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CHRIS EWART

OURAY ICE FESTIVAL

CELIA MILLER

TELLURIDE MOUNTAIN

EPIC COLORADO VOL. 1 ISSUE 2

A FAREWELL TO WINTER

SPRING RIDING, SUNNY

BREW DECKS AND A LOOK BACK AT SNOW DAYS

FREE


JEFF BROCKMEYER RIDER: JAKE BLACK

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEATURES 34

INSIDER PANEL

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MADE IN Ska Brewing Company

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SUMMIT MEDIA LABS

17 21 26

EPIC CULTURE The Buzz: Nightmare Development The Gallery: Dorothy Tanner Soundwaves: Michal Menert

62 67 71 74

THE LIFE The Art of Flight Chicks with Picks Transplanted Ruby Hill

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BACKCOUNTRY BRAIN

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DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT

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EYE CANDY

CHRIS EWART INFUSES SKATE, PARK AND TELE IN AN INNOVATIVE WAY

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SPOT CHECK: TELLURIDE ON-POINT AND OFF-PISTE

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OURAY ICE FESTIVAL A TRUE GRASS ROOTS EVENT

INSIDER PANEL PRO 54

UP, UP & AWAAAAY WITH CELIA MILLER

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WHAT’S THE HAPS

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TALK SHOP

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PHOTOHUNT

ON THE COVER: Karsten Delap at Kennedy's Gully in Ouray, Colorado. Photo by Fred Marmsater. Check out the Eye Candy section for more photos like this.


RED GERARD

PHOTO : JEFF BROCKMEYER

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/EDITOR IN CHIEF

Caleb Barcus CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER/PUBLISHER

Ben Dills MANAGING EDITOR

Jeff Nass ART DIRECTOR

Andrea Goodlin STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Dave Apple CONTENT EDITOR

Richard Scott CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER

Jayme Barcus CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Lynnea Tamsen, Kelsey McMaster, David Rodman, Mike Cook, Giesel Widmer, Ryan Cruze, Pat Milbery, Sven Brunso CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jeff Nass, Aaron Dodds, Scott DW Smith, Ben Koekler, Brett Schreckengost, Chris Farona, Dan Milner, Drew Levin, Fred Marmsater, Jeff Bernhard, Jeff Brockmeyer, Kelsey McMaster, Mike Artz, Patrick Orton, Terry Ratzlaff EVENT COORDINATOR

David Rodman CORRESPONDENTS

Ellen Feldman, Maddy Hagen, Rhonni Jameson WEB DESIGN

Secret Stache Media PRINTING & PREPRESS Publication Printers Denver, Colorado

ADVERTISING SALES AND GENERAL INQUIRIES

www.info@epic-mag.com EPIC Colorado Magazine and distinctive logo are trademarks owned by EPIC Colorado LLC. Copyright ©2013 Epic Colorado LLC No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written consent of EPIC Colorado LLC. Requests for permission should be directed to: EPIC Colorado LLC 1112 Washington Ave. Suite A Golden, CO 80401

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'  

   (      &!        !  $#   #"   !  $! ( #   !$!

) " &       " $  # !       !!    ($   (!  

! $  !      ( EPIC COLORADO #$!) $  ( MAGAZINE » SPRING 2013 7


WELCOME EPIC COLORADO PROUDLY PRESENTS TO YOU OUR SECOND ISSUE. BRINGING YOU A RETROSPECTIVE LOOK AT THE INCREDIBLE SEASON WE HAD AND MORE OF THE SPORTS, MUSIC, AND CULTURE THAT WE HAVE GROWN INSEPARABLE TO. IN THIS ISSUE, OUR GOAL IS TO FURTHER EXPLORE THE MANY, IF NOT INDEFINITE, WAYS TO ENJOY COLORADO WHILE SAYING FAREWELL TO THE 2012-2013 WINTER SEASON. THANK YOU FOR READING, ENJOY! » EPIC COLORADO

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FRED MARMSATER

CLIMBER: CHRIS MILLER


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» HERE IS A PEEK INTO THE SKA BREWING COMPANY BAR/TASTING ROOM IN DURANGO, COLORADO.

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MADE IN

(Ska) Gentleman Prefer (True) Blondes

I SIT HERE WITH A TRUE BLONDE BY MY SIDE, HELPING ME PEN

something magical. Seriously; after conversing with Dave

CRACKING A COLD ONE WITH DAVE THIBODEAU OF SKA BREWING

Thibodeau, co-owner of Ska Brewing, I become unbearably thirsty! So, a can of True Blonde Ale in hand later, I’m suddenly feeling more inspired to write. Call it article research, a love of handcrafted brews, or whatever you like; it always goes down smooth. Now raise your glass with me, and settle in for the tale of how this brewery came to be…

by lynnea tamsen

by scott d.w. smith It all began with Ska music-loving teenagers, the discovery of a parent’s dusty “home brew journal”, and a burning desire for booze. And now, Ska Brewing Company of Durango, CO, is still all about booze; but also about things like handcrafting with love, giving back, and character. Intrigued? Read on for the full scoop.

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ECM: What are Ska Brewing’s core values? DT: “We put a lot of thought into running a sustainable business; built extra space in our facility for non-profits to use for meetings/events; sit on different boards around town; we try to pay it forward with everything we can. If you’re fortunate enough to have a successful business, I think it’s your responsibility to give back. It makes for a better environment for the whole community.” ECM: Elaborate on the idea of “open source” craft brewing

Q&A HAPPY HOUR: ECM: Talk to me about how you got into the brewing business… DT: “In high school, we were punk rock kids; we did a lot of beer-drinking, and we listened to a lot of Ska music. One day we ran across a book on my dad’s shelf, and it just said, ‘Brew Log’. The first recipe was from 1969.

(…) We’d never heard of ‘home brewing’! In all honesty, at first, it didn’t have anything to do with an appreciation of a fine-craft beer; it was just about getting wasted; partying. But that book was the spark we needed. From then on, we always had this idea in the back of our heads that we wanted to open our own brewing company. ECM: So, when did you finally pull

the trigger? DT: We basically had a business plan on the back of a napkin; nobody wanted to lend us money. Professional brewers tried to talk us out of it …it seemed like everyone was a naysayer…so we just decided that we HAD to open up something, even if only out of spite. So, with a little money from Bill’s dad, we opened in 1995…found a small warehouse, had enough secondhand equipment to brew. We’d get off work at our regular jobs at five; go work on our brewery until 3am; sleep a couple hours, and do it all over again. ECM: Who are your brewing partners in crime?

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DT: “We started as home brewers, so we have an affinity for those guys, and Graham and me), and after a year, a they’ve been a vocal minority in the beer third friend of ours bought in (Matt world, pushing the growth. If someone Vincent). The three of us have owned it wants to brew one of our beers at their for 16 years. house, we’re willECM: What’s up ing to give them a with the comic scaled-down reciTRUE BLONDE book theme? pe. We encourage HOLDS A SPECIAL people to try to DT: “We’ve always PLACE IN MY clone the beers loved comics, and and talk about ‘em HEART, FOR BEING our friend actually with us!” OUR FIRST BEER. made one for us. So, all the packagECM: What does ing, branding, and the future hold? art have all come DT: “We’re going to focus on the quality from that comic. The story is about of our beers, the quality of our people, our war on ‘Rotgutzen’, a huge beer and the quality of life for our employconglomerate. The heroine in the story ees…until the next idea comes along!” is named ‘True Blonde’. DT: Two of us started the brewery (Bill

(…) We were lucky! We were young enough not to know any better…so, we just took the things we were passionate about –beer, Ska music, and comic books – and put them all together!” ECM: Which Ska brew is nearest and dearest to you? DT: “My favorite beer changes with my mood and seasons…but True Blonde holds a special place in my heart, for being our first beer. It’s a golden ale with honey from the local bees. Modus Hoperandi is probably my favorite allaround, taste-wise. Our Steel Toe Milk Stout is the most decorated, prizewinning beer.”

If you’re a true brew aficionado, and don’t stop into Ska Brewery when you’re in Durango, you should be shamefully forced to drink tasteless big-box light beer the rest of your days. Well, maybe not; but do yourself a favor and make an adult beverage pit stop during your next venture through the San Juans. Bottoms up!

GET YOUR BEER ON Ska Brewery 225 Girard Street Durango, CO 81301 (970.247.5792) www.skabrewing.com


MADE IN

» SKA BREWING COMPANY BELIEVES IN GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY AND MAKES SURE THAT THEIR HOME IS A PLACE THAT LOCALS AND TOURISTS WILL WANT TO VISIT OFTEN.

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Summit Media Labs GIVING VIDEO PRODUCTION A NEW REPUTATION by giesel widmer

SUMMIT

MEDIA

LABS

IS

located in beautiful Breckenridge, Colorado. Summit is taking riders’ lives from the mountains to the big screen. From rentals, to sales, to full production, Summit offers whatever you need, when it comes to filming. From the amateur videographer to the park blazers and backcountry documenters, Summit makes your footage come to life. Summit Media Labs is Summit County’s one stop shop for video production as well as the sale and rental of POV cameras and Camtrol stabilizers. They are able to film anything from rider edits to aerial photography. Camtrol is a support system for cameras that can be used to film high action sports. It limits unwanted shakiness in footage. This product took years to perfect and uses the concept of suspension and leverage to provide non-shaky footage from every angle possible. Summit offers videographers the opportunity to bring real professionalism to their footage. The company is not only 14

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known for the sale and rentals of their video production equipment, but also for their professional staff. They allow customers to get as hands on with their video projects as they want. If you aren’t familiar with editing, that’s no problem. At Summit, there are teachers available Monday-Friday, offering editing and filming classes from 4-5PM each day to help you with anything from basic to advanced editing. These classes are affordable and limited to 5 students per session so that each student gets the time and attention they need to learn to be great editors. And for our super busy shredders and skiers who do not have the time and patience to edit their own footage, Summit is here for you. At Summit they offer professional, on site editors to personalize, stylize and put great sound to your

EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

footage. After your edit is complete, they also have their own personal theatre with six theatre chairs set up to view your final cut with friends and family-the more the merrier. Editing turnaround is quick, affordable, professional and always pleasing to the eye and ear. Summit is working with some amazing brands and teaming up to create film magic. During the Dew Tour, Summit and ION teamed up with a mobile media lab on site to capture live feed and edit it right on the spot. They will also have a large presence at S.I.A in Denver this upcoming month. Look for more exciting collaborations in

the near future. So, if you get a chance to stop in, visit the amazing staff of Summit. The company is located at 211 North Main Street right across from the Breckenridge Gondola. They are paving their way into the creative and videography world of Colorado. Unlike their competitors they are not just aiming at sales, they are trying to teach their customers a unique and technical way of capturing their experiences on and off the mountain and editing them in a clean, fun, but professional way. If you have any questions about their services feel free to give them a ring at 970.423.6465.


