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Vol. 32, No. 1 • January 2019

Trends2019 DIGITAL MEDIA/ADVERTISING

Amazon Have you worked with the 60% digital ad platforms for Amazon, YES Walmart, Kroger and/or Target? If so, please rate them. 40%

4%

62%

25% YES

Is your organization currently developing voice-enabled (conversational commerce) marketing tools?

24%

0

10

20

30

40

14% NO

SHOPPER MARKETING

Does the following area of your organization value shopper marketing?

33%

Don’t know

LOOKING AHEAD Which topic will be of MOST practical value to your organization in the coming year? And which topic would be of LEAST practical value to your organization in the coming year?

Finance

NO

YES

50

Brands working with Walmart are encouraged to work with one of 11 select digital content partners. Do you plan to work with one in 2019?

44%

22%

44%

28%

NO

DON’T KNOW

TECHNOLOGY

Data sharing

30%

Influencer marketing 0

5

10

15

20

25

30%

Augmented reality/VR 0

5

30

10

15

20

25

30

63% 37%

NO

YES

E-COMMERCE Does your company use special branded e-commerce packaging for doorstep delivery?

GENDER GAP

“ We’re losing people to other industries far more than we’re losing people to the ‘mommy’ track.” Julie Quick, Shoptology

25%

Yes

No, but we’ve looked into it

30% 46%

No, and we haven’t looked into it 0

10

20

30

40

50

FULL COVER AGE BEGINS ON PAGE 10

INSIDE P2PX Coverage

Advantage Solutions on facial recognition ... Price Chopper’s digital strategy ... Forrester keynote address ... and Walgreens using VR. PAGES 8-9

No More Pallet Wraps P2PI honored 12 Women of Excellence in October at the Path to Purchase Expo. Here we profile the Innovation honorees.

Sam’s Club in September 2018 implemented a chainwide ban on pallet base wraps as part of a larger strategy to simplify its business.

INNOVATION PAGE 40

PAGE 54

Shopping With Steve

Page 46


You don't have You don't have to hold our hand. to hold our hand. Unless you want to. Tempt is an innovative visual solutions Tempt is an innovative visualretail solutions company that combines expertise company that combines expertise and with strategic creativeretail capabilities with strategicprinting creativeoptions capabilities and world-class to create world-class options to create enriched,printing emotionally charged signage enriched, emotionally charged signage and point-of-purchase materials. and point-of-purchase materials. Whether you hand us the big idea, or ask Whether you hand us the idea,on or us. ask us to develop it, you canbig count us to develop it, you can count on us. Learn more at tempt-ing.com. Learn more at tempt-ing.com. Visual solutions that command attention. Visual solutions that command attention.

Unless you want to.

For more information: For more information: www.tempt-ing.com www.tempt-ing.com info@tempt-ing.com info@tempt-ing.com 1.866.435.0263 Powered by

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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Bill Schober (773) 992-4430, bschober@ensembleiq.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Binder (773) 992-4437, tbinder@ensembleiq.com MANAGING EDITOR Charlie Menchaca (773) 992-4432, cmenchaca@ensembleiq.com DIRECTOR – PRODUCTION Ed Ward (773) 992-4418, eward@ensembleiq.com ART DIRECTOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER Sonja Lundquist (773) 992-4419, slundquist@ensembleiq.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Peter Breen, Patrycja Malinowska, Samantha Nelson, Cyndi Loza, Jacqueline Barba

CONTENTS 4 Editorial: Bill Schober 6 Solution Provider News 6 Welcoming Football Fans

As “Official Travel Center of the SEC,” Pilot Flying J enhanced its in-store experience to reinforce the travel centers as a critical location for college football game-day travel essentials.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Michael Applebaum, Anne Downes, Ed Finkel, Erika Flynn, Chris Gelbach, Dawn Klingensmith, Neal Lorenzi, April Miller, Dan Ochwat

SALES Albert Guffanti, Vice President, Publisher (973) 607-1301, aguffanti@ensembleiq.com Rich Zelvin, Associate Publisher (773) 992-4425, rzelvin@ensembleiq.com

SPECIAL REPORTS

PATH TO PURCHASE INSTITUTE / MEMBER DEVELOPMENT & SERVICES President Terese Herbig, (773) 992-4438 Senior Director – Member Development Patrick Hare, (773) 992-4465

During a P2PX presentation, Price Chopper and Oracle Data Cloud explained how the retailer is testing different methods of marketing and tracking the data surrounding those changes.

9 Be Customer-Obsessed

Forrester’s Brendan Witcher says the days of shaping a customer experience based on the company’s vision of “convenient, simple and easy” are gone. The key now is to become customer-obsessed and data-led.

9 Category Reset

10 Trends 2019

Walgreens works with beverage giant Coca-Cola Co. and virtual reality provider InContext Solutions to provide “a simple addition to the reset process – with big impact.”

Amazon, Walmart, technology, the store of the future, shopper marketing and women in leadership are just some of the topics we address in our annual Shopper Marketing Trends survey and report.

40 Women of Excellence: Editorial and Executive Offices 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60631-3731 Phone: (773) 992-4450 Fax: (773) 992-4455

8 Price Chopper Evolves

‘Innovation’ Honorees At P2PI’s Women of Excellence reception in October, 12 women were honored, including three in the Innovation category: • Julie Fisher, E. & J. Gallo Winery • Cathy Allin, Decision Insight • Bree Glaeser, The Mars Agency

19

An advertising supplement.

44 So-Lo-Mo Central

A roundup of social, local and mobile marketing activity at retail from: • Facebook • P&G’s Gillette Venus • Jagermeister • Kellogg Co. • inMarket • Verve and Yext • Flashflood • Buzzfeed • Google

Director – Member and New Business Development Todd Turner, (571) 395-7846 VP – Member Services Jennifer Zannelli, (773) 992-4444 Manager, New Member Development Katrina Lopez, (813) 713-4301 Executive Advisor, EnsembleIQ + P2PI Steve Frenda, (773) 992-4461

P2PI.ORG Managing Director – Content & Editorial Bill Schober, (773) 992-4430 Editor-in-Chief, Consumer Goods Technology Peter Breen, (973) 607-1300

8 Facial Recognition

Retailers and brands will have numerous applications for facial technology going forward, from learning more about their customers to making their lives easier by eliminating the need for passwords or credit cards, according to Lori Stillman of Advantage Solutions.

Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing

46 Shopping With Steve

EnsembleIQ’s Steve Frenda, a passionate retail watcher for more than four decades, gives us a look at Abt in Glenview, Illinois.

Associate Director – Content Patrycja Malinowska, (773) 992-4435 Associate Editor – Content Cyndi Loza, (773) 992-4439

48 Activation Gallery:

Associate Editor – Content Jacqueline Barba, (224) 632-8214

Emerging Brands

EVENTS & EDUCATION Director – Events Peggy Milbrandt, (773) 992-4412

52 Personnel

Meeting & Events Associate Kelly Doering, (773) 992-4408

Appointments

Director – Education & Faculty Administration Ronit Lawlor, (773) 992-4415

54 Institute Strategist

MARKETING Manager – Marketing & Events Stacey Bobby, (773) 992-4423

Sam’s Club notified suppliers of its decision to undress pallets via email midSeptember, explaining that it would no longer ship nor set any pallets with base wraps anywhere in its stores.

Manager – Marketing & Events Courtney Hofbauer, (224) 632-8215 Art Director Stephanie Beling, (773) 992-4442

AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Director of Audience Engagement Gail Reboletti Audience Engagement Manager Shelly Patton

PROJECT MANAGEMENT/PRODUCTION/ART Vice President, Production Derek Estey

No more pallet wraps, Page 54

Creative Director Colette Magliaro Custom Content Director Darren Ursino

Executive Chairman Alan Glass Chief Executive Officer David Shanker

Shopper Marketing (ISSN 1040-8169) is published monthly by EnsembleIQ, 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60631-3731. Periodicals Postage Paid at Chicago, IL, and at additional mailing offices.

Chief Financial Officer Dan McCarthy President, Path to Purchase Institute Terese Herbig Chief Digital Officer Joel Hughes Chief Innovation Officer Tanner Van Dusen Executive Vice President, Events & Conferences Ed Several

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Shopper Marketing, Computer Fulfillment, PO Box 261, Lowell, MA 01853. Entire contents copyright © 2019 by the Path to Purchase Institute. Canada Post International Publications Mail Product (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 40025274. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:

ENSEMBLEIQ CORPORATE OFFICERS

Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5 or Email: cpcreturns@wdsmail.com CHANGE OF ADDRESS and other circulation correspondence should be mailed to: Shopper Marketing, Computer Fulfillment, PO Box 261, Lowell, MA 01853, or email ensembleiq@e-circ.net for customer service. (Include your address label with all correspondence.) WHERE TO WRITE: Please direct all letters to the editor and other business/advertising correspondence to: Shopper Marketing, 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60631-3731.

REPRINTS, PERMISSIONS AND LICENSING: Contact Wright’s Media at ensembleiq@ wrightsmedia.com or (877) 652-5295. NOTICE: The Path to Purchase Institute occasionally uses the logos of various companies in its marketing materials. These include promotional brochures for events such as the Path to Purchase Expo, the Path to Purchase Summit, the Design of the Times Awards and others. The use of these logos does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by the companies identified by those logos, unless specifically noted as such.


4

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

EDITORIAL

High-Flying Buzzkill W hile browsing Reddit in early December I spotted a drone-taken photo of our little neighborhood. I thought it was pretty cool; a detailed, high-resolution image from a perspective attainable only via flying camera. I sent this curiosity over to my wife as our house was partially visible in the distance. “Ugh,” Madame replied. “Another invasion of privacy.” I wasn’t necessarily surprised by her response, but I was by the fact that the vast majority of Reddit commenters were also negative, complaining about intrusiveness, safety and noise and warning the poster about breaking FAA regulations. “Well, buckle up, folks,” I thought, because the great and powerful Jeff Bezos says that a world with Amazon drones landing on everyone’s doorstep is upon us. I could have used one recently, quite frankly, considering that Amazon’s delivery of new Christmas lights never showed … the app said it did but also admitted that the app often gets ahead of the truck ... and then, Amazon.com said to check back the next day and we’d see what’s what then. So I’m waiting for a truck. And it looks like we’re all going to keep waiting for the drones. A quick Google search reveals that Bezos said drone delivery would be ubiquitous within five years on Dec. 1, 2013 – five years ago already. Talk about a buzzkill. The good news is that on Dec. 1, 2014, you all (via our 2015 Trends survey) predicted this when you rated “drone delivery” as the futuristic concept “least likely” to have an impact on shopper marketing. Drones are depicted as commonplace in movies nowadays, and yes, a few companies like 7-Eleven and Walmart have flirted with them for drop-shipping to consumers or moving merchandise around stores. But deep down, weren’t you skeptical all along? I remember John Mount of Coca-Cola wondering how a drone that can’t lift a Coke 24-pack could ever hope to deliver full basket orders.

DISTINGUISHED FACULTY • Keith Anderson, SVP, Strategy & Insights, Profitero • Christopher Brace, Founder & CEO, Syntegrate Consulting • Shaun Brown, SVP, Growth & Innovation, Momentum Worldwide • Rich Butwinick, Owner/President, MarketingLab/SellCheck • Brian Cohen, Chief Operating Officer, Epsilon Catapult • Heidi Froseth, EVP, National Shopper Commerce Leader, Epsilon Catapult • Sarah Gleason, Director, OxfordSM • Wendy Liebmann, Founder, CEO & Chief Shopper, WSL Strategic Retail

• Stephen McGowan, RVP, Shopper & Consumer Activation, Mondelez International • Sarah Ortman, Shopper Marketing Consultant, Sovos Brands • Chris Perry, VP, Outreach & Education, Edge by Ascential • Julie Quick, SVP, Head of Insights & Strategy, Shoptology • Danny Silverman, CMO, Edge by Ascential • Michael Tilley, Biscuit Lead, Shopper Marketing & Strategic Partnerships, Mondelez International • Scott Young, Global CEO, PRS IN VIVO

INSTITUTE FACULTY

• Ken Bausch, VP, eCommerce & Digital Marketing, Welspun USA • Wendyjean Bennett, Key Account Manager, Tyson Foods • Stacy Bereck, Managing Director, GfK Custom Research • Mike Berendes, Director, Sales & Marketing, Custom Intercept Solutions • Dedra Berg, Senior Director of Marketing, Smithfield Foods • Garrett Bluhm, VP, Product Development, iServe • Hugh Boyle, CEO, TracyLocke • Glen Bradley, VP, Marketing Analytics, Price Chopper Supermarkets – Market 32 • Elaine Bragg, VP, Executive Creative Director, TPN • Donna Bressler, Senior Manager, Shopper Marketing, LG Electronics • Teddy Brown, Executive Creative Officer, FCB/RED • Chris Bryson, Founder & CEO, Unata • Melissa Burdick, President, Pacvue • Jack Burns, Corporate Manager, Store Projects, Ace Hardware • Tony Bynum, Director, Client Innovation & Program Strategy, RTC • Kendal Callender, Director of Digital Partnerships and Shopper Innovation, Albertsons Companies • Heather Campain, U.S. Shopper Marketing Leader, Johnson & Johnson • Chris Cancilla, EVP, Chief Creative Officer, Arc Worldwide

• Rick Abens, CEO & Founder, Foresight ROI • Kris Abrahamson, VP, Client Leadership, The Mars Agency • Courtney Jane Acuff, VP, Product Marketing, Ansira • Sarah Alter, CEO, Network of Executive Women • Charlie Anderson, CEO, Shoptology • Amy Andrews, SVP, Business Development & E-Commerce, The Mars Agency • Christian Ardito, Senior Marketing Manager, Soup & Broth Activation, Campbell Soup • Kevin Baartman, VP, Information Services, Lund Food Holdings • Katherine Bailey Doyle, Group Manager, National Shopper Marketing, The Clorox Co. • Spencer Baird, VP, Merchandising Strategy, Ahold Delhaize • Dana Barba, AVP, Shopper Marketing, The Coca-Cola Company • Andrew Barker, Senior Director, Shopper Marketing, Dr Pepper Snapple Group • Brandon Barr, Senior Director Sales, Kroger Team Leader, Duracell • Kelly Bartell, VP, Creative Director, Epsilon Catapult • Gina Bates, Brand Manager, eCommerce/Multi-Channel Shopper Marketing, Kimberly-Clark

Which brings us to the 2019 Trends survey, which begins on page 10 of this issue. Some things haven’t changed: Amazon and Walmart again cast a giant shadow over the proceedings. But instead of drones there are even scarier-sounding sci-fi concepts taking hold such as artificial intelligence, voice-enabled engagement and augmented reality. But the really big buzz among CPG marketing executives is around digital advertising platforms and their effectiveness in targeting shoppers, measuring results and delivering ROI. Oh, and how open the operators – Kroger, Target, Walmart and Amazon – are to data sharing. This level of CPG/chain interconnectivity is a far cry from the world I charted in my first survey back in 1994; that edition’s big “A-Ha” was that most marketers never bothered to measure – even rudimentarily – any of their retail activities. Occasionally our survey questions may be a little ahead of their time. For example, on page 11 we asked CPG marketers if they plan to work with any of the 11 digital content providers Walmart recently designated as “Connected Partners.” Two-thirds of respondents said they “don’t know,” which probably means they hadn’t even heard of the program yet. Nevertheless, I suspect we’ll be tracking its progress over the next few years. One area that is decidedly behind the times, however, is the CPG/retail industry’s “glass ceiling” for women executives, charted on page 14. When it comes to women’s advancement, this industry segment, at least by some accounts, trails all others in U.S. business. Some of the reasons why are shared by our respondents: “boys club,” “old-school mentality,” and “commitment to family first” are among the more predictable cliches. One answer, however, struck me as distressingly emblematic of the times we live in: “Organizations prioritize confidence over competency.” Think about it.

