Int. OCEAN FILM TOUR Volume 1 - Magazine

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aDvenTure arOunD-The-wOrlD sOlO TriP: laura DeKKer’s maiDenTriP waTer sPOrTs One wave, Three cOnTinenTs: This Time TOmOrrOw unDerwaTer wOrlD abOuT aDvenTurers anD Treasure hunTers: aTTenTiOn & raY


eDiTOrial

T R U E

This is FOr YOu, Ocean lOvers

K I TE BOA RDI N G

THE WAVEBOARD COLLECTION

“This is just where i want to be,” the 14-year-old circumnavigator, laura Dekker, says about the Pacific. even at 75 years, diver ray ives still explores the depths of the ocean, “where everything is absolutely perfect” when he holds his breath. scientists wistfully show us the beauty of the “last ocean”, and two surfers experience their “next-level strangeness” while looking for the ultimate wave. PRO

S ER IES

KO NTAC T

WAM

WOOHOO

W HI P

WWW.NORTHKITES .COM

N U G G E T

cover Photo: © ian Derry; Photo: © Todd Glaser

Rider_Airton Cozzolino__Pics_Mario Entero

if you miss the smell of salt water or the swaying of a boat’s planking and cannot wait to dive into a breaking wave, then this is just right for you. we’re taking the sea to you and to the big screen, showing you the best water sports and environmental documentaries of the year.

we are fascinated by the blue part of our planet. with the same enthusiasm and care that we employ for the eurOPean OuTDOOr Film TOur, we have created a versatile program, which we hope will inspire you in the same way. Take a deep breath… Edition notice: The INTERNATIONAL OCEAN FILM TOUR is a production of Moving Adventures Medien GmbH | Editorial team: Paula Flach, Joachim Hellinger, Daniela Schmitt, Thomas Witt | Art director: Birthe Steinbeck | Graphics: Claudia Wolff | Legally responsible for content: Thomas Witt | ® 2014 | Moving Adventures Medien GmbH, Munich 80337

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www.OceanFilmTOur.cOm 2014


eDiTOrial

T R U E

This is FOr YOu, Ocean lOvers

K I TE BOA RDI N G

THE WAVEBOARD COLLECTION

“This is just where i want to be,” the 14-year-old circumnavigator, laura Dekker, says about the Pacific. even at 75 years, diver ray ives still explores the depths of the ocean, “where everything is absolutely perfect” when he holds his breath. scientists wistfully show us the beauty of the “last ocean”, and two surfers experience their “next-level strangeness” while looking for the ultimate wave. PRO

S ER IES

KO NTAC T

WAM

WOOHOO

W HI P

WWW.NORTHKITES .COM

N U G G E T

cover Photo: © ian Derry; Photo: © Todd Glaser

Rider_Airton Cozzolino__Pics_Mario Entero

if you miss the smell of salt water or the swaying of a boat’s planking and cannot wait to dive into a breaking wave, then this is just right for you. we’re taking the sea to you and to the big screen, showing you the best water sports and environmental documentaries of the year.

we are fascinated by the blue part of our planet. with the same enthusiasm and care that we employ for the eurOPean OuTDOOr Film TOur, we have created a versatile program, which we hope will inspire you in the same way. Take a deep breath… Edition notice: The INTERNATIONAL OCEAN FILM TOUR is a production of Moving Adventures Medien GmbH | Editorial team: Paula Flach, Joachim Hellinger, Daniela Schmitt, Thomas Witt | Art director: Birthe Steinbeck | Graphics: Claudia Wolff | Legally responsible for content: Thomas Witt | ® 2014 | Moving Adventures Medien GmbH, Munich 80337

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www.OceanFilmTOur.cOm 2014


P R O G RAM

P R O G RAM

AI T CH ! T W O ! O H !

The sea moves us. It challenges us to set records in sports, it inspires us to play, and it is a source of bottomless fascination. In eight moving films, the International Ocean Film Tour presents the blue world of the seven seas.

Att e n t i o n

Beyond the waves: Guillaume Néry below the surface Three and a half minutes without breathing, 120 metres below the surface of the sea: freediving is a quiet type of extreme sport. The athletes head into a hostile environment where it is cold and dark and they are subjected to enormous pressure. However, the masters of this sport train their body and mind to enjoy each metre on their way into the depths. The French freediver Guillaume Néry is a multiple world champion of his discipline. In the Ocean Film Tour special edit of “Attention—A Life in Extremes”, he offers us a glimpse into the psyche of his sport.

r ay

MAI D EN T RI P

The old man and the sea

A teenager on a great voyage

Ray Ives from Great Britain has been diving all his life. In the 1960s, he started his career as an industrial diver, and even today, at 75 years, he can’t get enough of the underwater world. He loves the silence, the emptiness and weightlessness under water. Over the years, he has found so many treasures in the half-light of the submarine landscape that they fill a whole museum—a nautical treasury for historians. But he also knows that the greatest secret of the ocean cannot be uncovered.

When Laura Dekker sailed from the harbour in Gibraltar in her ketch Guppy on August 21st, 2010, she had already put a few challenges behind her. After a one-year trial between Laura’s father and the Dutch youth welfare service, Laura finally got the green light for her adventure. And while the camera teams were waiting in vain for Laura in Portimão, she secretly set sail in Gibraltar, to return 518 days later as the youngest solo circumnavigator in history. She filmed her voyage herself: Maidentrip is her story.

St e p N ’  So u l

Board instead of dance floor: dancing on the sea A board under his feet and jazz in his ears: surfer Sam Bleakley does not stand on his longboard—he dances. Between Wynton Marsalis’s trumpet solos and the rhythm of the waves he finds the perfect moment. With his awardwinning short film, film maker Toma Jablon creates an exciting fusion of music and the sea and lets the borders between art and sports become blurred. A tribute to the rhythm of the sea.

Skating where there used to be water

last ocean

An abandoned hotel complex somewhere in the Mojave Desert: nobody would spend their holidays here now. Where holidaymakers used to splash around in the pools, there is now nothing but emptiness—a ghost city of past summers. But you can still have fun here: when skateboarder Kilian Martin conquers the area, the abandoned pool is turned into a half pipe, and the water slide’s handrail is used for grinds.

Save what can be saved

The Ross Sea is one of the last intact ecosystems of our planet—and it is in danger. Until 1996, commercial fishing was prohibited in this little explored marginal sea in the Antarctic, but since this ban was lifted, the delicate balance of this cold paradise has started to be upset... The Antarctic toothfish, which is coveted by international gourmet restaurants, drives fishing boats into the Ross Sea, which in turn drives conservationists up the wall.

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Photos: © Viktor Schaider; © Toma Jablon; © Gilles Calvet; © Todd Glaser

A lt e r e d Ro u t e

Photos: © Uwe Moser; © Neil Hope; © Altered Route; © John Weller

AN T AN D R O Y

This Time Tomorrow

Between the elements— kitesurfing in Africa

Nomads of the wave

Lavanono is a small fishing village on the coast of Madagascar. It used to be accessible only by sea, and even today you have to drive a Jeep along adventurous roads for two days to get there. A spot that is hard to find, but that you will never forget. A group of kite pros takes the journey and finds a sunny paradise on the African coast. Before the wondering eyes of the young villagers, they are able to find the golden line between sea and sky.