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THE BUZZ

Nightmare Development LIVIN’ A RIDER’S DREAM TRUE TO IT’S SNOWBOARDING ROOTS by kelsey mcmaster

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collaborative effort was made between HOW IT ALL STARTED Suta and Schneider, and with the supRooted in a 90’s era “skate-shop mentalport of others in the community, the ity” and motivated to keep the snowNightmare Factory boarding industry in was built. the “hands of snowboarders,” out of a PROUD OF WHERE THE NIGHTMARE dream came NightTHEY LIVE, NIGHTMARE FACTORY mare Development. SUPPORTS LOCAL The 3,500 square foot This dream was Factory is headquarevoked by a group ECONOMY WHILE ALSO ters to Nightmare and of friends in SumPROVIDING AND is where all of the off mit County, Colorado KEEPING JOBS IN slope magic happens. who snowboarded It houses a tune shop, everyday and didn’t SUMMIT COUNTY. printing equipment, want the fun to end. presses, tools, a mini In effort to keep their skate ramp, and pretty dream alive and very much anything else you could possibly much an everyday reality, Nightmare need. The Nightmare team uses this as Development Co-Owners Joe Suta and home base for all of their production Tom Schneider made their snowboardand creative developments as well as ing passion a high standard of work and social events like skate night and the play as they started building their own occasional crazy party. snowboards. After a few years of trial and error Melding together their different skill as well as a lot of broken snowboards, sets, resources, ideas and equipment a

JEFF BERNHARD & SARAH SUTA

Nightmare got their product dialed in. Upholding their high standards for the industry, they emphasize quality American made product as well as production practices. They are continually innovating, keeping the best possible product available. Proud of where they live, Nightmare supports local economy in many ways but also by providing and keeping jobs in Summit County. Nightmare in a sense, learned as they went and have had a lot of fun doing it. THE BIZ & A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY After the snowboard industry boomed and markets settled in the mid 90’s, smaller mom-and-pop shops that were unable to meet demand came to pass. With the elimination of these small companies the result was big manufacturing companies with deep pockets getting bigger. They dominated the market place with their primary consideration being money and less about

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quality product ultimately tearing snowboarding away from its true roots. At not so Nightmare-ish prices, these customizable boards have different art, size, profile and shape options with a price point around $380. “It’s like a sushi menu,” said Suta as he looked over an order form. Nightmare has managed to keep the prices low by making everything in house down to the core. “We could’ve sourced our cores to China for $11 each or to an American manufacturer for $50-$60 but we learned how to do it ourselves instead,” said Suta. “This is snowboarding to us,” said Suta. Nightmare Development, is so much more then the production of boards and making money. Because even though Nightmare Development ultimately sells snowboards, it’s not so much a business as it is a lifestyle. “I don’t pay attention to the competitors,” said Suta. Beyond the cool snowboarding videos they watch, the crew doesn’t follow what others are doing. Nightmare isn’t trying to compete with big brands like Burton or K2 because to them, it doesn’t matter. Nightmare is a crew of hardcore snowboarders who build their boards from the ground up, really caring about their product and the guys who make it. They are doing

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their own thing and don’t want to be in big box stores like Sports Authority. Keeping it small, local and focused on lifestyle over dollar signs is what Nightmare stands for. THE NIGHTMARE CULTURE & CREW To keep things going, the support of others living the same way has had a large part in what makes Nightmare Development work. For example, team rider and board builder Ethan White also contributes by doing lay-ups; as he says he “puts the bun in the oven.” On mountain, the team spends a lot of time filming and shooting photos of tricks at the terrain parks. But especially, people like snowboarding legends Trent Bush and owner of Summit Snowboards, Steve Link, continually play a large role. “He’s (Steve Link) like our mentor, he saw what we were doing and wanted to help out,” said Suta. “Tom Sims used to babysit me,” said Link. “Along with Tom, I worked directly with Terry Kidwell who was the 1st freestyle pro snowboarder, we started the snowboard scene 20 years ago.” Link was manufacturing his own boards through his business Summit Snowboards but recently, when he’s not

helping others with their businesses, decided to build boards for himself. “Its my art, my love,” said Link. “I watched what he was doing when I was a kid,” said Suta. “Half of our equipment is Steve’s old shit.” Besides Link helping out on the production side of things, Bush founder of Brandbase who helped start Tech-Nine, Nomis, Analog, and Twist, walked away from it all and chose to join Nightmare’s cause. “He is responsible for snowboarders having an identity in this industry,” said Suta. Bush currently works with Nightmare on their distribution, focusing on core retail as well as a board re-issue project. CURRENT PROJECT & INDUSTRY CHANGE Currently, Nightmare is working directly with Kidwell on building the 1985 Sims Terry Kidwell re-issue. Before Sims passed, Kidwell was directly given the rights from Sims to work on the reissue project. Everyone involved in the project feels very honored to be apart of it and excited for the final product release. Above all the excitement and great products, Nightmare Development has undoubtedly brought the snowboarding community together in Summit County.

i NIGHTMARE INFO For more information about Nightmare Development’s team, production practices, snowboards and more visit www.nightmaredev.com


» RYAN MCCOY HITS A JUMP AT THE NIGHTMARE FACTORY.

JOE SUTA & JEFF BERNHARD

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THE GALLERY

Peanut Butter Jams written and photographed by kelsey mcmaster

ELECTRICITY AT PLAY: AN ILLUMINATING CONVERSATION WITH SCULPTOR DOROTHY TANNER

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THE GALLERY

it,” said Tanner. “My interest is in creatworking with conventional materials ing an environment that makes you feel like wood, stone and metal but then good. Lights and color changes are all discovered Plexiglas and the way that it conducive to a spiritual state.” transmitted light. She and her husband Tanner’s gallery and staff of three kept experimenthave a kind of ing with forms, energy, the same colors and lights calming energy “DENVER HAS A HIGH and together creher work comCONCENTRATION OF ated Lumonics. municates to its PEOPLE CONDUCIVE TO Born in New admirers. And deYork and later spite her age, TanANOTHER KIND OF spending 20 years ner has a youthful MENTALITY. I APPRECIATE in Florida, the and open mentalTHE YOUNG PEOPLE HERE; well-established ity, much like that artist decided to which she admires THEY ARE VERY move to Denver in the youngsters DEVELOPED AND to continue the of our Denver INTELLECTUALLY CURIOUS.” Lumonics cause. community. After her late husBut more than band and artistic the good vibes counterpart passed, it was time for one gets from her playful sculptures is change. Tanner loves the mountains the grass roots movement that Tanner and great weather, but it was also the and her staff have become supporters youth that drew her to Colorado. of. The Denver Peanut Butter Plan is a “Denver has a high concentration of movement gaining momentum in compeople conducive to another kind of munities worldwide. People are getting mentality,” said Tanner. “I appreciate together at meet-ups to make peanut the young people here; they are very butter and jelly sandwiches to hand out developed and intellectually curious.” to those in need. Dancing forms made of Plexiglas lit “It inspired us and our ‘co-conspirator,’ by LED lights, Tanner’s sculptures truly Hazy Meadow, to form a monthly dance embody the playful and humorous side event at Lumonics called Peanut Butter of her personality. “The light defines Jamz where people donate peanut butter, TANNER STARTED OUT HER ART CAREER

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THE GALLERY jelly, and bread. Tonight is our first official one,” said Barry Raphael, Tanner’s event coordinator. “Hazy, his wife Danielle and us will be making sandwiches tomorrow and handing them out.” Everyone of all ages and demographics is invited to come be supporters of the movement. The Denver Peanut Butter Plan meets monthly on a Sunday. After volunteers make the PB&J’s, they head out in carpools to the Denver Mission neighborhood and hand the sandwiches out to homeless on the streets and in the parks. Any leftovers are then donated to the Samaritan House or other agencies. The next Peanut Butter Plan meet-up is set for February in Denver. More information can be found by visiting the Facebook page for details. The Peanut Butter Jamz dance party at Lumonics also takes place monthly. “Sharing is what Lumonics is about, I like the interaction,” said Tanner. Lumonics Light and Sound Gallery

“MY INTEREST IS IN CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT THAT MAKES YOU FEEL GOOD. LIGHTS AND COLOR CHANGES ARE ALL CONDUCTIVE TO A SPIRITUAL STATE.”

rents and leases its pieces to homes and companies. The gallery/performance space can also be rented for events. Dorothy’s website is www.dorothytanner.com and event info is available at www.lumonics.net.

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JEFF NASS


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SOUNDWAVES

Michal Menert GOING OLD SCHOOL TO BRING SOME MAGIC BACK TO THE MUSIC INDUSTRY by david rodman

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The 30-year-old Colorado native discussed these plans as well as his career with me during an Epic Colorado photo shoot recently. Mr. Menert has been actively making music and performing in Colorado since 2001, years before the state became an EDM mecca. That summer he and his friends bought a used Peavey PA and started playing parties from the back of a truck. From these modest beginnings he eventually formed a group with Derek Vincent Smith (aka Pretty Lights), Cory Eberhard, and Ken Daley called Listen. They began opening for jam bands and hip-hop shows along the Front Range and then moved on to ski towns, eventually ending up with 6-week runs throughout the West Coast. Menert has been a key player in the Colorado EDM scene since its inception, but he is humble about his role in it. “I certainly helped shape the scene, but its not like I was the only driving force or anything, I feel like we ALL played a big part. I do think the

JEFF NASS

first Pretty Lights record that I produced with Derek was one of the first albums of its kind to come out of Colorado, and it was released in a way that revolutionized independent albums. I remember seeing an article in Forbes Online that credited us as the business model that Radiohead built upon when they released In Rainbows. That was nuts because some of my idols were using an idea that my friend and I came up with in our house; an idea that just seemed logical at the time due to the high costs of independently printing and promoting CDs, convincing people to buy them, not to mention the never ending struggle against piracy. I think Colorado artists in the early 2000s started working together or were at least very aware of each other because it wasn’t a huge scene. The styles were varied but became parallel, since we all taught each other production because there wasn’t anyone pioneering production locally.

