__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Name of the Game

Fall seasonal marketing programs reap rewards Page 45

All Day Long

In-store breakfast items move beyond morning Page 57

Media Matters

Engaging more shoppers online Page 97

Store of the Month

Experience

On Tap Lowes Foods excels at shopper engagement Page 24

Lowes Foods President Tim Lowe, flanked by Brewmaster Joe Quattlebaum and Store Director Bryan Saulpaugh

August 2017 • Volume 96 Number 8 $10 • www.progressivegrocer.com


Baked to perfection using quality ingredients like flour, eggs, chocolate and milk.

*Enlarged to show detail

• TEDDY has 70% awareness in the market 1 • 82% of parents said they would purchase TEDDY Soft Bakes when asked by their kids2 • No artificial colors, flavors or high fructose corn syrup Sources: 1Ipsos Aided Awareness, 2014. 2 Nielsen Bases 2 2015.

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with

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Contents

08.17 Volume 96, Issue 8

24

COVER STORY Store of the Month

On With the Show New Lowes Foods store sets the stage for experiential shopping. 38 / Category Management Practical Solutions Grocers and CPG companies find success as they embrace the evolution of category management. 45 / Seasonal Marketing Game On Tailgating and other fall seasonal events inspire programs across the store. 51 / Grocery Nicer Slices Balancing consumers’ concerns about health and transparency and their desires for indulgence and fun flavors could help boost a mature category.

57 / Breakfast Handbook Breaking Away Breakfast foods move beyond a single daypart and compete with a host of other foods in innovation and format.

74 / Fresh Food Harvesting Opportunity This fall, purveyors of produce look in-store and online to promote the season’s riches.

57

71 / Refrigerated & Frozen Foods Good Eggs Producers, brands get cracking on innovations that appeal to consumers.

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

5


Contents

08.17

570 Lake Cook Rd, Suite 310, Deerfield, IL 60015 224 632-8200 • www.progressivegrocer.com

88 / PG Pet The Latino Pet Owner Make sure to market the category to your Hispanic customers. 93 / Nonfoods Stronger Connections New ideas enliven the greeting card aisle, draw shoppers. 97 / Technology Social Study Most grocers are investing in social media — so why aren’t more shoppers following?

100 / Supply Chain Planning for Success New technology helps retailers manage the complexities of farm-to-fork logistics. 102 / Equipment & Design Light Switch LED is becoming the new norm for supermarket lighting.

12 / PG Pulse

20 / All’s Wellness Egging Shoppers On

Calendar

16 / Nielsen’s Shelf Stoppers/Spotlight

New Products

Fabric Care

104 / What’s Next Editors’ Picks for Innovative Products

Nonfood Grocery

6

CUSTOM MEDIA VP/Custom Media Division Pierce Hollingsworth 224-632-8229 phollingsworth@ensembleiq.com General Manager, Custom Media Kathy Colwell 224-632-8244 kcolwell@ensembleiq.com MARKETING VP, Marketing & Communications Bruce Hendrickson 224-632-8214 bhendrickson@ensembleiq.com

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Director of Audience Development Gail Reboletti greboletti@ensembleiq.com Audience Development Manager Shelly Patton 215-301-0593 spatton@ensembleiq.com List Rental The Information Refinery 800-529-9020 Brian Clotworthy Subscriber Services/Single-copy Purchases 978-671-0449 or email at EnsembleIQ@e-circ.net

18 / Mintel Global

October 2017

EVENTS SVP, Events & Conferences Maureen Macke 773-992-4413 mmacke@ensembleiq.com