• April Carlisle, VP, Shopper Marketing, National Retail Sales, The Coca-Cola Company • Ken Cassar, Principal Analyst, Rakuten Intelligence • Shelley Christianson, Senior Manager, Shopper Insights, The Hershey Co. • Scott Cole, Principal Consultant, Capre Group • Whitney Cooper, E-Commerce Sales Lead, Walmart U.S., Kellogg Company • Courtney Cotrupe, President, Partners + Napier • Linda Crowder, Senior Director – Partnerships, Peapod Interactive, Ahold Delhaize • Sonia Dalvi, Senior Director, Shopper Marketing, Fresh Direct • Jeff Daniel, Senior Media Director, Upshot Inc. • Sarah Davis, SVP, Executive Creative Director, Epsilon Catapult • Emily Detwiler, Senior Brand Manager, Smithfield Foods • Karen Doan, Senior Shopper Marketing Manager, Tyson Foods • Tom Dolan, SVP, CPG & Retail, Valassis Digital • Brian Dorgan, Senior Director of Business Development, Inmar Inc. • Meggie Dvorak, Senior Account Executive, Valassis Digital • Tom Edwards, Chief Digital & Innovation Officer, Agency, Epsilon Catapult • Blake Eisler, Director, CPG Retail Client Solutions, Oracle Data Cloud • Craig Elston, Global Chief Strategy Officer, The Integer Group • Liza Etu, Senior Shopper Marketing Manager, The Coca-Cola Company • Kate Favrow, Corporate Marketing Manager, Associated Wholesale Grocers • Karen Firda, Shopper Marketing Lead, Campbell Soup • Liz Fogerty, Chief Strategy Officer, Edge Marketing • Beth Freeman, Commercial Marketing Manager, Heineken USA • Michele Fuhs, Department Manager / Head of Premium Retail Experience, BMW • Sam Gagliardi, Head of E-Commerce (SVP), IRi • Brett Gerstenblatt, VP, Executive Creative Director, CVS Health

• Bridget Gilbert, Research Director, Geometry Global • Bob Gilbreath, CEO/Co-Founder, Ahalogy • Byron Gilstrap, Director, eCommerce Capability, The Coca-Cola Company • Josh Ginsberg, EVP, Breaktime Media • Jessica Glendenning, Director of Merchandising, Brandless • Jason Goldberg, SVP, Commerce & Content, SapientRazorfish • Ethan Goodman, SVP, Shopper Experience, The Mars Agency • Alister Greenwood, Head of Global eCommerce Insights, Mondelez International • Sheri Grone, Senior Manager, Midwest T&O, Accenture • Sheryl Hannam, Shopper Marketing Manager, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Mark Hardy, CEO, InContext Solutions • Tod Harrick, VP, Product, Marketplace Ignition • Jordan Henderson, Director, Client Solutions, Decision Insight • Denise Henderson, VP, Strategy Business Development, ItemMaster • Julie Herceg, Senior Manager, Retail Marketing, American Greetings • David Hewitt, VP, Consumer Experiences, SapientRazorfish • Carol Heyducek, Shopper Marketing Manager, Wakefern Food • Rhonda Hiatt, Executive Director, Strategy & Experience, Clear • Joy Ho, Marketing Manager, Fresh Direct • Adam Holyk, Chief Marketing Officer, Walgreen Co. • Laura Houghton, Director, Digital Shopper Marketing, The Coca-Cola Company • Tiffany Huey, Director, Shopper Marketing, Starbucks Coffee Co. • Chris Hunt, VP, Client Services, Epsilon Catapult • Jessica Irwin, Director, PNB & TE/ Retail – Consumer & Marketplace Insights, Verizon Communications • Nicky Jackson, CEO, RangeMe • Richard Jones, E-Commerce Lead, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Derek Joynt, EVP, General Manager, The Mars Agency • Melissa Jurgens, Group VP, Customer Success, InContext Solutions • Jason Katz, SVP Strategy, eCommerce, Geometry Global

• Greg Kearns, Brand Manager, Shopper Marketing, Kimberly-Clark • Matt Keller, Brand Manager, American Pet Nutrition • Barbara Kelly, Marketing Manager, Procter & Gamble • Jamie Kieffer, Managing Director, Client Strategy, Edelman • Sarah Kitchen, Senior Shopper Marketing Manager, McCormick and Company • Lisa Klauser, President, Consumer & Shopper Marketing, IN Connected Marketing • Kevin Kolman, Grill Master, Weber-Stephen Products • Paul Koop, Team Leader & General Manager, Quotient • Ken Krasnow, VP, OmniChannel Marketing, Henkel North America • Nancy Krawczyk, VP of Partner & Member Engagement, Network of Executive Women • Angelique Krembs, CMO, News America Marketing • Joe Lampertius, Global CEO, Shopper Marketing, Grey Worldwide • Ray Langton, Senior Product Manager, Saputo Cheese USA • Eric Le Blanc, Director of Marketing – Deli, Tyson Foods • Andrea Leigh, VP, Client Services, Ideoclick • Lena Lewis, Director, Shopper Marketing and Consumer Promotions, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Liridona Lunja, Senior Account Director, BrandShare • Steve MacKinnon, Associate Managing Partner, IBM Watson • Tina Manikas, President, FCB/RED • Anne Martin, Customer Director, Shopper Marketing, Mondelez International • Ashley McCollum, General Manager, Tasty, BuzzFeed • Kim McGough, Senior Manager Consumer Activation, Johnson & Johnson • Hannah McKee, Shopper Marketing Manager, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Erik McMillan, CEO, Shelfbucks • Steve Miller, Director of Marketing & CRM, Jo-Ann Stores • Emily Miller, Promotional Merchandise Manager, Walgreen Co. • Spencer Millerberg, Managing Partner, Edge by Ascential

And while there are no delivery drones hurtling toward our doors just yet, doorstep delivery (page 18) does have a role right now. One out of four survey respondents said they are already developing and shipping specially branded e-commerce packages direct to consumers or through online retailers. In-store displays were part of a First Moment of Truth (“deciding on the product”) activation; the doorstep delivery/unboxing presentation sets the stage for the Second Moment of Truth (“experiencing the product”) on a path-to-purchase loop. While the context, objectives and messaging must be completely different, a well-shaped doorstep delivery/ unboxing experience does rely on classic P-O-P material specification savvy, manufacturing capabilities and design skills. Indeed, I believe this burgeoning market niche, which really has only begun to coalesce in the past 12-18 months among the biggest players, represents one of the most upbeat industry narratives in many years. There’s no doubt that the P-O-P producer base has consolidated from my early years when there were 400500 players (fully integrated forest product suppliers, fullservice producers, brokers, design shops, subcontractors, etc.) out there. Today it’s probably around 100, according to one industry observer, who said it wasn’t due to lessening demand. Rather, there’s a financial barrier to entry in the form of multi-million-dollar digital-printing systems that are nonetheless considered table stakes. Luckily, personalization via digital printing will be an essential tool in a doorstep-delivery marketing program. This is just one of many fundamental industry, marketplace and Institute changes that you can look forward to seeing in 2019. Rest assured that I’ll be here at my doorstep watching for them too – and probably those damn’d SM Christmas lights as well.

Bill Schober is editorial director of the Path to Purchase Institute. He can be reached via phone: 773-992-4430 or email: bschober@ensembleiq.com.

• Brian Monahan, Head of Vertical Strategy, Pinterest • Angela Moore, Director, Shopper Marketing, Albertsons Companies • Timothy Moore, SVP, Group Creative Director, Epsilon Catapult • Kyle Morich, Consultant, Capre Group • John Mount, VP, National Retail Sales, Customer Marketing, The Coca-Cola Company • Curt Munk, Executive Planning Director, FCB/RED • Peter Naumann, SVP, Trade Strategy Optimization, Kantar Retail Virtual Reality • West Naze, VP, CPG & Shopper Marketing, Eyeview • Tom Neri, Commercial Director, GfK Custom Research • Leon Nicholas, VP, Retail Insights & Solutions, WestRock • Brooke Niemiec, Chief Marketing Officer, Elicit Insights • Jay Nikolich, Divisional VP, E-Commerce, Pharmavite • Andrew Nodes, VP, Retail Accounts, Instacart • Adrianna Nowell, Director of Product Marketing, Bazaarvoice • Sandra Oldaker, RCM AMM, WM, The Clorox Co. • Abbey Oslin, Account Supervisor, Epsilon Catapult • Liz Picariello, Senior Category Advisor, The Coca-Cola Company • Matt Pierre, Director of eCommerce, General Mills Inc. • David Plachecki, Senior Shopper Marketing Manager, The Coca-Cola Company • Cara Pratt, VP, Customer Communications Product Strategy & Innovation, 84.51 • Crystal Putnam, VP, Business Development, Inmar Inc. • Ram Rampalli, Global Head of Content Acquisition, Walmart Stores Inc. • Luke Rauch, Senior Director, US Insights, Walgreen Co. • Nikkia Reveillac, Associate Director, Consumer & Market Insights, Colgate-Palmolive Company • Melinda Rickert, Customer Director, Shopper Marketing, Mondelez International • Michael Rudolph, Senior Brand Manager, Stella Artois, Anheuser-Busch

• Robert Ruijssenaars, Senior Director, Shopper Marketing, E&J Gallo Winery • Lauren Ruis, Shopper Marketing Manager, Convenience, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Kara Russo, VP, Retail Consultancy, The Mars Agency • Kristen Sabol, VP, Client Leadership, The Mars Agency • Karen Sales, VP of Digital Partnerships & Shopper Marketing, Albertsons Companies • Corrine Sandler, CEO, Fresh Intelligence Research Corp. • Joe Scartz, Chief Digital Commerce Officer, TPN • Wes Schroll, Founder & CEO, Fetch Rewards • Matt Seitz, Senior Segment Marketing Manager, T-Mobile USA • Arthur Sevilla, Vertical Strategy Lead, Pinterest • Michele Shiroma, VP, Client Services, IN Connected Marketing • Grant Shova, Team Lead, PepsiCo • Jennifer Silverberg, CEO, SmartCommerce, Inc. • Matt Silvestri, Account Director, The Integer Group • Greg Smith, Director of Retail Marketing, Partners + Napier • Brian Sobecks, Senior Digital Innovator, The Kraft Heinz Company • David Sommer, Partnership Leader/ Global Marketing Solutions, Facebook • Ted Souder, Shopper Marketing Manager, Google Inc. • Taylor Steele, Assistant eCommerce Manager, Marketing, Burt's Bees • Anne Stephenson, Partner, Explorer Research • Ellen Stiffler, SVP Client Services, The Mars Agency • Lori Stillman, EVP, Analytics, Insights & Intelligence, Advantage Solutions • Peter Strong, E-Commerce Lead, Mars Wrigley Confectionery • Rob Sundy, Senior Director, Brands & Marketing Services, Whirlpool Corporation • Scott Swanson, CEO, Aki

• Tiffany Tan Kohler, Director, Brand Engagement – Commerce, The Clorox Co. • Matthew Tilley, Senior Director of Marketing, Valassis Digital • Chris Timmins, Director of Marketing, Responsive Retail, Intel Corporation • Aimee Topp, VP, General Sales Manager, News America Marketing • Jason Tripicchio, Director of Sales, Club & Drug Channels, The Lindt & Sprungli Group • Elizabeth Tung, Associate Director, National Shopper Marketing, The Clorox Co. • James Urich, Trade Marketing Manager, Anheuser-Busch • Bob Waibel, Senior Director, Shopper Marketing, Conagra Brands • Julie Walker, Senior Consultant, The Mom Complex • Andy Walter, Board Director & Strategic Advisor, AJW-Advisory • Duncan Wardle, Founder, id8&innov8 • Allison Welker, EVP & GM, Edge Marketing • Steven West, Director of Sales, Snipp Interactive • Phil Wilson, VP, Chute Gerdeman • Scot Wingo, Executive Chairman, ChannelAdvisor • Katherine Wintsch, Founder & CEO, The Mom Complex • Brendan Witcher, ViP / Principal Analyst, Digital Business Strategy, Forrester Research • Christopher Witte, VP, Total Store Leadership, Tyson Foods • Kim Yansen, Customer VP, Sales, Value Channel, Mondelez International • Eddie Yoon, Founder, EddieWouldGrow • Jason Young, Chief Marketing Officer, Quotient • Brooke Zec, Senior Manager, Consumer Activation, Johnson & Johnson • Debbie Zefting, Director, Shopper Strategy & Engagement, Barilla America

Distinguished Faculty and Institute Faculty are the highest-rated speakers, based on a 4-point scale, by past attendees of our various speaking engagements. Distinguished faculty have consistently scored high at four or more events. Faculty have scored high, presenting at least once.


6

PROGRAMS

SOLUTION PROVIDER NEWS Peapod and Quotient Launch Platform

Peapod Digital Labs, Ahold Delhaize USA’s e-commerce engine, has launched a digital media service called Peapod Digital Labs Media Partnerships, powered by Quotient Technology, Mountain View, California. It helps CPG brands target, optimize and measure digital media campaigns that address all customer contact

points and connect online as well as offline shopping experiences for consumers. The service will create connected solutions for CPG advertisers that will run on the digital properties of Ahold Delhaize USA banners, Quotient properties, major social media platforms and third-party digital publishers. Salsify Acquires Welcome Commerce: Boston-based Salsify has acquired Austin, Texas-based Welcome Commerce, a chat technology that enables brands to connect directly with consumers on major retailer e-commerce sites, including Walmart, Target and Office Depot. Welcome Commerce’s chat technology is now called “Salsify Chat,” which integrates with any chat and customer service tool so shoppers can initiate a real-time conversation with product experts. The technology, used by leading brands such as Procter & Gamble, HP and Purina is one of the only third-party systems with real estate on some of the world’s largest retailers. Nielsen and Microsoft Align Data: Nielsen and Microsoft have jointly developed an enterprise solution that brings the former’s consumer data set to life through the latter’s intelligent cloud platform. The strategic alliance seeks to “democratize” the vast Nielsen Connect data set through the global-scale Microsoft Azure platform. The goal is to help consumer packaged goods manufacturers and retail companies find growth and accelerate innovation within an open data environment. Nielsen Connect is inspiring companies to glean more value from their data and starting a movement for the industry to reimagine its approach to data strategy. Through advanced analytics and AI services built on Azure, Nielsen Connect helps companies integrate data to easily spot trends and act faster on opportunities. More Retailers Join Myxx: Walmart is joining other food retailers leveraging recipe and online shopping platform Myxx. In addition to Walmart, H-E-B and Albertsons Cos.’s Safeway, Jewel-Osco, Vons, Randalls, Tom Thumb and flagship banners are the newest additions to the growing list of Myxx retailers, which also includes Harris Teeter, Kroger, Ralphs, King Soopers and Fred Meyer. Myxx now reaches 10,000 stores nationwide, with Myxx technology present in 49 states. Correction: In our October 2018 issue previewing Design of the Times entries, the “Comment” portion for the Diet Pepsi Half-Pallet was inaccurate. It should have said “the objective here was to introduce Diet Pepsi’s new sleek can while promoting its classic taste and also highlight the original, wild cherry, lime and vanilla flavors.” Send your solution provider news – new projects and programs with brands and retailers – to Charlie Menchaca at cmenchaca@p2pi.org.