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SOUNDWAVES I guess my point is that I think influencing and helping build anything creatively is a two-way street and a way for someone to direct a movement while at the same time being directed by it--like dancing with someone, or demonic possession. Or an acid trip, where technically your mind is creating the hallucinations, but it’s pulling from your senses and experiences. Whatever hand I had in building anyone’s experience or this scene, I’m honored to have played that part, and to have watched it grow over the years." Menert was excited to discuss his upcoming project to bring some value and some magic back to the music buying experience. In a unique—and quite possibly—truly inspired move, he is planning on releasing several special tracks on vinyl this March. The impetus for this project lies in his passion for creating the perfect, all-encompassing musical experience for his fans. As a musician, Menert is excited about the better sound quality that comes from vinyl; but as a painter, he is ecstatic about getting to explore the potential of album art.

Q&A JAM SESH: ECM: Why subject yourself to the extra

costs and complications associated with pressing a record? MICHAL MENERT: I sample from vinyl, and ever since childhood I have been drawn to the artwork, feel and sound of vinyl. Giving music away for free through an independent label makes it tricky to sell physical copies, and CDs are so disposable and cheap that I don’t really

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want to mess with them. But pressing 500 copies of a special project gives people something tangible and real to buy. I want to bring back some of the magic that has been lost. ECM: Given your background in visual art, I assume you will be doing the album artwork that accompanies the LP? MM: Absolutely. ECM: How did you become interested in visual art? MM: I have loved drawing my whole life. I always designed logos and covers for groups I have been a part of. Through my early passion for hip-hop, I was drawn to graffiti, and at 19 I started hanging out with a few really talented writers. They showed me how to cut lines, how to blend, how to be patient and fix mistakes by incorporating them into the piece. In my early 20’s I gave acrylic painting a second chance, after being frustrated with it my whole life. With the help of my friend Zeke Derderian, I taught myself how to manipulate the medium and make it do what I want. A lot of the techniques I picked up from spray paint helped me with my brushwork. ECM: Moving on to your music, if you had to pick one song that would best exemplify your sound and style what would it be? MM: I’d say “Tomorrow May Never Come” of Dreaming of a Bigger Life is the most complete piece in terms of touching on what I do as a whole. ECM: Who would you say are your biggest influences musically? MM: I’d say overall it’s the Beastie Boys, because of their ability to flip a one bar loop into an incredible song. The result is a listening experience that changed


» THIS PAGE: MICHAL MENERT PERFORMS AT THE AT THE AGGIE THEATER IN FORT COLLINS AND AT SXSW MUSIC FESTIVAL IN AUSTIN, TEXAS ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE.

DREW LEVIN

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SOUNDWAVES

my life when I first heard them. I had a started really exploring Buffy Saintefriend in high school named John EggMarie, who has a very unique voice ert who was one of the few hip-hop DJs and an extensive career ranging from in Fort Collins at protest songs to the time. He took Sesame Street. me through a song “SINCE WE WERE CREATECM: How has from DJ Shadow’s ING OUR OWN GENRE, growing up in ColoEndtroducing and THE INCUBATION rado affected your pointed out the music? individual samples PERIOD WAS MUCH

as they came in, LONGER FOR MY PEERS MM: For a long and it made me time, it was very AND ME, WHICH FORCED realize the real limiting, because potential, beauty, US TO REFINE OUR VISION there wasn’t really and coincidence FOR YEARS BEFORE IT a sense of commuof sample collage. nity, or even a scene STARTED PLAYING OUT.” Another big influwithin the styles of ence on my musimusic I was drawn cal style is Mike to. I think that frusOldfield. He was a favorite of my partration led to producers like myself creatents and one of the reasons my name is ing a new facet of EDM that has strong Mike. His layering and composition was roots in hip-hop. Since we were creating amazing. His music introduced me to our own genre, the incubation period was the importance of building harmonies much longer for my peers and me, which and changing feels and showed me how forced us to refine our vision for years simple melodies and instrumentation before it started playing out. can be very emotive. ECM: Who are you actively listening to now? MM: I’m actually on a folk kick. I just

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ECM: What do you feel has been your greatest success to date?

off of music while releasing it for free is a huge blessing and a perpetual success. ECM: As you become more successful and your fame grows, do you intend to stay in Colorado? MM: Yes, I just bought a house, and I love my state. It’s got a great scene for art, music, food, outdoor activities, and the vibe is laid back, which makes it a great place to come home to after being on the road. ECM: Where do you see yourself professionally in 10 years? MM: I hope to be fusing my music with my visual art, I’ve really wanted to study animation, and bring my artwork to life. ECM: I know that you are an avid snowboarder, where might our readers catch a glimpse of you shredding? MM: I grew up going to Winter Park, Breck, A-Basin, and Keystone. I love riding at those resorts because there is a sense of nostalgia for me, a lot of great times with friends, causing trouble and pushing ourselves to try crazy shit.

MM: I’d have say that being able to live

DREW LEVIN


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TOUR

SAMMY

ADAMS &T.MILLS

WWW.SAMMYADAMSMUSIC.COM WWW.TMILLSMUSIC.COM

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tele CHRIS EWART INFUSES SKATE, PARK AND TELE IN AN INNOVATIVE WAY by giesel widmer

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CHRISTOPHER

EWART,

24

years old, stepped onto the competitive scene just a little over a year ago taking 1st place in Big Air, and taking home $2,500 in cash from Vail’s Winter Mountain games. Although new to the sport, Ewart is one to keep your eyes peeled for. He is giving this sport an entirely new and larger state of life than it has yet to see. A park rat at heart but passionate about the legitimacy of his sport, Ewart is bringing steeze to the telemark scene, infusing park with tele-skiing and making it look smooth. He was attracted to the idea of jumps, rails and parks as soon as he got the hang of turning. He was a frequent rider at Beaver Creek, and after three seasons of lapping the park, gathering on looking stares from other riders who hadn’t seen tele skiers attempt the things Ewart was attempting, he gained his first sponsorship from the Resort. So, what we all want to know is where Ewart came from? Ewart is more or less a Colorado native. His father was always a big skier. He was from upstate New York. After high school his father moved to Aspen and lived with his aunt and uncle for a while, working at a ski tuning shop. He loved the life, and after meeting Christopher’s mother, the passion never left him. Chris was born in Germany and lived there for two years while his father worked, and then the family picked up and moved to BEN KOELKER

a little town in Massachusetts. This is where Chris learned to ski; he was part of a small ski club that his father coached. Chris was about 6 when he started skiing, and the sport has not left his side since. He

out to be the catalysts for Chris’s telemarking career. He was curious about their sport and wanted to get involved. When Chris turned 18 and graduated from high school, he moved up to Vail from Fort Collins.

“I WANT PEOPLE TO RECOGNIZE TELEMARK AS A SPORT, NOT JUST A HOBBY. I WANT TO MAKE A GOOD NAME FOR MYSELF AS WELL AS THE INDUSTRY.

moved to Fort Collins, Colorado, when he was 8 and continued skiing as much as he could between school and clubs. He grew up racing, left racing to start snowboarding for a couple of years, and then joined the volunteer ski patrol at Winter Park. Patrollers he met in Winter Park turned

I asked Chris if his school work was affected by the sport. Interestingly enough, Chris isn’t just an athlete; he’s a smart kid. “Skiing never affected my school work, but I thought about it all the time. I was always ready for the weekends,” he replied. He did well throughout his schooling and went on to

attend Colorado Mountain College to become an EMT. He now works full time for Vail Medical Center and also helps in Beaver Creek as well. He is as dedicated to his EMT profession as he is to skiing. When speaking to Chris about his passion for skiing, he’s very humble about his talent. He is not in the sport to win or even to be a fierce competitor. He just wants to be able to do what he loves as much as he can. “I really want to shoot more film and photography as opposed to competing. I want to get my name out there in the telemark industry, and I want people to recognize telemark as a sport, not just a hobby. I want to make a good name for myself as well as the industry.” Not only is he making a good name for himself in this industry, he’s making them for his sponsors. Ewart is represented by Meier’s Ski’s, a smaller and newer ski company. He chose to go with Meier’s because they are starting out and really allow their riders to have a voice in the production of the skis. They are open minded to change, and give Ewart a little bit more of an opinion in the style and ride of the skis he wears. He is also sponsored by Beaver Creek Resort, Scarpa and Ravinos. His list of sponsors has grown over the past year. With his love for the sport and a professional and dynamic personality, the list promises to grow with his reputation. Beyond telemarking Chris

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WHEN THE MOUNTAIN ISN’T COVERED WITH SNOW, AND CHRIS ISN’T ABLE TO WEAR SKIS ON HIS FEET, HE TURNS TO MOTOCROSS INSTEAD.

is multi versed. When the mountain isn’t covered with snow, and Chris isn’t able to wear skis on his feet, he turns to motocross instead.

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He picked up motocross this past summer and competed in two different races. He placed 4th in the local Colorado RMXA race. It’s easy to assume Chris has a passion for extreme sports and loves to be outdoors. I think we are just seeing the beginning of a long and promising career. Ewart may have just popped up on the radar for professional racing, but I think it’s easy to say he won’t be disappearing anytime soon. This is only the beginning. Look for Ewart in upcoming competitions. He will be competing in the

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Telemark Skiing Extreme Challenge in Grand Targhee at the end of February and also at the Crested Butte Telemark Extreme Skiing Championships around mid-

March. Good luck, Chris, from everyone at Epic Colorado Magazine. We will be cheering you on all the way to the championships.