How do you manage to ride the exact same wave several times? Quite easy: you become a surfing nomad and follow it around. The surfing pros Dave Rastovich and Craig Anderson decided to make this dream come true when the perfect storm began to show on the weather charts. Together with the surfing film pioneer Taylor Steele, the two started out on their hunt and followed the swell from Tahiti via Mexico and California to Alaska for eight days... and as on any good road trip they met up with their friends Kelly Slater, Chris Del Moro, Alex Gray and Dan Malloy along the way.

5

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


P R O G RAM

P R O G RAM

AI T CH ! T W O ! O H !

The sea moves us. It challenges us to set records in sports, it inspires us to play, and it is a source of bottomless fascination. In eight moving films, the International Ocean Film Tour presents the blue world of the seven seas.

Att e n t i o n

Beyond the waves: Guillaume Néry below the surface Three and a half minutes without breathing, 120 metres below the surface of the sea: freediving is a quiet type of extreme sport. The athletes head into a hostile environment where it is cold and dark and they are subjected to enormous pressure. However, the masters of this sport train their body and mind to enjoy each metre on their way into the depths. The French freediver Guillaume Néry is a multiple world champion of his discipline. In the Ocean Film Tour special edit of “Attention—A Life in Extremes”, he offers us a glimpse into the psyche of his sport.

r ay

MAI D EN T RI P

The old man and the sea

A teenager on a great voyage

Ray Ives from Great Britain has been diving all his life. In the 1960s, he started his career as an industrial diver, and even today, at 75 years, he can’t get enough of the underwater world. He loves the silence, the emptiness and weightlessness under water. Over the years, he has found so many treasures in the half-light of the submarine landscape that they fill a whole museum—a nautical treasury for historians. But he also knows that the greatest secret of the ocean cannot be uncovered.

When Laura Dekker sailed from the harbour in Gibraltar in her ketch Guppy on August 21st, 2010, she had already put a few challenges behind her. After a one-year trial between Laura’s father and the Dutch youth welfare service, Laura finally got the green light for her adventure. And while the camera teams were waiting in vain for Laura in Portimão, she secretly set sail in Gibraltar, to return 518 days later as the youngest solo circumnavigator in history. She filmed her voyage herself: Maidentrip is her story.

St e p N ’  So u l

Board instead of dance floor: dancing on the sea A board under his feet and jazz in his ears: surfer Sam Bleakley does not stand on his longboard—he dances. Between Wynton Marsalis’s trumpet solos and the rhythm of the waves he finds the perfect moment. With his awardwinning short film, film maker Toma Jablon creates an exciting fusion of music and the sea and lets the borders between art and sports become blurred. A tribute to the rhythm of the sea.

Skating where there used to be water

last ocean

An abandoned hotel complex somewhere in the Mojave Desert: nobody would spend their holidays here now. Where holidaymakers used to splash around in the pools, there is now nothing but emptiness—a ghost city of past summers. But you can still have fun here: when skateboarder Kilian Martin conquers the area, the abandoned pool is turned into a half pipe, and the water slide’s handrail is used for grinds.

Save what can be saved

The Ross Sea is one of the last intact ecosystems of our planet—and it is in danger. Until 1996, commercial fishing was prohibited in this little explored marginal sea in the Antarctic, but since this ban was lifted, the delicate balance of this cold paradise has started to be upset... The Antarctic toothfish, which is coveted by international gourmet restaurants, drives fishing boats into the Ross Sea, which in turn drives conservationists up the wall.

4

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Photos: © Viktor Schaider; © Toma Jablon; © Gilles Calvet; © Todd Glaser

A lt e r e d Ro u t e

Photos: © Uwe Moser; © Neil Hope; © Altered Route; © John Weller

AN T AN D R O Y

This Time Tomorrow

Between the elements— kitesurfing in Africa

Nomads of the wave

Lavanono is a small fishing village on the coast of Madagascar. It used to be accessible only by sea, and even today you have to drive a Jeep along adventurous roads for two days to get there. A spot that is hard to find, but that you will never forget. A group of kite pros takes the journey and finds a sunny paradise on the African coast. Before the wondering eyes of the young villagers, they are able to find the golden line between sea and sky.

How do you manage to ride the exact same wave several times? Quite easy: you become a surfing nomad and follow it around. The surfing pros Dave Rastovich and Craig Anderson decided to make this dream come true when the perfect storm began to show on the weather charts. Together with the surfing film pioneer Taylor Steele, the two started out on their hunt and followed the swell from Tahiti via Mexico and California to Alaska for eight days... and as on any good road trip they met up with their friends Kelly Slater, Chris Del Moro, Alex Gray and Dan Malloy along the way.

5

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


ross sea

K EE P I T WIL D T HE LAS T O CEAN

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ross sea

The Ross Sea is situated in the southernmost part of our planet, right off the coast of the Antarctic. It is home to AdĂŠlie and Emperor Penguins, to Weddell seals and Antarctic toothfish, and for a long time it was known as the place on Earth which we as humans can influence the least.

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


ross sea

K EE P I T WIL D T HE LAS T O CEAN

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

ross sea

The Ross Sea is situated in the southernmost part of our planet, right off the coast of the Antarctic. It is home to AdĂŠlie and Emperor Penguins, to Weddell seals and Antarctic toothfish, and for a long time it was known as the place on Earth which we as humans can influence the least.

7

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


ross sea

ross sea

“ E v o c a t i v e , v i s u a l ly s t u n n i n g , i n fo r m a t i v e : w i t h ‘ T h e L a s t O c e a n ’, P e t e r Y o u n g h a s m a n a g e d to create an excellent film a b o u t o n e of t h e l a s t g r e a t wilderness areas o n E a r t h . W i t h po i g n a n t c l a r i ty, h e s h o w s u s t h a t w e r e a l ly h a v e to t a k e b e tt e r c a r e of m a r i n e l i f e — e s p e c i a l ly b e c a u s e w e s t i l l h a r d ly k n o w i t .”

T h e Ro s s S e a was named after the British sailor and explorer James Clark Ross (1800 - 1862) who in 1841 sailed these waters for the first time. It is up to 1,200 metres deep, and more than half of it (almost 500,000 square kilometres) is permanently covered by the Ross Ice Shelf.

Lars Abromeit, GEO

tainable use of our resources: from 2020, fishers will only be allowed to take as many fish as can grow back—not only in European waters, but around the world. However, the law only applies to fishermen from the EU. A good first step, but it does not suffice to solve the problem globally, since we Europeans are not the only ones who have expanded their fishing grounds to compensate for the missing stocks in our native waters.

