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Mentor Recruitment Introduction Introduction Every chapter has different pools of individuals they solicit to serve as mentors; therefore they utilize different recruitment strategies to engage mentors. Some chapters recruit faculty and graduate students, others work with undergraduate students and local environmental professionals. The following are several creative recruitment strategies. Tips for Mentor Recruiting  Partner with an environmental leadership course with service learning requirements (students can serve as mentors to fulfill their requirement) or with a summer academic program such as Upward Bound.  Re-invite mentors who served in previous year’s programs to mentor again and ask those mentors to refer colleagues and/or friends who are interested in becoming EM mentors.  Consider recruiting mentors beyond your academic department and within schools of education, engineering, public health, and other related fields with environmental interests.  Recruit mentors among environmental professionals working in government agencies, local universities, and in the community (i.e. departments of natural resources, wildlife, parks and recreation, non-profits, etc)  Present other EnvironMentors Participation Options in case individuals would like to participate in the EnvironMentors program without the time commitment of being a mentor


Step-by-Step Mentor Recruiting You will need to raise awareness about EnvironMentors, and the opportunity to serve as a mentor across your university and within your community. The following is a step-by-step “how to” for mentor recruiting adapted from the DC EM program. 1) Email: •

Past affiliates of your program, including mentors, to encourage them to forward to their colleagues and friends

University list serves and student organizations

Contacts at other colleges and departments

Online community networks related to science, environment, education, and diversity

Local science, environmental, and educational organizations and agencies.

2) Advertisement/ Awareness •

Put up Mentor Flyers around your university, high schools and major professional gathering places

Write a small article or develop an advertisement, for your institution’s or local newspapers, radio and TV station

Direct interested individuals to learn more about EnvironMentors at the EnvironMentors Website (www.ncseonline.org/environmentors)

3) EnvironMentors Interest Presentations •

Ask your universities and local university professors to make a short presentation in class. Coordinate presentations or brown bag lunches with key contacts at which you can present EnvironMentors and discuss mentoring

Presentation Ideas:  Remember to bring a signup sheet for attendees to list their name, email, and phone numbers  Open the presentation with the EnvironMentors video  Show the Mentor Recruitment PowerPoint  Explain the main components of the program and fundamental expectations of the mentors in your program  Exhibit a sample Mentor Manual  Have hard copies of mentor applications on-hand to distribute  After the presentation, enter names of attendees into a ‘Potential Mentor’ Spreadsheet and send a quick thank you e-mail with electronic version of the mentor application attached and a date for them to get back to you.


Sample Mentor Email Do You Want to Give Back to the Community? Do You Want to Give Back to the Community and Help Interest Youth in Environmental Science …..BE AN ENVIRONMENTOR! What is EnvironMentors? EnvironMentors is an environment-based mentoring program that helps prepare high school students for college studies and careers in environmental fields. Students develop environmentally-based science projects and present them to an elementary school class as well as at the annual EnvironMentors Science Fairs. Students who do well at the Fair and excel in the overall program are eligible to compete for college scholarships. What role do mentors play? Mentors work with their student protégés throughout the school year to develop an environmental research project on a topic of the student’s choosing. All aspects of the student’s and mentor’s work together is supported through a series of skills workshops, Student and Mentor Manuals, weekly meetings of EnvironMentors staff with the students in their science classes, and regular e-mail and phone communications with EnvironMentors staff. Expertise in environmental science or previous mentoring experience is NOT a requirement for participation. The most important criterion for success in EnvironMentors is the desire to have fun and work with youth. To learn more, please visit www.ncseonline.org/environmentors.org, or contact your local chapter!

**** PLEASE FORWARD THIS E-MAIL ON TO YOUR FRIENDS ****


Are you ready to become an EnvironMENTOR?    

Are you interested in the Environment? Do you like to get out into the field? Are you looking for a way to give back to the Community? Do you have an hour a week?

EnvironMentors is a science and environment-based mentoring program which works to support and strengthen student success in science and environmental fields. Students work one-on-one with mentors to develop and present an environmental science research project over the course of the academic year. Mentors guide their student through picking a topic, doing background research, helping them through an expert interview, designing an experiment, performing the experiment, and then presenting the findings at the EnvironMentors Fair.

What does it take to be an EnvironMENTOR? Anyone can be an EnvironMentor, all you need is an interest in the Environment and in helping high school students. You do not need to have previous mentoring experience to participate. Mentors are asked to meet with their student for 1-2 hours every week from September to May. Mentors are encouraged to participate in the EnvironMentors events, workshops, and field trips. Most of all, mentors should be a good guide, create memorable experiences with a student, and have fun! For more information please visit our website at www.environmentors.org

EnvironMentors is a program of the National Council for Science and the Environment.


Are you ready to become an EnvironMENTOR?    

Are you interested in the Environment? Do you like to get out into the field? Are you looking for a way to give back to the Community? Do you have an hour a week?

EnvironMentors is a science and environment-based mentoring program which works to support and strengthen student success in science and environmental fields. Students work one-on-one with mentors to develop and present an environmental science research project over the course of the academic year. Mentors guide their student through picking a topic, doing background research, helping them through an expert interview, designing an experiment, performing the experiment, and then presenting the findings at the EnvironMentors Fair.

What does it take to be an EnvironMENTOR? Anyone can be an EnvironMentor, all you need is an interest in the Environment and in helping DC High School students. You do not need to be a science major or have previous mentoring experience to participate. Mentors are asked to meet with their student for 1-2 hours every other week at MLK Jr. Library from September to May. Mentors are encouraged to participate in the EnvironMentors events, workshops, and field trips to the Anacostia River Living Classrooms Boat Tour, Morgan State University’s Estuarine Research Center, Great Falls Park Hiking Tour, and to the Ecosystems Farm. Most of all, mentors should be a good guide, create memorable experiences with a student, and have fun! For more information please visit our website at www.environmentors.org or contact Program Manager, Jacklyn Krisch at jshafir@ncseonline.org or 202-207-0017.

EnvironMentors is a program of the National Council for Science and the Environment.


EnvironMentors is a program of : 1


Program Goals • One-to-one mentoring relationships between science and environmental professionals and high school students • Engaging youth from underrepresented communities in environmental sciences • Developing interest and preparedness of college degree programs and careers in environmental fields


How Far We Have Come: The Program’s History Initiated in Washington, DC in 1992 with the help of then Vice President Al Gore Worked with well over 2,500 students in 18 years Results: 99% EnvironMentors students graduate from high school (compared to DCPS graduation rate of 60%) 95% of our students are admitted to a 2 or 4 year college (compared to DC college admission rate of 15.6%)


EnvironMentors at NCSE


The Process: Environmental Science Projects Student-mentor pairs research, design, and carry out environmental science research projects throughout the school year.


Background Research • Students choose a topic, develop a literature review, and conduct expert interviews.


Getting Dirty: Experimental Design and Field Work


Annual Fair and Awards Ceremony


Sharing the Knowledge: Elementary School Presentations


The Mentor’s Role • Develop a relationship with the student • Support environmental research project • Encourage discussion of college, particularly majors and careers in environmental science


Tools for Mentors and Students • • • • • • • • •

Student-Mentor Manual Weekly Progress Emails Skills Workshops EnvironMentors Portal Monthly Mentor Meetings In-class Student Support from Coordinators Coordinator Support via Telephone Scheduled Events Other Mentor Support Activities


Why Participate?

WE HAVE FUN!