PATRICK ORTON


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SPOT CHECK

TELLURIDE On-Point and Off-Piste LOCAL EXPERT, BRETT SCHRECKENGOST PINPOINTS THE HOT SPOTS by lynnea tamsen

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by brett schreckengost

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TELLURIDE STATS 2,000 ACRES of skiable terrain 4,425 FT. vertical drop 125 trails 41% Advanced/Expert Terrain 309” annual snowfall 3 terrain parks 9 hike-to chutes

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ON: POINT First and foremost, let’s talk “snow goods” and mountain stats. For those of you interested in numbers, get ready for overload (to the left). Numerical tallying aside, the mountain is perhaps better known bluebird days; next-to-zero lift lines; and being this close to the town itself. Reinforces our resident local expert, Brett Schereckengost. “The town of Telluride is ‘ski-in ski out’, which is pretty sweet. Access to our terrain is easy, both on and off piste. Grab a couple lifts up and you’re at 12,000’

with 3,000’+ vert dropping you right back to Main Street.” “Oh, and check the map, the nearest big city is more than a six-hour drive away, so NO crowds and NO lift lines pretty much ever. Spoiled? Yep.” OFF: PISTE All this talk of stats and verts and zero crowds has us salivating for some sweet backcountry action. And there is plenty to be found. “Our surrounding backcountry terrain is absolutely massive. I have been


cue and the San Miguel Sherriff’s department expressed concern about the potential increase of incidents back there and the general ambiguity and ‘unknown factor’ of the zone.” “…In the interest of getting everyone on the same page (skiers, riders, rescuers), I felt the time had come to get a

“MOST PEOPLE COME HERE TO SKI, AND END UP STAYING FOR LOTS OF OTHER REASONS: THE COMMUNITY, THE SUMMERS, THE FESTIVALS… I STAYED HERE FOR THE SKIING.”

- Brett Schreckengost, Telluride-ite for two decades (and counting)

here for two decades, and am still learning more each season because there is just so much out there to get to know.” So, where to even start the exploration? “I became familiar with the zones around the ski area and Bear Creek in particular by ski touring to Telluride from the town of Ophir. I had loads of photos from the tours, which – along with some aerial images – became really popular with a small group of skiers (aka poachers) that skied the Creek in the early 90’s. The wheels were spinning.” The wheels on Brett’s Bus kept going

‘round and ‘round until he crashed right into the idea of combining his showstopper photos, navigational skills, and backcountry knowledge of Telluride. Off-piste maps were brainstormed, and Brett was on the edge of adding “cartographer” to his repertoire. The final push he needed to turn his map idea into reality? “When the US Forest Service officially opened a backcountry gate on top of Gold Hill it became clear that Pandora’s Box was about to spring open. Some of my friends on Ski Patrol, Search and Res-

guide out there and hoped it would make it a little safer to navigate the backcountry accessed from the ski area.” We’re all for noble causes, but let’s be honest; what has been the reaction of other locals to this kind of “giving away of the goods”? With a smile in his tone, Brett discloses, “I’ve heard some grumbling, but most have been really positive and love the maps. I donated a stack of maps to the ski patrol, Sheriffs and SAR team and they have been utilized on every avalanche rescue that has happened back there since the gate opened. When something goes down, everyone knows exactly where it is and can respond quickly, which is pretty crucial.” ON: TREND Okay, yes, there’s more to Telluride than snow. So if the idea of hip nightlife and town ambience is more exciting than backcountry (um, who are you!?), never fear; Telluride will more than quench your après thirst. With bars EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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sic, and get to see it in one of the best small venues in Colorado, The Sheridan Opera House.”

aplenty harkening its rowdy mining heritage (“Last Dollar Saloon”; “Smuggler’s Brew Pub”; “Tomboy Tavern”), you’d have to try hard NOT to run head first into a cold brew after a long day. There’s also world-class dining for the fancy visitors; a museum offering “Telluride Afoot Walking Tours”; the well-loved “Baked in Telluride” bakery; and no stoplights for days. Oh, and Brett won’t let us forget about the general feel and tunes scene, either: “It’s a pretty relaxed vibe in town overall with a couple classic bars to kick back in. We get some good mu44

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OFF: SEASON Still not convinced Telluride is the place to be? What if you learned the summers often beat the winters in seasonal popularity contests? (Because they do). “The summers are amazing, and busy with a festival every single weekend. I love the off-seasons best; the ski touring is good through May/June and you can skip on down to the desert to catch some warmer weather for climbing, biking, rafting, etc. We are lucky in Telluride to have the desert at our doorstep, you can ski tour in the morning and be riding singletrack in the afternoon.” One last gem of local wisdom from Brett? “Living here full-time actually slows down the aging process.” Promoting a youthful glow, bestowing thrills on and off-piste, and providing adventures on and off season!? That’s enough to motivate anyone to sing a country ballad about Telluride.

i ABOUT THE EXPERT Our resident expert and star of this article, Brett Schreckengost, is a photojournalist and filmmaker living and working at 9600’ in the small mountain hamlet of Ophir (a quick ski away from Telluride mountain and town). He’s been a proud Telluride-area resident for 20+ years. Check out a few of Brett’s maps on the opposite page. This is just a taste. To get your mittened hands on your very own coveted backcountry maps go to:

www.tellurideoffpiste.com If you can’t visit Telluride in person, you can always daydream about it online:

The Mountain www.tellurideskiresort.com The Town www.visittelluride.com The Festivals www.telluride.com/telluride/festivals


tle Wasatch Face

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A. Revelation Bowl B. Tempter House C. Guiseppies D. Bear Creek Falls E. Temptation Avalanche Path F. Suicides Avalanche Path G. Bear Creek Road Egress to Town H. Reggae Avalanche Path I. Contention Avalanche Path Ski Area Boundary, DO NOT CROSS

6 Apex Lift 9 Plunge Lift 14 Gold Hill Lift 15 Revelation Lift A. Gold Hill Access Gate B. Nellie Mine/ Bowl C. Nellie Bench D. Nellie Shoulder E. Nellie/ E-Ticket Traverse F. E-Ticket G. Nellie Apron H. Delta Bowl I. Needle’s Eye EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE REVELATION BOWL J. Bee’s Run K. Silvercloud L. Majestic M. Liberty Bell N. Bear Creek Overlook 14 Gold Hill Express Lift 15 Revelation Lift

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A. Gold G. Nel O. The 15 Rev


EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES. ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES.

2013 » EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE 46EXCLUSIVESPRING VIDEO


www.dragonalliance.com www.dragonalliance.com

www.dragonalliance.com www.dragonalliance.com www.dragonalliance.com www.dragonalliance.com w w w .Âť d r aSPRING g o n a l l i a2013 nce.com EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE 47


» KYLE DEMPSTER SCALES A ROCK WALL DURING THE OURAY ICE FESTIVAL IN JANUARY.

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OURAY

FESTIVAL A TRUE GRASS ROOTS EVENT by kelsey mcmaster

by scott d.w. smith

STEAM DRIFTS FROM HOT SPRINGS AS EARLY MORNING FOG LIFTS

over the cozy wintery town of Ouray. Nestled among the impressive San Juan Mountain range, like many mountain towns in Colorado, Ouray too was once a mining town rich in gold and silver ore. Still built of Victorian houses and old storefronts, Main Street is a registered historical district, but don’t let the quaint façade be confused with a tired town because this place is far from it. Many extreme athletes work and live here, making the beautiful steep terrain of the San Juan’s their back county playground and setting for the largest Ice Festival in North America.

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a piece of the ice action. With over 200 Pronounced (yer - ray), the “Switzerice and mixed climbs, Ouray’s ice park land of America” got its name from lois perfect for athletes that like to take cal Ute Native American Chief Ouray advantage of the proximity to accessible when it was established in 1876. Beauticlimbs and extreme terrain. Much of ful country year round with much of its which is located within walking distance business being drawn during summer from Ouray’s Main Street. months, the ice park attracts a differFor those who are interested in adent crowd during winter. Ice climbers vancing their of all ages and skills, there are abilities come to many clinics oftake advantage fered during the of Ouray’s free ice festival that ice park from focus on differmid December ent aspects of ice through late climbing. Booking March. clinics in advance Enhancing is key because upon the natural most are sold out waterfalls that a few weeks bealready occur in fore the festival Unc o mp a hg re begins, and unGorge, a gravityless participants fed sprinkler nab a spot in one, system has been it may be chalset up with dolenging to get in nated materials a lot of climbing. and funds and is The gear used in maintained by ice climbing can the non-profit be expensive to volunteer corpopurchase, so free ration, Ouray Ice THIS YEAR WAS EVEN demos of the hotPark Inc. (OIPI). BETTER THAN YEARS test and newest Sourced by overBEFORE, AS IT FEATURED gear are offered flow water from from many sponthe City of Ouray A NEW 25 FOOT OVERHANGsors on a first spring water supING TOWER AT THE END OF come-first served ply tank, it spans THE ELITE MIXED ROUTE. basis including a good portion of gloves, ice tools, the deep Gorge belay devices, providing prime jackets, crampons, climbing for more boots and more. than a mile in length and three miles of The Ice Fest hosts two competitions cumulative vertical terrain. this year with a $16,000 overall purse in Without sponsorships, park memberprize money. One being the Elite Mixed ships, and OIPI’s volunteer force, the Climbing Comp, and the other being continuance of the grass-rooted Ouray the Hari Berger Speed Climbing Comp Ice Festival wouldn’t happen every year, sponsored by Lowa. This year was even nor would the free park be able to rebetter than years before, as it featured main open without the funds it raises a new 25 foot overhanging tower at the every year during the festival. end of the Elite Mixed route and more This spectacular icy event occurs evwomen competitors giving it a go than ery January, growing in size each year. ever before. It draws athletes, sponsors, climbers and Fierce competitors took each other spectators from all over, many hoping for 50

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MANY OF OURAY’S ICE PARK CLIMBS ARE LOCATED WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE FROM MAIN STREET.

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Harrington in 3rd place. on, scaling sheer rock and ice walls. There’s plenty to do after a full The telephone poll transition to the day of climbing, zip lining or spectat25 foot overhang for the Elite Mixed ing climbers Comp was in and out of the crux, or competition. toughest part Many partake of the route. in icy cold loEveryone cal brews and cheered for bone warmeach other, ing hot springs but a few danto work out gled above the sore muscles. rest. The overEven if climball results for ing isn’t your the 2013 Elite thing, once Mixed ClimbAFTER A WEEKEND FULL OF ICE the sun goes ing Comp down and rankings: 1st FESTIVITIES...ONE COMES AWAY evenings set for men was FROM THE WHOLE EXPERIENCE in, there are Simon DuFEELING INSPIRED AND many activiverney with ties to attend. Jeff Mercier ENCHANTED BY OURAY’S SPIRIT. Silent aucin 2nd and tions, dinners, Sam Elias in films, multi3rd. For wommedia presentations, and speeches by en, Ines Papert came in 1st, then Marithe likes of recent Everest summiteer anne Van Der Steen in 2nd and Emily

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and competitor Sam Elias, are available to fest goers. The free annual kick-off party and Petzl/Arc’teryx theme party are not to be missed either. Beer, food and prizes are provided at the free kick-off party hosted by the American Alpine Club and the Saturday night theme party this year was “lost in space.” People, of course, were encouraged to dress up in space garb, which is always a fun opportunity to hang out with old friends and meet new ones. After a full weekend of ice festivities and steamy hot spring affairs come to a close, one comes away from the whole experience feeling inspired, rejuvenated and enchanted by Ouray’s spirit and natural surroundings.

i ICE PARK INFO For more information on the ice park and ice festival, visit ourayicepark.com


» THE FALLS AT THE UNCOMPAHGRE GORGE ARE ENHANCED BY A GRAVITY-FED SPRINKLER SYSTEM WHICH MAKES THREE MILES OF CUMULATIVE VERTICAL TERRAIN.