For 15 years, worldwide fish stocks have been shrinking. More and more fishing fleets are working the oceans. We Eu­ ropeans are well on our way to emptying the Mediterranean and the North-eastern Atlantic. After years of ignorance, the European Union has finally acknowledged the problem and made the attempt to find a solution with a new fisheries law in May 2013. To some, the law is a small revolution; others only regard it as a drop in the bucket. The focus is the sus­

First, commercial fishing was established in areas where people used to fish traditionally, i.e. moderately, for exam­ ple in Africa. Since the mid-1990s, industrial fleets are also working in regions which were formerly entirely undisturbed by man. This is where overfishing poses a particularly grave problem. Its icy location at the end of the world used to protect the Ross Sea from our influence, but now its fragile

8

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

ecosystem is in great danger. In contrast to the Antarctic mainland, which was placed under special protection with the Antarctic Treaty in 1961, the usage of the waters adjacent to the continent is not as strictly regulated. This left the door wide open for the overfishing of the Antarctic toothfish.

Photos pages 6 -11: © Peter Weller

Far enough away from civilisation and uncomfortably cold, the Ross Sea used to be one thing above all else: of little global interest. Apart from a few researchers who investi­ gated its ecosystem no human beings spent longer periods of time there. However, today the Ross Sea is in danger. The problem seems to be far away, but its cause can be found right at our front door—overfishing.

to observe this development with concern. It would not be the first time that humans disturb an intact ecosystem with their inconsiderate behaviour. What is tragic about this is that we could still find out so much more about the Antarctic toothfish if scientific research had not all but stopped due to the diminishing stocks. We know that the fish has adapted perfectly to its icy environment. Its heart beats extremely slowly, and its blood contains a natural antifreeze agent. But that is all we can say with certainty. The question is whether we want to destroy a part of our planet before we have even had the chance to get to know it properly. Some people might regret being born too late to go down in history as a great explorer, but the fact is that we are not the generation that can only discover and explore our planet. We are the ones who have to protect it.

In the early 1990s, the fish conquered gourmet restau­ rants around the world under a false name, Chilean sea bass, because this meant better sales. This alias did not offer any protection, tough. Quite the opposite, demand grew from year to year. If the Antarctic toothfish completely dis­ appears—and that seems likely at the moment—the ecolog­ ical balance of the Ross Sea will be upset. The winners of this ”restructuring” would probably be the penguins, but with the Antarctic toothfish, orcas would also disappear from the Ross Sea. The researchers in the Antarctic have every reason

9

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


ross sea

ross sea

“ E v o c a t i v e , v i s u a l ly s t u n n i n g , i n fo r m a t i v e : w i t h ‘ T h e L a s t O c e a n ’, P e t e r Y o u n g h a s m a n a g e d to create an excellent film a b o u t o n e of t h e l a s t g r e a t wilderness areas o n E a r t h . W i t h po i g n a n t c l a r i ty, h e s h o w s u s t h a t w e r e a l ly h a v e to t a k e b e tt e r c a r e of m a r i n e l i f e — e s p e c i a l ly b e c a u s e w e s t i l l h a r d ly k n o w i t .”

T h e Ro s s S e a was named after the British sailor and explorer James Clark Ross (1800 - 1862) who in 1841 sailed these waters for the first time. It is up to 1,200 metres deep, and more than half of it (almost 500,000 square kilometres) is permanently covered by the Ross Ice Shelf.

Lars Abromeit, GEO

tainable use of our resources: from 2020, fishers will only be allowed to take as many fish as can grow back—not only in European waters, but around the world. However, the law only applies to fishermen from the EU. A good first step, but it does not suffice to solve the problem globally, since we Europeans are not the only ones who have expanded their fishing grounds to compensate for the missing stocks in our native waters.

For 15 years, worldwide fish stocks have been shrinking. More and more fishing fleets are working the oceans. We Eu­ ropeans are well on our way to emptying the Mediterranean and the North-eastern Atlantic. After years of ignorance, the European Union has finally acknowledged the problem and made the attempt to find a solution with a new fisheries law in May 2013. To some, the law is a small revolution; others only regard it as a drop in the bucket. The focus is the sus­

First, commercial fishing was established in areas where people used to fish traditionally, i.e. moderately, for exam­ ple in Africa. Since the mid-1990s, industrial fleets are also working in regions which were formerly entirely undisturbed by man. This is where overfishing poses a particularly grave problem. Its icy location at the end of the world used to protect the Ross Sea from our influence, but now its fragile

8

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

ecosystem is in great danger. In contrast to the Antarctic mainland, which was placed under special protection with the Antarctic Treaty in 1961, the usage of the waters adjacent to the continent is not as strictly regulated. This left the door wide open for the overfishing of the Antarctic toothfish.

Photos pages 6 -11: © Peter Weller

Far enough away from civilisation and uncomfortably cold, the Ross Sea used to be one thing above all else: of little global interest. Apart from a few researchers who investi­ gated its ecosystem no human beings spent longer periods of time there. However, today the Ross Sea is in danger. The problem seems to be far away, but its cause can be found right at our front door—overfishing.

to observe this development with concern. It would not be the first time that humans disturb an intact ecosystem with their inconsiderate behaviour. What is tragic about this is that we could still find out so much more about the Antarctic toothfish if scientific research had not all but stopped due to the diminishing stocks. We know that the fish has adapted perfectly to its icy environment. Its heart beats extremely slowly, and its blood contains a natural antifreeze agent. But that is all we can say with certainty. The question is whether we want to destroy a part of our planet before we have even had the chance to get to know it properly. Some people might regret being born too late to go down in history as a great explorer, but the fact is that we are not the generation that can only discover and explore our planet. We are the ones who have to protect it.

In the early 1990s, the fish conquered gourmet restau­ rants around the world under a false name, Chilean sea bass, because this meant better sales. This alias did not offer any protection, tough. Quite the opposite, demand grew from year to year. If the Antarctic toothfish completely dis­ appears—and that seems likely at the moment—the ecolog­ ical balance of the Ross Sea will be upset. The winners of this ”restructuring” would probably be the penguins, but with the Antarctic toothfish, orcas would also disappear from the Ross Sea. The researchers in the Antarctic have every reason

9

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


ross sea

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ross sea

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ross sea

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ross sea

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P R O J EC T S

P R O J EC T S

VIVA C O N A G UA Clean water for everyone!

Apart from the air that we breathe, water is the most elementary basis of life. Without water, there is no life. Water means health and happiness. For the Viva con Agua network from Hamburg, this fact is the fundamental motivation to become active—to initiate water projects all over the world and to provide people with access to clean water. www.vivaconagua.com

BI O T HERM WA T ERL O VERS

The organisation has been committed to the protection and sustainable use of the sea, waves and coasts for 20 years. Surfrider Foundation tries to attain its goals practically, with the help of flotsam collection events, but also legally, to stop the open sea from being treated as an unlegislated area, and politically, by promoting the inclusion of wave-generating coastlines into the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. www.surfriderfoundation.de

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Since 2012, Biotherm Waterlovers has been supporting projects that contribute to the protection and preservation of the oceans. The platform promoted the LAST OCEAN film project as part of its support for MISSION BLUE, the ocean protection program of biologist Sylvia Earle. She has been the driving force behind the fight for the “last ocean” for years. www.biothermsg.com/mission_blue.php Photo: © John Weller

Clean beaches!