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

Pilot Flying J Gives a Hearty ‘Welcome’ By Chris Gelbach

Knoxville, Tenn. — For its second year as “Official Travel Center of the SEC,” Pilot Flying J enhanced its in-store experience to reinforce the travel centers as a critical location for college football game-day travel essentials. The “Welcome To” campaign by Pilot Flying J contained new creative, exclusive myPilot app promotions and partnerships with ESPN/Southeastern Conference personalities Paul Finebaum and Laura Rutledge. It also included partnerships with Orca (coolers) and official SEC sponsors Johnsonville and Dr Pepper (Keurig Dr Pepper) to celebrate and support game-day activities. “We’re excited to elevate the second year of our four-year sponsorship with ESPN and the SEC with a campaign that reinforces to fans that we are the one-stop-shop for all college football gameday and travel essentials,” says Whitney Haslam Johnson, chief experience officer for Pilot Flying J. For brands like Johnsonville, the partnership supported a large opportunity within a specific channel. “Johnsonville’s foodservice division has seen the majority of its recent growth come from the c-store market,” says Steve Dutton, Johnsonville SE foodservice business manager. “C-stores have become more appealing as consumers seek quick, convenient and quality food choices. So we’ve been able to take (our) craft and bring a quality sausage product that also delivers our legendary flavor for that graband-go consumer.”

participating SEC schools were available for purchase in relevant regional Pilot Flying J travel centers from Aug. 31 through Nov. 1. Throughout the college football season, Pilot Flying J and Orca offered exclusive giveaway opportunities like the “ultimate tailgate package,” a weekly giveaway at all “SEC Nation” stops. In addition, Dr Pepper fans who purchased and scanned a 20-ounce Dr Pepper at participating Pilot Flying J locations received 30% off college gear from Aug. 31 through Dec. 6. The campaign’s “Welcome To” creative running across TV and digital platforms features enthusiastic team mem-

Pilot Flying J worked with Johnsonville and Dr Pepper, while also staging mobile events at Southeastern Conference college campuses.

The collaboration also extended to Pilot Flying J’s mobile “Fueling All Fans Experience” unit, which visits SEC college campuses. The attraction offered cold brew coffee and gave fans the chance to enter on-site to win a weekly “ultimate tailgate package” giveaway from Orca and Pilot Flying J. Johnsonville supported the activation by cooking its cheddar beer brats on its mobile Big Taste Grill for fans and offering a 50-cent coupon to encourage trial. Fans could also download a separate $1 coupon within the myPilot app from Sept. 17-30. “We’ve got a terrific synergy as two SEC sponsors looking to build affinity with Southeast consumers,” Dutton says. “We appreciate the trust Pilot Flying J has put in Johnsonville by including (the) cheddar beer brat on (its) roller grill menu. So we’re ready to help build awareness with their consumers about this new offering.” Orca coolers and drinkware emblazoned with logos of

ber Carol. Spots will air on SEC Network, ABC and ESPN as well as on ESPN.com, SECnetwork.com and the ESPN app. Pilot Flying J also was the presenting sponsor for three of “SEC Nation’s” regular-season broadcasts. While the “Welcome To” marketing campaign debuted as part of Pilot Flying J’s official SEC sponsorship, it will be integrated into a larger brand campaign. In Pilot Flying J’s home city of Knoxville, the campaign was tested on billboards. Various digital ads promoting the campaign ran on the myPilot and Waze apps, social media, at participating Pilot Flying J locations and during select event activations at SEC games. A Dr Pepper digital ad ran on Fanatics.com. Broadcasters Finebaum and Rutledge also supported the campaign with sponsored posts on social media. Pilot Flying J’s in-house creative services team completed the Johnsonville and Orca creative, while Dr Pepper managed its own creative. In a statement, Pilot Flying J officials say the partnerships are key to improving fans’ in-store experience and that they would evaluate opportuSM nities to continue working with the brands. RETAILER: Pilot Flying J BRANDS: Johnsonville, Dr Pepper, Orca KEY INSIGHT: Convenience stores are appealing as consumers seek quick, convenient and quality food choices, especially for college football game-day travel. ACTIVATION: Pilot Flying J’s “Welcome To” campaign contained new creative, exclusive myPilot app promotions and partnerships with ESPN/Southeastern Conference personalities as well as fellow SEC sponsors Johnsonville and Dr Pepper.


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8

PROGRAMS

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

Exec Offers Guidelines for Exploring Facial Recognition By Suzy Frisch

Minneapolis — Facial recognition technology has already been a powerful tool for security and health care, and it’s on the cusp of making a big splash in consumer marketing. By 2022, facial recognition technology will generate nearly $10 billion in revenue – a 21% increase over today – according to Lori Stillman, executive vice president of insights and analytics at Advantage Solutions. Retailers and brands will have numerous applications for facial technology, from learning more about their customers to making their lives easier by eliminating the

need for passwords or credit cards. Stillman, presenting at the Path to Purchase Expo in October, noted that facial recognition is starting to permeate every area of business. “Facial technology really has lots of areas from a customer marketing standpoint that you can lean into,” she said. That could include “customer activity analysis, just knowing who is walking by our display – are they standing there or engaging with the product or just walking by? – their demographic attributes. It’s super important.” Some brands and retailers have started

Advantage Solutions’ Lori Stillman talks facial recognition at the Path to Purchase Expo.

integrating facial technology in their operations. For example, Walmart deploys it to understand their customers’ experiences during checkout, using security cameras to track emotions of sadness, happiness or frustration. Then it pairs those readings with data about the cashiers working that day to uncover training opportunities or ways to streamline the checkout process. Some brands use facial recognition kiosks to interact with customers, offering unique experiences or taking and emailing photos that then capture dozens of data points about them, Stillman said. Or take CaliBurger, which melds facial recognition with its loyalty program. Its kiosks allow customers to place orders faster and pay without credit card by using two-factor authentication. The restaurant then collects analytics like age and gender, which it passes onto its marketing department to make smart decisions. There are endless opportunities. Stillman urged companies to follow seven guidelines before diving into facial technology. 1. Safeguard biometrics. Make sure to institute stringent requirements for protecting biometric data from people’s faces, fingerprints and more. The damage people can do with such stolen facial data is astronomical. 2. Catch and release data. Don’t hold on to customers’ biometric data any longer than necessary. It’s important to constantly manage this data set and release it when people are no longer customers. 3. The world is not your oyster. There are places where it’s completely inappropriate to use facial technology, such as bathrooms, locker rooms, health care

facilities and spots where children play. Be respectful of privacy and refrain from capturing data about people in the wrong place. 4. Inform the consumer. Let people know as they enter a building that facial recognition is underway. Some companies have gotten in trouble for collecting data without telling customers first. 5. Give options for opting out. Not everyone wants to participate in this new technology. So make it easy for people to turn off a brand or store’s ability to engage in facial recognition. 6. Single use only. Require express consent to use customers’ biometric data for something other than its original purpose. Inform customers that the use is changing and give them the opportunity to decline the new application. 7. Don’t recognize the stranger. If you have facial recognition data on customers, don’t use it to identify them in places where they haven’t given permission, like a bar or restaurant. Facial technology systems and software are evolving rapidly, so it can be hard to keep up. Track trends by watching what leaders in the space are doing, Stillman advised. Consider Clear, NEC, FaceFirst, and Amazon, which soon could use facial technology to prevent the wrong people from opening packages. Said Stillman: “I’m a big believer that the next frontier is facial SM recognition.”

As Price Chopper Evolves, So Does Its Digital Strategy By Suzy Frisch

M inneapolis — Price Chopper Supermarkets boasts a nearly 90-year history of successful operations, growing to 133 locations in six East Coast states. As the company rebrands its stores to become Market 32, it’s taking a closer look at the way it does everything. Evaluating and shifting its approach to shopper marketing is a big part of that process. “Market 32 has an emphasis on fresh food and the shopping experience. It’s not just a different banner we operate,” said Glen Bradley, vice president of group marketing at Price Chopper, explaining the new branding that launched in 2015. “It impacts everything we do in our Market 32 stores and traditional Price Chopper stores. It’s how we interact with customers in-store, online and in digital.” Partnering with Oracle Data Cloud, Price Chopper set out to test different methods of marketing and track the data surrounding those changes. Bradley and Blake Eisler, director of CPG retail client solutions at Oracle Data Cloud, walked through their approach and learning during a Path to Purchase Expo seminar in October. In its work with Price Chopper, Oracle Data Cloud aims to drive smart, digital media activations that help before, during, and after ad buys, while deploying data

to guide decisions, Eisler said. “We’re trying to hit the right audience in the right context, where the impressions are driving ad-serving opportunities with the right attention,” she said. “Then we get quality impressions and quality outcomes.” Acknowledging the 46%-plus drop in newspaper and magazine penetration with consumers and the 193% boost in smart-

“It’s helpful to know what we want to measure and what our goals are,” Bradley said. “Our goals are to drive people into the stores – that’s the objective for every ad campaign.” In the Northeast, 66% still want to peruse a paper circular. But this inclination starts dropping off with younger shoppers ages 18-34. The question is, what is an effective balance between paper and digital

“Grocery has been behind in moving to digital. We’re rapidly catching up and looking to move forward with a significant move into digital and away from traditional media. As the customer moves, we’ll meet the customer.” Glen Bradley, vice president of group marketing, Price Chopper

phone adoption, the partners decided to focus mainly on digital marketing. They didn’t totally eliminate print channels because many customers still use paper ads to make purchasing decisions. To find the best balance between print and digital, Oracle and Price Chopper used data analytics to make discoveries, then applied the findings to marketing decisions.

that will continue driving shoppers to the store? “We want a mix,” Bradley said. “And we want to establish our brand as we’re changing and evolving our brand online.” During a continuous process of testing and learning, the partners conducted a variety of trials. That might mean pulling the paper circular from some ZIP codes to posting the circular on Facebook complete

with eye-catching food photography. In every case, the team tracked results such as who saw the ads, if the ads prompted visits to the store, and whether those customers then made purchases. Once Price Chopper and Oracle Data Cloud determined the mix between print and digital, they next zeroed in on the most effective digital approaches because there are so many viable options, Eisler said. So far, targeted advertising on Facebook has showed a strong return on investment for the Price Chopper/Market 32 ads. In the future, the partners will look at diversifying its platforms for shopper marketing, target various segments like new shoppers or loyal customers, and test other approaches like using pricing or in-store engagement to drive sales – all while tracking data. “I’m not going to predict that paper circulars are dying,” Bradley said. “From what we’re seeing, grocery has been behind in moving to digital. We’re rapidly catching up and looking to move forward with a significant move into digital and away from traditional media. As the customer moves, we’ll SM meet the customer. But not too far.”


PROGRAMS

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

9

Keynoter: Win Loyalty by Being Customer-Obsessed, Data-Led By Jacqueline Barba

Minneapolis — “Our expectations are set by the things we experience every day,” proclaimed Brendan Witcher, vice president and principal analyst of digital business strategy at Forrester, during an October keynote presentation at the Path to Purchase Expo. Witcher asserted the days of shaping a customer experience based on the company’s vision of “convenient, simple and easy” are gone, because those three words can mean vastly different things to different people. According to Witcher, the key is becoming customer-obsessed and data-led instead of company-obsessed and data-driven. Today, companies must create a new alignment to truly understand the customer and the tools needed to do so. “We are far more influenced by pain than we are pleasure ... Solve customer pain points before you surprise and delight,” Witcher said. According to Forrester’s Top Retail Tech Investments for 2018, retailers and brands are focusing on tech investments that align with today’s customer expectations, like click-and-collect programs. “We are no longer chasing our competitors, we are chasing our customers’ expectations, [which] requires us to understand our customers as well as we used to understand our competitors,” according to Witcher. Witcher outlined four new retail imperatives for 2018 centered on omnichannel commerce that are customer-obsessed and data-led: engagement; fulfillment (not for brands who don’t do direct-to-consumer); product/price; and view of the customer. “Omnichannel commerce hinges on the view of the customer – if you cannot get the omnichannel view of the customer done, you cannot do the other three things,”

Witcher said. “That is the unsexy work that makes sexy work, work.” The more you know about each customer, the more effective engagements will be. Starbucks, for example, “knows 25 things that they didn’t know before because you’re using their app. It is a strategy for understanding who you are and capturing your behavior anywhere, anytime,” Witcher said, calling the retailer’s mobile payment app “a customer-data-capturing machine.” Product and price is another imperative. According to Forrester research, more than

80% of companies indicate a price match guarantee is important and it is how they address omnichannel pricing. Yet, only 17% of consumers will check for a price match guarantee, leaving 83% of people unaware. Personalized communication is an important element of that, though like everything else, must be about the customer, not a company’s idea of what the customer wants. Forrester research found nearly 90% of companies recognize that personalization matters and are prioritizing it, while 77% of consumers say they’ve chosen, recommend-

ed or paid more for a brand that provides a personalized service or experience. However, only 40% of consumers say they’re receiving relevant communication from brands. The next generation shopper demands a deep understanding of individual shopping behaviors and expectations, thus creating a shift from personalization to individualization. E-commerce bra company True & Co. is a prime example of individualization, using every item returned as an opportunity to inform that specific shopper’s customer experience by identifying characteristics she didn’t like about the bra and suppressing similar items on its website, even if an item is a best seller or high-margin item. That’s using data to create personalization, and it’s customer-obsessed. Unsurprisingly, data capabilities and analytics are also imperative. Companies should use new digital touchpoints to collect customer data. Companies like Fabletics, which gathers shoppers’ email addresses in fitting rooms and scans the items being tried on, have designed customer journeys for the sole purpose of collecting data. “Provide value in exchange for customers self-identifying,” Witcher said. “No one ever logs out of Amazon for a reason, there’s too much value in staying logged in.” In a time of seemingly infinite options, if you aren’t providing what a shopper wants the way they want it, you risk losing them because, Witcher said, “We move on when we find something that works better for us SM because we know we have choice.”

Walgreens’ Beverage Category Reset Leverages VR By Tim Binder

Minneapolis — Once a year, Walgreens executes a beverage category reset, and it’s critical to get it right, according to Emily Miller, senior category manager for the retailer. “It’s inexcusable to not merchandise appropriately for the customer that comes into brick-and-mortar because you are so lucky that they are coming into brick-andmortar,” she said in October during a Path to Purchase Expo presentation. To get it right, Walgreens worked with beverage giant Coca-Cola Co. and virtual reality provider InContext Solutions to provide what Miller called “a simple addition to the reset process – with big impact.” Liz Picariello, senior category advisor at Coca-Cola, and Melissa Jurgens, group vice president, customer success, at InContext Solutions, were co-presenters. Knowing that transaction-pack SKUs (including mini-cans) work well for the Walgreens shopper – especially Millennials – the partners used virtual testing to identify the optimal placement for transaction packs on shelves. Was a dedicated transaction-pack block within an existing brand block the way to go? Or would a separate vertical block merchandising all transaction packs together be more effective? Ultimately, the partners wanted to measure sales impact and shopper impact, get-

ting to the why behind the sales metrics. The virtual testing comprised an online survey of targeted Walgreens shoppers that included a link to the virtual store environment provided by InContext Solutions. Hundreds of virtual shoppers experienced each shelf set (brand block and vertical block), and then the sales data was compared. The key findings were:

The vertical block drove highest total category dollars, with a double-digit increase in dollars per shoppers for transaction packs. n Transaction packs overall and mini-cans specifically performed best (in terms of dollar sales) in the vertical block. n The preference to shop was highest within the vertical block set among all respondents and especially Millennials, with almost all of them preferring the vertical block. “To see almost 100% preference of a particular set is very, very significant,” Miller said. The decision was made to roll out the vertical block to stores. “The in-market results are nearing what we saw virtually,” Picariello said. “The vertical block is generating a 15% share for transaction packs. We also got some insights on the shopper. … n

The number of shoppers buying mini-cans at Walgreens has doubled in size.” According to Miller, virtual testing dramatically reduces cost savings compared to in-store testing, improves speed to market, provides rich sales and attitudinal data, eliminates store disruption, reduces risk of resets that don’t work and cost a retailer even more, and provides flexible and collaborative testing that allows you to make

decisions on the fly. “In-store testing used to be what we did … tests are almost archaic at this point,” Miller said. “I’ve done hundreds of tests in stores, and I can’t remember that I’ve ever had a very SM decisive result.”