8 / Editor’s Note What’s Your Wow Factor? 14 / In-store Events

EDITORIAL Managing Director of Content Strategy Joan Driggs 224-632-8211 jdriggs@ensembleiq.com Editorial Director James Dudlicek 224-632-8238 jdudlicek@ensembleiq.com Managing Editor Bridget Goldschmidt 201-855-7603 bgoldschmidt@ensembleiq.com Digital & Technology Editor Randy Hofbauer 224-632-8240 rhofbauer@ensembleiq.com Senior Editor Katie Martin 224-632-8172 kmartin@ensembleiq.com Senior Editor Anna Wolfe 207-773-1154 awolfe@ensembleiq.com Contributing Editors Kathleen Furore, Bob Ingram, Jenny McTaggart, Lynn Petrak, Barbara Sax and Jennifer Strailey

ADVERTISING SALES & BUSINESS Southeast Account Executive Larry Cornick 224.632.8248 lcornick@ensembleiq.com Midwest Marketing Manager Angela Flatland (AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MO, NE, ND, OK, SD, TN, WI) aflatland@ensembleiq.com 224-229-0547 • Mobile: 608-320-4421 Senior Marketing Manager Judy Hayes 925-785-9665 jhayes@ensembleiq.com Senior Marketing Manager Theresa Kossack 214-226-6468 tkossack@ensembleiq.com Western Regional Marketing Manager Rick Neigher (CA, OR, WA) rneigher@ensembleiq.com 818-597-9029 Northeast Marketing Manager Mike Shaw 201-855-7631 • Mobile: 201-281-9100 mshaw@ensembleiq.com Account Executive/ Classified Advertising Terry Kanganis 201-855-7615 • Fax: 201-855-7373 tkanganis@ensembleiq.com Classified Production Manager Mary Beth Medley 856-809-0050 marybeth@marybethmedley.com

88

SVP, Brand Director Katie Brennan 201-855-7609 • Mobile: 917-859-3619 kbrennan@ensembleiq.com

| Progressive Grocer | August 2017

ART/PRODUCTION Director of Production Kathryn Homenick khomenick@ensembleiq.com Advertising/Production Manager Jackie Batson 224-632-8183 • Fax: 888-316-7987 jbatson@ensembleiq.com Art Director Bill Antkowiak bantkowiak@ensembleiq.com REPRINTS, PERMISSIONS AND LICENSING Wright’s Media ensembleiq@wrightsmedia.com 877-652-5295

CORPORATE OFFICERS Executive Chairman Alan Glass Chief Operating Officer Richard Rivera Chief Brand Officer Jeff Greisch Chief Financial Officer Len Farrell Chief Business Development Officer & President, EnsembleIQ, Canada Korry Stagnito President of Enterprise Solutions/ Chief Customer Officer Ned Bardic Chief Digital Officer Joel Hughes Chief Human Resources Officer Greg Flores


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Note By Jim Dudlicek

What’s Your Wow Factor?

A

Is your new or remodeled store just a bigger, brighter and cleaner version of what you had before? Or is there something that stands out?

s online retailing continues to gain traction in the grocery channel and competition stretches across a greater number of players fighting for their share, traditional retailers that want to stay in business need to give shoppers a reason to come into their stores. I’ve said it before: It’s not enough just to sell stuff. Retailers need to make a compelling case for why shoppers should buy their stuff from them. Enter experiential marketing. Retailers that are planning to build new stores or remodel existing locations have a golden opportunity to design their stores around solution-based destination departments guided by themes that capture shoppers’ interest and allow associates to engage with them. The finest recent example of this that I’ve experienced is the Lowes Foods supermarket in Simpsonville, S.C., our Store of the Month in this issue, starting on page 24. “We try to make our brand live,” President Tim Lowe explained during my recent visit to the store, which teems with activity, character and detail. For example: A clanging bell and the chant “Hot fresh cookies!” announce to shoppers the latest baked goods to come out of the oven; associates in other store departments echo the chant. “PA announcements become noise. We prefer the chant,” Lowe told me. Dances, kids’ activities, a towering windmill, a coffee shop inside a boxcar, and an on-site microbrewery are among the many features that contribute to a shopping experience hard to find elsewhere. And there’s a story behind each concept that gives associates another foot in the door to engage with shoppers. “We look at this as a way to grow with the community,” Lowe said. Retailers, when you open a new or remodeled store, is it just a bigger, brighter and cleaner version of what you had before? Or is there something that stands out — something you didn’t have before that your competition doesn’t have, something that makes shoppers take notice? What’s your wow factor? Lowes Foods in Simpsonville is full of wow factors. And it’s not just flash — products, many local, are of high quality, and the prepared foods are delicious. Products are merchandised as solutions, which should also be a top priority, as we explore in our feature on the evolution of category management, starting on page 38. Retailers should be collaborating more closely with suppliers to develop solution-based merchandising strategies customized for the unique needs of each store location. Selling individual products or brands won’t cut it anymore — that’s not how a growing number of folks shop. Focus on occasions, need states — the why, not the what — that encompass the whole store, and sales will climb. Leverage consumer insights to deliver to your shoppers exactly what they need, when they need it — and hear them say, “Wow!” PG