Contact Us: Jacklyn Shafir DC EnvironMentors Program Manager jshafir@ncseonline.org 202-207-0017 www.ncseonline.org www.environmentors.org National Council for Science and the Environment


Sample Mentor Information Packet


EnvironMentors Participant Application

I) Contact Information Name:_____________________________________________________________________ Organization:________________________________________________________________ Title:_______________________________________________________________________ Phone:

Home ____________________ Cell _____________________ Work ____________________

Email:

Work: ______________________________________________ Alternate: ___________________________________________ Preferred for EnvironMentors Communications?________________________

Home Address_______________________________________________________________ Work Address________________________________________________________________

II) Participation Preference While developing a strong pool of mentors is our priority, there are a variety of ways that you can participate in EnvironMentors. For descriptions of Participation Options, please see the attached EnvironMentors Participation Option sheet. Please check the way(s) you would like to contribute: 1)____ Mentor (2-3 times a Month)

4)____ Subject Matter Expert (1 Hour)

2)____ Project Review Committee (2 Hrs/ Meeting)

5)____ Experimental Design Expert (2 Hrs/ Experimental Design Wkshp)

3)____ Judge (EnvironMentors Fair)

6)____ Career Advisor (2 Hrs/ Env. Career Wkshp)

Please note what Subject Matter/Workshop/Career that would feel comfortable assisting with: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Please indicate which Grade Level you would prefer to work with: ____ Freshman

____ Sophomore

____ Junior

____ Senior

____ No Preference

Are you available to mentor during school hours? If so, what days and for how longs?

____________________________________________________________

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III) Background Info How did you learn about EnvironMentors? _________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ What do you hope to gain from your experience with EnvironMentors? ___________________________________________________________________________ Have you participated in other mentoring, tutoring, teaching, or coaching programs, and/or other forms of youth supervision? If yes, please describe. __________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Do you have any questions or reservations about your role in EnvironMentors? We will do our best to contact you to discuss issues in advance of the program. ________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Is there anything else you would like us to know that could help us in the process of matching you with your student. __________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

IV) Content and Skill Expertise Please check the content areas in which you believe you have basic expertise. A) Content ____General Ecology

____Watersheds

____Estuarine Science

____Marine Science

____Hydrology

____Fresh Water Resources

____Atmospheric Sciences

____Agriculture

____Meteorology

____Air Quality

____Climate Change

____Biogeography

____Toxicology

____Land use

____Soils

____Wildlife Management

____Pollution Prevention

____Ornithology

____Entomology

____Fisheries

____Animal Science

____Botany

____Forestry

____Environmental Justice

____Environmental Health ____ Chemistry ____Other, please note‌ ________________________________________________________________________

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B) Skills Please check the skill sets in which you believe you have basic expertise ____Project Management

____Soil sampling

____Air quality sampling

____Time Management

____Web Development Skills

____Marine water quality

____Library Research

____Video Documentary Skills

____Writing Skills

____Field Biology Research

____Reading Skills

____Fresh water quality sampling

sampling ____Tree and/or forest inventory techniques ____ Other, please note

____________________________________________________________________________

V) Field Expertise We always need people willing to help with field trips. Please let us know if you believe you have a sufficient level of expertise sufficient in any of the following areas. ____Help to lead a hike

____Low and high rope challenge course skills

____Help to lead a bike ride

____Outdoor leadership skills

____Help to lead flat water canoe/kayak trip

____Leave No Trace certification

____Orienteering and map skills

____Other, Please note __________________

VI) Education College/University (Undergraduate)________________________________________________ Degree Program_______________________________________________________________ College/University (Graduate)_____________________________________________________ Degree Program_______________________________________________________________ Post Doctoral Institution/Program _________________________________________________ Additional Professional Development_______________________________________________ Professional Affiliations _________________________________________________________ Foreign Language(s) ___________________________________________________________

VII) Interests/hobbies Please list interests and hobbies, which will help us get to know you better. Hobbies: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Music and/or Movies: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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VIII) Reference Information Please provide the following information for your immediate supervisor. Name:_______________________________________________Title_____________________ Phone: (

) ______________ E-mail: ____________________________Years Known:____

Please provide the following information for a colleague or friend Name: _______________________________________________ Relation ________________ Work Phone: (

) ______________ E-mail ______________________ Years Known: _____

I ________________________________________, give the EnvironMentors Program my consent to contact these individuals and to perform background checks relevant to my participation in their program. Signed: ___________________________________Date of birth ___/___/___

IX) Ethnicity (Optional)

__________________________________________

X) Certification I certify that the information contained in this application is true to the best of my knowledge. I agree to undergo a the DCPS criminal background check prior to starting EnvironMentors. This includes completing the Volunteer Application, proof of a Tuberculosis test by a physician (university students may show waiver), and finger printing for background check purposes (Federal Employees with a security clearance can have a waiver letter in lieu of the background check). Please keep in mind that this is for the safety of the students and a requirement of the DC Public School system. Signature: _______________________________________ Date: ___________________ Please return to your local EnvironMentors Chapter Director, Jacklyn Krisch either via email at jshafir@ncseonline.org or fax (202-628-4311).

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EnvironMentors Explore Your Environment DC EnvironMentors Participation Options 1) Mentor (3 times a Month) Mentors are paired with a student and work directly with them over the course of the academic year. The student-mentor pair work to develop rigorous environmental science projects based on relevant environmental issues in their communities. Mentors help the student develop an environmentally-related project topic, based on the students’ interests, which can be researched and tested through hands on experiments to produce a full scientific research paper and EnvironMentors Fair project. Mentors are guided through the program by the Student Coordinator, their EnvironMentors Mentor Manual, and various workshops and events throughout the year. Mentors meet with their student for a 1-2 hour meeting approximately once-per-week, or two- three times per month, at a mutually convenient time and location. 2) Project Review Committee (2 Hours per Meeting) Students are guided through the scientific research paper writing process through a series of assignments that are delineated in the EnvironMentors Student Manual. To ensure the scientific rigor of the final paper and to help the students’ writing skills, their assignments must be approved at 4 different junctures in the process, which constitute 4 Project Review Committee meetings. These include: •

The Project Topic Form- 1 worksheet focusing on the general topic area, problem statement, need for project, project purpose, and research question

Background Research Paper- 3-4 pages including an introduction, problem statement, research question, basic information, literature review, and expert interview

Hypothesis and Experimental Design- 2 worksheets discussing Hypothesis, control and variables, experimental data sets, experimental procedure, and materials list

The Final Paper- 10-12 pages including title page, abstract, introduction, background research, experimental methods, results and analysis, discussion and conclusion, bibliography, and appendices

3) EnvironMentors Fair Judge (3 Hours at the EnvironMentors Fair) Students present their final project results at the EnvironMentors Fair to at least three judges. Judges circulate through the projects and evaluate the students based on the use of the scientific method, understanding of the issue, rigor of the experiment, creativity of the project, and presentation. 4) Subject Matter Expert (1 Hour) As part of the Students’ research they are asked to conduct Expert Interviews with local professionals to get a personal understanding of the issue and how it is being dealt with in


EnvironMentors Explore Your Environment the community. As Students choose their own topics, the need for Experts in almost every field is necessary. Experts will be part of an Expert Database that Students will have access to throughout the program. The Expert may be asked by the Student to assist with the experimental design as well. 5)Experimental Design Expert (2 Hours @ the Experimental Design Workshop) Throughout the program students and mentors choose a project topic and design an experiment to test a hypothesis they have on that issue. The Experimental Design workshop teaches students the basics of designing an experiment and collecting data. We need Experimental Design Experts to help the student and mentor pairs brainstorm how a workable experiment can be created around their topic. Experts may be asked to help several groups. The ideal Experimental Design Expert is someone who has done field research and has designed experiments in the past. (Graduate students, professors, and research scientists are great candidates). 6)Career Advisor (2 Hours @ the Environmental Career Workshop) Help students broaden their understandings of an environmental career by sharing your journey through college and into your career. The goal of the workshop is to expose students to a wide variety of career options and give them perspective on the pathway to a career in STEM.