Coca-Cola Co.’s Liz Picariello, right, presents alongside Walgreens’ Emily Miller during the Path to Purchase Expo in October.


10

Trends2019

We present results and analysis of our annual survey of consumer goods marketing executives Have you worked with the digital ad platforms for Amazon, Walmart, Kroger and/or Target? If so, please rate them in the following areas. Amazon

60% YES

40% NO

Targeting effectiveness 30%

Excellent Good Average Poor 6% 0

24% 10

20

Measurement capabilities 20%

40%

30%

8% 30

40

50

60

0

10

20

ROI 12%

42%

30

50

60

0

10

4%

40% 32%

16% 40

Data sharing

20

30

24%

44%

28%

40

50

60

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

40

50

60

40

50

60

50

60

Walmart

46% YES

54% NO

Excellent 0% Good Average 13% Poor 0

10

11%

34%

20

30

53% 40

50

21% 60

0

10

20

8%

34% 34% 30

11%

29%

13% 40

50

60

0

10

20

24%

50% 30

40

50

60

0

10

20

34% 32% 30

Kroger

32% YES

68% NO

37% 30% 33%

Excellent Good Average Poor 0% 0

10

20

30

11% 33%

7% 40

50

60

0

10

20

30

7%

48%

22%

26%

11% 40

50

60

0

10

20

30% 26% 22%

56% 30

40

50

60

0

10

20

30

Target

40% YES

60% NO

9%

Excellent Good Average Poor

9% 0

9%

42% 39% 10

20

30

40

36%

9% 50

60

0

10

20

30

3% 45% 40

6%

15% 21%

50

60

0

10

20

21%

61% 30

40

50

60

30% 0

10

20

30

42% 40

Digital Ad Platforms – Amazon, Walmart, Kroger and Target

D

By Patrycja Malinowska

igital media plays an increasingly important role in how consumers are discovering products, and as retailers are evolving their own content and advertising businesses, some brands are taking advantage of this “new shelf space.” In Shopper Marketing’s annual Trends survey, nearly two-thirds (60%) of respondents say they are buying digital ads from Amazon, 46% from Walmart, 40% from Target, and 32% from Kroger and its relatively new platform. Those who aren’t spending with retailers may be “missing the boat,” says Brian Cohen, chief operating officer at The Epsilon Agency. “It’s surprising that there are so many who haven’t made retailer platforms a meaningful part of their shopper or media programs given the benefits – shopper behaviors, enhanced relationships, better attribution. This is not just a shopper marketing tool, it’s a media tool.” Cohen makes his case particularly in terms of Amazon: “More product searches start on Amazon versus any other platform on the web, Google included. Yet these numbers indicate that the investment has yet to catch up. I’m sure many of these same brands have robust search budgets that have yet to include Amazon. Lever-

aging Amazon as a platform for your brand is so much more than simply ‘winning’ on Amazon through sales on the platform. It’s about brand building, shopping experience and expectation management.” On the data-sharing front, Cohen agrees with the 72% of respondents working with Amazon who rated it as average or poor, though he understands that Amazon needs to retain its hold on data to maintain a higher ground. “Quite frankly, I’m surprised 24% of respondents rated Amazon as good; sure they have more than most, but they don’t share it, nor does it make sense for them to do so,” Cohen says. “That said, the data is why their ad platforms are so big; they can create and reach audiences better than most.” Responses from those working with Target were similar to Amazon, with a data-sharing rating of average from 42%, poor from 30%, good from 21% and excellent from 6%. Walmart was more polarizing, with a full 11% of those working with the retailer indicating it is excellent at data sharing, but another 32% rating the retailer as poor. Kroger came out on top with 22% of respondents rating the supermarket retailer as excel-

lent and 30% as good. Turning the tables on consumer product manufacturers, Cohen says it is CPGs that have a wider lens and need to be able to bring data that is complementary to the data set a retailer has. “CPGs today should already have a meaningful data program and roadmap, be it by investing in their own first-party data programs or leveraging a suite of third-party inputs,” he says. “This will be the best way to drive a more meaningful value exchange with their retailer partners, sharing influences and behaviors outside their experiences at a given retailer.” In terms of targeting effectiveness, Walmart respondents gave the worst ratings (13% of respondents rated the retailer as poor and 53% as average), and Kroger took the lead with 37% of respondents rating the retailer as excellent and another 30% as good. Walmart was also the straggler in terms of measurement capabilities (21% of respondents rated the retailer as poor and 34% as average), while Amazon led the pack with 20% rating the retailer as excellent and 42% as good. Target fell to the back of the pack when it came to ROI, with 21% of respondents rating the retailer as poor and 61% as average.


TRENDS 2019

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

DIGITAL MEDIA/ADVERTISING

Working With Walmart’s Connected Partners By Patrycja Malinowska

As digital content gains priority, Walmart is relaunching its content provider program and asking brands to work with select “connected partners.” Ahead of the program’s relaunch in 2019, the majority of survey respondents (62%) indicated that they “don’t know” if they plan to work with the retailer’s partners. These third-party partners scale and optimize content from suppliers to retailers and are investing in Walmart by maintaining an onsite presence to ensure that technical issues and business objectives are addressed efficiently. The quarter of respondents who indicated they would be (or already are) working with Walmart’s partners cited various reasons, including that the partners are “very good” and will make publishing content to multiple retailer websites easier and faster, and that they will

40 Complete this sentence: In the next year, my company’s investment in the 30 Walmart Media Group (formerly WMX) ad platform will . . . ?

provide “insight into how Walmart works” as well as a “better understanding of the shopper mindset online.” Some are aligning with Walmart’s priorities to “improve the perception that we are easier to do business with” and to “get programs through for activation,” with one respondent simply stating:

“We do what Walmart says because they own 34% of our sales.” In the minority, respondents who are decisively opting out (14%) included those that have invested in their own content programs, and those who say they don’t do enough business with the retailer to support digital spending.

62%

Brands working with Walmart are now encouraged to work with one of 11 select digital content partners, but they are not required to. Do you plan to work with one of these 11 digital content partners in 2019?

DON’T KNOW

25% YES

14% NO

What percentage of your digital media activity is dedicated to the following objectives?

35%

40%

Brand awareness/consideration

30%

Sales in physical retail stores

25%

22%

18%

Sales on retailer websites

20

16%

9%

Direct sales on brand's website

2%

Other

10

0

10

20

30

40

2% 0

Grow

Stay the same

Shrink

Be Don’t nonexistent know

How familiar are you with Amazon letting advertisers target related products by buying an ad on a competitor’s product detail page?

How likely are you to use this method of advertising in 2019?

25%

Never heard of it

53%

Heard of it, but never used it

22%

Have used it 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

Have any of your competitors used this method to advertise their products on your pages?

28%

Not likely

32%

Likely

40%

Don’t know

33% YES

57%

Don’t know

10% NO

11


12

TRENDS 2019

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

BUDGETS/SHOPPER MARKETING

How Departments Value Shopper Marketing By Dan Ochwat

With a simple “yes” or “no,” survey respondents rated whether or not certain departments “value shopper marketing,” and while nearly all departments fared positively, more than 60% felt those in the finance department did not. As for their reasoning, some of the respondents say the finance sector has a “lack of understanding” of shopper marketing, they’re “not directly involved” with the discipline, and they “view it as more of a variable expense.” The survey includes only those working at consumer goods companies, and nearly a third of respondents work directly in shopper marketing while another third work in brand management, marketing and promotions. So, the opinions heavily reflect those closest to shopper marketing. The respondents rated the following departments: brand marketing, category management, customer field teams, finance, insights, media buying, sales and upper management. While most of the departments received high approval ratings (brand marketing and customer field teams had the most “yes” votes – 89% each), approximately 63% said those in finance are not sup-

the planning process from the very beginning. “If shopper marketing is not changing how brands build strategy upstream, then being ‘valued’ isn’t enough,” he says, adding that the question to truly ask is: Does shopper marketing change how brand teams build strategic growth initiatives at the beginning of each year?

portive. Media buying pretty much split the vote. Christopher Brace, founder and CEO of Syntegrate Consulting, feels shopper marketing has a bigger issue than being valued by the finance department, saying he doesn’t believe shopper teams are being given an equal seat at the larger strategy table and that they need to be pulled into

In your opinion, do each of the following areas of your organization value shopper marketing?

Brand marketing

Category management

89%

77%

YES

YES

11% NO

11% NO Media buying

83%

Sales force

67%

YES

NO

YES

Upper management

81%

54%

46%

NO

YES

41% 33%

A true collaboration

NO

NO

What are the top THREE benefits of shopper marketing to your organization?

Mostly/completely driven by retailer objectives

72% 70%

Incremental sales

64%

Brand awareness/equity Brand share

20%

Category share

20%

26%

19%

Incremental volume

In your opinion, what is the BEST training approach for shopper marketers? Formal internal training for key functional areas/roles

Informal external training

Formal external training for key functional areas/roles

1%

Other 0

23%

(conferences, agency presentations, etc.)

12%

Long-term ROI

28%

(info sharing, case studies, etc.)

15%

Short-term ROI

30%

Informal internal training

33%

19%

Increased retailer support

Mostly/completely driven by our own objectives

NO

YES

NO

17%

63%

37%

23%

YES

Finance

89%

YES

Insights/research

Thinking about all of the shopper marketing programs your organization works on, what percentage are . . . ?

Customer field teams

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

19% 0

10

20

30

40

Compared to last year, is your company investing more or less (money and/or attention) in the following areas? Shopper marketing

How do you predict your company’s shopper marketing budget will change in 2019?

35%

17%

It will increase, but less than 5%

43%

It will stay the same

Digital media

(paid search, Internet ads, social)

88%

10%

It will decrease less than 5%

0

46%

Mobile

(SMS, mobile app/ website advertising)

30

40

12% LESS

Trade promotion

42%

MORE

42%

58%

LESS

E-commerce content (PIM, DAM, delivery packaging, etc.)

LESS

Traditional media (TV, print, etc.)

23%

80%

MORE

MORE

MORE LESS

20

MORE

LESS

35% 10

Consumer promotion

58%

65%

MORE

6%

It will decrease more than 5%

MORE

LESS

19%

It will increase more than 5%

54%

65%

MORE

In-store marketing

20% LESS

77% LESS


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14

TRENDS 2019

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

GENDER GAP

Q.

Women comprise half of entry-level CPG/retail managers, but just 13% in the c-suite. Why do you think that is?

The CPG/Retail Glass Ceiling By Cyndi Loza

“CPG is an old-school mentality. A boys club with old-fashioned ‘relationships’ and favors.” … “Organizations prioritize confidence over competency.” … “Women don’t want c-suite roles.” These quotes were among the responses from Trends 2019 survey participants who were asked why women comprise half of entry-level/ manager positions in the CPG and retail industries but just 13% of the c-suite. Based on the responses, the question clearly struck a nerve with survey participants, all of whom work for a consumer goods company. We then chatted with Julie Quick, Shoptology senior vice president, head of insights and strategy, and Julie Jones, Procter & Gamble managing director, grocery channel and home hardware, to get their take on the survey responses. In October, Quick presented at the Path to Purchase Institute’s “When Women Lead” symposium, part of the Path to Purchase Expo. In November, Jones gave a passionate presentation at Progressive Grocer’s Top Women in Grocery event.

finding there’s more fulfilling work, there’s more openness to what they bring to the table often in other sectors. So we’re losing people to other industries I think far more than we’re losing people to the ‘mommy track.’” Other respondents cited an “old school mentality” and “boys club” for reasons why women do not advance. While Quick believes that these types of behaviors are called out in a negative way in the industry nowadays, she said CPG and retail are mature businesses, and many of the old paradigms – including dated views around what makes a “great leader” – die hard. “If you look at CPG and retail, women do really well right up to that top level, and it’s because ours is a ‘doing’ industry overall,” Quick said. “There’s a lot of projects and there’s a lot of things that have to execute and come to life, and I think the industry rightfully trusts women very much to deliver those kind of executional results and we do.” However, there are old paradigms and biases that keep the CPG/retail industry from believing women can deliver other kinds of results and have qualities such as strategic vision Julie Quick, Shoptology and financial acumen, according to Quick. “So they succeed really well at the doing, delivering and executing, and then they’re ready to make that step up the ladder and someone from the top says, ‘I don’t think they’re visionary enough. I don’t think they’re leader enough. I don’t think they’re financially savvy enough. … [There’s] that skill shift that isn’t necessarily trusted in leadership.” One response that stuck out to Jones is that women in leadership positions are holding other women back. “Honestly, that makes me really sad,” said Jones, who added she’s always had a

“ We’re losing people to other industries far more than we’re losing people to the ‘mommy’ track.” The most typical answer for why women appear to be locked out of the top in CPG/retail was the notion that women have family commitments and take time off from their careers to raise children. Quick said she had to park some of these responses aside. “I realize that is a factor, but it doesn’t explain our industry’s specific lag in senior leadership,” Quick said. “I know hundreds of [women] in this industry – and they are married and unmarried, and mom and child-free – who are all leaving CPG/retail at a faster pace. … And I think it’s because they’re

Here was the agenda from the Path to Purchase Expo’s “When Women Lead” symposium, which focused on women breaking barriers.

positive experience and felt supported at P&G. “If women don’t support each other how can we expect men to support us. … I think it’s important for everyone to have a tribe of people that they can count on – both women and men.”

SURVEY METHODOLOGY

In late October 2018, several thousand U.S.-based CPG marketing executives were emailed a questionnaire to be completed online. The names were drawn from Shopper Marketing magazine subscription, Path to Purchase Institute membership and EnsembleIQ registration lists, with an emphasis on those with director, manager or senior executive titles. From those emailings, 81 consumer goods marketing executives submitted completed surveys. Each respondent was entered into a drawing for an Apple Watch Series 3, which was awarded to Marc Bennett of Johnsonville. The survey was administered and the data compiled by EnsembleIQ Research Solutions.

FOR ALL CHARTS

Respondents: Consumer product marketing executives. Please source all charts to: the Path to Purchase Institute/Shopper Marketing magazine.


GREAT INSIGHTS Great Design Great Execution What works best at retail? Our experts bring a wealth of sophisticated tools, retail understanding, and knowledge of shopper insights that drive purchase decisions at retail. Learn how Great Northern Instore can help you win at retail. 800.558.4711 or greatnortherninstore.com

Using shopper insights, this Logitech display featured product demos so shoppers could get the ergonomic feel of the keyboard and mouse before buying. Bold colors and supersized product imagery also provided an impactful presence.

