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CITIZENS WAREHOUSE with select works from the artists


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CITIZENS WAREHOUSE Tucson, Arizona

“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” — Aristotle

e ponymous a telier


THIS IS AN EPONYMOUS ATELIER ART BOOK eponymousatelier.com Copyright Š 2013 Citizens Artist Collective, Tucson, Arizona. citizensart.com

ISBN 978-0-9890628-0-0 All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. Published and distributed in the United States by Eponymous Atelier. First Edition, 500 copies Designed by Alec Laughlin aleclaughlin.com Edited by Dennis Herrick dennisherrick.com Printed and bound in the United States by Arizona Lithographers.

On the Cover: Tucson Citizens Artists (unfinished detail), by Titus Castanza Back Cover: Citizens Stairwell, by Alec Laughlin


To the Memory of Elizabeth Bustamante

Portals, 45”x56”, oil on canvas, by Joe Hatton


Contents Foreword.................................................................................................................... i Julie Sasse, Tucson Museum of Art Preface....................................................................................................................... v Alec Laughlin, Citizens Artist Collective Introduction............................................................................................................. 1 Dennis Herrick, Author and Editor A Brief History of the Warehouses...................................................................... 2 Dave Devine, Author and Historian Tucson Warehouse Arts District Map................................................................. 4 City of Tucson Historic Preservation Office The History of Citizens Warehouse..................................................................... 6 Poster Frost Mirto, Inc. Citizens Warehouse Today.................................................................................... 9 David Aguirre, Dinnerware Artspace Citizens Artist Collective.................................................................................... 11 Titus Castanza, Citizens Artist Collective Bicycle Inter-Community Art Salvage.............................................................. 16 Kylie Walzak, BICAS Collective Member BICAS Underground Art and Art Annex........................................................ 17 Casey Wollschlaeger, BICAS Art Coordinator Warehouse Arts Management Organization................................................... 20 Ann Vargas, Vice President, WAMO

The Artists Titus Castanza........................................................................................................ 24 Matthew Diggins.................................................................................................... 28 Nick Georgiou........................................................................................................ 32 Laurel Hansen........................................................................................................ 36 Alec Laughlin......................................................................................................... 40


Dirk J. Arnold......................................................................................................... 44 Cristina Cรกrdenas.................................................................................................. 48 Rand Carlson.......................................................................................................... 52 Jack Doyle............................................................................................................... 56 Jeff Farmer.............................................................................................................. 60 Joe Hatton............................................................................................................... 64 Katherine Josten..................................................................................................... 68 Ezequiel Leoni........................................................................................................ 72 Patricia McNulty.................................................................................................... 76 Troy Neiman........................................................................................................... 80 Hannah Nance Partlow......................................................................................... 84 Joanna Pregon........................................................................................................ 88 Robert Redding...................................................................................................... 92 Tony Rosano........................................................................................................... 96 Michael B. Schwartz............................................................................................ 100 Jeremy Singer........................................................................................................ 104 Christopher Stevens............................................................................................. 108 Gavin Hugh Troy................................................................................................. 112 Jenny O. Wall........................................................................................................ 116

Acknowledgments............................................................................................... 121 Authors.................................................................................................................. 123 Photography Index............................................................................................. 125


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“Art is the conversation between lovers. Art offers an opening for the heart. True art makes the divine silence in the soul break into applause.” — Hafiz

Christopher Stevens, January 2013


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FOREWORD The Romance of the Studio

The notion of the artist’s studio as an alluring

space of creativity stretches back in time and spans throughout the world, a concept that is not lost on the workplaces in our own midst in Tucson. As a young artist, I first visited the graduate studios and communal work spaces at the University of Arizona in the 1970s. I felt right at home among the easels, looms, tables, and heavy equipment used to make paintings, weavings, and sculpture. Later, as a curator in the early 1990s, I visited the desert home and studio of sculptor Barbara Jo McLaughlin, and the foothills studios of artists Lynn and Fred Borcherdt. Their large, impressive workspaces nestled in the desert were exotic fantasies to me—true artists’ refuges. Later, when I moved to Tucson (and set up my own modest studio in my home) I found an amazing array of studios everywhere in the city and in outlying desert areas. Art thrives everywhere in Tucson— in spaces that are defined by artists based on need, ability, opportunity, and imagination Visiting artists at the Citizens Warehouse, as with any building where there are multiple studios within one space, I am always filled with great anticipation. What new projects await the first pair of outside eyes? What new body of work might become an exhibition or an addition to someone’s collection? Is there a new artist whose work I will discover during my visit? How many artists have created in these spaces over time, and what has become of them and their work? It is this sharing between maker and audience in the physical space where the art is created that becomes the ultimate conclusion to hours and even years of contemplation and hard work. But equally important is that studio complexes also afford a space for artists to interact with each other—to share ideas, techniques, tools, and


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pure camaraderie. For artists in Tucson, just as it is for artists in every city throughout the country and beyond, the studio is a necessary and magical physical space that facilitates the process of art making from conceiving to creating to releasing the work into the world. Light cascading down from rooftop skylights; supple brushes standing at attention in crockery jars; a small rumpled bed seductively nestled in a corner; books and mysterious artifacts crowded on shelves and tables; and blank canvases ready to receive the divine inspiration of the artist. These are the images most often conjured when the popular imagination thinks of an artist’s studio.

desire. In essence, the artist’s studio is a combination of abode, refuge, and incubator for ideas. Of course, the artist is fully aware of the loaded symbolic power of the studio. Indeed, it can become a work of art in itself as the artist creates an environment not only conducive to motivating his or her creative impulses, but to project an appealing person in order to attract the “suitor” of collector, curator, and critic. From private retreat to bustling locus of discourse and socializing, the studio reveals the work habits, style, economic status, and personality of the artist.

Few workplaces hold such allure. Even artists themselves glamorize the atelier, a space that most professions would regard as simply a room for toil. Often portrayed in literature, film, and television documentaries—from the austere garret in Puccini’s opera La Bohème to the twentieth century film documentary of Jackson Pollock maniacally flinging paint in his spacious barn—the artist’s workshop has long been one of intriguing associations. The studio is an intimate domain above and beyond the mere place for the manufacture of objects. It is a place of creative activity encompassing myriad actions from mundane, everyday tasks (cleaning brushes, stretching canvases, mixing paints, cleaning the studio), moments of quiet contemplation, and methodical construction of the art object, expectantly culminating in a burst of performative brilliance. Thus, the artist’s workspace represents a special place of invention and creativity that is romantically connected to the notion of the “artist as genius.” Seen within two opposing symbolic frameworks of the private/inward space and the public/outward space, the artist’s workplace is reflective of the artist and his/her product. Therefore, the studio and the object can be seen as embodiments of spaces and things, sometimes viewed as coded symbols of the body and therefore associated with concepts of

The public is first influenced by the privileged invitation to enter this sacred domain even before it has seen a work of art. Then, the unique status of the artist is often determined in part by the size and location of his or her studio, and the tools, materials, books, objects, and other equipment found within. The more distinctive the studio, the more it influences the perception of the artist as powerful and successful, eccentric and radical, or thoughtful and reclusive—a reinforcement of the creative power of the artist who inhabits it. Not only does the public align with such notions of the spaces and the objects contained in them as extensions of the artist, but artists themselves are often psychologically impacted by the size and character of their studios. Such factors in turn can define the method, size, and character of the art works created in them.

Titus Castanza’s Studio


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To understand how the artist’s studio has taken on romantic associations and mythic proportions, it is useful to examine historic precedents. Over time, studios have been as varied as the artists who have used them. The grand spaces with cascading north light that we have come to know as the classic atelier is a construct that developed in the modern age. Prior to the advent of the Middle Ages, the artist known for individually-recognized creations did not exist. For example, artists who lived in ancient Egypt and Greece worked near religious centers or the palaces of royalty, and created their vessels, sculptures, and paintings according to prescribed formulas. Under the control of a ruler or priest, they worked in anonymity in communal workshops that blended the trades of many decorative and utilitarian craftsmen. Their work spaces were highly ritualistic and formulaic, and the purpose of their product was for symbolic uses intended for sacred spaces, dictated by religion and society rather than inspired by personal imaginative expression. Therefore, early artists worked within communal public spaces to create works for highly specialized, private spaces. Over time, artists’ studios changed from large shared work places to small, individual rooms or grand salons meant to cultivate the attention of wealthy patrons. In the 1940s, with the emergence of Abstract Expressionism in New York, industrial loft spaces accommodated the creation of large-scale works in demand by collectors and museums alike. In the 1960s, minimalist, conceptual, and performance artists had no need for large spaces in which to make their art because their product was created by others, performed rather than manufactured, or only insinuated through text. In the digital age, computer-based artists often work with only a computer, table, printer, and chair. There is no functional need for a visit from a patron or curator since nothing tangible can be seen that one cannot view off-site on one’s own computer screen. Nevertheless, the desire by outsiders to enter into the creative space of an artist, and the need by artists for

a tangible, designated space for creative activity and dialogue with others about art, assures everyone that studios will continue to flourish. Of course, the point of a studio is to provide a practical, productive space for the artist to create works of art, which ultimately become coveted objects, the “things” that are the manifestations of the artist’s imagination. Without art objects, the studio becomes a barren space of futility and lacks meaning, no longer capturing the desires of collectors who hope to become inspired or fulfilled by the products that emerge from the space. Thus, the studio is a place that not only incubates the ideas of the artist but provides the space in which those ideas are made real. It is in essence the womb where the art is conceived and ultimately produced. To enter the studio, therefore, can be seen as a consummation of desire, or an intrusive act, depending on the relationship that builds between the artist and the visitor, be it a collector, critic, or curator. Upon the arrival of the visitor to the studio, the banality of the artist’s everyday work experience is transformed into a magical time of sharing. Ultimately, it is the relationship between people and things that gives the studio its power in a delicate balance of distance and proximity. Therefore, the studio is an extension of the artist and a personification of the art and the environment from which its offspring, the art, emerges. Society often informs and inspires the artist, and through its market and property relationships, regulates the activity of the artist in the studio. This interdependent relationship is intrinsically bound up with notions of lack and desire, encouraging a romanticized framework from which the studio emerges.