Background Check Guidelines EnvironMentors prides itself on the Mentoring relationships we provide. These relationships are meant to be positive, potentially life changing relationships, and therefore we require all mentors have criminal background checks run on them before they are admitted into the program. As the National Mentoring Partnership says, "All programs that work with children and youth have a responsibility to exercise reasonable care when faced with the chance that harm could result from their activities. Screening is part of the larger risk management effort that helps your program meet this responsibility. Screening is a multi-step process that includes performing a criminal history records check." Background Checks usually include: • Finger prints • Filling out a form with your social security number, date of birth, current address, and legal name • Search of criminal records and sexual offenders databases. Background checks can be very complicated, therefore we advise that you use an outside source to run the background check for your mentors. Such as:  Your university Human Resources office may have a background check program or organization that they use for screening university employees.  Your local Public School Administration may provide the service for free for any volunteers who are working within the school systems.  Your local Police Department should provide this service for a small processing fee.  Or you can use one of the many Background Check online resources which can range from $10-50 a person. At minimum, every chapter must make sure that ALL Mentors have been screened through the Department of Justice National Sexual Offender Registry (http://www.nsopw.gov/Core/Portal.aspx).


Student Recruitment Introduction Introduction Every high school student deserves the attention and support provided by EnvironMentors. Yet, we can only serve a very small fraction of students. The investment of time provided by Directors, Coordinators, Teachers, and mentors is quite high to make EnvironMentors successful. It is extremely important for Directors, Coordinators and Teachers to approach student recruitment wisely, and set aside the time needed to do so. Student retention is an ongoing issue. Coordinators and teachers can help mitigate attrition that occurs in the later months of the program by investing time needed in the early weeks to recruit the students with the best possible chances of success. To do this read the student recruitment section carefully and work together with your EnvironMentors teacher to determine which students will be the most successful in the program. Student Eligibility and Recruitment EnvironMentors’ mission is to serve students who are under-represented in the sciences. This language allows for broad interpretation of target student populations across our diverse chapter network. The national office has created the following, non-exhaustive list of student groups that we believe are “under-represented in the sciences”: -

Students of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds; Women; Students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds; Students from broad geographic areas; and At-risk youth

While considering variability across chapter geography, demographics, socioeconomics, and partner school districts, the national office encourages chapters to consider the following factors when determining student eligibility for their chapter’s EnvironMentors program: -

Interest in science and the environment; Commitment to the program (both in interest/motivation and time availability); “Middle of the road” students who neither benefit from honors programs and AP classes, nor qualify for remediation classes; Maturity (to undertake the level of work required, and to fully-understand scientific research).

Tips for Student Recruitment  Recruit those students who have the best chances for success including interest in science and the environment, maturity, motivation, accountability, family stability, and not over extended in extracurricular activities


ďƒź Recruit students who have participated in EnvironMentors before and ask these students for referrals, post flyers around school, exhibit at school club fairs, or advertise during the morning announcements ďƒź Review with students the Student Expectations and the Program Calendar in their entirety ďƒź Overall, present EnvironMentors as unique fun, cool, and something that they are fortunate to have the opportunity to participate in Fun Ideas to Raise Interest in EnvironMentors -

Show one or two of the EnvironMentors videos Review samples of past projects Go over the manual and discuss the benefits of mentorship Introduce them to the many well paying careers that are now and will be increasingly available through the new green economy. Have students write down their favorite pastime or issue and show them how it is related to the environment.


Student Expectations While EnvironMentors has much to offer students, it is also a rigorous and demanding program. Make sure students fully understand the following expectations at the very beginning of the program season. EnvironMentors asks students to commit to the following: 1. Stay in contact with your mentor Obtain all your mentor’s contact information (home, work, cell phone numbers, and email) and share all your contact information with your mentor and coordinator. - Meet in person with your mentor for 1-2 hours once per week or at least 3 times a month. - If you cannot make a meeting, contact your mentor immediately to reschedule. If you cannot reach your mentor, call your chapter coordinator immediately. 2. Stay in contact with your chapter coordinator -

-

Provide your chapter coordinator with your class schedule, after-school and weekend schedule, work schedule, and a list of your extracurricular activities. - Attend all EnvironMentors workshops and school meetings. If you cannot attend a workshop, school meeting, or other event, contact your chapter coordinator immediately. 3. Work with your mentor to design an experimental research project based on an environmental issue that concerns you. -

Identify a research question. Conduct a literature review on your topic utilizing library and internet tools. Identify a local expert on your topic and conduct an expert interview. Develop a background research paper, with mentor assistance, incorporating what you learned in your literature review and expert interview. - Develop a hypothesis based on your background research and design an experiment to test it. - Write a description of your experimental methods and materials. - Collect data for at least 3 experimental trials. - Organize, analyze and present your data visually with tables, charts and graphs. - Write a discussion and conclusion in which you discuss the results of your experiment and draw a conclusion about what your data mean. - Write a complete research paper using the elements you completed throughout your project. 4. Work with your mentor to communicate what you have learned -

Design and create a project display board or poster. Develop a lesson plan based on your project and present it to an elementary school class. Present your project at your Chapter Fair. Participate in your Chapter Awards Ceremony and possibly the National Competition.


Student & Mentor Meeting Commitment Form Student Copy Please fill out this form with your mentor and sign it at your Chapter’s Kick Off. You will be given another copy of this form to fill out and sign, and return to your chapter coordinator. FIRST MEETING I, _______________________________________, agree to meet my mentor for our first meeting at the time and location specified below: Date: _________________________________________ Time: _________________________________________ Location: ______________________________________ I will get to the first meeting location by (circle all that applies): Public Transportation Walk

Get a ride from __________________________ Other _________________

FUTURE MEETINGS I, _______________________________________, will continue to meet with my mentor as follows: Day of week: __________________________________ Time: ________________________________________ Location: _____________________________________ Transportation: ________________________________ CONTACT WITH MY MENTOR I, _______________________________________, agree to notify my mentor if I am unable to make a meeting or if I will be late to a meeting. I will do so by calling all numbers and writing to all emails my mentor provides me. If I do not reach my mentor, I promise to leave a message and continue to call my mentor until I speak to him/her directly. OUR ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES Student’s Goals _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________

Mentor’s Goals

I, _______________________________________, understand that if I fail to meet these basic commitments on an ongoing basis, I may be asked to leave the program. Student signature: ____________________

Mentor signature: ______________


EnvironMentors Student Application Please print clearly and answer all questions to the best of your ability. Personal/Contact Information Date: Gender: Male

Female

Full Name (Last, First): High School:

Grade:

Home Address: City:

State:

Zip Code:

Cultural Identity (optional):

Birthdate:

Home Phone:

YOUR Cell Phone:

Email:

Can you receive Text Messages? ▢ Yes ▢ No Family Information With whom do you live (check all that apply)? ▢

Mother

Father

Grandparent

Stepmother

Stepfather

Sibling (Number: ___)

Guardian

Other

▢ Aunt ▢ Parent/Guardian Name (Last, First): Relationship to student:

Occupation:

Parent/Guardian contact phone number:

Name:

Emergency Contact Phone:

Student Transportation and Communication Needs Do you live near a metro/train stop? If so, which one? Do you live near a bus stop? If so, which line? Do you live near a library? If so, which branch? Is English your first language? If not, what is your first language? What other languages do you speak (if any)?