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16

TRENDS 2019

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

TECHNOLOGY

Expect Adoption to Rise for These Technologies By Peter Breen

When it comes to potentially game-changing consumer technologies, it appears as if many shopper marketing organizations are still moving a little slowly to the starting line. The relatively low numbers of respondents already using or developing capabilities involving artificial intelligence (37%), voice-enabled engagement (22%) and augmented reality (also 22%) are somewhat surprising, given the buzz that these technologies have made over the last few years. These numbers should ramp up pretty quickly, however, especially in the case of AI: Gartner

expects 85% of brand-consumer interaction to be managed by AI-driven tools within two years. And it’s happening for good reason: IDC Manufacturing Insights believes that AI adoption will improve productivity by 30% and results by as much as 20%. The potential benefits for improving both consumer engagement on the front line and the consumer insights process internally are too strong to avoid for much longer. Voice commerce, too, should soon move beyond the Alexa-inspired gimmick phase to become a legitimate marketing tool: Online researcher comScore Inc. predicts that 50% of all

Is your organization currently developing voice-enabled (conversational commerce) marketing tools?

searches will be conducted via voice by 2020. And with “try on” apps already commonplace in the cosmetics category (L’Oreal even took the step of buying market-leading tech supplier Modiface last spring), it shouldn’t be too long before AR moves off the smartphone and onto packaging and product displays, as the survey results suggest. In all three cases, companies are also learning that these technologies can be implemented to improve internal communication and workflow, as well as external collaboration with service providers and retailer partners.

For which marketing vehicles is your organization currently developing conversational commerce marketing tools? 80

74%

70

44% NO

22%

60

YES

50

33%

40

Don’t know

32%

30

26%

20

21%

16%

16%

16%

10 0

0% Voice Social Brand assistants media website (e.g., Alexa) networks

Retailer Retailer On the On Brand website app primary product app shelf displays

YES

53%

25%

Don’t know

30

NO

20

21%

21%

In what ways is your organization utilizing artificial intelligence/machine learning?

10

70

21%

60 50

Brand website

Brand app

Retailer website

Retailer app

67% 50%

Social On the On product Other Don’t know/ media primary displays not sure networks shelf

47% 33%

40

5%

5%

5 0

80

26%

16%

15

63% NO

26% 21%

YES

Is your organization currently utilizing artificial intelligence/machine learning?

For which marketing vehicles are you currently developing augmented reality tools? 25

Other Don’t know/ not sure

37%

22%

Is your organization currently developing augmented reality tools?

16%

11%

30

17%

20 10 0

Consumer insights Performance analysis measurement

Media planning Direct consumer engagement

Other


TRENDS 2019

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

LOOKING AHEAD

Omnichannel Tools Lead Store of the Future By Dan Ochwat

In the answers to a set of questions that look at technology today and in the future, it’s clear there is an excitement around retail, with visions of a “store of the future” that includes interactive displays, voice-based shopping platforms and use of augmented reality. However, when estimating the “practical value” of these tools in the coming year, respondents in the survey expressed great caution. When asked which tools will become established parts of the “store of the future,” 77% of respondents said interactive displays and just shy of 70% said in-store access to offline buying. The two answers represent a view of a truly omnichannel shopping experience. “We are very enthusiastic about technology and shoppers are helping us refine and define the technologies that work best for retail,” says Curt Munk, EVP, group strategic planning director, FCB/RED. “Omnichannel technologies have been with us for some time and they continue to get better and better — we love what

Walmart and Sam’s Club are doing.” Munk notes that with some technology like voice-based shopping that has seen some disappointing reports, marketers need to exhibit patience and get comfortable with the technology. “Technology is a tool, not a strategy,” he says. Respondents in the survey showed optimism in both voice-based messaging and AR, nearly 60% of respondents saw both tools being a standard part of retail in the future. Conversely, when asked which trends will provide the most practical value in the coming year, only 2% of respondents picked voice-enabled commerce and only 5% saw AR or virtual reality providing value now. In addition, artificial intelligence saw little support, with only 6% seeing it provide value in the coming year. Leading the way, nearly a third of respondents said influencer marketing would provide the most practical value. Munk says that’s simply the “reality of access to technology.” He adds: “Influencers are popular short-term because they are an existing consumer and shopper behavior,

And which of these topics would be of LEAST practical value to your organization in the coming year?

Which of the following topics will be of MOST practical value to your organization in the coming year? 30%

Influencer marketing All-inclusive marketing

11%

Voice-enabled commerce

6%

Artificial intelligence

17%

Artificial intelligence

12%

(pride/lifestyles)

30%

Augmented reality/VR

23%

Health & Wellness

so the adoption curve is already well established compared to AI, AR, voice and subscriptions.” In a question asking what trends or topics would provide the “least practical value,” a third of respondents said AR and VR, and 17% pegged AI. If not practical in the short term, it doesn’t mean CPGs aren’t looking to innovate. Looking closer at what organizations are doing to address product innovation, 52% of respondents said they’re both increasing their existing internal activity around innovation and also launching new capabilities such as innovation centers of excellence and idea labs. When isolating a view from the top, 61% of those at a senior executive or director level said their organizations would increase internal activity and 55% said launch new COEs or labs. The increased focus on innovation is bright for the industry but as Munk notes, “innovation has to be intentional, supported, measured and rewarded for it to take hold in almost any organization. It is hard to do, but each organization has to find its own cadence for new ideas.”

10%

Subscription services

Augmented reality/VR

5%

All-inclusive marketing

Emerging brands

5%

Ethnic marketing

7%

Health & Wellness

7%

9%

(pride/lifestyles)

Ethnic marketing

4%

Subscription services

4%

Influencer marketing 2%

Sustainability

4%

Sustainability 2% Emerging brands 2%

Voice-enabled commerce 2%

1%

Transparency

4%

Other 0

5

10

15

20

25

58%

Augmented reality

57%

Text-based messaging

0

10

20

52%

36% 7% 1% 10% 0

30

40

50

60

70

30

40%

We haven't done much of anything

1%

Other

25

Launched new internal capabilities (innovation centers of

Other

25%

Facial recognition

20

52%

Invested in third-party incubators

41%

Virtual reality

15

Increased existing internal activity

Launched our own incubator for emerging brands/products

44%

Interactive packaging

10

Acquired emerging brands

51%

Traditional product displays

5

excellence, idea labs, etc.)

52%

(SMS or other)

1%

What actions, if any, is your organization taking to address the need to intensify product innovation?

69%

Voice-based messaging

Other 0

77%

In-store access to offline buying

1%

30

In your opinion, which tools will be standard elements of a brand’s marketing strategy in the “store of the future”? Interactive displays

Transparency

80

10

20

30

40

50

60

17


18

TRENDS 2019

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

E-COMMERCE/SOCIAL MEDIA

Packaging Trend: Special Doorstep Delivery Packs By Dan Ochwat

Approximately a quarter of our survey respondents said they are already developing and shipping specially branded e-commerce packages directly to the consumer or through an online retailer. Factor in that a third “have looked into it,” and the trend seems to be facing

a positive turning point. Add in some of the qualitative remarks, and there seems to be real excitement around specialty e-commerce packaging. One respondent shared that “it’s been an effective marketing tactic for us.” Another said: “We use special branded

Does your company use special branded e-commerce packaging for doorstep delivery? 25%

Yes

30%

No, but we’ve looked into it

46%

No, and we haven’t looked into it 0

10

20

30

40

50

40

50

e-commerce packaging so [consumers] really have an experience having it delivered and are fully attached to the product at that moment.” Of the respondents not furthering this packaging trend, some shared that it’s simply because their category isn’t applicable (like tires), or they produce a product that contains hazardous material and can’t be shipped, or they work in a heavily regulated category like alcohol. Knowing that shows that the positive results could have been higher. But make no mistake, a good portion of the negative respondents show some brands are very far from this trend. Some wrote that it’s too expensive or they do zero direct-to-consumer selling. Many flat out said they had no knowledge on the topic and remain in the dark.

Who in your organization is most responsible for e-commerce? 21%

Sales Marketing

20%

E-commerce Center of Excellence

20%

It’s still a piecemeal operation

20% 16%

Distinct e-commerce organization Other 4% 0

10

On which social media platform has your organization had the most success?

20

45 40

30

40% 40%

35 30 25 20 15

11%

10 5 0

Facebook

Instagram

Blogger sites

7% Pinterest

7% YouTube

0%

0%

1%

Snapchat

Twitter

Other


the 2019

A special supplement to

guide to DIGITAL SHOPPER MARKETING PROVIDERS

Featuring in-depth profiles from leading companies, including: • Aki • GasBuddy • GroundTruth

• News America Marketing • Quotient • ShopLiftr

• Valassis Digital • Verve


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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WWW.A.KI/SHOPPER

CONNECT WITH CONSUMERS DURING THE OPTIMAL MOMENTS IN THE PATH TO PURCHASE Aki Technologies helps you increase foot traffic, sales and engagement by enabling personalized advertising along the path to purchase. Our AI-powered moment marketing science predicts how and when a consumer will respond to your advertising message, so you can reach your audience during the right moments and deliver stronger and more cost-effective mobile campaigns. We help you:

UNDERSTAND YOUR MOBILE AUDIENCE Unlike radio, TV and even desktop, the mobile experience varies dramatically from person to person and moment to moment. We help you understand a consumer’s mobile experience—and how it evolves as they move through their day—so you can shape campaigns that align with each moment.

FIND THE MOMENTS THAT MATTER Consumers spend hours each day on mobile devices, but not every moment represents a strong opportunity for advertising. We apply machine learning to the full spectrum of data—demos, mobile data signals, third-party and CRM data, plus our own proprietary insights—to predict which moments will deliver for your campaign goals.

CPG/Candy brand beats sales benchmark by 20% by targeting Point-of-Sale Moments.

National retailer sees 42% lift in store traffic with Aki’s moment strategy.

PERSONALIZE YOUR MESSAGE Consumer attention is difficult to capture—even in the most receptive moments. We help you tailor mobile creative to the consumer’s needs and available attention during a given moment, resulting in a better experience for your audience and more cost-effective campaigns.

STAY AHEAD OF THE CURVE Consumer behavior is constantly evolving, which means the learning never stops for marketers. We serve as your partner in mobile marketing, providing deep campaign insights, including foot traffic, sales and moment-by-moment performance details, and generally helping you stay ahead of the curve. Ready to learn more? Contact us at shoppermarketing@a.ki And get our moment marketing science best practice guide: www.a.ki/shopper

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

MAJOR CLIENTS

Aki Technologies helps brands connect with mobile consumers during the most receptive and relevant moments. Founded by mobile adtech pioneers, the company was built on the belief that mobile success depends on a smarter and more empathetic approach to consumers.

• AI-Powered Audience Intelligence

• Johnson & Johnson

• Nestlé

• MARS/Wrigley

• Colgate-Palmolive

EXPERTISE We help shopper marketers drive stronger brand engagement, foot traffic and sales by personalizing mobile advertising to the moment. Our AI-powered technology uncovers patterns in mobile behavior, identifying when and how to best capture audience attention along the path to purchase.

• Pre-Campaign Analysis • Mobile Moment Planning and Targeting • In-House Creative Studio • Sales Lift, Foot Traffic and Engagement Analytics

• Coca-Cola

CONTACT Matt Knust, VP, Sales mknust@a.ki Todd Benedict, CRO tb@a.ki

• Hershey • Whirlpool


YOU SEE YOUR SHOPPERS BUT DO THEY SEE YOU?

You spend a lot of money to reach your shoppers, but if they’re not open and receptive to your messaging, they simply won’t see it. Aki Technologies predicts when and how a shopper will respond to marketing messages to more effectively influence awareness, engagement, foot traffic and sales. Get the moment marketing science advantage. www.a.ki/shopper | shoppermarketing@a.ki


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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BUSINESS.GASBUDDY.COM

WHY GASBUDDY? With more than 75 million downloads and 12 million active monthly users, GasBuddy is the essential car companion app and engagement platform in the United States and Canada. GasBuddy users search for gas prices; rate, review, and locate convenience stores; and save money through GasBack™ offers and the Pay With GasBuddy card. GasBuddies love to save. Drive incremental sales by integrating your brand into the GasBuddy ecosystem and promoting relevant offers. Key figures: •

12M active monthly users

16M email subscribers

#7 most positively-reviewed app in the history of the Apple App Store

Top #3 travel app on Apple and Android

THE GASBUDDY DIFFERENCE GasBuddy’s Digital Shopper Marketing Solutions position your products top-of-mind to fuel and convenience retailing customers. Backed by first-party, GPS-based data, we provide the attribution and analytics that you require to defend your investments. Solutions include: •

Native anchor units

Proximity-based, stitched advertisements

Custom email and editorial content

GasBack™ rebates

ACTIVATE FUEL AND CONVENIENCE STORE CUSTOMERS Approximately 165 million U.S. consumers visit fuel and convenience retailers daily—driving $237 billion total in-store sales in 2017. The average GasBuddy user visits convenience stores four times per month and spends 6m 34s during their visits. This is three minutes more than the average time spent refueling. With more than 150,000 locations, GasBuddy unites the fragmented fuel and convenience industry. We enable brand activation more broadly, but can also drive visits to specific retailers. GasBuddies also frequent restaurants, grocers, auto parts stores, and are active travelers in need of hotels and rental cars. We work with many brands outside of the fuel and convenience industry.

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

KEY EXECUTIVES

GasBuddy connects drivers with their Perfect Pit Stop. As the leading source for crowdsourced, real-time fuel prices at more than 150,000 gas station convenience stores in the U.S. and Canada, millions of drivers rely on GasBuddy daily.

• Advertising

Jordan Grossman, EVP, Advertising Sales

• Affiliate Marketing

Suz Lampert, VP, East Coast Advertising Sales

• GasBack™

Chad Beasley, VP, West Coast Advertising Sales

• Pay With GasBuddy payment platform

Scott Thompson, VP, Midwest Advertising Sales

• GasBuddy Data & APIs

EXPERTISE GasBuddy positions products and brands top-of-mind to the largest addressable audience of fuel and convenience store customers. Through mobile and digital advertising, our Digital Shopper Marketing Solutions transform impulse buys into planned purchases.

• Fuel Retailer Solutions

CONTACT

INDUSTRIES SERVED

Jordan Grossman EVP, Advertising Sales jgrossman@gasbuddy.com

• • • • • •

CPG Retail Quick-Service and Casual-Dining Restaurants Financial Services Automotive Travel and Lodging

Suz Lampert VP, East Coast Advertising slampert@gasbuddy.com Chad Beasley VP, West Coast Advertising cbeasley@gasbuddy.com


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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GROUNDTRUTH.COM

OUR FOUNDATION Our location platform is powered by our proprietary Blueprints mapping technology and patented location signal verification algorithm. Groundtruth is the only location company that exclusively uses multi-layered polygons for over 5M businesses, while filtering billions of location signals every month to ensure a store visit actually occurred.

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT Proprietary data at scale: A superior database of location- and weather-based behaviors built off seeing more than a billion physical trips a month across 21 countries globally. This provides us with the most comprehensive data and largest scale in the industry. Real World Performance: We build and optimize campaigns using privacy compliant offline data including visitation and in-store sales to drive offline results for shopper marketing programs. We target the right shoppers in the right moments and drive them to places where they can convert efficiently and effectively. Multiple Ways to Activate: GroundTruth offers everything from managed service campaigns, to programmatic buying, to our newly released self-serve buying platform, GroundTruth Ads Manager. Allowing clients to activate programs on their own terms.

DATA AND INSIGHTS • OFFLINE PERFORMANCE • QUALITY AND TRANSPARENCY

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

GroundTruth is a global location technology company that drives results. By unlocking our data and insights, we enable you to build off what real people are doing in the real world and influence what they do next.

• Location based targeting

EXPERTISE

• Data and insights

We drive in store visits and sales by leveraging location as the primary source of intent. Through real-time location targeting and location-based audience targeting, we influence purchase consideration and increase store trips of real customers.