— Julie Sasse

Chief Curator and Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Tucson Museum of Art Tucson, Arizona January, 2013


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“Freedom of expression is a very essential condition for me to make any art. Also, it is an essential value for my life. I have to protect this right and also to fight for the possibility.” — Ai Weiwei


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PREFACE

The move into my studio in Citizens Warehouse

in January 2011 has proven a wise decision. With one-thousand square feet at my disposal, cramped quarters no longer serve as an excuse for lack of productivity—a welcome relief. The space is enormous with natural light pouring in through windows on the east and north sides. Even with artwork hanging on the walls, a couple of rugs on the floor and miscellaneous furnishings, there is a deep echo that reverberates with the smallest sound. The acoustics alone contribute much of its charm. It is a solid building—even the ceilings fashioned of poured concrete. Regardless of its stocky build the floors rumble slightly whenever a train passes on the rail, which is just a few feet from the southwest corner of the building. The horns are deafening, at times necessitating pauses in conversations. There is a cherished creative camaraderie here, within which I harvest great inspiration for my own work. To be able to talk shop with fellow artists and being exposed to the great variety of mediums and techniques affords discovery of new concepts and ideas of which I may not have otherwise been aware or considered. Several of the artists in this creative bunker have come together and formed the artist group called, “Citizens Artist Collective”. Officially, the collective has a board of six, and established itself as a nonprofit with the vision and goal of bringing attention to this historic building and its artists, and protect it from the potential perils such an entity must endure in a time of rapid development in downtown Tucson. The Warehouse Arts District in downtown Tucson is an eclectic, thriving and growing community. Citizens Warehouse, a cornerstone to this community, is home to twenty-five artists of varied

mediums and disciplines. Painters, photographers, sculptures, writers and musicians alike. The result is an atmosphere rich in imagination, creativity and diversity. The primary purpose of this book is to support and give exposure to the artists in Citizens Warehouse. It showcases select works from the artists, amounting to more than 130 full color images of paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics, metal work, and mixed-media art. Citizens Warehouse is in danger of being lost, which would be a tremendous shame as the community of artists here would be displaced, as well as BICAS and its Art Annex. Currently, Citizens Warehouse offers affordable studio space to these artists which, if lost, would negatively impact the arts community— specifically, the Tucson Historic Warehouse District. Because of this, all sales proceeds of this book will be placed in funds for maintenance and repairs on the building, further marketing and promotion of the artists who work here, community programs such as field trips and workshops for area students, and programs to help protect the warehouse—ensuring that it remain a vital part of the Arts District community. May the contents of this book give you a glimpse into the fruits of this local arts community. May it give you a small insight into the inhabitants of Citizens Warehouse: our individuality, camaraderie, productivity, and the thunder of creativity that silences the roar of the train. And with my sincere gratitude may it further inspire you to investigate the work of the artists I’ve profiled within these pages.

— Alec Laughlin

Citizens Artist Collective Tucson, Arizona January, 2013


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“I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way —things I had no words for.” — Georgia O’Keeffe

Painted for BICAS with Love, by Pasqualina Azzerello


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INTRODUCTION Buying From Local Artists by Dennis Herrick Author and Editor

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lthough the artworks my wife and I have acquired are of modest cost, we have priceless paintings and sculptures. In other words, as long as we live, they’re not for sale. I think a lot of people feel that way about art they’ve purchased. It’s so satisfying when someone enters our home and stops to contemplate a painting or a sculpture. And if you invite us to your house, don’t be surprised if you catch us looking at the art in the room while you’re talking. It’s been said that buying art is a lot like falling in love. Even if others don’t seem to share your affection for art you’ve bought, you don’t care. Once it becomes a part of your life you protect it, you display it, you value it—and you defend it if anyone dares to denigrate it. What is it that’s so personal about the art we choose to have around us in our offices, our houses, and even in our yards? Why does someone like my wife and me, who have even gone so far as to commission an artist to obtain artwork with just the look we want, occasionally spend some of our hard-earned money on art rather than, say, a bigger car payment? We all need to buy a new car at times. But despite the love affair Americans have for their cars, have any of us ever kept a car for as long as we’ve kept that special little painting, sculpture, photograph, jewelry, or other art that in some special way speaks to us? Some people buy art and sell it if the value goes up. But they’re the exception. A recent Barclays Bank survey of art collectors reports that only 10 percent

of them purchase art for an investment. Almost all the rest say they buy art just for the enjoyment the art brings. My wife and I can’t afford to buy original art by internationally acclaimed artists. But we can afford the art of local artists who live around us with the concepts, landscapes, and perspectives we can identify with. Another advantage of buying the work of local artists is that you can meet the artist. We usually try to buy directly from the artist. Being able to do so infuses additional significance to the art. And then there are those possibilities. A high school art teacher painted a portrait of a friend of ours in Iowa. The teacher eventually moved to Santa Fe, began doing stylized paintings of Native Americans, and became renowned as Frank Howell. You might have heard of him. You just never know with artists. Local artists, like the twenty-five at Citizens Warehouse, produce paintings, writing, sculptures, design, and imaginative uses of old and new media. Many already are of international achievement working alongside others with strong city and regional reputations. All are active in bringing more art, culture, and insights to Tucson and the world. They deserve your support, and you deserve their art. They work with their hearts and dreams every day in large or small studios. They strive for success while always realizing that creativity can be its own reward. Like Vincent van Gogh, they could also say, “I am seeking, I am striving, I am in it with all of my heart.”


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A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE WAREHOUSES by Dave Devine

Author and Historian

When the first Southern Pacific Railroad train

pulled into Tucson on March 20, 1880, the depot grounds were far removed from the community of 7,000 inhabitants. The only way to get to town across a dusty patch of desert was to walk, ride a horse, or take a wagon. Thus, to store goods brought over the rails, a few merchants built warehouses next to the new station. That is how things remained for almost 20 years since Tucson didn’t grow much during that period. But as the 20th century dawned, the population began to increase and the need for more space to store merchandise transported by the railroad became obvious.

To meet this need, warehouses were constructed west of the depot and would eventually stretch all the way down Toole Avenue to Stone Avenue and beyond. At the same time, other warehouses began being built north of the train station, wiping out a small residential neighborhood that had previously existed in the area. These warehouses ranged in use from department store storage to commercial grocers to personal storage space. Other buildings in the area included a bakery, a couple of lumberyards and a plumbing supply warehouse. With the advent of the automobile, complaints soon began to be heard about the impediment the railroad tracks caused traffic. Responding to those concerns, the Fourth Avenue underpass was built in 1916, ones on Sixth Avenue and Broadway Boulevard opened around 1930, and then the Stone Avenue subway debuted in 1935. During World War II, the S.P. train station was a

Citizens Transfer Co. Carriage, when located on Congress Street, January 1912


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center of activity, but after the war things began to change. More travel was done by automobile and airplane, thus passenger trains slowly began to disappear. Plus, many goods were delivered by truck instead of by rail. At the same time, Tucson’s population was swelling and spreading out in all directions. Following their customers, downtown merchants opened stores in outlying strip centers or malls, and eventually abandoned their central city establishments entirely. That meant their need for the old warehouses mostly disappeared. By around 1960, many of downtown’s warehouses had been converted to other uses and that remained their status until some of them were abandoned by the 1980s. It was during that decade that the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) began purchasing some of the warehouses in order to implement what was known as the “Downtown Leg” of the Aviation Parkway. Before demolishing the buildings, though, ADOT leased them out to artists on a short-term basis.

By the mid-1990s, the historic significance of the warehouses, combined with their importance to many Tucson artists, was becoming apparent. That is why the Tucson Arts District Partnership began documenting the history of the buildings and successfully listed the Warehouse District on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. That listing, however, is only honorary and the district continues to face threats including from the downtown LINKS project – the successor to the long abandoned “Downtown Leg” of the Aviation Parkway. But other changes, such as the purchase and renovation of some of the ADOT warehouses by private owners and non-profit organizations may be a bright light for the future of the district. Tucson’s Historic Warehouse Arts District is an excellent example of preserving important structures and converting them to new uses as times change. Hopefully that lesson can continue to be learned as the district moves further into the 21st century.

Citizens Warehouse, 44 West 6th Street, east-facing wall, autumn 2012


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Historic Bulding in the Warehouse Historic District

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500 feet

Map created by City of Tucson Historic Preservation Office. February 2013

1,000


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Warehouse Arts District Presented here is a map illustrating the historic properties that were part of a 2004 study that lead to the Tucson Historic Warehouse Arts District Master Plan. The following list provides a sample of the properties that have had arts usage over the past several decades, their historic names, and their dates of construction. 1. Citizens Warehouse (1929) 2. Steinfeld Warehouse (1907) 3. Watson Battery and Electric Co. (1930) 4. Frank Brousse Auto Repair (1929) 5. Shoemaker Fender & Body Works (1930) 6. Baffert-Leon Warehouse (1923) 7. Tovrea/Tucson Warehouse & Transfer Co. (1908) 8. Wheatly Produce Warehouse (1904) 9. The Arches (1904) 10. Buxton-Smith Merc. Co. (1904) 11. Barker Brothers Warehouse (1904) 12. Tucson Warehouse & Transfer Co. (1918) 13. O’Reilly Motor Company (1929) 14. Firestone Warehouse (1931) 15. Coal Storage Shed (1918) 16. Toole Shed (1927) More information about the Tucson Warehouse Arts District can be found online at: warehouseartsdistrict.com This website was made possible through an initiative of the Tucson Pima Arts Council, in partnership with the Warehouse Arts Management Organization, and sponsored by a National Endowment for the Arts Our Town grant. Our Town was a planning project to measure the economic health and vitality of the Warehouse Arts District. The project’s goal has been to develop tools for bringing resources to support the district and, as Tucson Pima Arts Council’s Executive Director Roberto Bedoya states, “to make visible what’s invisible”. Key created by Alec Laughlin


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THE HISTORY OF CITIZENS WAREHOUSE

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built by Frank Putter Construction. Constructed entirely with cast-in-place reinforced concrete, the structure was designed to support up to five stories. Reinforced concrete columns were placed at a uniform twenty-one foot spacing and define a grid of five bays wide and three bays deep. At the interior, the round columns measuring eight feet in circumference with tapered capitals support a flat slab with drop slabs at all columns. The columns are square and are expressed on the exterior. Exterior walls are eight-inch thick poured-in-place concrete. While the elevator itself is non operational, the shaft is being used to allow light and fresh air into the basement, where BICAS is located.

The first known activity by Citizens at 44 West 6th Street was in 1929 when a single-story building with a full basement was designed by Roy Place and

The building was originally oriented toward the railroad tracks to the south, with several large openings and a raised loading platform. From the late 1920s through the early 1940s, Citizens’ employees would have to go to the rail yard at the southeast corner of 6th and 9th Avenue to unload merchandise and transport it to their warehouse. By the late 1940s the company had its own railroad spur and could off-load directly onto their dock.

Excerpted from the Citizens Warehouse Building Condition Assessment Report, 2007

by Poster Frost Mirto, Inc.

Architecture, Planning, Preservation

itizens Transfer and Storage Co., Inc. opened in 1907 as a cartage and drayage business, delivering goods and merchandise from the railroad, by horsedrawn wagons, to homes and individuals throughout the region. In its early days, Citizens was located on Congress Street, including a location at the intersection of Congress Street and Stone Avenue.