Extracurricular Activities A. Please list all other extra curricular activities you are currently involved in (include sports, band, church activities): 1. Days/times: 2.

Days/times:

3.

Days/times:

B. Please list any work or internship obligations: 1. Days/times: 2.

Days/times:

C. Please list any coursework you are taking outside of your high school (Include any classes being taken at local universities): 1. Days/times: 2.

Days/times: EnvironMentors Statement of Interest

Why do you want to do EnvironMentors? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Is there an environmental issue that really concerns you? Why? What would you do about it? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________

Teacher Recommendation Please ask a teacher to recommend you for this program. The teacher can be for any subject and should have worked with you for at least 5 months. Teachers: Why do you think that this student would be a good candidate for a science and environmental mentoring program? Please include information about how long you have known the student, what class/club you worked with them, and their academic abilities. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________ Teacher Name

______________________________ Teacher Signature

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EnvironMentors Program Orientation Workshop Template …………………………………………………. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overall context to the EnvironMentors program and give students and mentors a chance to get to know one another and indicate their preferences for who they might like to work with.

MATERIALS CHECKLIST □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

BACKGROUND: The EnvironMentors Program Orientation is traditionally an upbeat and fun event geared toward allowing all new students and new mentors to meet one another for the first time, learn more about the program, and consider who they might like to be work with as a mentor or mentee. PREREQUISITE CHECKLIST □

Identify an ideal location that is large enough to accommodate students and mentors with enough room to move around

Identify a time that will work for the students and the mentors.

Develop a flyer including the What/Purpose, Where, and When information and alert students, teachers, and mentors

Plan for transportation of students from the school to the Orientation

Provide food or snacks and music for the event

Plan your decorations

Contact University newspaper, local community newspaper, and/or one of your local TV stations

□ □

Develop your agenda, and talking points Copy all needed materials

EnvironMentors Investigators DVD Laptop LCD projector Projector screen Student sign-in sheet Mentor sign-in sheet Name tags Pencils EnvironMentors Interviewing Worksheets (student and mentor) EnvironMentors Preferred Partner Sheets for students and mentors Food and beverages

SAMPLE AGENDA 6:00

Sign-in, Mix, Mingle, Munch

6:30

Welcome from university administrator and EnvironMentors chapter team

6:40

EnvironMentors DVD

6:50

Student – Mentor Interviewing

7:20

What’s Next - (All new students and new mentors will meet their assigned partners at the Program Kick off scheduled _______.)

7:25

Raffle/Door Prizes

7:30

Adjourn

ADDITIONAL IDEAS The Orientation is also an event to develop a sense of group spirit among your students and mentors. You may wish to include the following elements in your Orientation Agenda: -Welcome (from you) -Welcome (from your Dean, Department Chair, or other University administrator) -Icebreaker -Detailed overview of EnvironMentors -EnvironMentors Investigators (DVD format or projected directly off the web site) -Student – Mentor Interviewing

FOLLOW UP Send a letter to parents/guardians to introduce EnvironMentors, informing them of their child’s participation in the program, inviting them to upcoming events, encouraging their support of their child’s project, and providing them with contact information for the Chapter EnvironMentors Staff, Lead Teacher, and Mentor. Letters should be sent on your University or Department letterhead and should also include your general program calendar of events, field trips, workshops, and assignment due date


EnvironMentors – Explore Your World

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DC EnvironMentors 2011-2012 Season Program Orientation September 20, 2011 5:00-7:00pm Martin Luther King Jr. Library, 901 G Street NW, Room A-10

The EnvironMentors Orientation is your opportunity to: ♦ Learn more about EnvironMentors ♦ Get a glimpse of the exciting program EnvironMentors has planned for our 2011-2012 season ♦ Get to know our cohort of 2011-2012 Students, Mentors, and Parents through fun games and activities ♦ Have a really FUN and INSPIRING evening along with GREAT FOOD! Directions: Chinatown/ Gallery Place Metro Stop (Red, Green, Yellow Lines) Exit at the 9th St. exit, the library is diagonally across the street. Metro Center (Blue, Orange Lines) Exit at the G St. exit and walk 3 blocks to 9th St.


EnvironMentors Interviewing 101

EnvironMentors Interviewing 101 is your opportunity to meet and learn a bit about as many people as possible. Use the enclosed sheets to interview mentors/students here tonight. These are “starter questions� only. If they prompt other questions, feel free to delve deeper in your conversations. Remember, however, that you want to meet as many students/mentors as possible in the time permitted. When the interviewing session is over, turn the reverse side of this sheet to complete the Preferred Partner information. If you enjoyed everyone you spoke with and are happy to be matched with anyone, please just let us know in the space indicated. If however, there were one or two people you particularly enjoyed talking with and think you might like to work with, please also let us know in the spaces indicated. This information will help EnvironMentors staff match you with the best partner possible.


EnvironMentors Interviewing Student Interview #1 What is your name?

Where do you attend school?

What is your favorite class this year?

What are your favorite things to do in your free time?

What is your favorite sports team?

What is your favorite dinner?

What is your favorite dessert?

If you received a $50,000 grant to go anywhere in the world and study anything you wanted, where would you go and what would you study?

If you won a $1 million lottery ticket, what would you spend it on?

What do you want to be or do when you “grow up"?

Student Interview #2 What is your name?

Where do you attend school?

What is your favorite class this year?

What are your favorite things to do in your free time?

What is your favorite sports team?

What is your favorite dinner?

What is your favorite dessert?

If you received a $50,000 grant to go anywhere in the world and study anything you wanted, where would you go and what would you study?

If you won a $1 million lottery ticket, what would you spend it on?

What do you want to be or do when you “grow up"?


EnvironMentors Interviewing Mentor Interview #1 1) What is your name?

2) Where do you work?

3) What do you like most about your work?

4) How did you prepare for your career?

5) What is the most important skill that you use in your work?

6) What are your favorite things to do in your free time?

7) What is your favorite sports team?

8) What is your favorite dinner?

9) What is your favorite dessert?

10) If you received a $50,000 fellowship to research anything in the world, what would you study?

11) If you won a $1 million lottery ticket, what would you spend it on?

12) What do you want to be or do when you “grow up"?

Mentor Interview #2 1) What is your name?

2) Where do you work?

3) What do you like most about your work?

4) How did you prepare for your career?

5) What is the most important skill that you use in your work?

6) What are your favorite things to do in your free time?

7) What is your favorite sports team?

8) What is your favorite dinner?

9) What is your favorite dessert?

10) If you received a $50,000 fellowship to research anything in the world, what would you study?

11) If you won a $1 million lottery ticket, what would you spend it on?


Preferred Partner Sheet The following information provided on the Preferred Partner Sheet is intended to help EnvironMentors staff match you with the best partner possible. It is entirely confidential, and will not be shared with anyone beyond EnvironMentors staff. _____

I enjoyed everyone I talked with tonight and am happy for you to match me with the best partner possible based on what you know about me from my application.

_____

I particularly enjoyed speaking with the following people and hope that I might be able to work with one of them in EnvironMentors.