Photos: © John Brömstrup; © Surfrider Foundation

SUR F RI D ER F O UN D A T I O N

Save the Ross Sea!

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


P R O J EC T S

P R O J EC T S

VIVA C O N A G UA Clean water for everyone!

Apart from the air that we breathe, water is the most elementary basis of life. Without water, there is no life. Water means health and happiness. For the Viva con Agua network from Hamburg, this fact is the fundamental motivation to become active—to initiate water projects all over the world and to provide people with access to clean water. www.vivaconagua.com

BI O T HERM WA T ERL O VERS

The organisation has been committed to the protection and sustainable use of the sea, waves and coasts for 20 years. Surfrider Foundation tries to attain its goals practically, with the help of flotsam collection events, but also legally, to stop the open sea from being treated as an unlegislated area, and politically, by promoting the inclusion of wave-generating coastlines into the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. www.surfriderfoundation.de

12

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Since 2012, Biotherm Waterlovers has been supporting projects that contribute to the protection and preservation of the oceans. The platform promoted the LAST OCEAN film project as part of its support for MISSION BLUE, the ocean protection program of biologist Sylvia Earle. She has been the driving force behind the fight for the “last ocean” for years. www.biothermsg.com/mission_blue.php Photo: © John Weller

Clean beaches!

Photos: © John Brömstrup; © Surfrider Foundation

SUR F RI D ER F O UN D A T I O N

Save the Ross Sea!

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


G ARBA G E WAVE

J AS P ER D O ES T

A WAVE O F RUBBISH

NA T URE IN F O CUS

A picture and its story

“ W i t h o u t p h otog r a p h y t h e r e w o u l d b e n o w i l d l i f e c o n s e r v a t i o n . If w e w a n t to m ot i v a t e p e op l e to p r ot e c t w i l d l i f e , w e n e e d to s h o w t h e m t h e b e a u ty a n d d i v e r s i ty t h a t n e e d s to b e p r ot e c t e d .” Jasper Doest, wildlife photographer

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Dutchman Jasper Doest is not afraid to jump right in. For a good picture, he is happy to camp alone on an island for one month or gets into a hot spring with Japanese macaques. Jasper, how does it feel to be so close to nature? Our society increasingly forgets what it means to adapt to our environment. Going along with the rhythm of nature is always a wonderful experience and also the basis for my pictures. I’m not in control—I’m just a guest in another world. I also try to convey this feeling to the participants of my workshops. Photo: © Jasper Doest

Seven million tonnes of rubbish find their way into the sea every year. The bay in which this picture was taken is far away from the next city. But objects that are thrown into the sea are distributed in all directions, they are carried along by the current and are washed ashore somewhere else. This means that the pollution of beaches does not only affect densely populated coastal areas. Beaches that are far away

from civilisation are also marked with the flotsam of society. Plastic bags, rubber rings, cans and other refuse become a death trap for sea dwellers of all kinds. Up to one million sea birds and more than 100,000 marine mammals die each year due to the effects of this garbage. However, organisa­ tions such as Oceana, the Ocean Conservancy or Surfrider Foundation are fighting for stricter regulations in worldwide garbage policy and literally take matters into their own hands: during international gathering events along coasts and beaches, volunteers collect up to 50,000 tonnes of rub­ bish per year. On the scale of things, this is like a rain drop in the sea—but it is a start.

Photo: © Zak Noyle / A Frame Photo

We know this perspective—a tanned surfer inside a tur­ quoise wave. But what Zak Doyle from the Indonesian is­ land of Java captured here is the sad reality: the Indonesian surfer Dede Surinaya is gliding through a tunnel of garbage.

Which reaction are you trying to evoke with your pictures? For some time, I tried to arouse peoples’ interest in environ­ mental protection. But if you are this direct, you alienate people and don’t achieve anything. I experience the pollu­ tion of the oceans and of other habitats first-hand during my photo trips. With my pictures, I would like to show people the fragility and beauty of nature and get them to rethink. For his pictures, Jasper has been named Travel Photo­ grapher of the Year. For an overview of his work, visit www.doest-photography.com.

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


G ARBA G E WAVE

J AS P ER D O ES T

A WAVE O F RUBBISH

NA T URE IN F O CUS

A picture and its story

“ W i t h o u t p h otog r a p h y t h e r e w o u l d b e n o w i l d l i f e c o n s e r v a t i o n . If w e w a n t to m ot i v a t e p e op l e to p r ot e c t w i l d l i f e , w e n e e d to s h o w t h e m t h e b e a u ty a n d d i v e r s i ty t h a t n e e d s to b e p r ot e c t e d .” Jasper Doest, wildlife photographer

14

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Dutchman Jasper Doest is not afraid to jump right in. For a good picture, he is happy to camp alone on an island for one month or gets into a hot spring with Japanese macaques. Jasper, how does it feel to be so close to nature? Our society increasingly forgets what it means to adapt to our environment. Going along with the rhythm of nature is always a wonderful experience and also the basis for my pictures. I’m not in control—I’m just a guest in another world. I also try to convey this feeling to the participants of my workshops. Photo: © Jasper Doest

Seven million tonnes of rubbish find their way into the sea every year. The bay in which this picture was taken is far away from the next city. But objects that are thrown into the sea are distributed in all directions, they are carried along by the current and are washed ashore somewhere else. This means that the pollution of beaches does not only affect densely populated coastal areas. Beaches that are far away

from civilisation are also marked with the flotsam of society. Plastic bags, rubber rings, cans and other refuse become a death trap for sea dwellers of all kinds. Up to one million sea birds and more than 100,000 marine mammals die each year due to the effects of this garbage. However, organisa­ tions such as Oceana, the Ocean Conservancy or Surfrider Foundation are fighting for stricter regulations in worldwide garbage policy and literally take matters into their own hands: during international gathering events along coasts and beaches, volunteers collect up to 50,000 tonnes of rub­ bish per year. On the scale of things, this is like a rain drop in the sea—but it is a start.

Photo: © Zak Noyle / A Frame Photo

We know this perspective—a tanned surfer inside a tur­ quoise wave. But what Zak Doyle from the Indonesian is­ land of Java captured here is the sad reality: the Indonesian surfer Dede Surinaya is gliding through a tunnel of garbage.

Which reaction are you trying to evoke with your pictures? For some time, I tried to arouse peoples’ interest in environ­ mental protection. But if you are this direct, you alienate people and don’t achieve anything. I experience the pollu­ tion of the oceans and of other habitats first-hand during my photo trips. With my pictures, I would like to show people the fragility and beauty of nature and get them to rethink. For his pictures, Jasper has been named Travel Photo­ grapher of the Year. For an overview of his work, visit www.doest-photography.com.