Citizens Warehouse, south face before the second story was added, circa 1950


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In 1951, a second story was added to the structure. This addition was also designed by Roy Place and his son, Lew, who joined with him in 1940 to form Place and Place architects. The contractor was once again Frank Putter Construction. Later that same year, a one-story brick addition was added to the west of the main structure after a fire destroyed metal buildings that were located there. In 1963, a two-story building was added north of the two-story structure. The architect for the addition was Howard Peck. This building was a single pour concrete structure with fifteen-foot pilasters built into the foundation. The structure was built over a drainage box which angles westward below the railroad tracks toward the Tucson Electric Power facility. A clear-space trestle was built over the box so that there was no load bearing weight on the box. This building, known as Lucky Street Studios, was demolished in the winter of 2012, in preparation for the ADOT Downtown Links project. In 1984, Citizens Warehouse was sold, along with two other structures and a vacant lot, to the Arizona Department of Transportation for the proposed expansion of the Aviation Corridor (Downtown Links). Since the early 1990s Citizens Warehouse has seen new life as artists’ studios and community space. In its reincarnation as artist space, Citizens Warehouse has undergone minor changes to address code and user comfort issues. Upon acquiring the building, the floor plates were not subdivided and electrical wiring and lighting was antiquated for the new use. Similarly, lack of windows created a cold and cavernous indoor space. Alterations, a number of which were completed with minor loans from the Arts District Partnership, have made the spaces satisfactory for art purposes. In the early 1990s, sprinklers were added to the basement, allowing occupancy of the first floor. At that time, interior partitions were added and new electrical conduit and wiring was run to support overhead lights and outlet boxes. In 1995, an open steel exit stair was added to the north side of the structure

to provide a second exit from the second floor. The second floor was subdivided into six studio spaces. New window openings were saw-cut into the existing poured-in-place walls to provide more illumination to the interior. Plumbing fixtures were added to several of the studio spaces on the second floor to make them more functional. Citizens Warehouse is a contributing structure to the Tucson Warehouse Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Place in October 1999. The Tucson Warehouse Historic District is significant for its contributions to the growth of industry and commerce in Tucson and Southern Arizona during the first half of the twentieth century. During this time, Citizens Transfer Company became one of Tucson’s most prominent storage and delivery companies, capitalizing on the growth of Tucson and through its prime location directly adjacent to the railroad tracks. Citizens Warehouse is a good example of trends in construction technology, including the use of a reinforced concrete structure. Citizens Warehouse is also significant for being designed by prominent Tucson architect Roy Place. He designed many of the noteworthy public buildings at the University of Arizona. In 1929, the same year that Citizens Warehouse was constructed, Place designed the iconic Pima County Courthouse. Just blocks from Citizens Warehouse, the elaborate, Moorish influenced, Spanish Colonial style Courthouse is a sharp contrast to the utilitarian building Place created for Citizens. In these two buildings it is possible to understand the breadth of Place’s architectural practice and his faculties for working with different architectural styles and construction techniques. In 1929 Place’s Citizens Warehouse may have contributed as much to the region’s growing commercial infrastructure as the Pima County Courthouse contributed to its civic character. Although Citizens Warehouse has undergone a change of use, many of its original features remain intact. Changes to the building have been in the spirit of its origins as a no-frills commercial structure.


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“Creating space 4 artists is integral to the creative process!” — @deyoungmusem

Open Studio Tour After Party (Greek Easter)


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CITIZENS WAREHOUSE TODAY by David Aguirre Dinnerware Artspace

The

warehouse that’s home now to a vibrant community of artists called the Citizens Warehouse was fated to be torn down just a few years ago. Boarded up and surrounded by weeds and clumps of grass, the 1929 Citizens Warehouse became a forlorn building slowly deteriorating for years. The Arizona Department of Transportation had purchased the warehouse at 44 W. Sixth Street in 1985, planning to demolish it for a new freeway through Tucson’s Historic Warehouse District. However, Tucson city officials balked at ADOT’s plan, holding up the proposed freeway as the years went by. Demolition was further stymied in the early 1990s when the Citizens Warehouse was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Fast-forward to 1994, when I was managing and leasing the nearby Steinfeld Warehouse Cooperative at 101 W. Sixth Street. Artists kept calling me for studio space. Because I had no more room available, their calls prompted me to look down the street at the empty Citizens Warehouse. I finally was able to persuade an ADOT property agent to come down from Phoenix and meet with artists interested in putting studios into the Citizens Warehouse. Together, flashlights in hand, we explored the inside of the dark and dusty building with its spooky, large main-floor open space and concrete columns. A new artist group was formed that day.


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Over the next several months, however, the artists ran into problems with needed repairs—and who would pay for them. I was called back and became the person willing to put up some credit-card money. Eventually I became the leaseholder of Citizens Warehouse. Artists would show up wanting space, and they would be conscripted into work parties according to their skill levels. Some had carpentry skills, electrical

skills, plumbing skills. We restored the building ourselves where we could, and I contracted parts of it out when necessary. One artist was a licensed plumber, so an architect friend of mine did drawings for the upstairs plumbing. I kept tapping the credit card to purchase materials. I found a contact person at the city who helped me navigate the maze of the city’s building codes. Without that contact, there would be no Citizens Art Studios today. Other substantial help came from the Tucson/Pima Arts Council, the Economic Development Office, and the Tucson Arts Coalition. Every day was a new adventure in learning about artist needs, lighting, space, temperature control, and innumerable construction/maintenance issues. My intent was to provide space for artists to create Citizens Artists Figure Drawing Session

art without the hassle of having to deal with the building’s problems. The corridors were designed to be wider than what building code required so artists could have exhibits in those spaces. The individual spaces needed to be secure and have natural light. Artists needed to respect each other’s goals. The prime directive was that artists could do whatever they wanted in their spaces, but they shouldn’t extend beyond their own

spaces without permission of their neighbor. In other words, even though we’re different, be nice, because we’re in this together. The City Council has always been supportive. I was awarded a $50,000 grant by former Tucson Mayor Bob Walkup to landscape the project. Council persons and their staff frequently visited, supporting the growth of an artist presence in Tucson. Artists participated in the art studio tours that I helped organize during those years. What started out as a warehouse demolition project back in 1985 resulted in creation of the Historic Warehouse Arts District with the Tucson City Council’s acceptance of the Master Plan in 2004. Today, artists thrive at the Citizens Warehouse with its studios and bright future.

left to right: Hannah Nance Partlow, Nick Georgiou, Laurel Hansen, Titus Castanza, Alec Laughlin


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CITIZENS ARTIST COLLECTIVE

“I cannot help it if my paintings do not sell. But the time will come when people realize that they are worth more than the cost of the paint.” — Vincent van Gogh

Titus Castanza, CAC retreat to San Carlos, Mexico


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“All my life I have worked to be able to earn my living, but I thought that one could do good painting without attracting attention to one’s private life. Certainly, an artist wishes to raise himself intellectually as much as possible, but the man must remain obscure. The pleasure must be found in the work.” — Paul Cézanne

Matthew Diggins Sweeping Rain Water off the Roof


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BIRTH OF A CREATION by Titus Castanza

Citizens Artist Collective

In 2010 Warehouse Arts Management Organization (WAMO) became our new property manager. In response to this new managerial change, the artists came together and officially formed a legitimate entity within the building, as one voice. The Citizens Artist Collective (CAC) was formed with the prime objective of keeping our rents low.

The birthing of Citizens Artist Collective was a

However, we were in a tight spot. If we endured any significant rent increases, the culture of the building could have been altered. And most likely not for the better. We could have lost many working artists who would not have been able to afford the luxury of having an art studio.

In June of 2010, the artists in the building banded together, like brethren. It was miraculous, like a flock of birds making a hairpin turn in an instant. We knew what we had to do and immediately began administering tasks, manning our stations.

This same artist demographic was responsible for having created the building’s patina, which took years to cultivate. However, we would be at a huge loss if we didn’t also attempt to raise funds for the much needed repairs to the building. We needed to organize. We needed to prioritize, compromise and grow up.

transition which felt much like being pushed out of a nest. After David Aguirre’s paradigm of nearly two decades in Citizens Warehouse, it was now time to fend for ourselves.

Admittedly, it didn’t quite happen like that. Getting some thirty artists to come together and organize was a bit more challenging.

The artists were catapulted into the politics of our

Laurel Hansen in her studio


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building’s issues—as if just being an artist wasn’t already hard enough—whereas for years it was all taken care of by David and his credit cards. In hindsight, I think it was a healthy challenge we all needed to wake up to. It awakened us to the idea of how our building contributes to the culture of Tucson and how we as artists are responsible for maintaining that existence for ourselves and our heirs. We learned to manage our own house, budget what little money we had and plan for the future.

Today we are faced with a much more daunting challenge—how to save our building from developers. It almost seems that our hardship of growing up was needed to prepare us for the ultimate challenge of all. In just a few short years we had gone from realizing self-management, to the potential reality of losing our building to the highest bidding property developer who may decide Citizens Warehouse would make some really cool apartment rentals or other trendy use.

With the help of WAMO, the CAC was able to keep rent increases modest and keep the general affairs of the building to the discretion of the artists. We have a strange sense of ownership in the building, an emotional attachment to something that we know isn’t really ours. We understand that it ultimately belongs to the State of Arizona. But, at the end of the day, we can say that we had the fortitude to manage ourselves and that we made this building better than when we had found it. Not bad for a lousy group of artists.

This reality really hit home when in late 2012 the adjacent building (Lucky Street Warehouse) was lost to demolition to make way for a freeway. We lost up to fourteen artists, but our main building of more than twenty artists escaped by a hair (a hair with a cramped existence between the railroad tracks and what one day will be the freeway). So, the CAC is working hard to build public awareness and gain community and government support so that this building remains an artist building. Our most daunting challenge.

Alec Laughlin in his studio


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“The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

Nick Georgiou, CAC retreat to San Carlos, Mexico


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BICYCLE INTER-COMMUNITY ART & SALVAGE by Kylie Walzak

BICAS Collective Member

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ICAS is Tucson’s only community bicycle education and recycling center. It is a space where people from all walks of life can come to learn about the bicycle, acquire one for personal transportation, ensure sustainability by learning the art of bike

repair, experience a sense of community and at the same time work to protect the environment by repurposing decommissioned bike parts into creative and functional art. Over the past twenty years several talented metal artists have made their way to BICAS and found a supportive environment to grow and expand their craft, pushing the limits of what, how much, and how big. One example: a giant, ten-foot tall saguaro cactus made entirely from flattened, straightened bicycle rims stands in the Citizens Warehouse courtyard outside the metal shop where smaller pieces, like a tiny, toy Chihuahua are also created. Each year BICAS hosts an art auction and community celebration requesting donations of art in any medium depicting the bicycle or bike culture. Hundreds of pieces are donated each year from friends and supporters and the event is the organization’s largest fund raiser. BICAS also hosts free, weekly community art workshops which introduces people to working with bicycle parts as both craft and as a medium for broader self expression. Since its founding in 1989, BICAS has saved thousands of pounds of metal from the landfill and has inspired the community by establishing public bicycle art pieces in and around downtown Tucson.