Jim Dudlicek Editorial Director jdudlicek@ensembleiq.com Twitter @jimdudlicek

8

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


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What’s trending on progressivegrocer.com …

As we had anticipated, the Whole Foods Market-Amazon.com deal took the first spot — as well as No. 3 – for top headlines on progressivegrocer.com for the June 16-July 15 time period. Seattle-based Amazon announced its intent to purchase the Austin, Texasbased natural grocer for $13.7 billion on the first day of the cycle, prompting much talk among industry experts — from doomsday speculation over jobs and competing grocers to skepticism and doubt that the deal really is a game-changer. Additional top stories were Kroger’s expansion of its private label program, and CEO departures at two Southeast-based retailers, The Fresh Market and Southeastern Grocers. Some attributed the corporate shakeups to the U.S. arrival of German deep-discounter Lidl, which opened its first stores in the region on June 15, heating up competition there.

Amazon, Whole Foods and the ‘New World of Supermarketing’ http://bit.ly/2syldqH

“It has been a difficult decision to leave my role as president and CEO of Southeastern Grocers, but ... the new position will be a positive opportunity for me and in the best interests of my family.” —Ian McLeod, former president and CEO, Southeastern Grocers

Rick Anicetti Quits as The Fresh Market CEO http://bit.ly/2u13OqU

AmazonWhole Foods Deal: Not a Game-Changer http://bit.ly/2u1sCNX

“Stop & Shop is the same size as Whole Foods. Would the business world be freaking out if Amazon bought Stop & Shop? Exactly.” —Kurt Jetta, Ph.D., CEO and founder of TABS Analytics

Ian McLeod Leaving Exec Shakeups Southeastern Roil ‘Overstored’ Grocers Southeast http://bit.ly/2u1c1vi

12

http://bit.ly/2vu9JTg

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

“If the threat posed by Amazon was raising the blood pressure of traditional supermarket operators, this move should send them into coronary arrest.” —Gary Hawkins, CEO, Center for Advancing Retail & Technology

“Through innovation, we are committed to introducing new items monthly that give our customers a wide selection of choices and price points, and always guaranteed quality.” —Gil Phipps, VP of Our Brands, Kroger

Kroger Plans PL Expansion http://bit.ly/2tWJYu

Southeastern Grocers and The Fresh Market “face unprecedented and overwhelming competition, and overall uncertainty ahead.” —Burt P. Flickinger, managing director, Strategic Resource Group


October 2017 is... American Cheese Month Breast Cancer Awareness Month Fair Trade Month National Pasta Month

S

1

International Coffee Day World Vegetarian Day

8

For National Dessert Month, share recipes on your Facebook page.

M

2

In honor of Fair Trade Month, share the stories behind some of your Fair Trade-certified products.

9

National Moldy Cheese Day

T

3

Pin your best-selling American cheeses on your Pinterest page to celebrate American Cheese Month.