15

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


L a u r a D e kk e r

L a u r a D e kk e r

P ER F EC T LY O N C O URSE

It is not unusual for teenagers to test their limits. However, most fourteen-year-olds restrict themselves to fighting with their friends or parents. Laura Dekker managed to start a fight with the Dutch youth welfare service and to attract the attention of the whole country. Her dream of circumnavigating the world alone was extraordinary enough to become a hot topic in the Netherlands. There was hardly anybody who did not want to contribute his opinion on the core question of the problem: Is she allowed to do that? 16

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Photos: © Jilian Schlesinger

On September 20, 2013, Laura finally turned 18. In Holland, where she used to live at the time of her circumnavigation, she would now be allowed to vote, drive a car and watch any movie she likes in the cinema. But what does coming of age mean to a person who has defied all limits when she was only fourteen? Laura Dekker has managed to circumnavi­ gate the world as the youngest solo sailor ever. Guinness World Records does not accept this record to prevent even younger girls from setting sail to beat her impressive feat. But even if someone managed to do this— Laura wouldn’t care if there was a new record. She does not set much store by her own success and still doesn’t think completing her school education or leading a ”wellordered” life is important. She has turned her back on Hol­ land. Since September 2012, Laura Dekker has been living in New Zealand with her boyfriend Daniel, of course on her ketch Guppy. She was born here, in Whangarei. At the time, her parents were also sailing around the world. Little Laura took her first steps on the swaying deck of the boat and until her sixth birthday regarded the boat as her home, either on the sea or at anchor in Den Osse. When she started going to school, the family stayed on land permanently for the first time. This was a decisive turning point in Laura’s life. When her parents separated, she decided to stay with her father, who is also the one who passed the passion for sailing on to her. To him, it was beyond all question whether she should be allowed to head into the greatest adventure of her young life with her boat. But there were quite a lot of people who were of a different opinion. What was hotly discussed in public was no big deal in Laura’s personal

environment. She was able to sail. She wanted to sail. She still wants it this way today. She was embarrassed by the attention she attracted be­ fore and during her journey. She also finds the success of the documentary ”Maidentrip”, for which she filmed most of the footage herself, a bit weird. She filmed during the day and at night, in calm and rough seas and only switched off the camera when the filming became a danger to the adven­ ture itself, for example when she had to navigate through Torres Strait in the pitch dark. The film shows that most of the time she enjoyed sharing her experiences with other people, but all the same Laura Dekker says that she is not 100 percent happy with the film—she keeps the reasons to herself, though. It cannot really be because she wants to keep her story to herself. She gives presentations and has written a book about her journey: ”Ein Mädchen, ein Traum” (A Girl, a Dream), which was published in September 2013. Modern adventurers walk a fine line between realising their own dreams and fulfilling their obligations towards their sponsors, whose financial support they depend on. But what is actually important when travelling? Is it more im­ portant to be on the go and to enjoy the moment? Or is what counts in the end only the story you can tell afterwards? For Laura it’s still only one thing that counts: sailing. Whether she has already overcome the greatest challenge of her life still remains to be seen, though. Somebody who has travelled around the world can still have great plans, for example the circumnavigation of Cape Horn—or a university course. Laura Dekker has passed the entrance exam for uni­ versity without finishing school. We’re keeping our fingers crossed for her captain’s license.

“ I ’ m n ot a f r a i d a t s e a .” 17

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


L a u r a D e kk e r

L a u r a D e kk e r

P ER F EC T LY O N C O URSE

It is not unusual for teenagers to test their limits. However, most fourteen-year-olds restrict themselves to fighting with their friends or parents. Laura Dekker managed to start a fight with the Dutch youth welfare service and to attract the attention of the whole country. Her dream of circumnavigating the world alone was extraordinary enough to become a hot topic in the Netherlands. There was hardly anybody who did not want to contribute his opinion on the core question of the problem: Is she allowed to do that? 16

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Photos: © Jilian Schlesinger

On September 20, 2013, Laura finally turned 18. In Holland, where she used to live at the time of her circumnavigation, she would now be allowed to vote, drive a car and watch any movie she likes in the cinema. But what does coming of age mean to a person who has defied all limits when she was only fourteen? Laura Dekker has managed to circumnavi­ gate the world as the youngest solo sailor ever. Guinness World Records does not accept this record to prevent even younger girls from setting sail to beat her impressive feat. But even if someone managed to do this— Laura wouldn’t care if there was a new record. She does not set much store by her own success and still doesn’t think completing her school education or leading a ”wellordered” life is important. She has turned her back on Hol­ land. Since September 2012, Laura Dekker has been living in New Zealand with her boyfriend Daniel, of course on her ketch Guppy. She was born here, in Whangarei. At the time, her parents were also sailing around the world. Little Laura took her first steps on the swaying deck of the boat and until her sixth birthday regarded the boat as her home, either on the sea or at anchor in Den Osse. When she started going to school, the family stayed on land permanently for the first time. This was a decisive turning point in Laura’s life. When her parents separated, she decided to stay with her father, who is also the one who passed the passion for sailing on to her. To him, it was beyond all question whether she should be allowed to head into the greatest adventure of her young life with her boat. But there were quite a lot of people who were of a different opinion. What was hotly discussed in public was no big deal in Laura’s personal

environment. She was able to sail. She wanted to sail. She still wants it this way today. She was embarrassed by the attention she attracted be­ fore and during her journey. She also finds the success of the documentary ”Maidentrip”, for which she filmed most of the footage herself, a bit weird. She filmed during the day and at night, in calm and rough seas and only switched off the camera when the filming became a danger to the adven­ ture itself, for example when she had to navigate through Torres Strait in the pitch dark. The film shows that most of the time she enjoyed sharing her experiences with other people, but all the same Laura Dekker says that she is not 100 percent happy with the film—she keeps the reasons to herself, though. It cannot really be because she wants to keep her story to herself. She gives presentations and has written a book about her journey: ”Ein Mädchen, ein Traum” (A Girl, a Dream), which was published in September 2013. Modern adventurers walk a fine line between realising their own dreams and fulfilling their obligations towards their sponsors, whose financial support they depend on. But what is actually important when travelling? Is it more im­ portant to be on the go and to enjoy the moment? Or is what counts in the end only the story you can tell afterwards? For Laura it’s still only one thing that counts: sailing. Whether she has already overcome the greatest challenge of her life still remains to be seen, though. Somebody who has travelled around the world can still have great plans, for example the circumnavigation of Cape Horn—or a university course. Laura Dekker has passed the entrance exam for uni­ versity without finishing school. We’re keeping our fingers crossed for her captain’s license.