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UP, UP, & AWAAAAY WITH

Celia Miller THE BACKCOUNTRY QUEEN GIVES US A LESSON IN FLYING by lynnea tamsen

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» CELIA TAKES A BREAK FROM BACKCOUNTRY RIDING TO POSE FOR THIS SHOT IN ALASKA.


INSIDER

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Pro

*FLY: to be carried through

the air by the wind, wings, or any other force.

You know how sometimes you meet a person, and a word immediately comes to mind? (ex: mesmerizing; awkward; Jerkstore; you get the gist)… Well, after spending some time with Celia Miller, I can’t seem to get the word “fly” out of my head. This chick embodies every aspect of “fly”…the noun (she really is so cool); the verb (this girl literally flies through the air,); and even the essence (such a free, soaring spirit). Celia’s word is “fly”. And this is the Queen of Backcountry’s story, set to some startlingly-appropriate lyrics. “I came to win, to survive, to prosper, to rise...to fly...” LEARNING TO FLY. Celia Miller took off from her Connecticut roots, and came to Colorado with visions of Breckenridge, sunny days, and powder dancing in her head. Set free from the confines of icy, gloom-and-doom East-Coast conditions, she embraced Colorado like the thirdplace trophy she would later win in an O’Neill Evolution competition. “I didn’t know I wanted to snowboard professionally; I just wanted to see how far I could take snowboarding for myself…so needed to be somewhere where I could do it every day. (…) When I came out here, it was the first time I’d ever seen anything like this. I was like,

HOLY CRAP, what IS this!?! I was blown away by all of Colorado…it was an immediate connection.” Years of flying down – and off of – hills later, Celia is gracing glossy magazine pages for brands like Flow

new standards for the sport. Oh, and by the way… after all of this backcountry playground-ing and jetsetting, Breckenridge is still her mountain soul mate. “Breckenridge is always my favorite. They have the

“I FEEL REALLY LUCKY TO HAVE BEEN EXPOSED TO BACKCOUNTRY. IT’S KIND OF LIKE YOU HAVE TO EARN THE RESPECT. IT’S AN HONOR.”

and O’Neill; cutting crazy air through the no-man’s land that is backcountry; and is revered as a seriously legit snowboarder worldwide. She’s also competing in contests with words like “Big Air” and “Tailgate Alaska” in the title; and setting

CHAD OTTERSTROM & AARON DODDS

best park in the world(…) The jumps at Breck and Keystone are just perfect; if you want to learn to jump, and get better at riding, it’s where you should be. I love Colorado!” “I am not fly, I am levitation. I represent an entire generation.”

BACKCOUNTRY QUEEN. While on the topic of accolades and singing Colorado praises, let’s discuss how Celia is making a name for herself in a historically dude-dominated sea of snow. She’s been lovingly dubbed “Backcountry Queen”, and is setting the bar for a new generation of powerful female riders. How did her journey to royalty status come to be? “I have to give all the credit to Chad Otterstrom; he’s a king of backcountry. He pretty taught me everything I know. But, I mean, Backcountry is a never-ending learning experience!” What advice would you give a female who’s looking to get into the backcountry arena? “For a new girl to come on the scene and say, ‘I’m gonna go do Backcountry!’; it’s hard. If you don’t have the right equipment, the right crew, and you don’t know where to go, you’re kind of blind. Plus, most guys aren’t gonna want to take a girl on a trip, because they probably don’t have a sled, probably don’t know how to shovel or build…and then they’ll probably be afraid to hit the jumps! So, I feel really lucky to have been exposed to backcountry. It’s kind of like you have to earn the respect. It’s an honor.” But the girls are representing, and Celia is helping to lead this effort. “The girls have really been stepping out recently, especially in contests… and if you compare it to the guys, it can seem like

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“…IN THE BACKCOUNTRY, THERE’S A LOT OF GIRLS TRYING DOUBLES, AND PUSHING THE LIMITS. YOU CAN OUT THERE; THERE’S A LITTLE MORE ROOM FOR ERROR. I HAVEN’T LANDED A DOUBLE YET, BUT I’M WORKIN’ ON IT!”

no big deal, but no other girls are doing this stuff! They’re pushing bigger and bigger things. And in the backcountry, there’s a lot of girls trying doubles, and pushing the limits. You can out there; there’s a little more room for error. I haven’t landed a double yet, but I’m workin’ on it!” Why does backcountry trump everything else? “There’s nothing better than hitting a jump, and landing in the powder. It doesn’t compare to anything else. It’s you and your buddies; you’re in touch with nature; it’s the stuff you really remember.” “I win, thrive, soar, higher, higher, higher. More fire.” TELL US MORE… (As in, I want more Celia like Christopher Walken wants more cowbell!) What’s on the radar for 2013? “This year, I’ve been doing a bunch of contests, and am trying to do the Olympic events. I need to stay in the top 30 to qualify, and have four more events to go. My heart is still in filming in the backcountry, though!” Anything else you want to leave us with? “Yes! In the spring we’ll be filming again; planning on doing at least one or two more edits with Sarka of 58

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our season this year (it’ll be online vid to come out next fall). And other than that… just promoting women’s snowboarding, and Colorado! It’s my home!” Amen to that, Her Backqueen Highness. Keep taking us up, up, and away!

CELIA FACTS SO MANY SPONSORS (!): » Flow » O’Neill » Bollé » Discrete Headwear » POW Gloves DID YOU KNOW: Celia and Chad opened up their own nonsnow-related clothing store in Breck? Check out the shop to score some stylie duds. Moxie Clothing Boutique 124 S. Main Street Breckenridge, CO (910.453.6722) There are two wiener dogs in Celia’s life named Calloway and Chopper who have their own Instagram “Wienergram” page, and so many followers it’s embarrassing Follow them here: http://web.stagram. com/n/wienergrams/

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» CELIA GETS HUGE AIR WHILE RIDING SOME FRESH POWDER AT VAIL PASS.

JEFF BROCKMEYER

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igh h s i h er t t t e b st .com u h j t s u i o c Musi .three20s www )

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DISCOUNT RENTALS Atomic • K2 • Burton • Lib Tech • Rossignol Salomon • Volkl • Nordica and more! RETAIL Obermeyer • Spyder • Oakley • Arc-teryx Burton • Quicksilver • Roxy RELIABLE SERVICE Expert Ski & Snowboard Tuning and Repair 12 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS Vail • Beaver Creek • Avon • Breckenridge Call toll free—888.295.9797 Ask about our Premier Ski Delivery www.CharterSports.com

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THE LIFE

THE ART OF FLIGHT INSIDE THE WORLD OF A HELI PILOT by lynnea tamsen

mike artz

WANTED: PART-TIME PILOT WITH A FULL-TIME LOVE OF SOARING THROUGH HIGH ALTITUDES; MUST WORK WELL UNDER PRESSURE; FEAR OF HEIGHTS IS A DEAL-BREAKER; BADASS-NESS A PLUS.

You don’t go looking for jobs like this; jobs like this find YOU. And, like an ill-fated bug on life’s windshield, the “flying bug” hit Lee Rhodes when he was twelve years old.

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“We were at a Fourth of July fair, and they had helicopter rides…and I took a ride…and I thought to myself, ‘I’m gonna do that someday!’ “

then set his sights on the heli-skiing world. Enter Silverton, where this pilot would hover for two years, calling eager backcountry skiers and riders his copilots.

THE TAKE-OFF THE FLIGHT Fast forward a handNot surprisingly, this ful of years, a firetype of flying quickly fighting career, and “YOU’RE RIGHT AT became his favorite; hours of practice in THE EDGE OF WHAT his voice glows with the air later, and Lee the giddiness of a THE HELICOPTER CAN could add “full time rider landing his first pilot” to his resume. DO, AND YOU ALWAYS Method as he deAnd then…he took HAVE TO BE THINKING scribes what it’s like off; literally. Zigzagto fly for backcountry ABOUT WHAT COULD ging through the air, powder hounds. the newly-minted piGO WRONG.” “So many people lot worked contracts are having a great ranging from transtime, and so many say porting geologists to it’s on their bucket list, or it’s the coolactive volcanoes; putting out forest est – or craziest – thing they’ve ever fires; flying for a California news stadone. So it’s about giving that experition; and even chauffeuring the rich ence to people for the first time. It’s reand glamorous from land-to-yacht. As ally fun for me to be involved in that if that weren’t captivating enough, he

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whole process; see their eyes just light up while they’re flying.“ Of course, amidst the fun and views, there is always a foundation of acute awareness in the mind of a heli pilot. The most daunting aspects of piloting a helicopter in the backcountry? “Weather can change really quickly… you have to pay attention to that. But once you get the skills, most of flying is decision-making. You have to know what you’re capable of, what you’re not capable of, and say ‘no’ when it’s not safe. Especially in Silverton! It’s the highest ski area in North America; we’re landing at 13,500 feet. You have a fully loaded helicopter, at that altitude, with drastic wind… you’re right at the edge of what the helicopter can do, and you always have to be thinking about what could go wrong.“ “Whiteouts are also a very real concern; you get close to the ground, snow starts to blow, and then all of a sudden you’re in a ‘bowl of milk’, as


THE ART OF FLIGHT

THE LANDING So, what’s on the horizon for this pilot? He’s thinking Alaska’s Valdez, for a change of backcountry scenery. But, then again, in the world of freelance helicopter flying, the possibilities are as endless as the clear blue sky. “Everyone always tells me I have the coolest job in the world!”, he quips. (Amen!) Lee can be reached at LeeRhodes@ hotmail.com if you’re ever in the mood for some soaring through the air…or are now completely enamored with the idea of becoming a helicopter pilot yourself. Until then, keep your head in the clouds.