BICAS, 2011 Tucson Montage, 24”x18”, hand screened limited edition print by Cast Iron Design


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UNDERGROUND ART AND ART ANNEX by Casey Wollschlaeger BICAS Art Coordinator

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ICAS inspires creative reuse as well as social and environmental responsibility while fostering art as a mode of personal expression, education, and activism. BICAS Underground Art merges human services, D.I.Y. ethics, ecological consciousness, and the Arts by providing educational art programs and affordable resources to the community that encourage collaboration, environmentally sustainable behavior and self-expression in an inclusive and safe space. Many of the original founders and mechanics of BICAS were also working artists who made the best creative use of broken bike parts by turning Schwinn lemon peelers into lemonade. BICAS founder and artist Kim Young felt that public art is a great way to revitalize communities and give them an added sense of identity and well-being, a sentiment that still resonates with the collective today.

Oh Dear!, 12”x18”x4”, salvaged bike parts, by Ash Burris

Casey Wollschlaeger in BICAS Art Annex


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BICAS collective members and art coordinators teach art workshops to the public, organize art auction fundraisers, and work within the community to make recycled public art installations. BICAS Underground Art hosts weekly recycled art workshops that encourage imagination, inventiveness, sustainability, and creative problem solving using salvaged and re-purposed materials. It offers community members from all walks of life the opportunity to collaborate, share experiences, teach, and learn new ways of enacting social change through visual art. Ongoing art projects include bike tube wallets, handmade books, jewelry, paper crafts, multi-media art, printmaking, and metal sculpture. The BICAS Art Studio is located within BICAS and is free and open to the public during bike shop hours. It invites the community to respectfully use the work space, donated art supplies, tools, sewing machines, and recycled bike parts for personal projects as well as craft nights, meetings, art swaps, or other events. In 2011, BICAS established the Art Annex on the first floor of the Citizens Warehouse to serve as a working studio and exhibition gallery to showcase donated and commissioned works of art by the BICAS Artist Collective and local artists working with recycled bike materials or themes involving cycling culture. The Annex gives increased exposure to BICAS’s long tradition of recycling bicycles into art. BICAS strives to facilitate recycling and repurposing by participating in a local system of skill sharing and material re-use and reDiablo, 20� tall, salvaged bike parts and metal, by Zach Lihatsh


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distribution. Originally an extension of the BICAS recycling program, the Art Program gave new lives to salvaged bicycle parts that were no longer serviceable for transportation purposes by making them available for art projects. While continuing to re-cycle its own surplus of bicycle parts, BICAS accept donations of art supplies, tools, and materials that are made available to the community at little or no cost. BICAS organized the First Annual Art Auction in 1995 as a way to support BICAS programs as well as provide exposure to local artists. Each year the Tucson community comes together for a silent auction of sculptures, paintings, jewelry, and functional art. The Auction features art that references bicycles, cycling culture, or uses salvaged bicycle parts as the medium. Last year, 353 art pieces were donated by local artists to help us raise $11,438. BICAS has proudly partnered with the Coronado Heights, El Rio, Dunbar Spring, and Iron Horse neighborhoods, to help youth create public art, and encourage a sustainable lifestyle. Many area schools have learned about the importance of recycling and reusing items into art materials through these programs including the International School of Tucson, Greenfield Elementary, BASIS, Safford Magnet School, Tucson High School, Khalsa Montessori, and City High.

Manits, 11” tall, salvaged bike parts, by Miguel Sousa

In 2011, BICAS was awarded a TPAC Kresge Art In Tucson: PLACE II Grant to carry out the project “Bridging Generations,” connecting Armory Park seniors and youth through art that brought residents of Armory Park Neighborhood together through storytelling, photography, and street art.

Javelina, 24”x36”x12”, bicycle spokes and miscellaneous parts, by Troy Neiman


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WAREHOUSE ARTS MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION by Ann Vargas

Vice President, WAMO

The Warehouse Arts Management Organization

(WAMO) came into existence after decades of escalating tension between two competing agendas for Tucson’s downtown warehouse district. Longstanding artist studios and galleries were at risk of becoming displaced by automobile-oriented development and gentrification of the city’s central business district, or they could be redeveloped as a catalytic for a mixed-use, economically vital urban environment focused on the arts. The district’s warehouses, like the one built by Albert Steinfeld in 1907, were points of transfer between the Southern Pacific Railroad and destinations in and around Tucson. As the American transportation landscape transformed in the post-World War II era, the warehouses began to lose their industrial tenants. Artists began adapting the warehouses for studio and gallery space, reinvigorating the area. Beginning in the 1980s the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) decided to construct the Barraza-Aviation Parkway, which would have destroyed the area now designated as Tucson’s Historic Warehouse Arts District. This discouraged outside investment in district properties, resulting in deterioration of buildings and streetscape. Long-time residents, businesses, and artists had limited resources to preserve this fifty-acre swath of downtown with its historic structures, including the Citizens Warehouse. This twenty-three thousand square foot, multi-story building and several other historic warehouses were slated for demolition.

The high-speed bypass link between downtown and Interstate 10 would have dissected Tucson’s central business district, taking out these landmarks and replacing them with an auto-dependent passthrough. Year after year the unexecuted ADOT plan held the warehouse arts district hostage, and the historic properties fell into disrepair. As the properties declined, artists continued to maintain their working studios patching leaks and making small improvements to keep the buildings occupied. Because of its grass-roots origins, no one has a complete history of the activities that took place inside Citizens Warehouse. But for many years it was where artists and neighbors gathered to make puppets and props for Tucson’s All Souls Procession. According to John Laswick, a former artist-inresidence who takes credit for the free-hand symbol of a heart painted on the west-facing parapet, the creative process and sense of community stemming from his connection to the Citizens Warehouse property was unparalleled. The Warehouse Arts District struggled in limbo for two decades. It became increasingly difficult to reverse the impacts of long-term neglect. The challenge was to save the historic structures without also dismantling the opportunities afforded to the arts community. The artists feared that bringing attention to the substandard conditions would make the buildings vulnerable to premature demolition. The reasonable rents, bartering, and sharing of resources, artistic advancement, and grass-roots gatherings that took place in Citizens Warehouse and surrounding properties could be lost, perhaps leading to the district’s destruction. By the late 1990s the historically significant warehouses were at risk of demise. In the summer of 2002 the City of Tucson contracted with the Tucson Arts District Partnership to produce the Historic Warehouse Arts District Master Plan. The mayor and Council’s adoption of this plan

Background image: main-level floor plan concept drawing for Steinfeld Warehouse renovations, Poster Frost Mirto, Inc.


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became the foundation for rescuing the district. It established public policy to protect the contribution of the historic warehouses and arts-related activities to the revitalization of Tucson’s downtown.

participation of the public. An outdoor performance venue is a high priority. Coordinated arts programming is an essential part of a successful arts district.”

Acknowledging that an artist-led redevelopment perspective was needed to refocus on the district as a significant community asset, one of the six master plan’s recommendations was the formation of the Warehouse Arts Management Organization. This body was charged with revitalizing the district while also promoting the arts.

WAMO’s overall mission has been to preserve, protect, promote, and develop the Historic Warehouse Arts District. The role of this non-profit has evolved from years of fear that Tucson’s Arts community might be displaced and the hope that the district will remain a foundation to secure the shifting landscape and economy.

Made up of a collaborative and diverse group of artisans, business leaders, organizers, and advocates, the WAMO board set on a course to make sure that the warehouse district survived and thrived as a community arts center area where artists could work, exhibit, sell, teach, entertain, and reach out to the community When plans for the Barraza-Aviation Parkway were abandoned, Tucson’s Department of Transportation and its Historic Preservation Office stepped in to help WAMO reassemble the district’s properties. State-owned properties, made available through government auction, facilitated the acquisition of the historic Steinfeld Warehouse, the Toole Shed artists’ studios, and the adjacent building that serves as a downtown youth center. As stated in Tucson’s master plan goals, “The Historic Warehouse Arts District shall be recognized for the important contribution that the arts make to our local and regional economy. The focus of the arts shall strive to be outward looking, encouraging exhibition, sales, education, festival, and the Steinfeld Warehouse Interior, February 2013


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Tucson Citizens Artists, 41�x48�, oil on canvas, by Titus Castanza

clockwise from top left: Alec Laughlin, Nick Georgiou, Laurel Hansen, Titus Castanza, Hannah Nance Partlow, Matthew Diggins


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The Artists

“It is important to express oneself... provided the feelings are real and are taken from your own experience.” — Berthe Morisot


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Titus Castanza Titus Castanza spent much of his teenage life in Tucson before receiving his B.F.A. at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. He is a former staff artist for The Franklin Mint in Philadelphia. He drew and painted a variety of subject matter, ranging from civil war portraits to medieval dragons. For several years after, he was a freelance illustrator for companies across the United States before returning to Tucson.

Caesar, 16”x12”, oil on canvas Aircraft Junkyard, 30”x60”, oil on canvas

The Amazing Zach, 10”x8”, oil on canvas


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Titus is best known for his commissioned portraits and figure work. However, he is really an artist capable of limitless subject matter, and he is difficult to categorize. He continues to teach and create new works for solo and group exhibitions. “Finding my voice as an artist is a lifelong task. While my main focus is about developing the idea behind my art, I also want my art to be a product of my time and place.”

Heather, 16”x12”, oil on canvas Rachael in the Studio, 20”x21”, oil on canvas

Laura in the Studio, 24”x18”, oil on canvas


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Matthew Diggins Matthew Diggins is a freelance illustrator and author of a children’s book, Andrew and the Secret Gallery, published in 2007. His paintings evoke, and sometimes burlesque art history while seeking to find a home in the modern world. Matthew works primarily in traditional materials, including oils, watercolor, and pastel.

Night Nude, 40”x26”, watercolor on paper Study of a Girl, 26”x22”, charcoal on paper

Judith, 30”x24”, oil on canvas


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Mathew seeks to raise questions about how the classical art forms that shaped history are challenged in modern times by popular culture. He is interested in the significance of a female nude existing in an era saturated with images of lingerie models, fashion magazines, and pornography. His work deals with gender, the weirdness of being human, and the corruptibility of beauty. A Tucson native, Matthew has a B.F.A. in studio arts from the University of Arizona, where he studied painting and illustration. He apprenticed under local artist, Chris Rush, and has also studied abroad in Italy.

The New Woman, 32”x24”, oil on canvas Man with a Dog, 21”x18”, watercolor on paper

Olivia, 40”x30”, oil on canvas


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Nick Georgiou Nick Georgiou creates meticulously hand-stitched newsprint sculptures, which he integrates into the urban environment. His sculptures breathe new life into discarded books and newspapers found on the streets and comment on the regeneration of the printed word in contemporary society. Some of the diverse projects with which he has been involved include commissions by Oxford University Press and the Washington Post Corporation.