• Guaranteed performance • Measurement and analytics • Self-Serve buying platform • Creative services

MAJOR CLIENTS Procter & Gamble PepsiCo Kraft Heinz Kimberly Clark Johnson & Johnson Mars Wrigley

CONTACT Mark Fleisch, Head of Industry, CPG & Healthcare mark.fleisch@groundtruth.com


Driving real-world performance with mobile location advertising.

Learn more: visit www.groundtruth.com

@groundtruthco


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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NEWSAMERICA.COM

WE ARE YOUR SHOPPER EXPERTS

We offer a broad reaching, omni-channel network of proven solutions that help brands and retailers guide consumers from shopping to buying.

Plan

Shop

“Get on the list”

“Get in the cart”

Post Shop

“Refill the funnel”

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT: We make it easy to turn data into action across the whole path to purchase.

Broad reach: our ever-growing etwork reaches a broad audience along the entire path to purchase.

Omni-channel/cross-platform: our executions across our at-home, in-store and digital solutions offer superior integrated measurement.

Data driven: our proprietary shopper hub is powered by hundreds of millions of dollars of verified receipt data.

Validated: for truly meaningful metrics, we measure sales lift and ROI, along with clicks and impressions.

We used a high impact mobile ad and targeted email, linking to a coupon to drive awareness and increase sales at our key retailer. Because we amplified our coupon offer with NAM’s digital media offerings, redemptions came in 3x higher than normal. —Shopper Marketer

AT-A-GLANCE

WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

INDUSTRIES SERVED

We are your shopper experts. Leveraging data into action across every moment of decision, we offer a broad reaching, omni-channel network of proven solutions that help brands and retailers guide consumers from shopping to buying.

• At-home/print: From efficient newspaper coupon inserts, to direct mail and custom sampling, our broad print network delivers innovative solutions to shoppers’ homes. By connecting our digital and print ecosystem, we can personalize content and drive relevancy.

We serve a variety of clients over many verticals. This includes, but is not limited to, retail, CPG, telecom, direct response, QSR/FSR, financial/banking, nonprofit, etc.

EXPERTISE

• In-store: A variety of advertising and coupon vehicles — located in over 55,000* stores in the US and Canada, serviced by over 3,400* field representatives, across multiple classes of trade. *As of November, 2018.

We are experts in the ability to diagnose and understand clients’ challenges and needs. This has helped us create the best strategies and employ the right solutions. Our strategies and solutions share these critical qualities: data driven, broad-reach, omnichannel/cross-platform, ease and validated.

• Digital: Digital media, including programmatic display, email, social, and video, along with an extensive digital coupon network comprised of mobile cash back apps, retailer load-to-card programs, and print-at-home couponing.

MAJOR CLIENTS Most major CPG and retailers including: • SCJ • P&G • Johnson & Johnson

• PepsiCo

• General Mills

• Albertsons Safeway

• Clorox

• Kroger

• Unilever

• Dollar General

CONTACT Lauren Holland, VP, Digital lholland@newsamerica.com


MAKING SHOPPING EASIER FOR EVERYONE.

TRANSFORMING SHOPPERS INTO BUYERS.

FACEBOOK AND LINKEDIN: /NEWSAMERICAMARKETING

TWITTER: @NEWSAMERICAMKTG


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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QUOTIENT.COM

QUOTIENT TECHNOLOGY For CPGs and retailers under pressure to deliver ROI on marketing spend, it’s time to move to a more efficient and effective way to convert sales: a holistic, mid-to-low funnel digital approach that delivers measurable business outcomes. With technology embedded throughout our exclusive retail partner’s stores, dominant leadership in digital promotions and best-of-breed media and ad tech, we are the only marketing partner that can deliver maximum results for your business. Our end-to-end solution is driven by exclusive consumer data and delivers powerful, personalized ad content through our market-leading Promotions and Media channels—so you can target consumers with pinpoint precision. By engaging the right individuals at the point of consideration with personal and frictionless experiences, we inspire them to act, driving quantifiable brand sales, and data analytics to optimize performance.

WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT A Connected Technology Engine

Consumer Data, Intelligence & Reach

Only Quotient has a comprehensive suite that brings together consumer data, promotions, media and analytics as a strategic, integrated cycle that can drive results at scale.

Quotient provides the single biggest point of consumer access and understanding in the CPG industry – so you can drive the most powerful, data-driven campaigns out to the widest possible audience. Creative That Converts Quotient sees ad content differently. Instead of churning out static assets, we have the technology and the exclusive access to create truly personalized content and creative at unprecedented scale. Unparalleled Industry Experience Quotient has the unique and essential combination of deep CPG & retail expertise, as well as the technology acumen of a digital native. With both industries integral to our DNA, we are better placed than anyone else to engineer your success. The Future of CPG Marketing The world of CPG marketing is changing rapidly—and in this shifting paradigm, traditional marketing methods cannot deliver the results you need. At Quotient, we are defining and pioneering the future of CPG marketing with vision and purpose.

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Quotient Technology is an innovative digital commerce marketing company serving CPG and retail marketers. Using proprietary shopper data and advanced technology, we deliver personalized digital media, promotions and data analytics that drive sales, both in-store and online.

Quotient provides a broad range of digital commerce products and services including:

KEY EXECUTIVES Mir Aamir, Chief Executive Officer

• Quotient Promotions Network • Quotient Retail Performance Media, including: – Albertsons Performance Media – Peapod Digital Labs Media Partnerships – DG Media Network – SEG Media Hub

Chad Summe, Chief Operating Officer

• Quotient Data & Analytics

Jason Young, Chief Marketing & Media Officer

• Ahalogy social influencer platform

INDUSTRIES SERVED • Consumer Packaged Goods • Grocery, Dollar, Drug, Convenience, Club and Mass Retail • Specialty and Franchise Retail

MAJOR CLIENTS • • • • • •

Ahold Delhaize USA Albertsons Companies Dollar General Southeastern Grocers The Clorox Company General Mills

• • • • • •

Johnson & Johnson Kellogg’s Nestle Procter & Gamble S.C. Johnson Unilever

CONTACT Mike Weis Vice President, CPG Team Leader 949.395.5308 mweis@quotient.com


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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SHOPLIFTR.COM

SHOPPABLE MOMENTS THAT LIFT SALES ShopLiftr’s SMART™ digital ad personalization platform delivers the right message to the right person, at the right time and place, to drive superior sales lift. ShopLiftr uses trade promotions and event-based triggers to create dynamic, personalized digital experiences, rendered in real-time, bridging the gap between on-line and in-store.

LOCAL TRADE PROMOTIONS

REAL-TIME TRIGGERS

Motivate shoppers to action by alerting them to nearby promotions from our real-time database of 200,000+ monthly promotions from over 300 retailers.

Make sure your message is contextually relevant and responsive to your shoppers dynamic environment.

HYPER-LOCAL TARGETING

DYNAMIC CREATIVE

Connect with shoppers at the right time in the right place, influencing them at the critical touchpoints along their journey.

A unique dynamic creative solution that integrates localized trade promotions and retailer information in real time, directly in your ads.

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE ShopLiftr helps CPG brands, retailers, and their agency partners delight their customers by enhancing creative with hyper-local trade promotions and our dynamic ad rendering technology to create highly relevant and location-based campaigns.

INDUSTRIES SERVED

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

MAJOR CLIENTS

• CPGs • Retailers • Agencies

• SMART™

• ConAgra

• INSPIRET™

• General Mills

• API Integration

• Gorton’s • Hannaford • J.M. Smucker


Give your campaign a Lift

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A personalized ad with infinite possibilities, rendered in real-time ... that’s SMARTTM

ShopLiftr uses trade promotions and event based triggers to create SMARTTM ads in real-time - dynamic, personalized digital experiences that drive superior in-store sales lift. Go beyond targeting the right person at the right time and place with ShopLiftr’s personalized messaging to achieve superior results.

Contact Us! John Scott

Co-Founder & EVP 1.866.760.2525 x.112 jscott@shopliftr.com

Ian Clark

VP, Sales 1.866.760.2525 x.124 iclark@shopliftr.com

Mike Ede

Regional Sales Director 1.866.760.2525 x.122 mede@shopliftr.com Experience our demonstration, visit ...

shopliftr.com/demo


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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VALASSISDIGITAL.COM

VALASSIS DIGITAL SPARKS ACTION Valassis Digital connects advertising to consumers in an efficient and powerful way to ignite sales. Our advanced data science and patented approaches pinpoint your ideal consumers and engage them when and where it matters. Every decision we make is informed by historical knowledge of the user, media, and device from previously run campaigns. This artificial intelligence powers campaign performance and focuses on delivering last-mile conversions ranging from online form fills to in-store purchases — enabling you to move your ideal consumers from ad to action.

OUR DIFFERENCE

V A L A S S I S C O N S U M E R G R A P H TM

We deliver superior results with our industry leading identity resolution and media, powered by the Valassis Consumer Graph™. The Graph unites our fully owned targeting and execution platforms with unprecedented data connectivity by: • Combining exclusive audience and location intelligence for a more complete consumer view • Building a single consumer identity for intelligent, 1:1 targeting across channels • Anchoring devices to households for data stability and targeting neighborhoods for scale • Connecting data, devices, and media buying to reach ideal consumers when and where it matters • Understanding top responders inflight to optimize delivery and activate similar audiences • Leveraging unrivaled online and offline reach to precisely engage consumers, delivering higher ROI*

“Valassis Digital’s ability to very specifically target the right people at the right time who shop at the retailer…is where they bring a ton of value.”

*The Total Economic Impact™ Of Advertising With Valassis Digital, 9/18, Forrester Consulting

– DIGITAL MEDIA BUYER, Midwest CPG Company*

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Valassis Digital is a leading consumer and marketing intelligence company with proprietary consumer data and diverse online and offline reach. We pinpoint individuals who are ready to buy and present marketing precisely when and where it matters to spark action.

• Display

• Coupons

• Video

• Identity Resolution

• Dynamic Mobile

• Data Enrichment

• Email

• Measurement

INDUSTRIES SERVED We work with 1,500+ clients across every major vertical, including: • 19 of the top 20 national advertisers • Top 10 ad agencies • Top 10 retailers and CPGs

EXPERTISE

• Innovative Ad Formats: Connected TV, Social, Conversational, and Add-to-Cart

With a highly patented, AI-driven platform, Valassis Digital drives consumer action. We combine advanced technologies in one platform for greater cross-channel audience reach and unparalleled performance. Our decades of historical data guides real-time campaign decisioning and optimization, yielding higher ROAS.

VERIFIED AD ASSURANCE

CONTACT Jason Kaplan 404.338.0173 jasonkaplan@valassis.com


The Guide to Digital Shopper Marketing • 2019

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VERVE.COM

EMBRACING MOVEMENT SCIENCE™ TO DRIVE PATH TO PURCHASE Watch where people go, habitually, over time, and you gain a detailed understanding of who they are and what moves them. The many signals generated by a consumer’s mobile device, directly sourced and meticulously analyzed, are superlative predictors of human behavior and can be used to shape not just targeting but the messaging and creative end-user experiences that convert likely shoppers and drive them to make a purchase in retail partners’ locations. It’s something Verve calls Movement Science, and we use it to produce mobile marketing experiences that drive engagement, action, and sales, both online and in the brick and mortar world.

HELPING BRANDS SUCCEED

AT-A-GLANCE WHO WE ARE

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

MAJOR CLIENTS

Verve™ is a location-based mobile marketing platform that connects advertisers with consumers to deliver successful business outcomes. The company’s proprietary location intelligence, patented technology, premium mobile inventory, and analytics capabilities empower marketers to reach and engage consumers with compelling mobile advertising experiences.

• A complete location-powered mobile marketing platform accessible via self or managed service

• Amazon

• Marriott

• Premium in-app publisher inventory

• American Express

• Merck

• Bloomin’ Brands

• PepsiCo

• Dell

• The Home Depot

• Ford

• Unilever

EXPERTISE

• Campaign analytics and dashboard highlight attribution, location-data visualization, and instore insights

In a world where up to 80% of exchange data is inaccurate, Verve’s methodology cuts through the clutter to find the cleanest, most accurate signals possible — from direct integrations — then uses them to inspire consumers to action that drive sales.

• First-party location data sets to inform robust audiences with reach and scale • Full range of mobile creative experiences, including rich-media, video, and shoppable formats

KEY EXECUTIVES Tom Kenney, CEO Erin Madorsky, CRO Julie Bernard, CMO

INDUSTRIES SERVED • Consumer Packaged Goods

• Auto

CONTACT

• Retail

• Entertainment • Travel and Hospitality

Dan Engebretson, VP Sales dan.engebretson@verve.com

• Quick Serve Restaurants


THE DOMINANT MOBILE PLATFORM FOR PROGRAMMATIC VIDEO AND DISPLAY MARKETING FIND YOUR CUSTOMERS

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SPOTLIGHT:

‘SHOPPER MARKETING’ SPECIAL REPORTS The writers and editors of Shopper Marketing supplement monthly feature articles, reports and campaign stories with a variety of bonus content. Some of the content is produced in collaboration with sponsors. Among the special reports …

ANNUAL WHO’S WHO n

Who’s Who in Merchandising, February 2018

n

Who’s Who in Shopper Marketing Agencies, April 2018

n

Who’s Who in Digital Shopper Marketing, June 2018

n

Who’s Who in Shopper Marketing, August 2018

n

People to Watch, September 2018

n

Who’s Who in E-Commerce, December 2018

REPRESENTATIVE SPECIAL REPORTS n

Mastering Retailer Ad Platforms, August 2018

n

Voice Assistants and Shopping, July 2018

n

Shopper Marketing Effies, June 2018

n

The Evolution of Retail Environments, May–July–September 2018

n

Under the Influence: Influencer Marketing Virtual Roundtable, May 2018

n

Data Design: Finding Order in the Chaos, April 2018

n

Urban Shoppers and Store Formats, March 2018

n

Zero-Based Budgeting, February 2018


REPRESENTATIVE WALL CHARTS, ETC.

ANNUAL SURVEYS n

Trends Report, January 2019

WHITE PAPERS n

n

E-Commerce Intelligence, August 2018

n

The Retailer Receptivity Guide, December 2017

n

Digital Collaboration Playbook, October 2017

n

Retail Promo Guide, September 2017

n

Digital Shopper Marketing Landscape, July 2017

Data’s Digital Divide, October 2018

EXPERTS THAT DRIVE EDITORIAL EXCELLENCE Each member of the Shopper Marketing editorial staff is steeped in experience serving the industry. Month after month, they deliver editorial excellence and unprecedented access to shopper marketing thought-leaders.

Bill Schober

Peter Breen

Tim Binder

Charlie Menchaca

Patrycja Malinowska

Cyndi Loza

Jackie Barba

Managing Director, Content and Editorial 25+ years with P2PI bschober@ensembleiq.com (773) 992-4430

Editor-in-Chief, Consumer Goods Technology 15+ years with P2PI pbreen@ensembleiq.com (973) 607-1300

Executive Editor, Shopper Marketing 9+ years with P2PI tbinder@ensembleiq.com (773) 992-4437

Managing Editor, Shopper Marketing 2+ years with P2PI cmenchaca@ensembleiq.com (773) 992-4432

Associate Director, Content, P2PI.org 8+ years with P2PI pmalinowska@ensembleiq.com (773) 992-4435

Associate Editor, P2PI.org 4+ years with P2PI cloza@ensembleiq.com (773) 992-4439

Associate Editor, P2PI.org In 1st year with P2PI jbarba@ensembleiq.com (224) 632-8214


Don’t miss these other upcoming Industry Guides appearing only in Shopper Marketing magazine in 2019.