THE LIFE

i GET YOUR HELI ON Itching to heli-drop immediately now? Don’t forget that Silverton has a whole menu of options, whether you’re in the mood for a single drop, a whole day, or private transport to any mountain!

www.silvertonmountain.com/ page/experience/heli

Fascinated by choppers in general? Spend 10 minutes at this site, learn some aviation lingo, and feel instantly cooler:

http://sierrahotel.net/ slang-18.html

they call it. You can’t let that happen. Helicopters are not like airplanes; you always have to have a visual reference with the ground. If I lose that, I have no idea which way is up, and there’s basically a second or two before hitting the ground.” Speaking of terrifying things, Lee’s biggest scare came last winter, in front of a large audience, no less. “It was the “Red Bull Cold Rush” competition at Silverton, and I was flying the athletes and crews. Everything seemed normal, and it was a clear day. But in the mountains, the winds are unpredictable. I was coming into a landing spot, and this big downdraft came out of nowhere; I had to do an abrupt maneuver very close to the ground. All the spectators were right there.” Death-defying conditions; navigating a hunk of metal through the air; daredevil, life-saving moves in front of a crowd…all in a day’s work of a heli pilot, right?

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Owl House Pottery

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Durango, CO


CHICKS WITH PICKS

THE LIFE

CHICKS WITH

PICKS FROM CLIMBING TO CHARITY FUND RAISING, THESE GALS ARE BADAXE! by kelsey mcmaster

scott d.w. smith

GENERALLY, WHEN ONE THINKS OF TAKING A RETREAT, LAZING ON SANDY BEACHES WITH FRUIT-FILLED COCONUT COCKTAILS COMES TO MIND. HOWEVER, CHICKS WITH PICKS/CHICKS ROCK CLIMBING CLINICS OFFER A DIFFERENT KIND OF ENRICHING GET-AWAY.

14 years ago, life coach and climbing guide Kim Reynolds, along with associate Kelly Day, started the Ouray, Colorado based Chicks With Picks guiding company. The company offers a unique guiding service that is a women specific organization with the mission to promote climbing in a fun and safe environment. “Our goal is to help women become strong, self-sufficient climbers,” said girly guide and accomplished rock and ice climber Dawn Glanc. “Our guides are awesome!”

CLIMBER & GUIDE: DAWN GLANC

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CHICKS WITH PICKS

The Chicks With Picks guides are very accomplished climbers who have climbed all over the world, putting up first ascents on a variety of terrain. Many of the guides have AMGA training and certifications. Chicks offers clinics in a variety of lengths, levels and types. When ice season is over, Chicks Rock kicks into gear and expands its rock climbing clinics into different terrain and locations across the United States. Some years they even offer guided Nepali trekking trips. “Our events are very empowering and often times a moment of wow in a person’s life,” said Glanc. Women of all ages from different states attend these different climbing events. They create a comfortable and safe atmosphere for learning, and when different pressures are removed from the equation, it opens people up to getting in touch with themselves. And maybe, in lieu of lazing on sandy beaches, that kind of enriching experience with Chicks is just what the doctor ordered. “The impact these clinics have on the women who take them, it ends up being SO much more than climbing,” said Reynolds. This experience results in what one can only describe as a kind of learning intensive but relaxed women’s retreat. After the events, many women give feedback that the clinics were life changing. The learning that occurs in the women that attend is not only monumental in climbing skills, but in life skills. “Mental barriers are the

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hardest thing to overcome. They can stop even the strongest climber,” said Glanc. “I have seen many clients become empowered throughout the Chicks climbing events. There is something about facing fear and pushing comfort levels that makes transformation happen.” Chicks With Picks/Chicks Rock is doing more to help women than just offering the clinics. They raise money for Ouray area charities like The Tri-County Women’s Resource Center and The Ouray Ice Park. They are helping at risk women receive safe shelter. “We host two public slideshows/ auctions; we have raised $186,000 for local charities. It’s a big piece of what we do,” said Reynolds. “Women climbing with women, for women. That’s just a piece of it.”

i CLIMBING INFO For more information on Chicks climbing clinics, how you can get involved or to sign up visit: www.chickswithpicks.net

EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE


» INES PAPERT (THIS PAGE) EMILY HARRINGTON (OPPOSITE PAGE) CLIMB BOTH A ROCK FACE AND AN OVERHANG TOWER IN OURAY, COLORADO.

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TRANSPLANT

THE LIFE

TRANSPLANT by pat milbery WE WANDER AROUND THIS GREAT EARTH IN SEARCH OF MANY DIFFERENT THINGS.

Some wander to discover themselves, others wander to encounter a lover, some others may wander to achieve a higher quality of life and me, I wander because I want to ride the best mountains in the world. The Rocky Mountains energy sucked me in at the young teenage age of 13 while visiting Colorado on a trip with my incredible family. We adventured out to the Vail Slopes and I soon feel deeply in love. I remember there was an event taking place at the top of Vail called “Unvailed,” and every one of my favorite pro-snowboarders were riding the super unique set-up the Vail park crew had built for them.

TERRY RATZLAFF

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I had the opportunity to meet Kevin Jones and saw him stomp a frontside 900, I met Bryan Iguchi and watched him boost giant Mctwists out of a quarter pipe, and I even met Jim Rippey, the backflip slayer, who’s video part the year before in the video TB4 blew my mind! These guys were all having so much fun and taught me quite a lot about snowboarding in one single afternoon of shredding in the Rocky Mountains. Granted, I only visited Colorado from my homeland of Minnesota once a year for the next 8 years, there was something about this place that made me so happy.

CHRIS FARONA

I made the move in the spring of 2002 and transplanted my existence to the town of Breckenridge. What a place, I spent 6 seasons shredding the slopes there and I have since relocated to the birthplace of Epic Colorado Magazine, Golden the gateway to the Rockies. That decision was the best decision I have ever made. I have grown as a person, as a friend, as a snowboarder, as an artist, as a nature lover and most importantly a committed believer to the notion that Colorado is the best place on the planet. The more people I met while living in Colorado, the larger percentage of correlation between them being transplants became a very consistent obser-

around the globe. I take vation. I began to notice pride in representing this that Colorado has a special great state of Colorado. energy about it. Maybe it This colexists in umn goes the air, or out to maybe in “I ONLY VISITED the thouthe water COLORADO ONCE A sands of or in the YEAR FOR THE NEXT us transm o u n plants tains? My 8 YEARS, BUT THERE t h a t answer is WAS SOMETHING choose that is exSPECIAL ABOUT THIS this aweists in the s o m e people! PLACE THAT MADE state to We make ME SO HAPPY. coexist in, this state lets keep what it bu i l d i ng is today it through the respect and through our creativity, love the locals have welpositive energy and buildcomed us in with. ing together. I am very lucky to travel the world as a professional snowboarder, and spread that Colorado love

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THE LIFE

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RUBY HILL

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DENVER’S NEW RUBY IT SEEMS OUR HIGHLY SOUGHT CITY HAS A NEW GEM TO BRAG ABOUT…OR RATHER, A NEW RUBY. by mike cook

CHRIS FARONA

RUBY HILL RAILYARD MADE ITS LONG-AWAITED

years in-the-making. Colorado citizens might

grand opening this January. For those who

remember that low-pressure week of bitter

haven’t heard yet. . . Tucked conveniently near

January weather that rolled out across our state

the South Platte River, within the old Ruby Hill

mid-month. While most of us were layering

Park, now rests a ski and snowboard terrain

clothes to the point of injury and cursing the

park. That’s right, a terrain park, in the armpit

cold, volunteers and staff behind The Ruby

of our city. A project which is the result of a

Hill project couldn’t have been happier. For

collaboration between Winter Park Ski Resort,

although Playoff Week brought dashed hopes

Denver Parks & Recreation, and Christy Sports

and biting cold, it also graciously ushered in the

Retailers, the launching of which has been many

weather necessary to get Ruby Hill in operation.

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THE LIFE

RUBY HILL TRANSPLANTED

the most interesting of all Indeed, last year we never the features is “the torpedo,” hit the three days below 27 aptly named as it looks to be degree-streak needed in order a missile, half-buried on the to blow and retain the snow farthest East side of the park. base appropriate for a terrain Ruby Hill boasts a few park. Not just any ordinary less tangible, yet nonetheterrain park, but a totally inless worthy ‘features’ which novative, inner-city park at are rarely encountered in that. Thus a few abnormally on-mountain terrain parks. mild winters have continuNot only is there an uncomally postponed the Ruby Hill mon, yet distinct sense of Debut season after season. calm dousing the park to its But Mother Nature and Old perimeters, but also an overMan Winter were on our whelming feeling of comside this season and Ruby munity replacing the typiHill Railyard opened to the cal, competitive tension that powpow-anticipating public can be as hard and sharp as on Monday January 21st. morning ice in most parks. Word must have done a This tension is exactly what quick downhill run through deters a good number of the Denver Valley, because novices from ever venturing by as early as Monday afterinto a park and furthering noon the park was teeming their skill base. with riders and skiers. Upon observation it beA couple bright-eyed volc o m e s unteers roa p p a re nt tate shifts that Ruby maintainRUBY IS MAKING IT Hill is not ing the like other entry and POSSIBLE, WHERE IT parks. At landing of ONCE WAS NOT FOR any given all ten of A RANGE OF UNtime the the park’s age-range fe a t u re s . FORTUNATE COLOon the The menu RADANS TO FINALLY hill is as Ruby ofGET A TASTE OF WHY wide as fers parkthe range goers is as PEOPLE TRAVEL THE of skill. follows: WORLD SIMPLY TO A diverse a couple SAY THEY’VE SKIED collage b o x e s of people w i d e IN OUR STATE. atypical to enough for the crowd even the usually most novseen on the slopes, and all ice to bust a sick boardslide, of them with one common some smaller and more chalthread- they’re all Snolenging boxes, a double rail wheads. Any sex, any age, at the bottom just for good any color; and all of them measure, a rainbow and a Snowheads. Everyone is bent rail, and for the more courteous, despite the limexperienced taste is a tall and ited space, waiting patientslim rounded rail; but by far

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ly their turn to grind, unstrap and climb back to do it all again. From middleaged beginners who can’t stand for the length of the “bunny hill’ sized run, to a few young ones who the Olympics should start looking out for. Yet further beneath the surface: below the features, the snow, and even beyond the vibe, Ruby Hill is truly doing big things behind the scenes for our state, our city, our people, and even for the sport as a whole. It is a “big picture” sort of project, you might say. Ruby is making it possible, where it once was not for a range of unfortunate Coloradans to finally get a taste of why people travel the world simply to say they’ve skied in our state. On Colorado Snow. In the Rocky Mountains. Let’s face it, skiing/snowboarding must be one of the most expensive sports

JEFF NASS

to participate in. For some, the sport is out of the question based on cost alone. For others insufficient or unreliable transportation can’t guarantee them a safe trip up the hill. Whatever it may be, many Colorado residents aren’t able to enjoy the sport that makes their state famous, and there’s just something inherently wrong with that fact. Apparently the three powers-that-be who make Ruby Hill happen felt the same way. So they decided to offer absolutely free rentals for anyone over the age of 8, every weekend the park is able to stay open. Just another way Ruby Hill and those responsible for seeing it into reality are making it possible for every Coloradan to enjoy our namesake, our white gold, and our proclaimed but unofficial State Sport.