1) 2) 3) 4)


Tips for Student Mentor Matching  Have someone help you. Matching student and mentor teams can become an emotionally involved process. An additional perspective from a colleague or friend can help you sort through personality types and consistency in student and mentor interests.  If a student indicates a particular area of interest, try to pair him/ her with a mentor in that field.  Look at mentor’s preference sheets first. If a mentor only has one student’s name on their sheet, find that student’s sheet. If that particular student has that mentors name or “I like everyone” (ILE), match the two. If the student has another mentor’s name on the sheet, look for that mentor and see what students they have on their list. It can become a cycle, but just keep repeating until everyone is matched.  If you find one mentor whose name appears on numerous students’ sheets, pull that mentor’s sheet. If they have matching names, give them the first choice.  If you have matched a lot of pairs and get to a mentor or student who you think would be better suited for each other, you will just need to switch pairs in mid stream.  By now you should know some of your students’ personalities. Pairing of opposites can work out well and to the benefit of both the student and mentor.  Once you match a student and a mentor, place their preference sheets and applications together. Input the student and mentor pair name in a list. Now you have two separate places for the student and mentor pairs’ names.  Match male mentors (as positive role models) with male students first. It can become problematic to match male mentors with female students, so do everything possible to avoid this. However you will more than likely be in a situation of matching female mentors with male students which is fine.  Try to give returning mentors their first pick of students.


EnvironMentors Kick-Off Workshop Template ………………………… OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the Kick-Off is to introduce students and new mentors for the first time in a non-threatening, group setting. At the Kick-off, you will distribute the Student-Mentor Manuals, have pairs work through the “Getting to Know You” pages, and submit completed First Meeting forms

SAMPLE AGENDA 6:00

Overview of your program calendar

6:15

Expectations for students and their mentor’s role

6:30

Benefits to students including trips for top three students to the National fair in Washington, DC

6:45

Provide students and mentors with their EnvironMentors manuals

7:00

Pairs working together on the First Meeting sheets and Mentor Interview sheets. These are getting-to-know-you worksheets for students and mentors. Make sure all sheets are turned in at the end of the event for your records.

7:30

Adjourn

MATERIALS CHECKLIST □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

EnvironMentors Investigation DVD Laptop LCD Projector Projector Screen Student Sign In sheet Mentors Sign In sheet Name Tags Pencils Student manuals Mentor manuals Student and Mentor Commitment Forms Getting to Know your Mentor Worksheet Food and beverages

PREREQUISITE CHECKLIST □

Identify an ideal location

Identify a time

Develop a flyer

Plan for transportation of students from the school to the Orientation

Provide food or snacks and music for the event

Plan your decorations

Develop your agenda and copy all materials

FOLLOW UP Check in with students and mentors regularly to ensure that they have had their first meeting and that they are meeting on a regular basis


Getting to Know Your Mentor: Education & College Experience THE APPLICATION AND DECISION PROCESS 1. When did you start thinking about, and planning for, college? 2. What influenced your decision about where you wanted to go to school and what type of school you wanted to attend (private, public, liberal arts, HBCU, large, small, etc.)? 3. Did you choose to go to school near or far from where you grew up? UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE 4. As a freshman, did you know what you wanted to major in? Did you graduate with that major, or did you change it? Did you have a minor? 5. If you had your undergraduate years to do again, what would you do the same and what would you do differently? 6. How did you finance your undergraduate education? GRADUATE SCHOOL 7. Do you have an advanced degree? If yes, what degree (Master’s, PhD, JD, etc.) and in what subject area? What prompted your decision to obtain an advanced degree? 8. If no, do you plan to pursue an advanced degree? What is currently motivating you to pursue (or not pursue) an advanced degree? PREPARING FOR COLLEGE 9. Based on your experience, what would you recommend I do during high school to prepare me for college? 10. What would you recommend I do during high school to gain college acceptance? 11. What kinds of things should I do now to make me successful in college? Career & Work Experience Your mentor is a great resource to give you insight into what it is like to work in environmental fields. The following are a few questions you can use to learn more about possible environmentally-related fields. 1. What are your first memories of wanting to work in the areas of science, technology and/or the environment, or the profession in which you are currently working? What was your inspiration? 2. What experiences (including internships, fellowships, teaching assistantships, etc.) led you to your current job?


3. What do you like most about your job? 4. What do you like least about your job? 5. What do you like most about your overall career? 6. What special knowledge, skills and abilities are required for your current job? 7. What are the special strengths you bring to your job? 8. What are your aspirations for the future? 9. Would you feel comfortable sharing your resume with me or sharing tips on how to create a useful and effective resume? 10. Would you feel comfortable helping me design and build my resume? 11. Do you have any other thoughts about how to be successful in the fields of science, technology and/or the environment?


Getting to Know Your Student The following are some questions to help you learn about your student's interests, aspirations, and life. Education 1. What is your favorite subject? Why? 2. What is your hardest subject? Why? 3. What kind of teachers do you like? 4. What kind of learner do you think you are: visual, auditory, hands-on, or passive? 5. What was the best project you have ever done in school? Graduation and College 6. Are you on track to graduate high school? If not, what do you need to do? 7. What are you looking forward to after high school? 8. Are you planning on going to college? 9. What type of college are you interested in attending? (size, location, programs, etc) 10. Has anyone else in your family graduated high school? Attended college? Career 11. What jobs or careers paths (such as family members' jobs) do you know about? 12. What is the most interesting job that you have ever seen? 13. What do you think you want to do when you get older?


14. What do you think you need to do to get there? 15. Are you currently doing any activities or programs that will help you prepare for that career?


Student & Mentor Progress Chart Use the chart on the following pages to keep track of your work, weekly goals, and time invested in EnvironMentors. For many students, this record can be used as a log of community service hours that count toward graduation requirements. For each entry: • Enter the date, time, location, and a general description of activities each time you meet with your mentor. • Keep track of all activities. Even if you just go out to dinner or a movie or spend time at an EnvironMentors workshop or event, it’s important that you keep track of the time you spend with your mentor. • Discuss your goals for the following week with your mentor and record them in the space provided. Assessing your progress: • Compare your progress with due dates set by your teacher and/or chapter coordinator. • Each week, compare your accomplishments with your goals from the previous week. • Work with your mentor to identify what you think you did well and what you need help with. • Tracking your progress can provide a clearer view of short- and long-term goals. Sign-off: • Your mentor should sign your Student & Mentor Progress Chart each time you meet. Make it a habit to do the sign-off at the end of every meeting. Remember, you will get credit for community service hours only if the time is recorded. • Charts will be routinely checked and initialed by your teacher and/or chapter coordinator in order to monitor your progress. Student & Mentor Progress Chart Student: ___________________________________ Mentor: ___________________________________ Chapter: ___________________________________ School: ___________________________________ Date & Time 9/18 5 pm

9/27 1 pm

Location

Total Hours

Library

1

High School Auditorium

Log of Progress & Goals Meeting Activities/Work Completed: Researched possible project topic – animal behavior, water quality, recycling. Found a very interesting study on… Next week’s goals: Decide on topic; research what resources to use, including the internet, books, and experts Meeting Activities/Work Completed: Attended a weekly meeting with my EnvironMentors chapter and participated in a field trip to… Next week’s goals: Meet with my mentor for 2 hours

EXAMPLE 2

Mentor Initials

Coord. Initials

MLW

RKE

MLW

RKE


National Council for Science and the Environment Improving the scientific basis for environmental decision-making 1101 17 Street, NW • Suite 250 • Washington, DC 20036-4722 • TEL 202/530-5810 • FAX 202/628-4311 • www.NCSEonline.org

A. Karim Ahmed, Ph.D. Secretary-Treasurer Hon. Richard Benedick

Dominique House 1740 Tobias Dr. SE Washington DC 20020

President Joyce Berry, Ph.D. James Buizer

October 10, 2008

Rita Colwell, Ph.D. Mohamed El-Ashry, Ph.D.