10

National Angel Food Cake Day

National Fluffernutter Day

National Red Wine Day. Make a big display of red wine glasses and carafes. National Mushroom Day

16

National Liqueur Day. Pin pictures of your favorite quaffs on your Pinterest page.

4

National Taco Day. Build end caps spotlighting taco fixings.

11

National Coming Out Day promotes awareness of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender issues.

T

5

For National Apple Betty Day, share pictures on Instagram.

12

National Pumpkin Pie Day

F

6

National Noodle Day. Offer demos for quick recipes throughout the store.

13

Yorkshire Pudding Day National M&M Day

S

7

National Frappé Day Anuga in Cologne, Germany, begins and continues through Oct. 11.

14

Chicken Cacciatore Day. Pin recipes on your Pinterest page. National Dessert Day

National Sausage Pizza Day

Columbus Day

15

W

National Cookbook Month National Pork Month National Seafood Month National Apple Month

17

National Pasta Day

18

National Chocolate Cupcake Day

19

Adopt a Shelter Dog Month. Support your local shelter by allowing it to set up an adoption clinic outside.

20

National Brandied Fruit Day. Promote fresh and dried fruit, mason jars, and sugar. And brandy, if you carry it.

21

Back To The Future Day National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day

National World Food Day

22

National Nut Day. Use signage to call out all of the different products that contain nuts.

29

National Oatmeal Day. Sample steelcut and rolled oats so customers can taste the difference.

23

National Boston Cream Pie Day

24

Review inventory levels for the remainder of Q4. National Bologna Day

30

Close out National Dessert Month with a knock-’em-dead class.

25

26

27

Sourest Day

National Pumpkin Day

National Potato Day

National Greasy Foods Day

American Beer Day. Tweet about your favorite pairings.

28

National Chocolate Day

World Pasta Day

31

National Caramel Apple Day Halloween

National Candy Corn Day. Nearly 9 billion pieces are consumed each year.

14

National Mincemeat Day

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

Email your calendar submissions to awolfe@ensembleIQ.com


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Front End Market Intelligence By The Numbers Shelf Stoppers

Frozen Vegetables Shelf Stoppers

Basket Drivers

TOTAL FROZEN VEGETABLE SALES REACHED $2.97 BILLION IN THE PAST YEAR Nonfood Grocery (52 weeks ending April 2, 2016)

Sales (millions)

Top Nonfood Departments by $ Growth vs. Previous Year

$ % Change YA

Latest 52 Wks YA W/E 07/02/16

Latest 52 Wks W/E 07/01/17

Latest 52 Wks YA W/E 07/02/16

Latest 52 Wks W/E 07/01/17

Among the various nonfood departments, which commands the largest basket size (average spend per trip) in conventional store channels like grocery, mass merch, etc.?

Department/Category

Health Care

$42,715,853,601

$43,835,598,713

4.3%

2.6%

Pet Care

20,166,970,757

20,408,874,058

1.8

1.2

Household Care

57,782,661,361

58,090,001,002

2.2

0.5

Personal Care

42,991,173,146

42,934,675,376

1.7

-0.1

Beauty Care

16,575,065,435

16,358,530,570

1.9

-1.3

Sales (millions)

$ % Change YA

Latest 52 Wks YA W/E 07/02/16

Latest 52 Wks W/E 07/01/17

Latest 52 Wks YA W/E 07/02/16

Latest 52 Wks W/E 07/01/17

Vitamins and Supplements

$9,006,590,930

$9,417,132,263

6.2%

4.6%

Upper-respiratory Medicine

8,111,658,552

8,467,695,402

3.7

4.4

Pain Relief

4,776,142,780

4,937,362,504

2.8

3.4

Stomach-Upper G.I.