RIDER: CAMERON LAWRENCE


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a youth development charity

C O U R A G E DISCIPLINE INTEGRITY W I S D O M C O M PA S S I O N inspiring youth  to  make  positive  decisions  for  healthy   and  successful  lives  through  winter  and  outdoor  sports

he d t sprea

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www.sosoutreach.org

 


Vital Outdoors 1224 Washington Ave. Golden, Colorado 80401 303-215-1644

.com

Golden Colorado

Great Deals! Great Brands!

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BACKCOUNTRY BRAIN TIPS FOR RIDING BACKCOUNTRY SAFELY by ryan cruze

In the last issue we covered the basic equipment you should have when headed outside of resort and ski area boundaries. For this time around we will give some essential guidelines to prepare for getting out in the mountains and riding untracked lines. Some of the basic knowledge that you will need to enjoy the backcountry is given here and remember that continuing your outdoor education is a must if you want to progress to bigger and steeper terrain. GET PREPARED: Taking an avalanche course is the first step to becoming more confident and capable. Always remember the essential tools; an avalanche beacon, shovel, probe, water, first aid, and extra layers. Also pairing up with experienced partners will give you the best on hand resources for having a safe and enjoyable day. Be sure to tell someone where you are going and an approximate time of when you will return. If for some reason you don’t make it back search and rescue will have much better odds of finding you when they know where to start looking. A crucial first step is getting yourself familiar with the symptoms of avalanche potential. You can find this information from local avalanche center updates, watching for obvious clues, viewing natural avalanche paths and by digging snowpits. Using all the available tools will help you to make safe decisions and boost confidence when in the backcountry. OBVIOUS CLUES AND RED FLAGS: There are some clues that you can pay attention to that will give you signs of instability before you even dig a snow pit if you know what to look for. Observing natural avalanches or detecting a rapid temperature

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rise indicates potential avalanche danger. Details such as shooting cracks in the snow or also whoompfing (a burst of air pressure as snow layers beneath are settling) tell you immediately that there is a weak layer or lack of bonding in the snow. Recent snowfall in the previous 24-48 hours is also a sign of instability since new snow usually hasn’t had time to bond on old surfaces. Entry-level avalanche courses will teach you how to conduct a proper compression test of the slope, and even if you are comfortable with the terrain it is good habit to dig a pit every time you head out into the backcountry. TRAVEL PROTOCOLS: Avoid undercutting slopes, traveling over convex rolls, and areas that expose one to terrain traps such as valleys and creeks where it may be easier to get buried by snow. Minimize the number of people on the slope, and remember to stop only in safe locations away from the dangerous areas described above. When the snow does show signs of instability you want to have a plan for an easy route to ski or ride down. This may even involve hiking down something you just walked up. It may seem frustrating, but remember even the best riders in the world sometimes will change their route to safe zones and choose other slopes when the conditions just are not right. Once you become more comfortable and familiar with your surroundings in the backcountry, noticing these signs and how to respond should become easier as you gain more experience. Check out http://www.avalanche.org/ for more information on local avalanche centers and courses available throughout the US.

TERRY RATZLAFF


» RYAN CRUZE TAKES A BREAK TO CHECK OUT THE VIEW ON HIS SLED IN SILVERTON, COLORADO.

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Durango Mountain Resort NO PLACE CAN BEAT ALL THE OPTIONS THIS PLACE OFFERS by sven brunso

TO

SOME,

THE

TERM

“Basecamp” brings to mind a sea of yellow tents, sherpas, and time spent getting acclimated to some unforgiving climate. For those visiting Durango Mountain Resort each winter, the term basecamp is commonly used to describe the perfect location from which to harvest the bounty of outdoor activities located amidst the rugged terrain of the San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado. This is definitely not the I-70 experience as Durango Mountain is more than 3 hours away from the closest major city which keep the crowds minimal and the untracked snow plentiful. In many other resorts the term powder-day has been replaced with the moniker powder-hour. Not so here, as the snow tends to last for days instead of hours. We like to think of our basecamp as a place that is perfectly located in the heart of winter adventure. From your Durango Mountain Resort doorstep you find more than 1360 acres of varied terrain at Durango Mountain Resort, access to more than 35,000 acres of untracked powder via snowcat with San 82

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Juan Ski Company, endless backcountry touring options with Kling Mountain Guides, and quick access to Silverton Mountain providing the most challenging ski and snowboard experience in America. Need a day off? Take a drive on the Million Dollar Highway to Ouray and play at the Ice Climbing Park or head south 20 minutes to the town of Durango where there are more restaurants per capita than any city in America plus four craft breweries including the legendary Steamworks and SKA. No other place in ski country has access to such a wide variety of winter sports opportunities. Whether you want the comfort of riding high-speed lifts and skiing at a resort or earning turns in the backcountry, Durango Mountain Resort puts you in the heart of everything winter. After a day in the mountains, guests retreat to slopeside lodging where they enjoy all the comforts of home plus many others such as rooftop hot tubs and a full service spa facility. After soaking away the day, guests have numerous choices for dining in the Purgatory plaza. SCOTT D.W. SMITH


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CANDY


TERRY RATZLAFF RIDER: GREYSON CLIFFORD DENVER, COLORADO EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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JEFF NASS RIDER: MARK HOYT SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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FRED MARMSATER CLIMBER: MICHAEL ARNOLD LONG'S PEAK, COLORADO 88

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MIKE ARTZ RIDER: LEO AHRENS SILVERTON, COLORADO EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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DAN MILNER RIDER: ANGUS LEITH TELLURIDE, COLORADO 90

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FRED MARMSATER CLIMBER: BRYAN SMITH DEAD ELK COULOIR, COLORADO 92

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DAVE APPLE RIDER: MAT FERIC RED CLIFF, COLORADO

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CHRIS FARONA RIDER: PAT MILBERY RED ROCKS, COLORADO EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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BRETT SCHRECKENGOST CLIMBER: MATT STEEN TELLURIDE, COLORADO 96

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JEFF BROCKMEYER VAIL PASS, COLORADO

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TERRY RATZLAFF RIDERS: RYAN CRUZE & RITCHIE COLASANTI SILVERTON, COLORADO 100

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JEFF NASS SKIER: JOSH BERLAND EVERGREEN, COLORADO

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MARTIN SODERQVIST SKIER: SVEN BRUNSO DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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DAVE APPLE RIDER: DICK HOFFMAN VAIL, COLORADO EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

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DAN MILNER RIDER: ANGUS LEITH TELLURIDE, COLORADO 106

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GUIDE

WHAT'S THE HAPS WINTER EVENTS ACROSS COLORADO

ASPEN

MURS, Fox Theatre March 8

Touwab Krewe and See-I March 22

Eoto, Belly Up March 14

Kill Paris, Fox Theatre March 14

Joey Porter’s Shady Business March 23

Yonder Mountain String Band, Belly Up March 16-17

G.Love & Special Sauce, Boulder Theater March 15

Stop Making Sense March 29

Toubab Krewe & See-I, Belly Up March 24

Hoodie Allen & AER, Fox Theatre March 16

Aspen AIDS Benefit Fashion Show, Belly Up March 27 Elephant Revival, Belly Up March 29 Bombastic Meatbeats, Belly Up March 30 Lotus, Belly Up April 2 Modestep, Belly Up April 10 Soul Asylum, Belly Up April 12 Buttermilk Closing Day April 7 Snowmass Closing Day April 14 Aspen Mountain Closing Day April 14 Rusko, Belly Up April 14 Aspen Highlands Closing Day April 21 Mobb Deep, Belly Up May 11

Dillon Francis, Boulder Theater March 7

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Toubab Krewe & See-I, Fox Theatre March 21 Lotus, Boulder Theater April 4 Sammy Adams & T. Mills, Fox Theatre April 9 Bonobo (Live Band), Fox Theatre April 25 The Black Angels, Boulder Theater May 10

CRESTED BUTTE Conspirator, Eldo March 20 CB All Stars, Eldo March 23 Crested Butte Closing day April 7

DENVER

BOULDER

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French Montana, Fox Theatre March 20

»

Revenge of the 90’s III March 30 Random Rab Live & Bluetech April 5

Band of Horses, Ogden Theatre April 8 Bad Religion & Against Me, Fillmore Auditorium April 10

Polish Ambassador & Blockhead April 6

Bullet For My Valentine, Halestorm, & Young Guns: Harddrive Live Tour, Fillmore Auditorium April 12

Method Man & Redman April 20

Lily Tomlin, Paramount Theatre April 13

The Unified Field May 3-4

Rusko, Ogden Theatre April 12-13

Lettuce May 31 & June 1st

Bon Jovi, Pepsi Center April 16

(DENVER EVENTS CONTINUED)

Danzig, Ogden Theatre April 19

Animal Collective, Ogden Theatre March 22

Slightly Stoopid with Cypress Hill, Red Rocks April 20

Tech N9ne, Fillmore Auditorium March 22

SOJA (Roots Underground and Euforquestra), Ogden Theatre May 3

Imagine Dragons, Fillmore Auditorium March 23 Chris Tucker, Paramount Theatre March 23 All That Remains, Fillmore Auditorium March 26

CERVANTES THEATER

Lindsey Stirling, Ogden Theatre March 28

Nit Grit, Gladkill, Sugar Pill, Rodway, 50 Carrot, Lt. Dan March 16

Erykah Badu, Fillmore Auditorium March 30

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Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band, Pepsi Center April 2

SOJA (Air Dubai and Las Rakas), Ogden Theatre May 4 Global Dub Festival: Flux Pavilion/Excision, Red Rocks May17 Ron White, Temple Buell Theatre May 17 Vampire Weekend & Of Monsters and Men, Red Rocks May 20 Arctic Monkeys, Ogden Theatre May 28


