balsam, and sponges. prestigeitaly.com $89

Ellany Cheetah Gold Snaffle Elastic Belt This belt will give you the comfort you never realized you were missing with a leather belt. One size fits most, going from 24" to 65", so you never have to worry about finding a different belt to fit with your low-rise and high-rise jeans and breeches. ellany.com $45

Horses Barrette Show off that major obsession of yours with the Milton Menasco Horses-edition crystal and studembellished hair barrette. Made from tortoiseshell resin, this limited-edition barrette is the perfect accessory. shopmiltonmenasco.com $37

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Tryon Travel Overnight This generous overnight duffle bag is designed with padded heavy-duty 900 denier black nylon, featuring full-grain smooth leather accents in tones of chestnut or black. Comfort continues with supple rolled leather handles and an optional, adjustable padded shoulder strap. Refined interior with private zip and open pocket. tuckertweed.com $239

Equestrian Stationery A ton of help goes into a successful show season. Express your appreciation with a handwritten note on equestrian-themed stationery. Your purchase supports US Equestrian programming. horseshoegreetings.com $28 for a 20-card pack

Rambo® Optimo Supreme Summer Sheet This sheet is made from poly cotton outer fabric to give superior breathability and has a lightweight bib-front closure that protects the chest and neck from rubbing, ensuring maximum comfort for your horse. horseware.com $185

Winner Keychain Show your champion colors with this blue-ribbon enamel keychain with a shiny gold-colored back. The perfect small gift—or a little reminder to always be your best. huntseatpaperco.com $12.50

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Soap for Dirty Equestrians This new collection of all-natural soaps removes dirt, purifies skin, and leaves riders feeling rejuvenated. It is vegan and cruelty-free. heelsdownmag.com $49.99 for a six-pack or $10.99 per soap.

Pet Portrait A Stitch in Stride offers fully custom and handmade pet + horse and rider portraits. Each piece is handpainted and embroidered to create a unique work of art that you will treasure forever. thehuntequestrian.com $65

EquiFit Anatomical Hunter Girth Anatomically shaped T-Foam hunter girth allows for increased comfort, freedom of movement, and a more stable saddle. The removable T-Foam liner aids in perspiration control, prevents irritation, and absorbs 97% of shock and vibration. Available in sizes 36"-56" equifit.net $299

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EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE

EXCITEMENT

EVENTING

BECOME A CLASSIC CONTRIBUTOR Join the group that is building an enduring future for eventing month by month!

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For as little as $5 a month you can help the USEA Foundation ensure the USEA has the resources it needs to continue its educational and safety programs to benefit you now and for years to come.

Become a Classic Monthly Contributor by making your first donation today at USEAFOUNDATION.ORG/DONATE


FOR THE RECORD

Hearing Committee Rulings and Administrative Penalties OFFICIAL NOTICES Contributed by the Regulation Department unless otherwise indicated. The following official notices are only intended to give penalty information for a given case and not to disclose the factual basis for each violation or penalty. The Hearing Committee decides each case based on the evidence presented at the hearing and takes into account many factors that may raise or lower a given penalty. For example, the Hearing Committee takes into account such things as whether the violation was intentional or unintentional, the nature of the violation, the credibility of witnesses, penalties in similar cases, past violations of Federation rules by a respondent, and many other mitigating factors. US Equestrian members can access and search the United States Equestrian Federation rulings and findings online at USequestrian.org. Hover over the Compete tab on the homepage. In the menu that appears, click Rulings & Findings under Rules & Regulations. HEARING COMMITTEE RULINGS Below are the official rulings reached by the Hearing Committee following hearings held in these matters and/or plea agreements made. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc., Hearing Committee on October 2, 2019. The Hearing Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, in connection with the Carolina International CCI & HT held March 20-24, 2019, wherein HAYLEY SMITH of Vass, N.C., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse JOKER’S WIN after it had been administered and/or contained in its body trazodone and hydroxytrazodone. For this violation of the rules, the Hearing Committee members present directed that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, HAYLEY SMITH be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for three months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The three-month suspension shall commence on January 1, 84 SPRING ISSUE 2020

2020, and terminate at midnight on March 31, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c.

ANN ANDERSON of Duxbury, Mass., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the New England Morgan Horse Show held on July 23-27, 2019, in that, she, as trainer, exhibited the horse AZEEDAD’S LUCKY STAR after it had been administered and/or contained in its body 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide.

The Hearing Committee also directed that HAYLEY SMITH be fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j.

For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, ANN ANDERSON be found not in good standing, suspended from membership and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant, or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities.