“ I ’ m n ot a f r a i d a t s e a .” 17

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


guillaume nÉry

guillaume nÉry

AS T R O NAU T O F T HE D EE P

Guillaume, freediving is depicted as a high-risk sport in the media. How do you see your sport? Freediving became popular when people started setting re­ cords, breaking limits and diving deeper than anyone else before them. The hunt for records can be dangerous if the athletes overestimate themselves, are not patient with their bodies or want to make progress too quickly. The media re­ gularly report about freediving accidents, but actually most accidents happen during spearfishing: in Nice, where I live, there are fatal spearfishing accidents each summer. In the media, you then hear about ”another fatal freediving acci­ dent”, which means that the sport has a risky reputation by mistake. However, freediving is not dangerous. Anybody can do it and explore the fantastic underwater world. This is the message I want to live, convey and spread. What do you experience when you dive into the depths? The only thing I feel under water is enjoyment. That is why I love this sport so much. You experience unbelievable things down there. When you go down, the most important thing is to remain very calm and focussed. You do feel the pressure on lungs and ribcage, but if you’re well trained, even that doesn’t hurt. You only feel pain if you try to fight the pressure, fight the elements. But if you let go and relax, then it feels like flying. Gravity seems suspended and I feel completely free. Everywhere around me there is just this deep, dark blue—there is no other place on Earth where everything around you is just one deep colour. That’s an amazing feeling. When you get to the deepest point, it is dark, cold and you feel the pressure, but not the need to breathe. I always have the feeling that I could stay down there for a really long time. But it’s not a place for humans. On the way to the sur­ face, my body starts to wake up. I feel that I need to breathe again. This part of the dive is a little more painful, but I don’t

18

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

What makes the deep so fascinating? It is like in outer space down there. My other passion is as­ tronomy and space. As a child, I wanted to become an astro­ naut. I still watch the stars at night. There are some similarities between outer space and the sea: the absence of gravity, the darkness and the feeling of freedom in a place that is hostile to humans—I think freedivers and astronauts experience similar states and feelings. What do the raptures of the deep feel like? You only experience them when you dive really deep, that means from around 100 metres of depth. I feel them during every dive. I have visions and I see images. It’s like dreaming at night: you cannot control your visions. I cannot influence the feelings. They depend on my mood and are different every time. Sometimes I feel great fear and other times I’m com­ pletely calm. I’ve had visions of my wife, my wedding; some­ times you see really confused things—just like when you dream. When I told my wife Julie what I had seen during nitro­ gen narcosis, she started writing it down and developing some ideas for a film. This was how our latest film project, NARCOSE came about. Through our films, we would like to share the amazing beauty of the underwater world with other people. The INTERNATIONAL OCEAN FILM TOUR shows an exclusive version of the film ATTENTION—A Life in Extremes. The long version of the film presents the world-class athletic achie­ vements of freediver Guillaume Néry, the Austrian extreme biker Gerhard Gulewisz and the Norwegian wingsuit flyer Halvor Angvik. The film will be shown in cinemas from autumn 2014. To find out more, visit www.attentionalifeinextremes.com

With just one breath, the French freediver Guillaume Néry dives up to 120 metres deep. Néry holds his breath for three and a half minutes and despite the cold, dark and the enormous pressure feels “incredibly free” down there.

ATTENTION – A LIFE IN EXTREMES

Photos: © Viktor Schaider

“The sea feels like outer space”—Guillaume Néry is a freediver and multiple world champion of his discipline. In ATTENTION—A Life in Extremes he takes us with him into the depths. Here he tells us about what he experiences during his dives and which myths about his sport he wants to put in perspective.

suffer. I experience the raptures of the deep, which alters my mind and my perception.

19

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


guillaume nÉry

guillaume nÉry

AS T R O NAU T O F T HE D EE P

Guillaume, freediving is depicted as a high-risk sport in the media. How do you see your sport? Freediving became popular when people started setting re­ cords, breaking limits and diving deeper than anyone else before them. The hunt for records can be dangerous if the athletes overestimate themselves, are not patient with their bodies or want to make progress too quickly. The media re­ gularly report about freediving accidents, but actually most accidents happen during spearfishing: in Nice, where I live, there are fatal spearfishing accidents each summer. In the media, you then hear about ”another fatal freediving acci­ dent”, which means that the sport has a risky reputation by mistake. However, freediving is not dangerous. Anybody can do it and explore the fantastic underwater world. This is the message I want to live, convey and spread. What do you experience when you dive into the depths? The only thing I feel under water is enjoyment. That is why I love this sport so much. You experience unbelievable things down there. When you go down, the most important thing is to remain very calm and focussed. You do feel the pressure on lungs and ribcage, but if you’re well trained, even that doesn’t hurt. You only feel pain if you try to fight the pressure, fight the elements. But if you let go and relax, then it feels like flying. Gravity seems suspended and I feel completely free. Everywhere around me there is just this deep, dark blue—there is no other place on Earth where everything around you is just one deep colour. That’s an amazing feeling. When you get to the deepest point, it is dark, cold and you feel the pressure, but not the need to breathe. I always have the feeling that I could stay down there for a really long time. But it’s not a place for humans. On the way to the sur­ face, my body starts to wake up. I feel that I need to breathe again. This part of the dive is a little more painful, but I don’t

18

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

What makes the deep so fascinating? It is like in outer space down there. My other passion is as­ tronomy and space. As a child, I wanted to become an astro­ naut. I still watch the stars at night. There are some similarities between outer space and the sea: the absence of gravity, the darkness and the feeling of freedom in a place that is hostile to humans—I think freedivers and astronauts experience similar states and feelings. What do the raptures of the deep feel like? You only experience them when you dive really deep, that means from around 100 metres of depth. I feel them during every dive. I have visions and I see images. It’s like dreaming at night: you cannot control your visions. I cannot influence the feelings. They depend on my mood and are different every time. Sometimes I feel great fear and other times I’m com­ pletely calm. I’ve had visions of my wife, my wedding; some­ times you see really confused things—just like when you dream. When I told my wife Julie what I had seen during nitro­ gen narcosis, she started writing it down and developing some ideas for a film. This was how our latest film project, NARCOSE came about. Through our films, we would like to share the amazing beauty of the underwater world with other people. The INTERNATIONAL OCEAN FILM TOUR shows an exclusive version of the film ATTENTION—A Life in Extremes. The long version of the film presents the world-class athletic achie­ vements of freediver Guillaume Néry, the Austrian extreme biker Gerhard Gulewisz and the Norwegian wingsuit flyer Halvor Angvik. The film will be shown in cinemas from autumn 2014. To find out more, visit www.attentionalifeinextremes.com

With just one breath, the French freediver Guillaume Néry dives up to 120 metres deep. Néry holds his breath for three and a half minutes and despite the cold, dark and the enormous pressure feels “incredibly free” down there.

ATTENTION – A LIFE IN EXTREMES

Photos: © Viktor Schaider

“The sea feels like outer space”—Guillaume Néry is a freediver and multiple world champion of his discipline. In ATTENTION—A Life in Extremes he takes us with him into the depths. Here he tells us about what he experiences during his dives and which myths about his sport he wants to put in perspective.

suffer. I experience the raptures of the deep, which alters my mind and my perception.

19

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


s e b a s t i a n s t e u dt n e r

ABS O LU T E G IAN T S

“Calling our blue planet ‘Earth’ is a bit of a joke, really.” —Sebastian Steudtner is one of the best-known German surfers and as an inter­nationally successful big-wave surfer rides gigantic waves that are up to 30 metres high. In our interview, Sebastian tells us how he started to surf, about his years of learning in Hawaii and about his plans for big-wave surfing in Europe.