Plankton, 24”x18”, discarded books, archival inks on panel Bon Papier, 24”x18.5”, discarded books, vintage wallpaper, archival inks on panel

The Scholar, 40”x30” discarded books, archival inks on canvas


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Nick’s works have also been exhibited at Black Rat Press and Andipa Modern galleries in London as well as featured in several shows in the New York area. He is represented by Etherton Gallery in Tucson. Nick received his B.F.A. in film and television from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. He worked as a production designer and art director on independent films before focusing full time on his career as a sculptor. In 2009 he moved to Tucson for an exhibition at the University of Arizona and has remained ever since.

Skeletal Collect, 30”x24”, discarded books, archival inks on canvas Tracks, 34”x30”x21” newspaper, wire and foam

Prosperity of Devices, 30”x24”, discarded books, archival inks on canvas


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Laurel Hansen Originally from Napa Valley, California, Laurel spent her childhood outdoors or drawing for hours under the baby grand piano while her mother played. For several years she lived in the San Francisco Bay area and attended Indian Valley and Marin Colleges. In 1983 she moved to Tucson to attend the University of Arizona where in 1986 she earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts.

Green Lady, 10.5”x10.5”, acrylic and prismacolor on paper He Could Not See Her, 11.5”x11” acrylic and prismacolor on paper


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She Watched Them Walk On Water, 22”x26”, acrylic and prismacolor on paper


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Pink on Pink, 20.5x27.5”, acrylic on paper Urban Moment, 4”x8.5”, acrylic and prismacolor on paper


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Laurel’s contemporary figurative works are done with a variety of media on paper or wood panel. They range in size from miniature to large scale. Her rich visual language explores the interactions of nature and society. Often she works in series and currently she has

two ongoing called “Animal Spirit” and “A Creature Feature”. Laurel’s artwork is shown and collected in galleries throughout the country. Laurel’s art studio has been located in the Citizens Warehouse Art Studios Building for over ten years.

Meditating on the Creature, 21”x23”, acrylic on paper


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Alec Laughlin Born in January of 1971, Alec is a painter, photographer and designer. He moved his studio into Citizens Warehouse in January, 2011. Painting is his primary affection and focus. Richly textured with acrylic and charcoal, his paintings are expressionistic in style, the subject almost always being the human face and form, primarily fictitious and conceptual, however including a series of real persons—admired artists and figures of the past. Three works from this series are presented here.

Red Poppies, 10”x8”, acrylic and charcoal on board Self portrait with Beard, 12”x12”, acrylic and charcoal on canvas

Mr. Beckmann, 11”x9”, acrylic and charcoal on board


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Alec often sets fire to the larger works, on aged and weathered wood, to enrich texture and manifest a spontaneous blending and subtle alteration of colors by applying the fire multiple times during the course of painting while the medium is still drying. Alec’s photography is primarily black and white, with the human form again being the subject. Though fine art prints are his ambition with photography, he also provides digital tech, photographic and retouching services by assignment.

Ms. Kahlo, 11”x9”, acrylic and charcoal on board Green Monkey (Betrayal), 12”x12”, acrylic and charcoal on canvas

A Young American Painter (Mr. Kuhn), 11”x9”, acrylic and charcoal on board


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Dirk J. Arnold Dirk’s Endangered Architecture project preserves Tucson’s historic building facades in miniature. The models framed in shadow boxes are approximately HO model railroad scale. The miniatures are fastidious assemblages of cardboard, paper, wood, and plastic. Dirk lays out the drawings to scale and cuts the parts by hand. By hand-painting the materials and implying textures, Dirk imbues the miniatures with the feeling of an architectural drawing that has emerged into the third dimension.

Gateway Saguaro, 30’ tall, public art sculpture with neon the Buffet, 4”x6”, digital illustration


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KY Market, 6”x13”, mixed media

School of Mines (Old Main), 10”x33”, mixed media


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Dirk’s digital recreations of Tucson’s classic neon signs grace many refrigerator doors throughout Tucson and nationwide. He created the Gateway Saguaro, a thirty-foot neon saguaro, in the median of Oracle Road near Drachman Street. He served on the Tucson Historic Landmark Sign Code Subcommittee and works with the Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation. Dirk and his partner, Robert, live in the Dunbar-Spring neighborhood, where they are restoring a former Chinese grocery to a more historical appearance.

Ye Olde Lantern 6”x4”, digital illustration

Tucson Warehouse & Transfer, 3”x5.5”, refrigerator magnet

El Conquistador Hotel (detail), 11”x42”, mixed media


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Cristina Cárdenas The paintings of Cristina Cárdenas are in several museum collections in Arizona, California, Illinois, and Mexico — including the University of Arizona Museum of Art and the Tucson Museum of Art. Cristina earned an M.F.A. in printmaking from the University of Arizona and a B.A. in painting from the Universidad de Guadalajara.

Eva, 40”x18”, gouache on wood panel

Maya Girl/Muchacha Maya, 20”x24”, gouache on board


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La Perla / The Pearl, 40”x18”, gouache on wood panel Perros Callejeros / Street Dogs, 14”x14”, gouache on wood panel


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Cristina has received numerous honors and awards for her artwork, including a presentation at the Latina/o Images for the 21st Century Conference and Exhibition in Germany; a Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Award fourmonth residency at the Claude Monet Museum in Giverny, France; a five-week residency in South Africa with the Africa Program for the Hourglass Project: A Woman Vision; and the 1994 WESTAF/NEA Regional Fellowships for Visual Artists in Painting, Santa Fe, NM Exhibitions by Cristina have included the ALAC Latina Art Exhibit in Phoenix, Contreras Gallery in Tucson, The Flesh ChimMaya Gallery in Los Angeles, and Amates Universidad de Colima in Mexico.

Cholita, 14”x14”, gouache and acrylic on wood panel Chicana, 14”x14”, gouache and acrylic on wood panel


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Rand Carlson Rand Carlson is the creator of the comic strip “Random Shots,” which he still draws for the Tucson Weekly. In 1987, he started Random Arts, a grab bag of graphics, design, illustration and painting. He illustrated for alternative newsweeklies nationwide, and he also did magazine design and consulting work. In 2003, he started working in tin collage. “I liked the idea of using cast-off materials and reconstituting them into something else, just by juxtaposition. There is humor and whimsy, as well as a love of nature in my work.”

Change is Constant, 18”x18”, tin collage with automobile letters But Wait, There’s More, 15”x11”, tin collage with automobile letters

Topsy Turvy, 24”x36”, tin collage with automobile letters


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Pipe Dream, 18”x18”, tin collage with automobile letters Sedona Panorama, 6”x28”, acrylic on wood


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Rand is in a dozen galleries and shops nationwide. He has had several one-man and invitational shows for a Tucson gallery.

He moved into the Citizens Warehouse in 2008. “It’s a great environment. The artists drop in to the others’ spaces to talk about

their processes. Many people come to the warehouse because there are many studios to see in one place.”


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Jack Doyle Jack Doyle occupies tiny Citizens studio #11, roughly the size of a classic Irish monk’s cell from the 10th century. There he works on an ongoing novel and other writing projects. He is retired from the Navy. A graduate of the Naval Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) and the Naval War College, Jack commanded a jet training squadron, was a war-gaming instructor at the Naval War College, and served aboard aircraft carriers during Operation Desert Storm. Olongapo, 1966

In addition to a B.A. in Journalism, Jack earned an M.A. in International Relations and an M.A. in Strategic Studies. “The common man is my hero. I firmly believe that each of us is capable of far more success, knowledge, insight, endurance, love, tolerance, and mercy, than we might think. My protagonist is a common man, who is thrust into situations not of his choosing, and then rises to face and counter adversity with uncommon courage and heart.”

Only the Dead (excerpt from the novel)

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ndy had just arrived from the States and I had been released from the naval hospital earlier in the day. We were both headed back to the war tomorrow morning. Our showtime for the C-130 to Da Nang was 1000 hours. We agreed to meet for dinner at the Cubi Point Officers Club and then sortie into Olongapo City for late night entertainment. Andy wasn’t particularly worried about returning to combat flying over North Vietnam, but he still planned on stockpiling the good times in case his luck should run out.


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The Cubi club was quiet and peaceful. There was no carrier in port so the main bar was not three deep with intense, wired and crazed aviators blowing off steam after weeks of combat flying on Yankee Station. We bypassed the nearly empty bar and entered the dining room. Dinner was superb. “Surf and Turf ” was the featured special and we ate and drank splendidly in the softly lit dining room. The sweet jasmine scent of sampaguita, the Philippine national flower, came through the open French doors. After dessert Andy and I moved to the patio where our waiter brought us Napoleon brandy and two good cigars. The brandy’s fiery bouquet, the smell of good tobacco and the fragrance of the jasmine enveloped us in a cocoon of pleasure. When our cigars were embers and our snifters empty, we tipped handsomely on our surprisingly inexpensive bill. Andy said, “Time for town.” I nodded in reply. I had never been on liberty with Andy but I had heard tales. This would be my first time off the base. It might be a very educational experience. Outside the club we grabbed a taxi for the fivemile ride to the main gate. The road paralleled the brilliant blue waters of Subic Bay. In the far distance rose the lush green peaks of central Luzon. Nearer at hand, the taxi passed ball fields, picnic facilities, a bowling alley, riding stables and a beautifully manicured eighteen-hole golf course. All provided for the recreation needs of American servicemen and their dependents. The main gate was restricted to pedestrian traffic. Both U.S. Marines and Filipino police patrolled the gate area. The marines inspected bags and parcels coming on base. The Filipinos inspected bags and parcels leaving the base. Passing quickly through security, we stepped onto the short bridge connecting the base with Olongapo. The filthy and fetid Kalakan River languidly flowed beneath the bridge and provided the physical demarcation between base and town. Known as the

“Shit River,” the waterway emptied varying amounts of raw sewage and an occasional animal corpse into the lovely waters of Subic Bay. Its short ninetyfoot width separated the imported from America cleanliness, order and security of the base from the harsh realities and uncertainties of life and poverty in the Third World. Glancing down at the ugly, stinking and stagnant river, I noted a single dugout canoe manned by two small boys. The smaller boy sat in the stern wearing a ragged blue T-shirt and shorts. A bigger boy sat in the bow. His T-shirt and shorts were wet and the color of fresh adobe mud. He cheerfully called out to the passing sailors and marines. “Hey, Joe, pesos?” Occasionally a sailor or marine would stop and throw a coin into the river. As the coin was in midair, the older boy would launch himself at its expected water entry point. Almost always the youngster successfully retrieved the money. Most Americans ignored the pleas. They were appalled at the very idea of anyone voluntarily immersing themselves in those horrid, stinking waters. Filthy and ragged they might be but the “river boys” possessed a quiet dignity which no jeering, mocking or insults could disturb. They were tough little survivors and I admired them, but they sure did smell. Stepping off the bridge, Andy and I entered a different world. A world of blaring horns, sing-song chatter in both English and Tagalog. A world of strange smells and open sewers. We were now on lower Magsaysay Drive, our portal to the Third World. We immediately encountered a gauntlet of street panderers, Chiclet-selling little girls and cyclo-taxi drivers. Andy took the lead and gently pushed his way through the crowd. To the left a large warehouse type structure lined the side of the street. Cambios, T-Shirt kiosks and an occasional café lined the right side. Up ahead several multi-colored Jeepneys, the