It was further directed that for these violations of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by JOKER’S WIN at said competition, must be returned for redistribution pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. This is official notice of actions taken by the United States Equestrian Federation, Inc. Hearing Committee on November 12, 2019. The Committee Members present received and accepted a plea agreement tendered pursuant to Chapter 6, GR617, wherein MOIRA BURNHAM, of New York, N.Y., violated Chapter 13, GR1301.4b, of this Federation, in that she was reported three times for making non-negotiable payments for membership and horse registration fees to the Federation. For this violation it was determined that MOIRA BURNHAM be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. ADMINISTRATIVE PENALTIES This is official notice of the imposition of Administrative Penalties pursuant to Chapter 4, GR412, and/or Chapter 6, GR616, offered by the Federation and accepted by the following parties and approved by the Hearing Committee in lieu of hearings.

The two-month suspension shall commence on June 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on July 31, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. ANN ANDERSON was also fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by AZEEDAD’S

LUCKY STAR at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. CARYL BERZACK of Maysville, Ga., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Labor Day Dressage Classic I Horse Show held on August 31, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse COLONEL after it had been administered and/or contained in its body hydroxyzine and cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that CARYL BERZACK be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by COLONEL at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. G R E G B E S T o f We l l e s ley, Mass., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Tryon Summer 3 Horse Show held on June 26-30, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse CRUZ after it had been administered and/or contained in its body cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that GREG BEST be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any,


won by CRUZ at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. ROBERT BLANCHETTE of Aptos, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Bay Area Summer Festival Horse Show held on June 26-30, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse CHICO 951 after it had been administered and/or contained in its body cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that ROBERT BLANCHETTE be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CHICO 951 at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. LIZ BROMBERG of Chapel Hill, N.C., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the NCDCTA Labor of Love I Horse Show held on August 31, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse, VIGOUREUX, after it had been administered and/or contained in its body lidocaine and hydroxylidocaine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that LIZ BROMBERG be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by VIGOUREUX at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. JENNIFER COBB of Chesapeake, Va., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Waredaca Farm Horse Trials held on August 17-18, 2019, in that, she, as trainer, exhibited the horse CALIFORNIA GIRL after it had been administered and/or contained in its body acepromazine and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide. For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, JENNIFER COBB be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for three months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed

Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The three-month suspension shall commence on July 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on September 30, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. JENNIFER COBB was also fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CALIFORNIA GIRL at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. BENITO COTTO of Ocala, Fla., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Spectrum International Horse Show held on May 22-26, 2019, in that, he, as trainer, exhibited the horse SIMBOLICA DE JH after it had been administered and/or contained in its body 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide and promazine. For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, BENITO COTTO be found not in good standing, suspended from membership, and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by, or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The two-month suspension shall commence on May 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on June 30, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of his, or shown in his name or for his reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged USEQUESTRIAN.ORG 85


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violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. BENITO COTTO was also fined $3,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by SIMBOLICA DE JH at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. JUSTIN COWDEN of Minden, Nev., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation, in connection with the Region 7 Arabian Championship held on April 22-28, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse TN KHALIENTE after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that JUSTIN COWDEN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by TN KHALIENTE at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. JESSICA FORTIN of Hamilton, Va., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation, in

connection with the Lexington Spring Encore Horse Show held on May 1-5, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse DALLAS after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that JESSICA FORTIN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by DALLAS at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. DEVON GIBSON of Rolling Hills Estate, Calif., and Redondo Beach, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with USEF Junior Hunter National Championships - West Coast Horse Show held on July 22-23, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse SO TO SPEAK after it had been administered and/or contained in its body triamcinolone acetonide. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines.


For this violation it was determined that DEVON GIBSON be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by SO TO SPEAK at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. DEVON GIBSON of Rolling Hills Estate, Calif., and Redondo Beach, Calif., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Blue Grass Festival Horse Show held on August 13-18, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse REALLY after it had been administered and/or contained in its body triamcinolone acetonide. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that DEVON GIBSON be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by REALLY at said competition

must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. DAVID JENNINGS of Franklin, Tenn., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Nashville Classic Horse Show held on May 29-June 2, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse CADDIE R after it had been administered and/or contained in its body pramoxine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that DAVID JENNINGS be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $2,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. LACEY MESSICK of Springfield, Mo., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Fox River Valley Pony Club Horse Trials held on June 21-23, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse SUDDEN IMPULSE RSF after it had been administered and/or contained in its body mepivacaine and hydroxymepivacaine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in