20

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Photos: © Fred Pompermayr (left); © Christian Spreitz / BILD am Sonntag (above)

s e b a s t i a n s t e u dt n e r

Sebastian, how would you describe the German surfing scene? People are increasingly fascinated by waves and water: those who used to go to the mountains for recreation are now travelling abroad to surf. But there will always be few people like Marlon Lipke, Nic von Rupp or myself. The heart of surfing culture and the surfing VIPs are still from the United States, and I’m sure it will stay that way. They simply have the highest level there.

first time, and my mother gave me a boogie board. From that moment, I was hooked. When I was sixteen, I moved to Hawaii. The surfing legend Nelson Armitage Senior took me in, let me stay with his family and taught me how to wind­ surf. I stayed in Hawaii, and eight months later I qualified for the World Cup. But I wanted to learn more. On Maui, I saw the huge Jaws (Pe'ahi) wave break. The Hawaiian ex-champion Dane Kealoha taught me big-wave surfing.

In 2010 you were the first European to win the ”Biggest Wave” at the Billabong XXL Global Big Wave Awards. What were the reactions to this? When I won the title, no one in Germany really knew what big-wave surfing actually is. I had to explain and justify my­ self and my sport at first. I was labelled as an adrenaline junkie. It was almost like meeting Reinhold Messner with­ out knowing what mountaineering is. You just see how high the mountain is that he has climbed and think: that guy is completely crazy. Luckily, a lot happened during the last season. In 2011, the first world record was set in Nazaré in Portugal—that was when big-wave surfing was in all the media for the first time. We saw the biggest storms of all times—not just one, but four!

What does the perfect wave look like for you? For me, the wave has to be as difficult to ride as possible. It has to move quickly, form a tube and break as cleanly as possible. You try to surf in the tube as long as possible and to find the best line on the wave. I always have a clear idea of how I want to surf the wave. I have to make 1,000 deci­ sions in 20 seconds. That doesn’t work in my head, it’s just instinct. I always have to know what I’m doing and what the wave is doing. So the ”hippie” saying about ”becoming one with the wave” is actually true.

Your mother is Austrian and your father German. How did you become a surfer? I’ve always felt drawn to water. When I was just able to walk, one of the first things I did was jump into a pool. I just loved it. When I was nine years old, I was by the sea for the

What are your new projects? I still have lots of plans—big-wave surfing is only just arriv­ ing in Europe. Nazaré is also an important sign for the inter­ national big-wave scene. I personally want to continue improving and to use my full potential. Nazaré certainly is an important project for me. I want to set the world record there in the next season. But that is only the start: now the plan is to discover new waves. That is why I’m travelling all over Europe all the time—to find the next big wave!

21

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


s e b a s t i a n s t e u dt n e r

ABS O LU T E G IAN T S

“Calling our blue planet ‘Earth’ is a bit of a joke, really.” —Sebastian Steudtner is one of the best-known German surfers and as an inter­nationally successful big-wave surfer rides gigantic waves that are up to 30 metres high. In our interview, Sebastian tells us how he started to surf, about his years of learning in Hawaii and about his plans for big-wave surfing in Europe.

20

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

Photos: © Fred Pompermayr (left); © Christian Spreitz / BILD am Sonntag (above)

s e b a s t i a n s t e u dt n e r

Sebastian, how would you describe the German surfing scene? People are increasingly fascinated by waves and water: those who used to go to the mountains for recreation are now travelling abroad to surf. But there will always be few people like Marlon Lipke, Nic von Rupp or myself. The heart of surfing culture and the surfing VIPs are still from the United States, and I’m sure it will stay that way. They simply have the highest level there.

first time, and my mother gave me a boogie board. From that moment, I was hooked. When I was sixteen, I moved to Hawaii. The surfing legend Nelson Armitage Senior took me in, let me stay with his family and taught me how to wind­ surf. I stayed in Hawaii, and eight months later I qualified for the World Cup. But I wanted to learn more. On Maui, I saw the huge Jaws (Pe'ahi) wave break. The Hawaiian ex-champion Dane Kealoha taught me big-wave surfing.

In 2010 you were the first European to win the ”Biggest Wave” at the Billabong XXL Global Big Wave Awards. What were the reactions to this? When I won the title, no one in Germany really knew what big-wave surfing actually is. I had to explain and justify my­ self and my sport at first. I was labelled as an adrenaline junkie. It was almost like meeting Reinhold Messner with­ out knowing what mountaineering is. You just see how high the mountain is that he has climbed and think: that guy is completely crazy. Luckily, a lot happened during the last season. In 2011, the first world record was set in Nazaré in Portugal—that was when big-wave surfing was in all the media for the first time. We saw the biggest storms of all times—not just one, but four!

What does the perfect wave look like for you? For me, the wave has to be as difficult to ride as possible. It has to move quickly, form a tube and break as cleanly as possible. You try to surf in the tube as long as possible and to find the best line on the wave. I always have a clear idea of how I want to surf the wave. I have to make 1,000 deci­ sions in 20 seconds. That doesn’t work in my head, it’s just instinct. I always have to know what I’m doing and what the wave is doing. So the ”hippie” saying about ”becoming one with the wave” is actually true.

Your mother is Austrian and your father German. How did you become a surfer? I’ve always felt drawn to water. When I was just able to walk, one of the first things I did was jump into a pool. I just loved it. When I was nine years old, I was by the sea for the

What are your new projects? I still have lots of plans—big-wave surfing is only just arriv­ ing in Europe. Nazaré is also an important sign for the inter­ national big-wave scene. I personally want to continue improving and to use my full potential. Nazaré certainly is an important project for me. I want to set the world record there in the next season. But that is only the start: now the plan is to discover new waves. That is why I’m travelling all over Europe all the time—to find the next big wave!

21

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


BEACH LI F E

BEACH LI F E

”Explaining surfing to a non-surfer is almost like de­ scribing colours to a blind man.”—for world-class surfer Dave Rastovich, this indescribability is proof of some­ thing great. Hardly any other sport is as closely linked to a lifestyle as surfing. A lifestyle which with its music

LI F E IS A BEACH Surfing as a way of life

and fashion has already entered the mainstream, as it stands for freedom, nature and alternative ways of life. Rastovich: ”Surfing is like art—it does not have a reason or purpose, which is what’s so great about it.”

Summer, sun, waves— living by the sea is more than just a dream for surfers

The new HYMERCAR:

365

Day Flexibility.

22

Simply scan the QR code with your smartphone to find out more!

I n t e r n at i o n a l O c e a n F i l m To u r 2014

Photos: © Gilles Calvet, © Todd Glaser

Yesterday in the mountains, today by the sea, tomorrow in the city – and always best prepared for everything. Make every day unique. Thanks to its compact size and intelligent space solutions the new HYMERCAR offers a whole new dimension of freedom and flexibility. Not only for trips away but for everyday life. Not just a recreational vehicle, also your freedom vehicle. Experience it for yourself! Either at your nearest HYMERCAR trade partners or at www.hymercar.com

23

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


BEACH LI F E

BEACH LI F E

”Explaining surfing to a non-surfer is almost like de­ scribing colours to a blind man.”—for world-class surfer Dave Rastovich, this indescribability is proof of some­ thing great. Hardly any other sport is as closely linked to a lifestyle as surfing. A lifestyle which with its music

LI F E IS A BEACH Surfing as a way of life

and fashion has already entered the mainstream, as it stands for freedom, nature and alternative ways of life. Rastovich: ”Surfing is like art—it does not have a reason or purpose, which is what’s so great about it.”

