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We mainly concentrated on education and how we could assist people to not only acquire digital skills, but also to cultivate their entrepreneurial opportunities. To make this possible one must focus on both the short term as well as the long term education. What this means is that not only should all EU Member States and regions focus on raising the competence of future job seekers (primary to postsecondary education) but also those whom already exist on the job market. This is often referred to as lifelong learning and can be achieved by using conventional education methods, such as schools and evening courses, but can now also be taught with internet resources that help teachers learn programming regardless if they are young or old and regardless of place. The problem here is that while many of these resources are easy to learn, it is hard for teachers and job seekers to find them in the first place. This brings us to our first suggestion which is that the European Commission should facilitate finding these opportunities by either recommending them to institutions such as CoR and national governments or to simply list them on a website for all to find. This should simultaneously be achieved with a general campaign from industry, education and politics which highlights the need for teaching more jobseekers in vital ICT skills (information and communication technology). Initiatives such as these has already started with e-skills for jobs campaign from DigitalEurope and the Grand coalition for digital jobs that was started by the European Commission, but we need far more movement particularly from already successful entrepreneurs that could motivate as well as inspire people to take the first step. This is especially important for youngsters that could and should be able to interact with these people at school talks and job days organised by local regions across Europe. Not only would this teach the public about the need for IT-skills and tackling risks but also accepting failures as a part of their careers. On a final and relating note, we believe it is curtail for local communities and schools to open business accelerators, as this would not only help future entrepreneurs to fund and sustain their ideas to become fully fleshed business. What Europe needs to do is to identify resources that could help people to learn about programming, promote lifelong learning in civil society, provide guidance on how to start and finance start-up businesses. All of this also has to work within the pre-existing initiatives to create a single digital market and matching skills across borders within the single market. Not only do we believe that this can happen on a pan European and local scale, we believe that it is already happening. The only thing we need to do is to protect it, nurture it, promote it accelerate it and make it universal.

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Closing the gap: digital and entrepreneurial skills for all

Closing the gap: digital and entrepreneurial skills for all  

A collection of essays from participants at the 2015 EPP Group in the European Committee of the Regions and the EDS Study Visit on digital a...

Closing the gap: digital and entrepreneurial skills for all  

A collection of essays from participants at the 2015 EPP Group in the European Committee of the Regions and the EDS Study Visit on digital a...

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