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Editor ROSIE ANGEL-CLARK Digital Editor EVE COLEMAN Deputy Editor ELENA VENTURELLI

Starting university with a mental health condition Samantha Kilford shares her tips for when a new start isn’t so straightforward

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It was so reassuring to have that in place before essay deadlines started piling up and it allowed me to feel a little bit more comfortable and secure knowing I had someone to turn to if I began to feel inundated with anxiety or panic. It’s natural to feel nervous or overwhelmed during the first few weeks – or even year – at university, and it can really take some time to feel like you’ve found your feet. Everyone will tell you not to worry and to get stuck-in. That can be an excellent way to combat your anxieties headon, but as someone who tried to say ‘yes’ to every opportunity and event throughout Freshers’ week, I know it can lead to feeling down and burnt-out if you’re not careful. The most important thing to remember is to take care of yourself. Don’t feel like you have to force yourself to participate if you’re not feeling up to it or if you feel uncomfortable and definitely do reach out to someone. Whether it’s a message to Wellbeing or your personal tutor, it’s important to establish a line of communication early on so that they can be there to offer support if and when you do hit that rough patch. And know that there’s absolutely nothing wrong if you need to use a weekend to travel home to see your family! Moving to university marks a huge departure from the comfortable environments and lifestyles we’re used to. Freshers’ week can be very intense and having strangers popping in and out of your life for the first few weeks is unlike anything most of us have experienced before; make sure you are prioritising yourself and your wellbeing! Epigram / Robin Irelan

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t’s that time of year again; a batch of starryeyed new students are flocking to the city, ready to begin their journey at Bristol. Starting uni can be challenging for everyone, but when you’re already living with a mental health condition, it can be even harder. Suffering from anxiety, I found the transition of moving away from home to a new city full of strangers incredibly overwhelming, so much so that I actually had to suspend my studies altogether and return the following year. It was a risky decision, but it meant that I was far more prepared for the academic year and the challenges ahead. It also meant I could ensure that measures were put in place to ease my anxieties. I personally found talking with a therapist for a few sessions before moving away beneficial in ironing out my doubts and concerns so that I felt more capable to cope in such an intense environment. If you have a mental health condition, my best advice would be to research what help your university can give you beforehand so that you’re not left entirely clueless about who to turn to when you’re in distress. At first, I felt embarrassed or ashamed about having to reach out and ask for help, but I quickly realised there was no need to feel this way. After an awful start the year before, I knew I needed to prioritise the complicated rollercoaster that was my mental health. The Student Wellbeing and Disability Services assigned me a member of staff within my faculty to conduct regular check-ins to see how I was coping emotionally, and also to give me advice on what could be done to assist me if my mental health started affecting my workload.

Profile for Epigram

Epigram 349 - The Croft 10  

The tenth issue of Epigram's lifestyle pullout, with sections in Wellbeing, Food, Style, and Travel.

Epigram 349 - The Croft 10  

The tenth issue of Epigram's lifestyle pullout, with sections in Wellbeing, Food, Style, and Travel.

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