Summer, sun, waves— living by the sea is more than just a dream for surfers

The new HYMERCAR:

365

Day Flexibility.

22

Simply scan the QR code with your smartphone to find out more!

I n t e r n at i o n a l O c e a n F i l m To u r 2014

Photos: © Gilles Calvet, © Todd Glaser

Yesterday in the mountains, today by the sea, tomorrow in the city – and always best prepared for everything. Make every day unique. Thanks to its compact size and intelligent space solutions the new HYMERCAR offers a whole new dimension of freedom and flexibility. Not only for trips away but for everyday life. Not just a recreational vehicle, also your freedom vehicle. Experience it for yourself! Either at your nearest HYMERCAR trade partners or at www.hymercar.com

23

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


personalities

personalities

Amanda Bluglass – R ay I v e s

Toma Jablon – Sam Bleakley

“I’M DOING THIS ONLY FOR YOU, AMANDA.” Amanda Bluglass has mastered the art of getting shy people to talk in front of the camera. The chemistry between her and Ray Ives was right from the start—even though the now 77-year-old diver never wanted to audition for a leading part in a movie. Amanda Bluglass insisted that he should tell his story himself, because she felt that an additional voice in the film would have been distracting. So she simply shut herself into the recording studio with him and only let him out again when she was convinced that she had all the important information recorded. “Ray does not like watching the film,” she says, “but I suspect he secretly enjoys the attention!”

In the beginning was the music. To be more precise: the track “Sunflowers” from the album “The Marciac Suite” by jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. The perfect mixture of composition and improvisation—at least to director Toma Jablon. In his film, he wanted to turn the unwritten law “first there’s the film, then comes the music” upside down for once. Waterproof head­phones made it possible for Sam Bleakley to listen to the music while surfing and to explore the boundaries between surfing, dancing and improvisation on his board. But why should he remain the only one? Tom Jablon for one, dreams of an official “JAZZ SURFING” competition.

Step N’ Soul

Photos: © Michael Buckner / Getty Images, © Todd Glaser

24

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

This Time Tomorrow

Photos: © Neil Hope, Toma Jablon

Ray

T a y l o r St e e l E – D a v e R a s to v i c h Craig Anderson Two surfers follow a storm and its waves for 30,000 kilometres. This is proof of a passion which connects the two Australian surfing pros Dave Rastovich and Craig Anderson with film maker Taylor Steele: surfing, surfing and more surfing! With his camera, Steele accompanied the two on their international wave hunt hrough the Pacific. Steele has made a name for himself in the international surf-film world in the last 20 years and is seen as one of the most influential film makers of the scene. His trademark: an unerring sense of dramaturgy and an eclectic taste in music, which also characterises THIS TIME TOMORROW. The result is a surfing film which does not only portray the sport, but a lifestyle with all its facets.

25

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


personalities

personalities

Amanda Bluglass – R ay I v e s

Toma Jablon – Sam Bleakley

“I’M DOING THIS ONLY FOR YOU, AMANDA.” Amanda Bluglass has mastered the art of getting shy people to talk in front of the camera. The chemistry between her and Ray Ives was right from the start—even though the now 77-year-old diver never wanted to audition for a leading part in a movie. Amanda Bluglass insisted that he should tell his story himself, because she felt that an additional voice in the film would have been distracting. So she simply shut herself into the recording studio with him and only let him out again when she was convinced that she had all the important information recorded. “Ray does not like watching the film,” she says, “but I suspect he secretly enjoys the attention!”

In the beginning was the music. To be more precise: the track “Sunflowers” from the album “The Marciac Suite” by jazz trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. The perfect mixture of composition and improvisation—at least to director Toma Jablon. In his film, he wanted to turn the unwritten law “first there’s the film, then comes the music” upside down for once. Waterproof head­phones made it possible for Sam Bleakley to listen to the music while surfing and to explore the boundaries between surfing, dancing and improvisation on his board. But why should he remain the only one? Tom Jablon for one, dreams of an official “JAZZ SURFING” competition.

Step N’ Soul

Photos: © Michael Buckner / Getty Images, © Todd Glaser

24

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

This Time Tomorrow

Photos: © Neil Hope, Toma Jablon

Ray

T a y l o r St e e l E – D a v e R a s to v i c h Craig Anderson Two surfers follow a storm and its waves for 30,000 kilometres. This is proof of a passion which connects the two Australian surfing pros Dave Rastovich and Craig Anderson with film maker Taylor Steele: surfing, surfing and more surfing! With his camera, Steele accompanied the two on their international wave hunt hrough the Pacific. Steele has made a name for himself in the international surf-film world in the last 20 years and is seen as one of the most influential film makers of the scene. His trademark: an unerring sense of dramaturgy and an eclectic taste in music, which also characterises THIS TIME TOMORROW. The result is a surfing film which does not only portray the sport, but a lifestyle with all its facets.

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014


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E Y E - O P ENIN G ! The notorious One Eye off Mauritius is an extremely swift, left-running wave, which breaks on a reef full of sea urchins located just beneath the water’s surface: a spot that is reserved only to professionals. The wave owes its name to its unique location. Those who surf here can look the 556-metre mountain Le Morne Brabant directly in the ”eye”. Or rather: they could, because even though the view might be enticing, One Eye requires your full attention.

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www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

ATHLET: MARLON GERBER | AUFGENOMMEN VON: MARLON GERBER

Photos: © Mario Entero; © chabaphoto / shutterstock

R i d e r : A i r to n Co z z o l i n o W a v e : O n e Ey e / M a u r i t i u s

Wear it. Mount it. Love it.™ GoPro App

ZUBEHÖRTEILE TENDENZ STEIGEND Mehr auf gopro.com


last picture

E Y E - O P ENIN G ! The notorious One Eye off Mauritius is an extremely swift, left-running wave, which breaks on a reef full of sea urchins located just beneath the water’s surface: a spot that is reserved only to professionals. The wave owes its name to its unique location. Those who surf here can look the 556-metre mountain Le Morne Brabant directly in the ”eye”. Or rather: they could, because even though the view might be enticing, One Eye requires your full attention.

26

www.OceanFilmTour.com 2014

ATHLET: MARLON GERBER | AUFGENOMMEN VON: MARLON GERBER

Photos: © Mario Entero; © chabaphoto / shutterstock

R i d e r : A i r to n Co z z o l i n o W a v e : O n e Ey e / M a u r i t i u s

Wear it. Mount it. Love it.™ GoPro App

ZUBEHÖRTEILE TENDENZ STEIGEND Mehr auf gopro.com


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