P-O-P Design & Manufacturing February 2019

Digital Incentive Platforms June 2019

Insights, Data & Analytics October 2019

Shopper Marketing Agencies September 2019

E-Commerce December 2019

Contact Rich Zelvin at the Path to Purchase Institute at rzelvin@ensembleiq.com or (773) 992-4425 for more information.


SAVE THE DATE

Where leaders collaborate to meet the challenges of the evolving retail landscape and honor the best

of the best at the Shopper Marketing Celebration.

May 15-17, 2019

Fort Lauderdale, FL. Path2PurchaseSummit.com An official event of:

Produced by:


40 Bree Glaeser, Cathy Allin and Julie Fisher, from left to right, pose with their Innovation awards during an Oct. 3 reception.

INNOVATION Julie Fisher,

J

Director, Shopper Marketing, E. & J. Gallo Winery

ulie Fisher started her career in Louisville, Kentucky, working for Yum! Brands in a variety of analyst, program management and marketing capacities, during which time she fell in love with marketing, innovation and creativity. She then moved over to the Louisville offices of Gallo nearly a decade ago and has since made her mark in various creative and shopper marketing roles. “I’ve been incredibly fortunate throughout my career to have held traditional and nontraditional roles,” Fisher says, “and to have truly experienced end-to-end marketing.” She is one of the Path to Purchase Institute’s Women of Excellence honorees in the “Innovation” category.

What are your current responsibilities? FISHER: Within the Northern and Midwest areas, I lead the shopper marketing efforts for national chains such as Kroger, Target, Walgreens and CVS and regional chains Meijer and Jewel Osco. Our team focuses on omnichannel strategies and solutions that overlay retailer strategies to better reach the right shoppers during the moments that matter most.

Tell us about the company’s “Rose Your Way” program. FISHER: The “Rose Your Way” omnichannel program was groundbreaking in many ways. Based on consumer and shopper insights, our creative team partnered with shopper manager Molly Swopes to develop a beautiful and inspirational in-store program that helped shoppers choose the rose that best suits their tastes, personality and price points. With more than 200 new SKUs introduced in 2018, there was a massive opportunity to aid shoppers in their selection. Our digital team, led by Alexis Nascimento, developed an innovative solution via chatbot through Facebook Messenger that allowed for a 1-to-1 conversation with shoppers who recommended wines

based on their needs, suggested occasions, recipes and pairings – all personalized for the shopper’s needs. This first-of-its-kind solution acted as a “Mobile Concierge” and was incredibly successful.

What does it mean to be a true innovator? FISHER: The most important commonality is empathy for your consumer. Through data, insights and real-life observations, true innovators are able to develop a deep empathy for whomever they’re trying to reach. The second is creativity without fear of failure – the ability to explore crazy ideas. I often say the most innovative ideas evoke an immediate gut reaction of “that won’t work.” Lastly, all true innovators have an outstanding team and are able to recognize and employ the best talent. Ideas stay ideas without the talent and trust in a team to bring them to life.

What do you hope to provide to shoppers and consumers every day? FISHER: The wine shopping and spirits experience can be complicated, depending on the shopper. For the 20% of shoppers who love a treasure hunt or know exactly what they want, the shopping experience is often satisfying. But for the other 80%, shopping for wine is overwhelming. With so many varietals, appellations, sub-AVAs [American Viticultural Area], vintages, brands, etc., there’s a great deal of information without telling shoppers if they’ll like it. My goal is to help demystify the wine and spirits aisle to help shoppers find a wine they’ll truly love.

What excites you most about this space now and in the future? FISHER: Shopper marketing may be the most exciting field to be in today. Never before has the landscape changed so quickly or so aggressively for shoppers. Getting ahead of trends, understanding the new path to purchase, developing empathy and applying creativity to this new space of ecommerce and omnichannel marketing is critical to us as marketers – and it’s wildly exciting.

UPCOMING: The Collaboration winners will be featured in the February issue. The Rising Star and Leadership winners were featured in November and December, respectively.


inspiring the next generation of leaders In 1972, our founder, Marilyn Barnett, became the first woman to open and lead a shopper marketing agency. Today, we salute the Path to Purchase Institute’s Women of Excellence Award winners and nominees for the trails they’re blazing—and examples they’re setting. We can’t go without noting how particularly proud we are of our very own Bree Glaeser, winner for Innovation and Rising Star nominee, as well as the many women who’ve helped us become the agency we are today.

Bentonville Chicago Cincinnati

Dallas

Detroit HQ London Minneapolis

New York Oakland

© 2018 Mars Advertising Inc., All Rights Reserved.

Seattle

Stamford Toronto

/

themarsagency.com


42 WOMEN OF EXCELLENCE

Cathy Allin,

A

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

President and CEO, Decision Insight

n entrepreneur from a very young age, Cathy Allin thrives on asking the “what ifs” in any given business situation and leading the charge while tackling groundbreaking industry initiatives. Her diverse work experience spans food and beverage, real estate and TV.

She also founded and led an internet company for five years prior to being tapped to join the executive team at Decision Insight. She says change is always constant and she has an innate need to see it through in her work. Deeply entrenched in research at Decision Insight for 17 years now, she’s built some of that change, focused on leading the company to continue innovating both for itself and for the industry around it. She is one of the Path to Purchase Institute’s Women of Excellence honorees in the “Innovation” category.

What are your current responsibilities? ALLIN: My job is to be the vision for the company. We look at how we can continue to differentiate ourselves in bringing unique offerings and solutions to our end clients to meet their needs. We’ll continue to innovate around our capabilities and stay in front of the challenges that our clients face while internally creating a culture that enables us to thrive collectively, work together collaboratively and create stability for everyone here.

You’ve been called an entrepreneurial trailblazer. How so? ALLIN: My first year here I realized the need for the market research industry to be online. Research is a lot of art and science, and we needed to reach tremendous numbers of people in order to do the work we do in the quantitative space. We were the first

Bree Glaeser,

B

to develop a tool that measures shopping behavior online. It was a pivotal point for us as a company – a great challenge and tremendous fun to build the tools and have amazing partners in the early days to help us really vet and validate the methodologies and solutions we built. Out of that came our virtual shopping platform. This was about putting our stake in the sand about being online, leading our clients there, developing the right tools and methodologies, and validating that we were able to recreate that shopper experience using virtual environments.

How did it change things? ALLIN: Our whole job was to eliminate stated behavior and begin to capture true behavior. It’s not what people say; it’s what they do. Our platforms enabled us to watch what people do, collect rich data and then demonstrate to our clients what in fact was happening – using the real data we had collected from the environments we built. It was a tremendous story to take to the retailer, along with recommendations based on the test cells and, finally, results. It was incredibly transformational and a huge shift for the industry.

What do you believe constitutes a true innovator? ALLIN: You have to be a little restless and do a lot of what-iffing. I’m constantly thinking about where everything is going from a shopper’s, retailer’s and manufacturer’s standpoint. Generational shifts, trends and all the transformation happening because of new capabilities and the rapid speed of innovation in technology all play a part. It’s about repositioning and reflecting, deconstructing and reconstructing what we think are the next big things we need to be prepared to address.

What motivates you most in your work? ALLIN: A better shopper experience online. Bringing brands to life online in a much more immersive and interactive way with the shopper is part of the future. There will be an opportunity to create shopping in a way that isn’t a bunch of thumbnails and in the grid environment we’ve used for 20 years. We’re innovating on that right now, to bring a much richer in-storebut-without-physical-limitations-type of experience to the online world.

Director of Shopper Innovation, Voice Practice Lead, The Mars Agency

ree Glaeser started her career doing psychiatric research at various Harvard-affiliated hospitals in Boston – which she thought would lead to a doctorate in clinical psychology. But four years into her career, she decided to pivot to a more business-oriented field and went on to earn her masters in strategic design and management from Parsons School of Design. From there she began working at The Mars Agency’s sister company, The Strategy Shop, managing strategy and insights, and then in late 2017 moved over to Mars on its innovation team. As innovation work has evolved to voice, specifically, it’s been an exciting trajectory, she says. She is one of the Path to Purchase Institute’s Women of Excellence honorees in the “Innovation” category.

What do you focus on at Mars today? GLAESER: I lead a relatively new voice practice, focused on the voice ecosystem specifically and responsible for bringing together multiple stakeholders, both internally and often on the client side as well to identify not only the opportunities in this new landscape, but what marketing looks like on these platforms. I work closely on maintaining relationships with Amazon and Google to be on the forefront of opportunities for our clients, and determining how they can leverage these AI assistants to move their brands forward.

Tell us about your work with Smart Aisle. GLAESER: I also serve as the design lead for our proprietary voice-at-retail product, Smart Aisle. I helped design the solution from the ground up and we’re continuing to work on what exactly that conversational expe-

rience looks like in all of our activations going forward. We were seeing people engage with these assistants in their homes and adopting new habits, so it made sense to translate that into the retail environment. Our first program drove great business results for the client and led us to new business opportunities as an agency. Our next launch is with a major alcoholic beverage chain on the West Coast early this year.

What makes you a true innovator? GLAESER: Creative success comes from different diverse perspectives and putting trust in other people, so I try to bring a supportive and collaborative attitude to work every day. I spend a lot of time developing partnerships because of that and encouraging our clients to activate voice platforms as a way of establishing strategic partnerships with Amazon or Google, both of which are increasingly defining the advertising landscape. Being reflective of past work and results is also paramount so we can do things differently on the next iteration.

How have you embraced your work in conversational commerce? GLAESER: My background in innovation has definitely helped. Because the field is so new, there’s been a lot of room for innovators to define the best practices and approaches. I keep my eye on it all the time in this role and am always thinking about what the opportunities for commerce on these platforms look like. They’re definitely going to evolve significantly in the next five to 10 years in a way that will change our agency and a lot of clients’ businesses in significant ways.

What about where shopper marketing is heading? GLAESER: The ability for marketing to provide more value to consumers through personalization is a significant motivator for me. If my AI assistant can move from responding to me in this generic way to anticipating my personal needs, that’s a world I want to live in.


IT’S COMING

The launch that will empower the entire consumer goods industry.

Learn more at p2pi.org/Rise


44

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

SO-LO-MO Central

A roundup of social, local and mobile marketing activity at retail

Dan Ochwat, on the So-Lo-Mo beat since 2011, served as an editor of Shopper Marketing for nine years. Send comments and So-Lo-Mo news to solomo@p2pi.org.

SOCIAL

Facebook launched a 3-D 3-D photo feature, giving viewers a photos. chance to see photos with 3-Dlike depth. A user can pan, tilt and scroll through a photo, giving it a bit of motion or activity. The photos become truly 3-D when viewed through virtual reality tech. Facebook users who want to post a 3-D photo snap a picture in “portrait” mode with a phone that has dual-lens compatibility. The pic can then be shared on Facebook as a 3-D photo; the social network automatically adds layers to it to bring out the 3-D effects and engage viewers in the news feed.

Procter & Gamble’s Gillette Venus launched an ad campaign called “My Skin, My Way” – a new approach by the brand to focus more on women themselves, their diversity and their stories, and celebrated women who challenge conventional thoughts of femininity. The ads are said not to include any retouching and the campaign will be seen in-store, online and heavily over social with the #MySkinMyWay tag. Instagram was the first place Venus kicked off the approach. Influencers have been tapped to tell their stories and share to get a social conversation going about Gillette’s how women treat their skin, their way. way.

Jagermeister turned to Snapchat and the AR Snapchat lens for its annual Halloween push. The liquor brand has a history of creepy imagery and ads that fit nicely for the season and reportedly loves Snapchat, spending more than $100,000 on ads for the network. This year’s effort was called “Divine the Darke,” and the Snapchat lens was played as a Jagermeister-branded tarot card that delivered a user’s fate when clicked, along with offering brand information. According to the digital agency involved in the campaign, Firstborn, the campaign exceeded expectations, netting a 6.25% share rate compared to the average of 1.3% and seeing an average of 124 seconds of interactivity with the lens vs. the Jagermeister average of 12 seconds for a Snapchat lens. Halloween.

Kellogg’s Kellogg Co. ran a pair of recent social campaigns. First, a social “Holiday Baking Challenge” asked consumers at home to campaigns. enter a creative holiday dessert that highlights a Kellogg’s cereal product. Four home bakers were chosen and brought to the Kellogg’s NYC Cafe, where author and TV host Padma Lakshmi was expected to choose the winning dish and bring that baker on a promotional tour. Consumers entered their dish with photos, videos and more on a dedicated holiday baking challenge site. Kellogg’s also posted humorous videos on its social channels of actor Jason Biggs preparing his “Raisin Bran bod,” a parody of 1980s workout videos that had Biggs doing jokey workout moves to build up his Raisin Bran body while informing viewers of the digestive benefits of the cereal.


SO-LO-MO CENTRAL 45

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

LOCAL

Mobile company inMarket, Venice, California, introduced a new suite of location-based display ads under a lineup called “Interactive Moments.” Brands running ads across inMarket’s network of apps can access these new ways of engaging consumers such as a new swipeable ad with multiple coupons or offers to choose from, a new click-to-cart ad, an ad that leverages predictive analytics based on weather or current events to dynamically serve more relevant ads based on that information, and also ads that are animated or enhanced with a game. The suite of ads is built on the company’s more than eight years of mobile ad work. Interactive Moments.

New York-based Verve, a company that enables brand clients to use its platform to develop location-based programmatic video and ad programs for mobile, is integrating into New York-based Yext and its directory of apps. Because of the integration with Yext and its place data, Verve clients and advertisers will be able to create geobehavioral segments to target and retarget ads, deliver ads to consumers in real time based on that consumer’s location, create ads that dynamiIntegrating cally display the nearest store locations and measure store visits. Yext.

MOBILE

Buy closeA new mobile app called Flashfood from the Toronto-based company of the same to-expiring name aims to help shoppers buy foods that are close to expiring at big discounts. foods. The app hopes to lessen food waste and save its mobile members money. There are two ways for shoppers to access the expiring foods: First, there’s the mobile app that enables participating grocers to post foods on sale to be bought on the app or instore. Secondly, there’s a direct-to-consumer food box program. The company just opened an office in Minneapolis, following a run with Target’s startup incubation program called Techstars Retail, and expects to branch out to U.S. shoppers this year. Currently, the app is being used in select stores in Canada. Flashfood did work with Tyson and its innovation labs last spring to offer up a test of Flashfood boxes that consumers in the Detroit area could order through the app. The box shipped to consumers’ homes and included produce and protein that was near expiring or was misshapen and less appealing.

Media brand Buzzfeed, maker of the popular Tasty recipe videos that have an accompanying line of cookware products, is launching retail products tied to its Goodful lifestyle channel, which runs videos on wellness and lifestyle, as well as news items. The Goodful products will be sold at Macy’s and include cooking and housewares products. Consumers can shop items at Macy’s Goodful that appear in Goodful videos. products.

Google’s Shopping

For the holiday shopping season, Google announced that Best Buy, Nike and Actions. Sephora were leveraging Google’s “Shopping Actions” program, which gets products in front of shoppers across Google’s platforms like voice with Google Assistant, putting product to buy on Google Express, using sponsored shopping ads, search, and access to a universal cart for desktop and mobile. Best Buy prepared for the holidays by getting products onto Google Express and synced up with Google Assistant so consumers at home could use voice to check on store hours, status of an online order or buy via the assistant. Both Nike and Sephora integrated its loyalty programs (Nike Plus and Beauty Insider) to reward shoppers buying through the Google properties as well.