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minibuses of the Philippines, loaded and unloaded their passengers. As we passed Gordon Street the building facades changed. Small clubs and souvenir shops appeared, interspersed with small two-story hotels. Each club had two or three young women outside soliciting business from the passing Americans. Young Filipino men were a rarity. Now shoulder to shoulder with Andy, we continued up Magsaysay. More and more clubs appeared with names of Openers, the Fur Trader, the Joy Club, New Jolo’s and more. I was still new to Asia and the Far East and I tried to absorb all the sights and sounds and smells around me. The bustling street scene around me was exotic, yet tacky and rundown at the same time. The pungent odor of the universal Asian blend of poor sanitation, wood fires, cooking oil and rice farts filled my nostrils. Once smelled, never forgotten. As we passed the Manila Hotel, at three stories the tallest edifice in town, I asked Andy, “Where are we headed?” “The Wild West Number Two. It’s a great place with great girls. It’s just up the street where Rizal meets Magsaysay,” he answered.

beer as they scanned the club. A trio of young Filipinas formed a small group farther down the bar—they seemed to be waiting for the marines to make a decision. The taller of the girls glanced up our entrance. Her calm expression changed instantly to a huge smile. “An-dy!” she yelled as she hurried to greet him. Andy grinned back and threw his arms wide and she leaped into them. I stood flatfooted just inside the doorway as they hugged, broke with smiles, and hugged again. “Oh, Andy, I missed you!” she exclaimed. “I missed you too, Angel,” Andy answered. Suddenly remembering my presence, Andy turned toward me and said, “This is my friend Levi, honey. He’s kinda new to this part of the world.” Angel, if indeed that was her name, extended her hand and said very formally, “I am very glad to meet you, Levi. I am Angelina. You must be very nice. Andy only has very nice friends.” Taking her hand, I replied, “I am very pleased to meet you too, Angelina.”

A short walk farther and we arrived at the Wild West. From the outside, the club appeared to live up to its name. The sidewalk transitioned to a wooden plank front porch. Saloon chairs and spittoons flanked its doorway and its classic swinging doors. A hitching post stood silent sentinel in the street.

Introductions settled, Angelina took Andy’s hand and led him to a table at the back of the room. I followed in trail.

“Here we are, Levi,” Andy said as he shouldered his way through the swinging doors. I caught the doors and followed him into the club. The room was an authentic Western saloon.

Angelina turned and headed to the bar where the marines had finished their beers and were now headed out the saloon doors. The remaining pair of Filipinas joined Angelina at the bar.

A sturdy bar ran the length of the room along the right wall. A large mirror loomed over the bar. To the left was a piano on a small bandstand.

Andy took this moment to give me a situation brief.

A few customers, marines by the shortness of their haircuts, leaned against the bar. They were drinking

At the table, Andy said, “Angel, a couple of San Miguels for Levi and I and something for yourself.”

“Levi, in a moment, those other girls are going to be over here. They’ll be interested in you but don’t be too interested in them. At least, not yet. This place will start getting crowded in another hour and there


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will be another dozen girls here. If you are going to be interested in female companionship tonight, you might want to wait to see all the local talent.” “It’s okay that I chat with them?” I asked. “That’s polite, Levi, but don’t buy either of them a drink or dance with either. If you do, the girl will feel she has squatter’s rights to you. The other girls will think the same. You don’t want a reputation as a ‘butterfly’. I’ll buy the girls a drink or two because they are Angelina’s friends. That’ll be okay.” Curious, I asked, “What is a ‘butterfly’?” Andy laughed, then replied,” Sorry. A butterfly flies from flower to flower, pollinating each of them. ‘Butterflies’ are frowned upon. Get the metaphor?” “Loud and clear,” I laughed in response, as Angelina arrived at the table carrying a small tray with two ice-cold San Miguel beers and a small tumbler filled with a red liquid. She passed each of us a beer and, by ice-cold, I mean ice-cold. Large chunks of ice clung to each bottle. Angelina set down her drink and then turned to return to the bar. Andy and I both raised our beers and tipped them to our lips. The beer was good and cold. There are two good San Miguel breweries in the world, Spain and the Philippines. I like both products but I prefer the Filipino brew.

The girls joined us at the table. Andy and Angelina took a trip down memory lane and then caught up on their lives of the past two years. The other girls engaged me in casual conversation, mostly centered on where I came from, where I had been and what I liked. Andy bought a round of drinks. Each of the girls now had a small red drink in front of them. I quickly learned that the girls preferred to be referred to as “hostesses”. A steady flow of Americans came and went from the club. There were now a dozen girls in the room. Some paired off with a customer, others moving about chatting here and chatting there. Clementina and Dolores had both risen to work the room. Occasionally a newly arrived girl would stop to visit at our table. There was a succession of Spanish names. I met Carmen, Luz, Soledad, Raquel and Regina. Without exception, all the girls were attractive and they seemed available. My thoughts turned to the morrow. I needed to finish packing, and a sound night’s sleep seemed a good investment. I looked at Andy and his pretty partner and said, “I need to head back. I have to pack my gear for the C-130.” Andy looked at me thoughtfully. Then he said, “OK, Levi, you’re probably showing better sense than me, but who knows when I’ll get another chance for this kind of fun. You could still have the pick of the litter here.”

When Angelina returned, she brought the two other girls with her. All three were dressed very much alike. White sleeveless blouses and tight, knee-length skirts. Beehive hairdos with flips. They were dressed like American girls but physically smaller. They were graceful and delicate with tiny wasp waists. Sort of three-quarter scale Annette Funicellos. They looked nice, had pretty smiles and they were female. Angelina immediately did the introductions.

“I like it here. Maybe next time I’ll join in,” I replied.

“Clementina and Dolores, this my dear friend Andy and his friend Levi. Clementina and Dolores are both new since you were last here, Andy.”

Maybe I was foolish, but I needed to focus on my return to the squadron, to flying and to the air war. At a steady pace, I headed back to the base.

“If you decide to stop in any of the other clubs on the way back, don’t forget curfew is midnight at the maingate,” Andy reminded me. I said goodnight to Angelina and nodded to the girls whom I had met and exited the barroom to Magsaysay.


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Jeff Farmer Born in California and raised in Bellevue, Washington, Jeff earned a B.A. in advertising with an art emphasis from Pepperdine University and also studied architecture and Italian design at the SACI Institute in Florence, Italy. He now creates art that is best described as being with a futuristic approach and an art-nouveau flair. His artistic goal is to brighten up a room and one’s soul with positive vibes.

Solo, 15”x7.5”, watercolor pencil on paper

Reside, 12”x9.5”, colored pencil on paper


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The purpose of Jeff ’s art is for you to enjoy your experience viewing his art. He paints art that gives a good feeling. His use of vibrant colors magnifies the detailed energetic and interactive designs. His preferred media include oil, water color (pencils), and pen and ink. Besides art, Jeff ’s passions include contributing to Tucson through being active in the health care and mentoring communities.

Not Your Stereotypical Dream, 9”x12”, oil, acrylic, watercolor, pen and ink on paper Entangled, 9”x24”, watercolor, pen and ink on paper

Devine, 36”x24”, oil on canvas


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Joe Hatton Joe Hatton was a university faculty member for many years before moving to Tucson in 2005. He received his B.F.A. from the University of Arizona and his M.F.A. from the University of Iowa. He is a Marine veteran. Joe taught at California State University-Sacramento and at the University of Georgia. An artist-in-residence grant from the Ford Foundation gave him a year to focus on his painting. That included an eleven-week trip to Italy, where he completed several watercolors leading to an exhibition in Cortona.

Silent Conversation, 54”x48”, oil on canvas Different in Every Way, 46”x54”, oil on canvas

Dancing Cholla, 50”x45”, oil on canvas


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Joe’s current focus is on desert flora. Through painting and collagemaking, Joe tells a visual story of the individual nature of the cactus, exploring how he sees and reacts to its color, shape, and texture. His paintings and collage art have been shown at several Tucson galleries. He has participated for many years in the annual Open Studio Tour sponsored by the Tucson Pima Arts Council, serving two years as cochair.

Desert Jungle, 42”x54”, oil on canvas Thirsty Cholla, 54”x45”, oil on canvas

Not What You Think, 54”x44”, oil on canvas


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Katherine Josten Katherine Josten is an artist, educator, speaker and Founder/Director of the Global Art Project for Peace, a multi-cultural celebration of peace and diversity that has actively involved 115,000 participants on seven continents. Nominated for a 2002 UNESCO Peace Prize, her Project inspires personal and social evolution through creativity. Katherine was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1949. She holds a B.S. Ed. in English from Ohio University, a B.F.A. in painting from the Atlanta College of Art and an M.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She taught art for fourteen years at University and College levels before founding the Global Art Project.

Source Recordings (detail), 60” diameter, oil on canvas Transformer, 60”x48”, acrylic on canvas


Awards for Katherine’s art include grants from the PollockKrasner Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Cultural Exchange Council of Tucson, International Friends

of Transformative Art, and the Tucson/Pima Arts Council. In 1999 she was an Arizona Arts Award Nominee. Josten has lectured and led workshops around the world. Her postcard

book, Visions of Global Unity: Inspired Images from the Global Art Project is sold at the United Nations Bookshop/NY.

Source Recordings, 60� diameter, oil on canvas


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Installation: Frequencies and Source Recordings


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Ezequiel Leoni Ezequiel Leoni was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1994 he began his journey in the art world, creating lamps and other functional pieces from found materials. He arrived in Tucson in 1995, adding new fabricating techniques to his repertory of metal working skills. He has been showing his designs at Obsidian Gallery, in Tucson, since 1996. His fabricated steel lamps are contemporary, sculptural and sometimes whimsical. The popularity of his designs led to many private commissions.

Lamp, 27” tall, mesquite and eucalyptus Mirror, 36”x24”, mesquite, bamboo, purple heart, mahogany, and other exotic woods

Metal End Table, 20”x17”x14”, stainless steel


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Exotic Woods Furnishings


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In Washington State in the late ’90s, Ezequiel worked with Russell Jaqua and Steve Lopes, learning blacksmithing and working with stainless steel and applied textures. When Ezequiel returned to Tucson in 2002, he had significantly expanded his inventory of designs. His emphasis is still in the area of functional artwork, mainly home furnishings and accessories in forged and fabricated stainless steel. His works include side tables, coffee tables, trays, lamps, luminaries, and bathroom and kitchen hardware.