Dear Dominique House:

Jan Hartke Joseph Highland, Ph.D. Stephen P. Hubbell, Ph.D. Founding Chairman Hon. Randy Johnson Donald N. Langenberg, Ph.D. Chairman Margaret S. Leinen, Ph.D. H. Jeffrey Leonard, Ph.D. Astrid E. Merget, Ph.D. Vice Chairman Anthony Michaels, Ph.D. Larry A. Nielsen, Ph.D. Dian Ogilvie, Esq. Hon. Richard Ottinger, Esq.

This letter is to inform you that your child has been selected to participate in the 2008-2009 DC EnvironMentors Program. EnvironMentors is a rigorous, environmental science mentoring program. We match people working and studying in science and environmental fields with high school students in one to one mentoring relationships. Student and mentor pairs work together to develop environmental science research projects over the school year. The program concludes each May with the EnvironMentors Fair and Awards Ceremony at which students present their projects and winners are awarded scholarships to college and college prep programs. During our 2007-2008 program season, we gave away nearly $20,000 in scholarships to deserving students. 100% of EnvironMentors seniors enrolled in a college or university this past year, and many of our students can be found at top ranked US colleges and universities. In addition, we work closely with students who participate in EnvironMentors to give them support in the college application process.

Ronald Pulliam, Ph.D. Gov. Bill Richardson Peter D. Saundry, Ph.D. Executive Director Jeffrey Seabright Hon. Barbara Sheen Todd Claire A. Van Ummersen, Ph.D. Warren Washington, Ph.D. Honorary Members of the Board Richard C. Bartlett Hon. Hazel O’Leary Hon. William K. Reilly Hon. William D. Ruckelshaus James Gustave Speth, Esq.

EnvironMentors started off this year, with an Orientation Event and a Kick-Off Event. At this event your child met her EnvironMentors mentor for the first time. We worked hard to match students with the most appropriate mentor possible based on shared interests. Most of our student/mentor relationships are highly positive and we certainly hope this is the case for your child. Students meet with their mentor two or three times a month to work on their EnvironMentors projects. Ask your child when their next meeting will be. The next event that you can look for is the Council of Environmental Deans and Directors (CEDD) Reception that will be on December 7, 2008. This event will be a great opportunity to make connections with over 100 Deans and Directors of major universities, learn about different colleges and universities, and to make a good impression on the people who are in charge of accepting students into their programs. You are invited to the reception along with your child. We hope you will consider joining us for future EnvironMentors events and fieldtrips. We also hope you will support your daughter in developing their EnvironMentors project and participation in the program as a whole. Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns regarding participation of your daughter in EnvironMentors. Sincerely,

Jacklyn Shafir DC Program Manager, NCSE EnvironMentors 202-207-0017 jshafir@ncseonline.org


Permission Slip Release for EnvironMentors Dear Parent/Guardian: Please carefully read, and if you agree to the following terms, sign and return this letter. I, the undersigned, for valuable consideration, understand and acknowledge the following terms: My child will be in the care and authority of

on

.

I, on behalf of myself, my personal representatives and my heirs, hereby voluntarily agree to release, wave, discharge and hold harmless (your university), and the National Council for Science and the Environment and its employees, from any and all claims, actions, or losses of property damage, body injury, loss of services, or otherwise which may arise out of my child’s participation on the I have read the above waiver and release and by signing it agree to its terms. It is my intention to exempt and relieve the (your university) and National Council for Science and the Environment from liability for property or personal injury. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact (Coordinator and contact information) _____________________________ Student’s Name

_____ Age

________________ Date

_____________________________ Signature of Parent or Guardian _____________________________ Printed Name of Parent or Guardian Emergency Contact Information: ________________________ Primary Contact Name

____________________________ Primary Contact Phone Number

________________________ Secondary Contact Name

____________________________ Secondary Contact Phone Number

Sample Authorization for Treatment Form


Authorization for Treatment

___________________________________ Student Name

________________ Date

As the parent/ guardian of the above named student, I hereby give authority to the staff of EnvironMentors to take my child to an emergency room of the nearest hospital should, for any reason, they require any minor medical or surgical treatment and/or medication while participating in an approved field trip activity. I further authorize the hospital and its medical staff to administer treatment as deemed necessary by them for the well-being of said student. I understand that staff will make attempts to notify me in all medical emergencies, and I will be contacted, if possible, for my permission if hospitalization or treatment of a serious nature is required. I have read and understand the above and I freely give my consent and permission of all things contained herein. __________________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

___________________ Date

Media Release I grant permission for my child (name, voice, written work, video and photographic likeness) to be used by EnvironMentors and , ________ (name of University) and school personnel, for promotional purposes. Student’s name: ___________________________________________________________ Parent’s name: ____________________________________________________________ Parent’s signature: ____________________________________________ Date: _______

EnvironMentors is an initiative of the National Council for Science and the Environment 1101 17th St. NW Suite 250 Washington DC, 20036~ 202-530-5810~www.ncseonline.org


Release of FERPA Information to EnvironMentors The Family Educations Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that requires schools, with certain exceptions, to get your permission before disclosing personally identifiable information from education records. EnvironMentors is a college access program that has a very high graduation and college acceptance rate amongst its students. In order to track that information, we need your permission to have _______________________ (Student's School) release: student name, address, telephone listing, diplomas and awards received, dates of attendance, transcript, graduation, and college acceptance information to EnvironMentors for the purpose of program evaluations and success tracking. NO PERSONAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD WILL BE MADE PUBLIC WITH THIS INFORMATION.

Student’s name: ___________________________________________________________ Parent’s name: ____________________________________________________________ Parent’s signature: ____________________________________________ Date: _______


EnvironMentors Mentor Training Workshop Template

SAMPLE AGENDA 6:00

Sign-in, Mix, Mingle, Munch

6:15

Welcome from university administrator, EnvironMentors chapter team, and College

…………………………………………………. OBJECTIVE: This workshop will provide a deeper understanding of the roles of mentors, the local issues that their student population faces, and review the EM program calendar and expectations. BACKGROUND: The EnvironMentors Mentor Training is partially informational where Mentors learn the philosophy behind mentoring, as well as introspective where Mentors will reflect on their past mentors. The informational sources should be given in a PowerPoint presentation. It is good to invite a local anthropologist or professor to talk about some of the issues that your student population faces. Let your College Access Partner give an overview of the college access events and materials that students will learn through the year and the role of the mentor in the CA process. PREREQUISITE CHECKLIST □

Identify an ideal location that is large enough to accommodate Mentors, with the technology necessary for a PowerPoint presentation.

Identify a time that will work for the Mentors, ideally after work.

Develop a flyer including the What/Purpose, Where, and When information and email it to the Mentors.

Provide food or snacks for the event

Develop your agenda, and talking points

Copy all needed materials

MATERIALS CHECKLIST □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

Laptop LCD projector Projector screen Mentor sign-in sheet Name tags Pencils Mentors in My Life EnvironMentors Guru Scenarios Food and beverages

Access Partner 6:20

"Mentors in My Life" Activity

6:30

National Mentoring Center- Mentor Cycle PowerPoint Presentation

6:45

EnvironMentors Mentoring 101

7:15

Question/Answer and Showing Past Projects

7:25

College Access Overview (CA Partner)

7:40

EnvironMentors Guru Scenarios

7:30

Adjourn

ADDITIONAL IDEAS During the "Mentors in My Life" exercise, have the Mentors pair up and share with each other their past experiences.