46

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

SHOPPING WITH STEVE

Abt in Glenview, Illinois

FRENDA: Lifestyle vignettes aside, I was impressed with how effective Abt works with brands. In this case, you can see how Dyson has the opportunity to promote, display and educate shoppers in this alcove dedicated to its products. FRENDA: If you are going to be a seller of the most impressive array of TVs I’ve ever seen, you might as well sell the best TV-watchin’ chairs available. Pictured here is only a fraction of the TVs large and small on display. FRENDA: One of the very charming elements of the store was a good-sized area set aside as a museum. Long before we had Apple stores, this was one of the first products offered for sale by them in 1990: the desktop computer called the Apple Macintosh. Among other things on display were TVs dating back to the 1950s.

FRENDA: If cooking is your game, there are more than 20 spectacular kitchen display areas complete with appliances, counters, seating and amenities – all for sale. Talk about inspiration for the perfect kitchen.

FRENDA: Not every space in the store is lifestyle-oriented or even branded. If you are simply in the mode of identifying good, better and best as well as feature comparisons in your stove, refrigerator or washer/dryer, there is ample opportunity (as well an ample number of salespeople to help).


SHOPPING WITH STEVE 47

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

FRENDA: The retailer’s mini-mall houses a Dylan’s Candy Bar shop for those seeking unique confectionery items. The Cave (in the background) is an Abt-owned “man cave” furnished with high-end pool tables, pingpong tables, air hockey, etc.

Steve Says: We talk about “experiential retail” a lot these days. Well, look up that term and the Abt Electronics logo just might be there. Located in suburban Chicago, Abt is 82 years young. (For the record, Abt is the family name.) Abt is the largest

FRENDA: Inspiration? I was tempted to tell Abt to send this entire ensemble to my home – TV, furniture, fireplace and artwork, which were all for sale.

single-store operator of electronics, appliances and home furnishings in the U.S. The store’s showroom floor exceeds 110,000 square feet, plus

FRENDA: Here is the “world’s largest” Pac-Man game, which gets quite a workout. As excited as I was to play, I was equally saddened to be reminded about how pathetic my Pac-Man skills were back in the day.

it features a mini-mall that is reminiscent of a Las Vegas casino shopping mall. If you read its history, Abt’s excellence is based on a commitment to delivering complete FRENDA: iRobot was able to design a display piece integrated in a high-traffic area. It’s another great example of how Abt is able to work with mainstream brands.

FRENDA: The mini-mall adjacent to the retail floor features seven or eight major brands, including Apple and TUMI, who have leased space to exclusively sell their products. While this is not an “official” Apple store, only Apple products are offered in this space.

customer satisfaction, a highly trained and passionate staff, and dedication to fair pricing.

Steve Frenda, executive advisor for EnsembleIQ and the Path to Purchase Institute, has been a passionate retail watcher for more than four decades. Having worked as a retailer, for a brand manufacturer and in the infotech world, he is an authority on the entire path to purchase and its changing face. Contact Steve at sfrenda@ensembleiq.com.


48

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

ACTIVATION GALLERY Emerging Brands Walmart welcomed digitalnative and men’s grooming brand Harry’s to its product assortment in May 2018. As it did for its 2016 brickand-mortar debut at Target, Harry’s gave Walmart an exclusive item: a razor with a handle in a blue color similar to Walmart’s logo. Harry’s launched as an online-only subscription service in 2013.

From ABC-TV’s “Shark Tank” to store aisles, pancake and waffle mix brand Kodiak Cakes was spotted at Albertsons Cos.’ Jewel-Osco, stocking its pumpkin flax energy cakes mix via floorstands.

In CVS/pharmacy’s new BeautyIRL format as well as test stores in New York City, Peach & Lily’s emerging Korean beauty brand Peach Slices enjoys an accountspecific, illuminated gondola display merchandising SKUs “handpicked” by the brand, including a variety of personal care products like lotions and lip balms.

Target began exclusively stocking electric toothbrush starter sets from oral subscription service Quip in the fall of 2018. The SKUs enjoyed secondary merchandising space via dedicated endcaps.


JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

TRION

®

P.O.P DISPLAY COMPONENTS

Spotted in Walgreens, this floorstand stocked PepsiCo’s Red Rock Deli potato chips. Frito-Lay North America brought the popular Australian snack brand to the U.S. in the spring of 2018.

The cold brew coffee craze has gone mainstream. Heartland Food Products Group, maker of Splenda products, in 2017 introduced a Java House cold brew coffee brand in concentrate, ready-to-drink bottles and private-label varieties, and in 2018 added liquid pods. At Walmart, aisle violators promoting the newest offering explain how to serve the beverage cold.

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Oral care challenger brand Hello Products shook up the category in 2013 by launching “farm-to-tube” and “friendly” products, starting with a pilot at Walgreens, Duane Reade and Target. The brand’s trendy activated charcoal toothpaste, which appears as a black paste, now receives secondary merchandising space at Walmart on a power wing.

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Continuing its strategy of giving digital native brands an instore presence, Target began exclusively stocking Procter & Gamble’s Native deodorants in September 2018. Native’s initial offering at launch encompassed its aluminum- and paraben-free deodorants for men and women, including a Target-exclusive “Jasmine & Cedar” scent.

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www.TrionOnline.com Toll-Free 800.444.4665 © 2019 Trion Industries, Inc.

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50 ACTIVATION GALLERY | EMERGING BRANDS

SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

Vogue International, a manufacturer and distributor of salon-heritage hair care and personal care products, consistently makes its presence known at Walgreens. Among the activity has been these displays for the OGX and Maui Moisture brands. Johnson & Johnson acquired Vogue International in 2016.

More images at P2PI.org In May 2018, Bausch + Lomb launched Lumify eye drops for the treatment of eye redness, promising the SKU would provide lasting relief without the adverse effects associated with leading redness relievers. At Walmart, the product earned secondary merchandising space on a dedicated endcap.

Part of CVS/pharmacy’s initiative to go beyond traditional drugstore beauty offerings, the retailer devoted merchandising space in its BeautyIRL storewithin-a-store formats to over 30 emerging indie brands including Storybook Cosmetics and Doll Face.

Path to Purchase Institute members can view activations from emerging and well-established brands in the image vault at P2PI.org.


ACTIVATION GALLERY | EMERGING BRANDS 51

JANUARY 2019 SHOPPER MARKETING

Starbucks, in partnership with AnheuserBusch, began shipping all Teavana craft iced teas to grocery and convenience retailers nationwide in 2018, expanding the brand’s ready-to-drink portfolio to six flavors. The beverages have enjoyed secondary merchandising space via dedicated refrigerators at stores such as Schnucks.

Kiss Products, a manufacturer and distributor of nail products, gave Walgreens shoppers the opportunity to “bring the salon home” with an endcap that offered instructions on how to apply lashes and encouraged trying the product virtually via its eyelash simulation app.

Actress Jessica Alba’s eco-friendly The Honest Co. received the spotlight at Albertsons Co.’s Randalls as floorstands stocked multiple SKUs in baby aisles.

Clif Bar & Co.’s flagship brand was positioned in the spotlight at Schnucks stores via floorstands touting that the company is family- and employee-owned and offers “kitchen crafted nutrition.”

C.H. Guenther & Son’s Pioneer gravy SKUs enjoyed secondary merchandising space ahead of Thanksgiving at Kroger stores.


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SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

PERSONNEL APPOINTMENTS BRAND MARKETERS Kimberly-Clark, Irving, Texas

Michael Hsu, Kimberly-Clark president and chief operating officer, was promoted to CEO. He succeeds Thomas Falk, who has served as the company’s top leader since 2002. Falk will become executive board chairman to ensure a smooth transition. Hsu previously oversaw the company’s North American personal care and consumer tissue businesses.

RETAILERS

Ahold Delhaize, Zaandam, Netherlands

Albert Heijn general manager Selma Postma was named president of Peapod. With nearly 20 years of experience at the chain, she

led the transformation of Albert Heijn into an omnichannel retailer by optimizing its website and creating such customer-facing features as list predictors, voice assistants and subscription services.

Fred’s, Memphis, Tennessee

Former Marsh Supermarkets and SpartanNash executive Amit Bhardwaj joined Fred’s as vice president of customer experience. As senior director of customer loyalty at Marsh, Bhardwaj increased core customer engagement for the retailer’s personalized delivery. He managed the customer loyalty, marketing and digital operations teams. At SpartanNash, Bhardwaj directed B2C and B2B consumer and loyalty marketing operations.

Alletto

Denton

Godbole

Lowe’s, Mooresville, North Carolina

Lowe’s filled its vacant chief information officer role with Target senior vice president Seemantini Godbole. She succeeded Paul Ramsay, who quietly departed in August after seven years with the company. As senior vice president, digital and marketing technology, Godbole helped lead Target’s digital tech transformation, including the re-architecture of the company’s digital platforms

Hsu

Kenny

Moffitt

and implementation of agile product management. In other news, David Denton officially left his chief financial officer post at CVS Health to work in the same position at Lowe’s. Tiffany Mason, who had been serving as interim chief financial officer, resumed her role as senior vice president of corporate finance and treasurer.

Office Depot, Boca Raton, Florida

Senior vice president Kevin Moffitt was promoted to executive vice president, chief retail officer. The appointment was made in connection with the company’s focus on its strategic initiatives to grow sales of products and services for small and medium-sized businesses and leverage the company’s retail business.

Pier 1 Imports, Fort Worth, Texas

White House Black Market brand president Donna Noce Colaco was named Pier 1 Imports chief customer officer. In this newly created position, Colaco leads the merchandising organization and oversees product development, planning and allocations, stores, marketing and e-commerce. She reports to president and CEO Alasdair James.

SOLUTION PROVIDERS Nielsen, New York

David Kenny, former IBM senior vice president of cognitive solutions, joined Nielsen as CEO. He succeeds Mitch Barns who retired from the company after 22 years. Most recently, Kenny led IBM’s AI platform and portfolio. He also was responsible for developing IBM Watson and its cloud platform. Kenny previously was chairman and chief executive of The Weather Company, joining IBM after their acquisition of The Weather Company’s product and technology business.

POP Displays, Yonkers, New York

Company veteran Roseanne Alletto was promoted to senior vice president of innovative solutions. In the role, Alletto drives innovation within the organization and with its clients. Alletto has more than 30 years’ business experience in the P-O-P display industry, and 18 of those years have been at POP Displays. Her background includes estimating, project management, sales, development and sales operations. Alletto was one of the founders of Women in POP, an industry-wide organization that was established in the 1990s to raise funds for breast cancer awareness and research.

Quotient, Mountain View, California

ShopperMarketingMag.com ShopperMarketingMag.com provides a deep dive

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Industry and Path to Purchase Institute news. Special reports, including trends surveys and expert roundtables. People profiles, including various Who’s Who reports. Commentary from P2PI’s editors.

So-Lo-Mo Central: social, local and mobile marketing activity at retail. Case studies focused on brand and retailer programs. Topical white papers and supplier guides.

12/10/18 3:56 PM

Quotient promoted two of its senior leaders, Chad Summe and Jason Young, to strengthen the company’s ability to deliver on the future of CPG and retailer marketing. Summe is now chief operating officer and Young is the chief marketing and media officer. As the COO, Summe is responsible for Quotient’s operations, revenue and go-to-market strategies with CPGs and retailers. Summe joined Quotient in 2012 and most recently was senior vp and general manager of brands and retail, leading all sales functions and overseeing brand and retail partnerships. Beyond his contributions driving Quotient’s revenue growth, Summe has been instrumental in leading the company’s expansion in Cincinnati, where it currently has more than 200 employees. Jason Young, based in Quotient’s New York office, is responsible for overseeing media, including media-related data strategy, product and engineering.

Please send information regarding personnel appointments to managing editor Charlie Menchaca at cmenchaca@p2pi.org


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SHOPPER MARKETING JANUARY 2019

INSTITUTE STRATEGIST More info at

No More Pallet Wraps Sam’s Club sends email to suppliers, banning pallet base wraps due to low ROI

By Jacqueline Barba

Sam’s Club in September 2018 implemented a chainwide ban on pallet base wraps as part of a larger strategy to simplify its business. A year prior, Sam’s Club’s then-new president and chief executive officer John Furner laid the groundwork for the P-O-P policy change by underlining the importance of product over presentation. The former Sam’s Club merchant said that the way to win in the club channel is by stocking the best items, and the key to that is in the merchant team, which underwent a significant restructure earlier that year. Every part of the business was reevaluated to make sure it aligned with the new strategy, including a warehouses staple: pallets. “We reviewed every step of the pallet skirt process and saw that it had a low ROI,” Sam’s Club senior director of corporate communications Carrie McKnight told the Path to Purchase Institute. Sam’s Club officially notified suppliers of its decision to undress pallets via email in mid-September, explain-

ing that it would no longer ship nor set any pallets with base wraps anywhere in its stores even if a pallet had already shipped or was ready to ship. Sam’s Club senior leadership painted this as an opportunity to be more innovative and effective, and to grow business with vendors, though the move caught some people in the industry by surprise, according to a P2PI source familiar with the matter. In terms of how this may affect brands who have a history of deploying pallets outfitted with base wraps, McKnight said, “We think brands will appreciate that we’re being mindful stewards of shared resources and are focused on implementing and executing high-value work. “This move is about innovation, growth, being smart about where we invest and where we ask our suppliers to invest,” McKnight added. Coming just ahead of the holidays, the change begged the question: How might this affect the holiday shopping season? McKnight indicated it would make for a better associate and member experience. “In fact, the initial

Editorial Index Companies named in the editorial columns of this issue are listed below. AB InBev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Abt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 47 Advantage Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Ahold Delhaize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Albertsons Cos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 51 Amazon .com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4, 10 Apple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Bausch + Lomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 BuzzFeed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 C .H . Guenther & Son . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Clif Bar & Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Coca Cola Co ., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 CVS/pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 50

Decision Insight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Doll Face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Dylan’s Candy Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Dyson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 E . & J . Gallo Winery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Epsilon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Facebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 FCB/RED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Flashfood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Forrester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Google . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Greek Pita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Harry’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Heartland Food Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Hello Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Honest Co ., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 InContext Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 inMarket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Jagermeister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Johnsonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Kellogg Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Keurig Dr Pepper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Kiss Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Kodiak Cakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Kraft Heinz Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Kroger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 51

feedback we’ve received from associates and members is they really like how this makes the club look, and it’s easier to shop,” she stated. Most locations quickly made the change. During an October visit to a club in Minnesota, P2PI noted an abundance of “bare” pallets, a change that was noticeable immediately upon entering the entryway merchandising area. Gone were the wraps that used to adorn pallets throughout the store, with just one skirt and one mini-skirt remaining – on a Greek Pita pallet and a Heinz “HomeStyle” gravy pallet from Kraft Heinz Co., respectively. It’s unclear how strict every location will be in enforcing the change going forward, but if it follows the lead of Walmart’s somewhat soft ban on floorstands, it’s possible shoppers will still see the occasional pallet skirt. P2PI’s source said the change would also include moving the placement of price signs from above pallet displays to the floor, though that was not evident in the store and McKnight told P2PI there are no plans to do so. SM

Mars Agency, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Microsoft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Myxx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Nielsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Oracle Data Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Orca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Peach & Lily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 PepsiCo/Frito-Lay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Pilot Flying J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Price Chopper Supermarkets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Procter & Gamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 44, 49 Quip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Quotient Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Salsify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Sam’s Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Schnucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Shoptology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Starbucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Storybook Cosmetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Syntegrate Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Target . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 48, 49 Tumi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Verve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Vogue International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Walgreens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 49, 50, 51 Walmart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4, 10, 11, 48, 49, 50 Welcome Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Yext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45


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Shopper Marketing - Jan 2019  

Shopper Marketing - Jan 2019