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the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation, it was determined that LACEY MESSICK be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by SUDDEN IMPULSE RSF at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MICHAEL NEWMAN of Pace, Fla., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation, in connection with the Aiken Summer Classic II Horse Show held on June 19-23, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse WENGELO’S WILLEM after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that MICHAEL NEWMAN be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by WENGELO’S WILLEM at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MATTHEW SCHUCKERT of Upton, Ky., violated Chapter 4,

GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the Rock Creek Horse Show held on June 4-8, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse FINNMASTER after it had been administered and/or contained in its body clenbuterol. For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, MATTHEW SCHUCKERT be found not in good standing, suspended from membership and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for one month, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The one-month suspension shall commence on May 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on May 31, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of his, or shown in his name or for his reputation (whether such interest

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FOR THE RECORD was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. M AT T H E W SC H U C K E RT was also fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by FINNMASTER at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. MATTHEW SCHUCKERT of Upton, Ky., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with All American Horse Classic Horse Show held on September 4-7, 2019, in that, he, as trainer, exhibited the horse CRAYCROFT BOMBS AWAY after it had been administered and/or contained in its body clenbuterol and dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1b and GR703.1f, MATTHEW SCHUCKERT be found not in good standing, suspended from membership and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for one month, and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an

88 SPRING ISSUE 2020

exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The one-month suspension shall commence on September 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on September 30, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation, or stable of his, or shown in his name or for his reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. MATTHEW SCHUCKERT was also fined $2,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by CRAYCROFT BOMBS AWAY at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. RUTH SIEGFRIED of New Castle, Pa., violated Chapter 4,

GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with the South Farm Horse Trials held on July 6-7, 2019, in that she, as trainer, exhibited the horse ROAD NOT TAKEN after it had been administered and/ or contained in its body hydroxyzine and cetirizine. The facts and mitigating factors in this case supported the following penalty even though it is below the suggested range for Category II Violations outlined in the Drugs and Medications Penalty Guidelines. For this violation it was determined that RUTH SIEGFRIED be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by ROAD NOT TAKEN at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. TONYA SKINNER o f La s Vegas, Nev., violated Chapter 4, GR410-411, of this Federation, in connection with Region 7 Arabian Championship Horse Show held on April 22-28, 2019, in that, she, as trainer, exhibited the horse TRUE SERENITY after it had been administered and/or contained in its body 2-(1-hydroxyethyl) promazine sulfoxide. For this violation it was determined that pursuant to Chapter 7,

GR703.1b and GR703.1f, TONYA SKINNER be found not in good standing, suspended from membership and forbidden from the privilege of taking any part whatsoever in any Licensed Competition for two months and is excluded from all competition grounds during Licensed Competitions for that period: (1) as an exhibitor, participant or spectator; (2) from participating in all Federation affairs and activities; (3) from holding or exercising office in the Federation or in any Licensed Competition; and (4) from attending, observing, or participating in any event, forum, meeting, program, clinic, task force, or committee of the Federation, sponsored by or conducted by the Federation, or held in connection with the Federation and any of its activities. The two-month suspension shall commence on March 1, 2020, and terminate at midnight on April 30, 2020. Any horse or horses owned, leased, or of any partnership, corporation or stable of hers, or shown in her name or for her reputation (whether such interest was held at the time of the alleged violation or acquired thereafter), shall also be suspended, pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1c, for the same period. TONYA SKINNER was also fined $2,000 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed


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FOR THE RECORD that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by TRUE SERENITY at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g. JIMMY TORANO, of Wellington, Fla., violated Chapter 13, GR1304.26b(3), of this Federation, in connection with the National Horse Show held October 29-November 3, 2019, in that he judged the ASPCA Maclay Championship class and, within 30 days following the competition day, an exhibitor of the class became his client. For this violation, it was determined that JIMMY TORANO be censured pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1a, and fined $1,500 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. DALE WRIGHT of Wake Forest, N.C., violated Chapter 4, GR410, of this Federation, in connection with the NCHJA Annual Horse Show held on June 26-30, 2019, in that he, as trainer, exhibited the horse JAMESON after it had been administered and/or contained in its body dexamethasone in a plasma concentration exceeding the maximum permitted level. For this violation it was determined that DALE WRIGHT be censured pursuant to Chapter 7,

GR703.1a, and fined $750 pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1j. It was further directed that for this violation of the rules, all trophies, prizes, ribbons, and monies, if any, won by JAMESON at said competition must be redistributed pursuant to Chapter 7, GR703.1g.

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