Building Mentoring Relationships Erich Stiefvater National Mentoring Center @ Education Northwest http://www.nwrel.org/mentoring/


“Closer, more supportive relationships are more likely to make positive changes in youth’s lives.” -From Assessing the Effectiveness of Mentoring Programs, in Contemporary Issues in Mentoring


The Mentor-Mentee Relationship Cycle Ending

Beginning of the Match

“Real� Mentoring

Challenging and Testing

From: Ongoing Training for Mentors available at: http://www.edmentoring.org/pubs/ongoing_training.pdf


Beginning the Match Characteristics: • Getting to know each other • The first impressions • Trying to see the positive in the relationship • Bonding

Effective Communication: • Ask open-ended questions • Use open body language and active listening • Demonstrate empathy • Avoid “prescriptive” communication • Use prompts • Speak with language that you feel comfortable with • Don’t be afraid of silence


Challenging and Testing Characteristics: • Mentee challenges • Testing phase • Rethinking first impressions • Difficult feelings or emotions may surface

Effective Communication: • Be consistent in your communication • Demonstrate respect • Build problem-solving techniques into your openended questions • Raise sensitive issues at the beginning of your interactions • Separate behaviors from who the mentee is • Disclose personal feelings and experiences as appropriate


“Real” Mentoring Characteristics: • The relationship begins feeling right again • Trust is established • Growth in the mentee can be observed • A “deeper” bond and connection has been formed

Effective Communication: • Continue with disclosures when appropriate • Avoid advising, and allow youth to actively problem solve • Build off your knowledge of your mentee’s strengths to foster deeper discussions • Give positive feedback • Don’t be afraid to let your mentee know when something has hurt you


What Does “Real” Mentoring Look Like in EnvironMentors?


Ending Characteristics: • Preparing for closure • Relationship may become deeper or mentee may start pulling away • Reflection

Effective Communication: • Find common language to sum up your feelings • Provide feedback that describes growth that you observed • Be prepared to listen and affirm fears that your mentee may have


Questions?


Thank You! • Erich Stiefvater – (503) 275-0761 – erich.stiefvater@educationnorthwest.org – http://educationnorthwest.org/nmc


Mentors in My Life Mentor / 1: a friend of Odysseus entrusted with the education of Telemnachus, 2: a trusted counselor or guide, 3: tutor, coach.

1) Please think of someone who represents a mentor in your life. This could be a teacher, family member, coach, fellow “life traveler�, anyone who helped you along your way. Who was this person?

2) Now think about what this person meant to you. In what ways did he or she support you, represent a role or someone who inspired you? I n what ways did this person help you along your way?

3) What were some of the things this person did with and/or for you that you felt were valuable?

4) With these activities in mind, what are some of the things you would like to provide for your student through EnvironMentors?

5) What are some of the characteristics you admired most in this person?

6) With these in mind, what are some of the characteristics you would like to model for your student?

7) What are two or three of your expectations regarding your mentoring in EnvironMentors

8) What are some of the things you would like to get back through your participation in the program?


EnvironMentors Mentee Training Workshop Template

6:15

Welcome from university administrator, EnvironMentors chapter team, and College Access Partner

6:20

"Mentors in My Life" Activity

………………………………………………….

6:30

Benefits of Mentorships and Role of Mentors

OBJECTIVE: This workshop will provide a deeper understanding of the roles of mentors, studentmentor communication techniques, and review the EM program calendar and expectations.

6:35

Education Northwest Mentoring Cycle

6:45

Time Management and Professional

BACKGROUND: The EnvironMentors Mentee Training is a dual training where Students learn the philosophy behind and benefits of mentoring, as well as instructions for time management and professional communication techniques. The informational sources should be given in a PowerPoint presentation. It is good to invite your College Access partner to help deliver the time management portion of the workshop.

7:00

Professional Communication Game

7:15

Adjourn

PREREQUISITE CHECKLIST □

Identify an ideal location that is large enough to accommodate students, with the technology necessary for a PowerPoint presentation.

Identify a time that will work for the students, ideally directly after school.

Develop a flyer including the What/Purpose, Where, and When information and distribute it to the students.

Provide food or snacks for the event

Develop your agenda, and talking points

Copy all needed materials

MATERIALS CHECKLIST □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

Laptop LCD projector Projector screen Mentor sign-in sheet Name tags Pencils EnvironMentors Calendars/School Planners Food and beverages

SAMPLE AGENDA 6:00

Sign-in, Mix, Mingle, Munch

Communication Etiquette (CA Partner)

ADDITIONAL IDEAS During the "Mentors in My Life" exercise, have the students pair up and share with each other their past experiences.


Mentor Evaluation Thank you in advance for taking the time to complete the Mentor Evaluation. This should not take more than 15 minutes. Please return by Friday, June 3th to: (You, Phone/Email) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name (Optional) ____________________________________________________________________ I) Participation: 1) How did you learn about EnvironMentors? _____A colleague/friend _____Presentation from staff member _____Notice in the Washington Post _____E-mail notice _____Notice in the Washingtonian Magazine _____Surfing the Web _____Flyer on Bulletin Board _____ Other 2) How many years have you participated in EnvironMentors? ___1 year ___2 years ____3 years ____4 years ____5 years ____ more than 5 years 3) What motivated you to mentor with EnvironMentors? (Check any/all that apply). ____Desire to help a student. ____Desire to share my love of the environment with a student. ____Desire to develop an environmental project with a student. ____Desire to share my professional interests with a student. ____Desire to do something beyond the boundaries of my job description. ____Other._________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ 4) On average, how often did you met with your student? ____ Once per week. ____ 3-5 face to face meetings per month, interspersed with phone calls and e-mail. ____ Approximately once per month ____ Less frequently 5) What were your expectations for mentoring with EnvironMentors and do you feel these were met. "In general, my expectations included____________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Do you feel these expectations were met? ____ Yes, I feel these expectations were met

____ No, these expectations were not met.

6) What currently does, or does not, motivate you to consider mentoring with EnvironMentors in the future? (Check all that apply. Your answers in no way bind you to actually participating next year). ____Positive experience this year motivates me to do it again next year. ____Satisfactory experience this year motivates me to expand my efforts next year. ____Less than satisfactory experience this year leads me to not want to participate in EnvironMentors next year. ____Other, please explain.


7) Are you considering mentoring in next year’s program? Your response, positive or negative, does not bind you to mentoring next year.) ____Yes, I am considering participating in next year’s program and would like to do so with my current student(s). ____Yes, I am considering participating in next year’s program and would like to do so with a new student(s). ____No, I am not considering participating in next year’s program. 8) If you are not considering participating next year, can you tell us the reasons why? (Your responses are extremely valuable and confidential). ____Time commitment more than my schedule will allow. ____Work with student too difficult. ____Work with the EnvironMentors organization too difficult. ____Relocation ____Additional reasons/comments ________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ 9) Please let us know your overall thoughts regarding your level of satisfaction with EnvironMentors. a) What aspects of EnvironMentors worked well for you?

b) What aspects of the program did not work for you?

c) What are some of the most significant things you would like to see changed/improved to increase your level of satisfaction with EnvironMentors and enhance the program for other new mentors? II) Program 10) Please indicate in which of the following events/workshops you participated and whether they were valuable to your role as an EnvironMentor.