Bassnecter, Red Rocks June 1

MTHDS, State Bridge May 24

DURANGO

Campout For The Cause, State Bridge May 24-26

Joel Racheff, Derailed Saloon March 16 The Gamits, The Summit March 16 Three Brothers, Deraled Saloon March 23 Policulture, The Summit March 30 DEVO Bike Swap, LaPlata County Fairgrounds March 29-31 Ska Beach Party, Durango Mountain Resort March 31 Purgatory Closing Day March 31 Wolf Creek Closing Day April 7

Blues, Brews & BBQ, Beaver Creek May 25 – 27 Vail Valor Half-Marathon, Vail May 27

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS Bud Light Rocks The Boat Concert Series March 9 – April 14 M.T.H.D.S., Sweet Water Grill March 16 St. Patrick’s Day Torchlight Parade & Fireworks Display March 17 Annual Cody’s Challenge at Steamboat Resort March 23

Silverton Mountain Closing Day April 14

Ski 4 Yellow at Steamboat Resort March 29 - 30

Durango Bluegrass Meltdown, Main St., Durango April 19-21

The Big Motif, Ghost Ranch Saloon April 6

Iron Horse Bicycle Classic April 24-27

33rd Annual Cardboard Classic at Steamboat Resort April 13

EAGLE COUNTY

String Board Theory, Old Town Pub April 13

Winter Market, Edwards March 17 - 31 Korbel American Ski Classic, Vail March 20 - 23 Vail Film Festival March 28 – 31 Taste of Vail April 3 – 6 Spring Back to Vail April 8 – 14 Vail Mountain Closing Day April 14 Beaver Creek Resort Closing Day April 14 Short Track Mountain Biking Series, Beaver Creek May 15

Gipsy Moon, The Tugboat April 14 SPLASHDOWN Pond Skimming Competition at Steamboat Resort April 14 Steamboat Resort Closing Day April 14

SUMMIT COUNTY St. Patty’s Day O’Fuego, Copper Mountain March 16 Breckenridge Spring Fever March 17 – April 14 5 Peaks Mountaineering Race, Breckenridge March 23

INSET PHOTO BY KELSEY MCMASTER

Spring Fever Chili Cook-off, Breckenridge March 24 Throwback Throwdown, Breckenridge March 30 USASA National Championships at Copper Mountain March 30 – April 9 SHAKEDOWN STREET, Three20South April 5 Breckenridge Spring Beer Festival April 6 Bud Light Concert Series at Breckenridge April 6 - 14

Telluride Closing Day April 7th Mountainfilm Festival, Telluride May 24-27th Telluride Bluegrass Festival June 20-23rd

WINTER PARK So-Gnar Shred Circuit Finale April 6th Silver Bullet Base Bash, Presented by Coors Light April 6th, 13th Winter Park Springtopia April 20-21st

Keystone Slush Cup April 7

Coca-Cola Spring Splash April 21st

Keystone Closing Day April 7

Winter Park Summer Opening June 15th

Imperial Challenge at Breckenridge April 13

EPIC Singletrack Race June 15th

Annual Loveland Derby April 13 – 14 Sunsation, RedBull Slopesoakers, Copper Mountain April 13 – 14

Trestle Gravity Series June 22-23rd

i MORE INFO

Breckenridge Closing Day April 14 Closing Day Party with The Werks & Free Beer, Three20South April 14

For more info on upcoming events, please visit www.epic-mag.com for an updated event calendar.

Copper Mountain Closing Day April 14 Loveland Closing Day TBA Arapahoe Basin Closing Day TBA

TELLURIDE First Thursday Art Walk, Telluride April 4th KOTO End of Season Street Dance, Telluride April 5th Bluegrass Party, Telluride April 5th

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GUIDE

TALKIN' SHOP WHERE TO GET YOUR GEAR

ASPEN (ASPEN, HIGHLANDS, BUTTERMILK, SNOWMASS)

UP Snowboard Rentals 970-920-0123 426 S. Spring St. Aspen, CO 81611 www.upsnowboard.com

SKIING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals)

MUSIC (stores, venues, etc.)

D & E Ski and Snowboard Shop Aspen 970-920-233 520 E. Durant Ave Aspen, CO 81611 www.aspensnowmass.com

Belly Up Aspen 970-544-9800 450 South Galena Street Aspen, CO 81611

DENVER MUSIC (stores, venues, etc. Cervantes Masterpiece 303-297-1772 2637 Welton Street Denver, CO 80205 www.cervantesmasterpiece.com

Pepi and Sheika have brought you one of the greatest selections of quality skiwear and equipment for over 40 years. In the lower level, we have a full service ski & rental shop containing the finest winter equipment and ski accessories.

Stapleton Sports 970-925-9169 426 S. Spring St. Aspen, CO 81611 www.stapletonski.com

Transition Sports/ The Stash Boardshop 970-845-7388 240 Chapel Place #125 Avon, CO 81620 www.Transition-sports.com www.Stashboardshop.com

SNOWBOARDING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals)

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Double Diamond Ski Shop 970-476-5500 520 E. Lionshead Cir. Vail, CO 81657 www.DoubleDiamondVail.com

Pepi Sports 970-476-5206 231 Bridge Street Vail, CO 81657 www.pepisports.com

Pomeroy Sports 970-925-7875 614 E. Durant Ave. Aspen, CO 81611 www.pomeroysports.com

Radio Boardshop 970-925-9373 400 E. Hopkins Ave. Aspen, CO 81611 www.radioboardshop.com

Charter Sports has 12 convenient ski and board rental locations throughout Vail, Beaver Creek, Avon and Breckenridge. Save 30% on rentals by reserving online at www. CharterSports.com.

“America’s Top Ski Shop” Just Steps From the Gondola

Hamilton Sports 970-925-1200 520 E. Durant Ave #106 Aspen, CO 81611 www.hamiltonsports.com

D & E Ski and Snowboard Shop Aspen 970-920-233 520 E. Durant Ave Aspen, CO 81611 www.aspensnowmass.com

PO Box 4570 Avon, CO 81620 www.CharterSports.com

www.bellyupaspen.com Two Old Hippies 970-925-7492 111 S. Monarch Street Aspen, CO 81611 www.twooldhippies.com

EPIC COLORADO MAGAZINE

EAGLE COUNTY (VAIL, BEAVER CREEK) SKIING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals) Charter Sports 888-295-9797

Transition Sports accepts all types of “in-season” sporting goods and associated gear. Bring in your old, lightly used outdoor equipment and we will sell it for you in the shop. Consignors receive 60% cash or 70% store credit for all sold items…in certain cases, we may even buy the gear directly from you.

Venture Sports 888-825-8245 51 Beaver Creek Pl.


Avon, CO 81620 www.avonventuresports.com info@avonventuresports.com Voted “Best of the Vail Valley” 10 years running, we pioneered ski & snowboard rental delivery and offer a 100% money back guarantee on all our services. Locally owned and operated with the best prices, services & locations.

SNOWBOARDING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals) Charter Sports 888-295-9797 PO Box 4570 Avon, CO 81620 www.CharterSports.com Charter Sports has 12 convenient ski and board rental locations throughout Vail, Beaver Creek, Avon and Breckenridge. Save 30% on rentals by reserving online at www. CharterSports.com.

Double Diamond Ski Shop 970-476-5500 520 E. Lionshead Cir. Vail, CO 81657 www.DoubleDiamondVail.com “America’s Top Ski Shop” Just Steps From the Gondola

Transition Sports/ The Stash Boardshop 970-845-7388 240 Chapel Place #125 Avon, CO 81620 www.Transition-sports.com www.Stashboardshop.com Transition Sports accepts all types of “in-season” sporting goods and associated gear. Bring in your old, lightly used outdoor equipment and we will sell it for you in the shop. Consignors receive 60% cash or 70% store credit for all sold items…in certain cases, we may even buy the gear directly from you.

JEFF NASS

Venture Sports 888-825-8245 51 Beaver Creek Pl. Avon, CO 81620 www.avonventuresports.com info@avonventuresports.com

SUMMIT COUNTY (KEYSTONE, BRECKENRIDGE) SKIING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals) Base Mountain Sports 970-453-6405 500 South Park Avenue Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.basemountainsports.com Columbia Breckenridge 970-453-9307 108 S. Main Street Breckenridge, CO 80424 PO Box 5590 breckski@breckgear.com Main Street Sports 970-453-1777 401 S. Main Street PO Box 1560 Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.mainstreetsports.com Mountain Wave 970-453-8305 800-453-3050 600 S. Park Ave www.mtnwavesnowboards.com Mountain Vibe 970-423-6052 mountain1859@yahoo.com 221 S. Main St. Breckenridge, CO 80424 Slope Style 970-547-4417

SKIER: PAUL COTTER

110 S. Main St, Unit A Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.slopestyle-ski.com Slope Style is Breckenridge’s newest ski shop, and Breck’s only core freeski shop. Located in the heart of main street we’re just minutes away from both the bottom of 4 O’clock run and the Gondola.

The North Face Breckenridge 970-453-1613 322 S. Main St. Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.breckgear.com SNOWBOARDING (soft goods/hard goods/rentals) Base Mountain Sports 970-453-6405 500 South Park Avenue Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.basemountainsports.com

Underground Breck (970) 453-7400 320 South Main Street Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.undergroundsnow boards.com OPTICS (glasses, goggles, etc) Sun logic 970-453-8477 421 S. Main St Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.sunlogic.com Mountain Vibe 970-423-6052 mountain1859@yahoo.com 221 S. Main St. Breckenridge, CO 80424 OTHER (etcetera)

Joes Lock & Key 970-389-KEYS PO Box 3253 Big Hit Dillon, CO 80435 970-453-1109 JoesLockAndKey@gmail.com 100 North Main # 210 Breckenridge, CO 80424 Main Street Sports 970-453-1777 401 S. Main Street PO Box 1560 Breckenridge, CO 80424 www.mainstreetsports.com Mountain Wave 970-453-8305 800-453-3050 600 S. Park Ave www.mtnwavesnowboards.com Mountain Vibe 970-423-6052 221 S. Main St. Breckenridge, CO 80424 mountain1859@yahoo.com

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EPIC Colorado - Winter / Sring 2013  

"Farewell to Winter" Our second issue featured Telluride Resort, Ouray Colorado, Chris Ewart and Celia Miller