TV Lamp, 18”x7”x5”, cast and fabricated stainless steel, plexiglass


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Patricia McNulty The sounds, colors, rhythms, and humanity that surrounded Patricia McNulty during her childhood in Ghana, West Africa, shaped her vision of the world, even in their absence. She absorbed an international community early in life, a unique blending of cultures. In Africa she began a lifelong passion of understanding indigenous cultures. The reds, browns, and greens of Arizona’s Sonoran desert have layered her artistic endeavors.

Listens to Intuition, 24”x24”, oil and acrylic on canvas Kazuhiko and the Sea Urchins, 24”x24”, oil and acrylic on canvas

Nesting Instincts, 30”x40”, oil and acrylic on canvas


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Patti began drawing and painting early in her life. She attended The Art Center of Tucson in the first year of its opening, graduating with an understanding of graphic arts, illustration, and design. She has been practicing her fine arts skills while also working as a commercial artist. She worked as a sign painter/muralist at Trader Joe’s for four years while homeschooling her daughter. Presently, Patti is embarking on a new artistic adventure selling and promoting her fine arts locally and at juried art fairs across the southwest.

Biker Bride Revisited, 18”x24”, acrylic on canvas What is Sacred?, 24”x36”, oil and acrylic on canvas

Conversations, 36”24”, oil on canvas


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Troy Neiman Troy Neiman has a background in ceramics and found-metal sculpture exemplified by his passion for art and his love for bicycles through the nonprofit organization BICAS. Since 2002 Troy has worked on many public and private art projects in Tucson. Through the bicycle, Troy has found endless ways to express form and function that were not intended in the life of these objects.

Vase, 12” tall, ceramic A Swallow’s Sorrow, 45” tall, ceramic and metal

Chicken 33”x36”x19”, bicycle parts and iron


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The Many Faces of a Small Desert Town, 26”x12”x12”, ceramic

Half Empty, 21”x17”x7”, ceramic, metal and glass


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Troy finds great satisfaction in exploring ways for discarded materials to fit together, expanding the possibilities of how something is used while introducing to people the idea of creative re-use of refuse. Many of these projects often involve working with schools, youth groups, and neighborhoods and have been a truly rewarding experience. Troy’s history of working with ceramics started in 1996 with equal dedication in pottery as well as sculpture. He works out of both the Citizens Warehouse and the Romero House Ceramics Studio at the Tucson Museum of Art.

A Logical Place to Hide, 8”x5”x3.5x”, ceramic and metal Windmill, 10’ tall, bicycle parts


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Hannah Nance Partlow Hannah Nance Partlow is an interdisciplinary artist and Tucson native. Although she generally identifies herself as a printmaker, Hannah is always careful to say that she works with a great variety of materials Her 2012 exhibition, titled Moral Tchotchke, featured a poster installation, reductive wood carvings, atypical basketry, and a hand-painted, oversized soap box as a conceptual political platform. Her work is visually eclectic, to say the least.

The Whistle Blower, Campaign to Battle Apathy Series, Digital Print The Bureau of Incensed Persons, Seals of Disapproval Series, screenprint

Soapbox, Disengaged, Wood, gouache and plastic megaphone installation


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Hannah’s artwork is conceptually influenced by popular and consumer culture as well as current events. Auto-criticism is an inherent part of her artistic process, and her work is often diaristic and colloquial. Her work is aesthetically influenced by her background as a letterer and graphic designer, and it is frequently typographic. This is a natural tie-in to her printmaking practice and her continued work as an independent letterer and illustrator.

Upset Citizens Brigade, Seals of Disapproval Series, screenprint

The Outspoken Do-Gooder, Campaign to Battle Apathy Series, digital print

The Hand Raiser, Campaign to Battle Apathy Series, digital print


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Joanna Pregon Born in Communist Poland, Joanna Pregon immigrated to the United States when she was 12. She and her family crossed national, cultural, and linguistic borders as they negotiated their way to Germany before settling in Connecticut. The experience turned her awareness outward and inward. She attended Pine Manor College in Massachusetts before her curiosity for the West brought her to Arizona.

The Seed, 30”x15”, oil on canvas

How Many More, 20”x16”, oil on canvas


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Joanna’s paintings play at the intersections of the natural, the physical and the dream-state. Female faces and bodies gracefully intertwined with organic shapes like plants, seashells, and the moon inhabit much of her art, expressing universal concepts such as cycles of change, fertility and growth. Joanna has shown with galleries throughout the country and sold her art to collectors across the globe. From 2006 to 2009 she had her own gallery in Jerome, Arizona. She has volunteered her time by curating shows, working with art-focused non-profits, and teaching art to school age children.

Demeter, 24”x20”, oil on canvas Self Portrait, 20”x16”, oil on canvas

Carnival, 20”x16”, oil on canvas


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Robert Redding Robert weaves new life into recycled materials. Woolen mill scraps and neglected yarns are revitalized when he combines them on his loom. Color, texture, and pattern interact in fascinating ways that one might not expect from the materials alone. Robert apprenticed with Tucson’s master weaver, Crane Day, who taught him to appreciate the endto-end process beyond the warp and the weft. While the woven piece is the result, the process is Robert’s focus. Preparing the loom can take longer than the weaving itself, but each step of the way demands – and receives – the same attention.

Untitled Rug , 72”x25”, rayon industrial upholstery loom waste weft, cotton warp

Red Square , 73”x58”, Swedish doubleweave, Pendleton blanket loom waste weft, cotton warp


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Robert has a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University of Michigan. His interest in people and cultures comes through in his work, whether in contemplative themes of the I Ching, or in patterns that reflect the bustle of city life. Robert and his partner, Dirk, live in their historic home in downtown Tucson, where he tends the landscape and porch cats.

I Ching Rug 1 (detail), 31”x21”, Swedish doubleweave, rayon and cotton weft, cotton warp I Ching Rug 8 (detail), 59”x57”, Swedish doubleweave, Pendleton wool blanket loom waste weft, cotton warp

Untitled Sleigh Blanket (detail), 60”x5”, Pendleton wool blanket and fabric loom waste weft, cotton warp


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Tony Rosano Tony Rosano was born in 1974 in Tucson. Expanding foam is his favorite thing in the world. Unfortunately, it is bad for the environment. If he isn’t reading “ScoobyDoo in Jungle Jeopardy” to his five-year-old daughter for the hundredth time, he is probably dismantling her Barbie dolls and foaming their parts together. He is also one of the many people in Tucson who dresses up in a rabbit costume and plays the sousaphone.

Interchangeable Heads, 32”x22”, plywood, Velcro, voice box from bilingual Ernie Chess Set, 18”x18”, board: ceramic, travertine tile, steel, copper and nickel plated brass plumbing parts

Little Pneumatic Devil Baby, 12” tall, doll parts, aluminum thing, red fabric, drywall screws, marbles


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Dumpsters, thrift stores, and hardware stores provide much of the raw material for Tony’s work. Pool hoses, rotisserie motors and colored light bulbs are common themes. Doll and mannequin parts can be found throughout his kinetic sculptures as well, with expanding foam and drywall screws holding everything together. His work can be seen at various galleries around Tucson or at his studio by appointment. His kinetic sculptures can be seen every year at “GLOW” in Oracle, Arizona, at Triangle L Ranch.

Barbie Creature, 40” tall, doll parts, 1/4 inch copper tees for necklace

The Revolution will not be Motorized, 23”x27”x21”, doll parts, rotisserie motor, black lights, paint, expanding foam


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Michael B. Schwartz Michael is a prolific visual artist whose works can be found world-wide. He was recruited by painter Robert Colescott to study at the University of Arizona Art Department. Following his graduation from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in 1988 Michael moved to Tucson, where he earned his MFA in 1991 Michael’s work includes public art, murals, paintings, drawings, writings and teaching. His projects balance group creative process with stunning results. His current studio work revolves around themes of social structures, mysticism and ecology.

(Dreams of) Arbel, 72”x36”, acrylic on canvas (triptych)


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Trumferet, 24”x24”, acrylic on Masonite


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Heart Song, 24”x24”, acrylic on Masonite


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Michael has worked with numerous organizations, including the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, Settlement Music School, Fleisher Art Memorial, International Council of Adult Education, Audubon Society, Tucson Unified School District, Tucson Museum of Art and Prescott College. Michael is the recipient of many awards including, the Puffin Foundation and Art Matters Fellowships. In May 2009 he joined other community-arts leaders at the White House to begin a historic dialogue about the role of arts in national recovery. In addition to serving as the director of Tucson Arts Brigade, he is a correspondent with the Teaching Artist Journal Alt/ SPACE and lead artist on public and community arts projects.

(Dreams of) Safed, 36”x48”, acrylic on canvas (diptych) Assorted Attachments, 24”x24”, acrylic on Masonite


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Jeremy Singer Jeremy Singer was born in 1977 on the Navajo Reservation in Tuba City, Arizona. Jeremy is a documentholding, certificate of Indian blood 4/4 member of the Navajo tribe. He is of the Towering House people and born for the Salt People. His maternal grandparents are of the Bitter Water People and his paternal grandparents are of the Red Bottom people. Jeremy attended school in Flagstaff, which is 35 miles south of his paternal grandparents in Gray Mountain and 50 miles south of his maternal grandparents in Cameron, Arizona.

Waiting for Her Favorite Song, 36”x24”, acrylic on canvas The Stew Eaters, 31”x41”, oil on canvas

The Recollection of Her Husband and Sheep Dwindled in Old Age, 48”x41”, oil canvas


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Family has played an important role in Jeremy’s art making. Navajo textiles and humor are his main influences. Jeremy attended both Northern Arizona University and the University of Arizona. “When you put Native American and artist together, it seems to mean an entirely different thing. When someone thinks of Native American art, a cliché pops into their head. Art made by Native Americans is seen as a generic picture of an Indian princess, wolf, and a teepee. I want to show there are subjects beyond the cliché teepee and loincloth. As an artist I want to explore and grow.”

Monsoon VI, 36”x27”, oil on canvas Reservation Road, 26”x27”, acrylic on canvas

Monsoon V, 36”x27”, oil on canvas


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Christopher Stevens Christopher, a musician and artist living in Tucson since 1992, was raised in Liberty Township, Indiana. There is an old road, there is the old house still there, amidst the beauty and splendor of fields, a stream, planes of woods, a quiet place. His visual art expresses soul’s journey through the eyes, faces, figures, stories, signs, often ancient and worn moments depicted in acrylic, ink, graphite, oils, and shoe polish.