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

Program Orientation Program Kick off Mentor Training Workshop Project Design Workshop Science Writing Workshop Experimental Methods Workshop Lesson Planning/Presentation Skills Mentor Happy Hours

Valuable

Moderately Valuable

Not Valuable

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________ _______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_________________ _________________ _________________ _________________ _________________ _________________ _________________ _________________

____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________

11) Please indicate topics for additional training you think would be valuable to you as a mentor and/or students. ____ More effective mentoring trainings Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ ____ Mentor Happy Hours --More opportunities to get together in informal situations. Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ 2


____ College awareness and preparedness (joint mentor-student session) Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ ____ Career awareness in environmental professions (joint mentors-student session) Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ ____ Time Management (joint mentors-student session) Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ ____ Basic Composition and Research Paper Writing (joint mentors-student session) Comments/Suggestions_______________________________________________________________ Other Topics________________________________________________________________________

12) Please indicate activities you believe would strengthen the program and your work with your student. (rank in order 1-3). ___ more workshops geared to skills building. ___ more workshops geared to awareness of environmental topics and issues ___ more field trips geared to promoting bonding and team building between and among mentors and students. ___ more field trips geared to expanding awareness and understanding of local ecology and environmental issues

13) Because skill building is a necessary component of EnvironMentors, some forms of training sessions are inevitable. Please let us know what would be your preferred time for workshops. ___ Saturday mornings ___ Saturday afternoons ___ Early evenings ___ For mentor-only workshops, noon-time brown bag meetings would work for me III) Communications: 14) Please indicate the methods of communication that worked for you. ____ E-mail updates ____ Workshops and events ____ Mentor/Student Manual ____ Telephone reminders and contacts with Student Coordinator 15) Please indicate whether the quality of staff support and communications met your needs. (responses are confidential) Staff support was: ____Excellent ___Satisfactory ___Unsatisfactory 16) Please state whether the quantity of staff communications met your needs. ____ Just the right amount of communication. I felt well supported by the staff and chapter. ____

Not enough communication. I felt less than well-supported by the staff and chapter. I often didn’t know what I should be doing next with my student. ____ More information than I could handle; I found the level of communication overwhelming. Please let us know of any other ideas for improving communications with mentors. __________________________________________________________________________________ 3


__________________________________________________________________________________ 17) Please check all that apply in-person and technology-based methods of support you would be valuable your work in EnvironMentors. ____ More mentor Happy Hours ____ Mentor brown bag speaker series on mentoring skills ____ Mentor Manual and other mentor training materials in online instructional format. ____ Mentor list-serve to facilitate easy idea exchange among mentors. ____Other options? IV) Will you help? 18) Quotable Quotes It is extremely valuable to have supportive quotes from participating mentors when we tell others about the program--through grant proposals, newsletters, media communications, and public presentations. Your words of support in the form of a few sentences, a paragraph, or even a quick letter are much appreciated. ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

4


EnvironMentors Student Drop Form Today’s Date

_____________________________________________________

Student’s Name

______________________________________________________

School

______________________________________________________

Grade

______________________________________________________

Teacher

______________________________________________________

Address

______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

Phone

______________________________________________________

1) Results of in person and/or phone conversations to student/mentor/parent to inquire of difficulty and to support student in remaining with the program through the season. • • • 2) Student’s stated perspectives(s) for difficulties in staying with EnvironMentors.

3) Mentor’s perspective on student(s) difficulties in staying with EnvironMentors.

4) Student’s final reason for leaving EnvironMentors.

__________________________________ Student Signature

_______________________ Mentor’s signature

Effective Date of Termination

________________________


Field Trips and Outdoor Opportunities Introduction Countless studies document the importance of spending time in nature to the physical, mental, and emotional development of youth. The seminal work by Richard Louv, “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder” brought to national attention the negative impacts to young people when experiences in nature are limited during adolescent years, a term which he coined as “Nature Deficit Disorder”. Louv suggests that there are numerous benefits to youth when provided with many varied experiences in nature. Another nationally recognized expert, Dr. Stephen Kellert, suggests in his text “Children and Nature,” that the natural world provides opportunities for children to develop intellectually through their experiences with the outside world. He suggests that although the support of family, teachers, and community are important to the development of children another critical component is the contact with the natural world. EnvironMentors seeks to prepare our students for college degree programs and careers in the environmental fields, and raise the interest level of our students in nature and the environment. Therefore, planning field trips and other opportunities to maximize the time our students spend in nature are fundamental to the EnvironMentors mission. This is particularly important given that the EnvironMentors target population are students from underrepresented backgrounds, many of whom have had limited opportunities in nature. EnvironMentors Field Trip Tips  Plan in advance for field trips to occur early in your program season and throughout the year.  Schedule one or more tours of your university and/or college and departments.  Guide the development of your students’ projects towards those that will entail fieldbased experimental research.  Schedule fun outdoor events just following major assignment due dates as incentives for students to complete these assignments. These could include hiking, an outdoor challenge course, or other fun outdoor activity.  Routinely encourage your mentors to accompany their student in any or all field research data collection trials he or she may undertake.  Coordinate a chapter photo contest to encourage students to get out with their cameras to take pictures of elements of your local environment that interest them or start a “Get Students Outdoors” campaign and challenge mentors to participate in one outdoor activity a week to win cool prizes.


Field Trip Checklist Coordinators and teachers can make use of the following check list to help plan your field trips well in advance.  Review and discuss ideas for field trips together. Determine top three ideas for trips. Identify tentative dates and/or time frames for each field trip.  Research/schedule field trips that will help to provide students with exposure to natural resources and environmental issues in your area, and inspire ideas for students EnvironMentors project topics.  Attempt to schedule at least one trip as a Student-Mentor field trip, for student-mentor bonding. This will probably require scheduling the trip either after work hours, during the weekend, or on a federal holiday.  Inquire whether your college or university has vans that you may reserve for your trips. Also, inquire if your partner high school has a Special Events and/or a Field Trip budget. Does the teacher have discretion to make special requests for school buses for field trips?  Select the top 3 field trip destinations that will best represent different habitat types in your region and environmental issues in your community.  Discuss best date and time options for each trip.  If you are working with a local outfitter, contact the on site coordinator, schedule a site visit to determine necessary logistics of the trip. Logistics: Transportation: ___ Determine the most feasible and cost effective mode of transportation for students (and mentors) a. If using a University Van: reserve the van well in advance, make sure you have a certified driver for the van. Also, check to make sure your partner high school will allow students to leave the high school grounds in a university van. b. If using School Bus: find out about the required procedures for use of your partner high school bus service. c. If using Public Transportation: make sure to inquire what permissions and/or waivers the school and parents may need to allow students to use public transportation.


d. If using a personal vehicle: make sure your have investigated and covered all liability issues that could arise and plan ahead for parental approval.

Permissions and Waivers: ___ Work together to develop and distribute permission slips to students. 1) Most outfitters will have their own liability insurance and waiver forms. 2) If you are planning an independent field trip, you will need to find out what waivers and parental permissions your high school requires. 3) Also, make note of the attached waiver, which waives any liability against NCSE and EnvironMentors. You can build this language into specially prepared waiver letter for your university, and include it with your field trip waiver package. 4) If you are considering undertaking a Student Exchange trip with another EnvironMentors chapter or any overnight excursion, use either the general liability permission slip from your university or program or the NCSE/EnvironMentors Template below. Extended trips (anything over night) should also include a letter describing the trip to the Parents as well as a detailed Itinerary. See Parent Waiver Letter and Itinerary Templates which follow. Keep in mind: ___

Even if students are asked to bring their lunch, always bring some extra food and snacks. For outdoor trips more then 2 hours, bring plenty of water.

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Be prepared for your trip and bring: 1) a class roster with emergency contacts 2) cell phone 3) first aid kit 4) directions to and from the field trip location 5) food and water (if necessary) 6) extra money 7) camera 8) any other supplemental material you will need for the trip

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