Blue Guitar, 30”x11.5”, ink, shoe polish, enamel, and acrylic on wood

Alive, 10”x8”, acrylic, Conté crayon and shoe polish on canvas


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Christopher’s work is inspired by this quiet place where it is just the individual and one’s attention—one’s inner world. A place where there is a great friend with whom one shares each and every experience, passing messages back and forth— encouraging love notes, inner scripts to enliven with imagination. For Christopher, art is a way to realize, live, and articulate love through song, painting, word and color. He writes and performs original songs and music rooted in delta blues, soul, and spirituals. Founded in “old forms” of music, there is a new voice being born and shared.

Let’s Let It, 31”x25”, acrylic, ink and Conté crayon on canvas Green Piano, 26”x24”, acrylic and ink on canvas

Egg Head, 60”x48”, gold leaf, enamel, shoe polish, ink and acrylic on canvas


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Gavin Hugh Troy Gavin has participated in more than fifty group and solo showings in Arizona and California, and his work can be found in collections across the country and world, including Dubai, Paris, Denmark, Spain, Canada, Puerto Rico, Mexico, and Canada. Throughout these years Gavin has also been working with younger artists. “An important part of childhood is allowing the creative within to grow and be encouraged, and I enjoy sharing and teaching this to all ages.”

connection, 34.5”x10.5”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on canvas

union, 36.5”x33”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on canvas


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Gavin teaches at the Tucson Museum of Art, and he is a mentor at the Tucson branch of Prescott College. Graduating with a B.F.A. in inter-media from Arizona State University, Gavin began pursuing a need to express his inner passion, creating art. Gavin moved to Tucson in 1998. From the very beginning he has enjoyed showing his work in coffee shops and restaurants “making art accessible to the people.” He said joining Citizens Warehouse was “like coming aboard a huge art ship.”

within this song, 36”x60”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on wood panel village of lights, 15.5”x22.5”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on canvas flower river, 36”x60”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on wood panel

the journey, 36”x36”, acrylic, pencil and gesso on canvas


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Jenny O. Wall Jenny has always straddled the line between design and fine art, maintaining studios everywhere she went and supplementing design work with her own personal vision translated into fine art. Moving to Arizona — first Bisbee, and then Tucson — inspired her to begin painting using personal interior dialogue as an inspiration rather than the comfortable landscape elements that were her major focus while in New England and California.

Madonna, 48”x48”, oil on canvas Growth, 48”x48”, oil on canvas

Body (Wound Series), 48”x36”, pastel, charcoal and graphite on paper


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Jenny’s work treats oil paint transparently, much like the printmaking process, layered rather than heavily applied. Jenny received her B.F.A. in illustration and printmaking from Rhode Island School of Design. As a professional printmaker in Boston, she was a member of Experimental Etching Studio and exhibited work consisting mostly of abstract monotypes and color lithographs. During this period, Jenny continued her education through Radcliffe College and won the award for excellence in landscape design.

The Mystery Series, 6”x6” each, oil and graphite on wood panel (triptych)

Spirit (Wound Series), 48”x36”, pastel, charcoal and graphite on paper


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Acknowledgments

Special thanks to the following individuals and organizations for their support of this book’s publication, without which our self indulgence would not have been possible. Warehouse Arts Management Organization (WAMO) Tucson, AZ wamotucson.org Zocalo Magazine Tucson, AZ zocalomagazine.com David Aguirre Dinnerware Artspace Tucson, AZ DinnerwareArtspace.org Dennis & Beatrice Herrick Rio Rancho, NM dennisherrick.com Bicycle Inter-Community Art & Salvage (BICAS) Tucson, AZ bicas.org

Tucson Pima Arts Council Tucson, AZ tucsonpimaartscouncil.org Pamela Sutherland Tucson, AZ Stephen Michael Tucson, AZ Paul Reese Tucson, AZ John Laswick Arlington, VA Kathy Bennen Tucson, AZ Ann Teall Long Beach, CA Robert & Dirk Tucson, AZ

Thank you to Obsidian Gallery in Tucson where several Citizens artists regularly exhibit their work.

And a personal thank you from Alec Laughlin to Michael Howard for his support and encouragement during this project.


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Matthew Diggins in his studio Michael B. Schwartz’s studio


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Authors Julie Sasse

David Aguirre

Julie Sasse is Chief Curator and Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Tucson Museum of Art. Prior to joining the TMA staff in 2000, she was the Galleries Curator for The University of Arizona from 1995-2000. In the 1980s, Sasse directed the operations of the Elaine Horwitch Galleries in Arizona, California, and New Mexico.

David Aguirre is a longtime Tucson artist and activist who has spearheaded and managed arts organizations in downtown Tucson, including the Steinfeld Warehouse Cooperative, Industrial Arts, Dinnerware Artspace, Tucson Arts Coalition, and the Tucson Arts District Partnership.

Alec Laughlin

Titus Castanza

Alec Laughlin is a painter, photographer, designer and educator. He moved into Citizens Warehouse in January of 2011. In 2012 he was elected President of Citizens Artist Collective and of Warehouse Arts Management Organization.

Titus Castanza is a painter. In 2012 he was elected Vice President of Citizens Artist Collective. Titus received his BFA from the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida, and began his career in 2001 working as a staff artist for The Franklin Mint in Philadelphia.

Dennis Herrick

Kylie Walzak

Dennis Herrick is an emeritus member of the journalism faculty at the University of New Mexico. He published a weekly newspaper in Iowa for twelve years and worked several years as a daily newspaper reporter. He now writes fiction.

Kylie Walzak has worked as an educator and outreach coordinator at BICAS and as a Spanish teacher in Tucson’s public schools since 2008. She holds a MEd from the University of Arizona and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa in 2002.

Dave Devine

Casey Wollschlaeger

For much of the 1990s, Dave Devine assisted the Tucson Arts District Partnership with its ultimately successful effort to list the Tucson Warehouse District on the National Register of Historic Places.

Casey Wollschlaeger joined BICAS in 2009 as a mechanic and became its Art Coordinator in 2010, opening the Art Annex in 2011. She received a BFA in photography from Minnesota State University.

Poster Frost Mirto, Inc.

Ann Vargas

Poster Frost Mirto specializes in architecture for communities—neighborhood centers, multi-family and infill housing, mixed-use developments, and buildings to serve Southern Arizona’s private non-profit organizations. A leading architectural conservation and historic preservation firm, it specializes in work on historic Sonoran Desert buildings and landscapes.

Ann Vargas is a community planner and writer, and a member of the Warehouse Arts Management board, elected Vice President in 2012. She works collaboratively with neighborhoods, government, individuals and businesses to manifest community vision in the built environment.


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First Floor Hall

Nick Georgiou’s studio


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Photography Index Photos by Alec Laughlin Tucson Citizens Artists (unfinished detail), by Titus Castanza.......................................................................cover Paint-Splattered Floor.................................................................................................................. inside front cover Christopher Stevens in his studio, February 2013...................................................................................................... i Titus Castanza’s Studio................................................................................................................................................ ii Artist Tools................................................................................................................................................................... iv Painted for BICAS with Love, mural by Pasqualina Azzerello, circa 1999 ......................................................... vi Citizens Warehouse, 44 West 6th Street, Autumn 2012........................................................................................... 3 Open Studio Tour After Party (Greek Easter), Spring 2012 .................................................................................... 8 Citizens Figure Drawing Session, September 2012................................................................................................. 10 Titus Castanza, CAC Retreat to San Carlos, Mexico, Spring 2012....................................................................... 11 Matthew Diggins Sweeping Rain Water Off the Roof, July 4th, 2011................................................................... 12 Laurel Hansen in her studio, March 2013............................................................................................................... 13 Alec Laughlin in his studio, March 2013................................................................................................................. 14 Nick Georgiou, CAC Retreat to San Carlos, Mexico, Spring 2012........................................................................ 15 Casey Wollschlaeger in BICAS Art Annex, Autumn 2012..................................................................................... 17 Steinfeld Warehouse Interior, February 2013.......................................................................................................... 21 Elevator Shaft (BICAS Underground Art Gallery)............................................................................................... 120 Matthew Diggins in his studio, February 2013..................................................................................................... 122 Michael B. Schwartz’s Studio................................................................................................................................... 122 First Floor Hall......................................................................................................................................................... 124 Nick Georgiou’s Studio............................................................................................................................................. 124 Self portrait with Beard (detail), by Alec Laughlin...................................................................... inside back cover Citizens Stairwell..........................................................................................................................................back cover Artwork Photos Portals, by Joe Hatton, photo by Joe Hatton............................................................................................dedication Javelina, Troy Neiman, photo by Dan Stein Photography................................................................................... 19 Photos of Nick Georgiou’s work by Nick Georgiou........................................................................................ 32-35 Gateway Saguaro, Dirk Arnold, photo by Dirk Arnold....................................................................................... 44 KY Market, Dirk Arnold, photo by Andrew Emery Brown................................................................................. 45 Photos of Rand Carlson’s work by Rand Carlson............................................................................................ 52-54 Photos of Joe Hatton’s work by Joe Hatton...................................................................................................... 64-67 Transformer, Katherine Josten, photo by Katherine Josten................................................................................. 68 Source Recordings and Installation, Katherine Josten, photos by Jeffrey Keith Schreiber.......................... 68-71 Metal End Table, Ezequiel Leoni, photo by Graham Wilson Photography....................................................... 73 Windmill, Troy Neiman, photo by Troy Neiman.................................................................................................. 83 Photos of Joanna Pregon’s work by Tom Alexander Photography................................................................ 88-91 Historic Photographs Citizens Transfer Co., Raphael Castro (right), Arizona Historical Society, photo file #62673........................... 2 Citizens Warehouse, circa 1950, courtesy Poster Frost Mirto, Inc........................................................................ 6 Olongapo, 1966, courtesy Jack Doyle...................................................................................................................... 56


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This

publication was made possible in part through an initiative of the Tucson Pima Arts Council, in partnership with the Warehouse Arts Management Organization, and sponsored by a National Endowment for the Arts Our Town grant. To learn more about the initiative, visit tucsonpimaartscouncil.org.


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Related Websites

Citizens Artist Collective citizensart.com

Warehouse Arts Management Organization wamotucson.org

Tucson Pima Arts Council tucsonpimaartscouncil.org

Tucson Warehouse Arts District warehouseartsdistrict.com

Tucson Museum of Art tucsonmuseumofart.org

Dinnerware Artspace dinnerwareartspace.org Bicycle Inter-Community Art & Salvage bicas.org

Eponymous Atelier eponymousatelier.com


CITIZENS WAREHOUSE Tucson, Arizona

“I thought I was going to be a bum the rest of my life.” — Jean-Michel Basquiat

e ponymous a telier


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e ponymous a telier

Citizens Warehouse  
Citizens Warehouse  

Art book about the historic Citizens Warehouse in Tucson, featuring the artists who work there. Foreword by Julie Sasse, Chief Curator and C...

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