4,010,219,051

3,982,413,071

1.1

-0.7

Nutritional

3,697,904,580

3,801,136,378

9.9

2.8

A Look Within Health Care: Top Categories by $ Sales Category

Total U.S. — all outlets combined, plus convenience stores — includes grocery stores, drug stores, mass merchandisers, convenience stores, select dollar stores, select warehouse clubs and military commissaries (DeCA)

“At a total market level, growth has been hard to come by, with contractions in center store edibles like frozen foods and dairy at the forefront. That said, many nonfood focal points have been sources of positivity in stores this year. Health and household care are two examples of this, growing at 2.6 percent and 1 percent, respectively. The healthy halo driving performance in fresh prepared foods may be extending into how consumers can healthfully cleanCONSUMERS and care for their loved ones at home. The impressive performance of WHEN ARE EATING FROZEN BROCCOLI? vitamins and supplements — up 5 percent in dollar sales — would suggest nothing less.” VP Consumer Broccoli as an ingredient is most commonly Frozen broccoli—Jordan is mostRost, often used in Insights a side consumed at dinner, followed by lunch. dish, followed by as a main entrée.

Spotlight on Frozen Broccoli Demographics

3% Household size has an impact on purchasing when it comes to nonfood departments like household care, personal care and beauty care. The largest households (five-plus mem9% bers) are spending more than their expected share on these departments – 24 percent more on beauty care, 25 percent more on household care and an impressive 49 percent more on personal care. Another trend worth noting is the dynamics of pet care across various ethnicities. Both African-American and Asian households underindex OCCASION MEAL ITEM in pet care purchasing (spending 60 percent and 51 percent less than expected, respectively). 29% TYPE CLASS 62% 35% 61%

Cross-merchandising Candidates Nuts Medications, Remedies Aids DINNER LUNCH and Health OTHER Coffee Household Supplies Butter and Margarine

Cough and Cold Remedies OralSIDE Hygiene DISH MAIN ENTRÉE Stationery and School Supplies Fresh Produce Ice Cream

Source: Nielsen

16

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

OTHER

The average American household spends: Consumers chose

frozen broccoli over alternatives for a variety of reasons:

12% $15.79 because it’s

per trip on pet care quick and easy

10%

because it tastes great

$13.83

per trip on health care

9%

because it’s healthy and nutritious

8% $10.60

because it’s low in per trip on sugar calories, fat and household care

Source: Nielsen Homescan, Total U.S., 52 weeks ending May 27, 2017


Š2017 Goya Foods, Inc. *Top selling coconut milk SKU (in grocery outlets) Source: Nielsen Strategic Planner, Total US (unit sales), 52 weeks ending 6/3/17.


Mintel Global New Products Database Category Insights For more information, visit www.mintel.com or call 800-932-0400.

Fabric Care Market Overview Laundry detergents account for nearly two-thirds of sales within the overall fabric care market in the United States and Canada. The U.S. fabric care market is the largest in the world, with Americans spending about $38 million annually. Automatic-detergent launches are on the rise in North America, with an increase to 47

percent of total launches in the 12 months preceding October 2016, up from 35 percent in the previous year. Capsule formats also are on the rise, accounting for 29 percent of total automatic-detergent launches. Liquid, however, remains the most popular, with a 61 percent share of total automaticdetergent launches. key issues Botanical/herbal and no-additive/preservative claims are on the rise; in the 12 months ending October 2016, botanical/herbal claims rose 15 percent, up from 9 percent in 2013, and no additives/preservatives saw an increase of 14 percent this year, compared with 12 percent in 2013. Many product launches tapped into the aromatherapeutic trend by featuring plant essential oils.

Plant-based products will need to prove their worth in terms of efficiency, as natural cleaning products tend to be perceived as less efficient. Botanical/herbal ingredients and no-additive/-preservative claims can expand and appeal to consumers seeking gentler and more natural formulations, but brands will also need to strongly denote efficacy. Despite scent being important when choosing fabric care products, many consumers are worried about fragrances. For example, 24 percent of American consumers who are responsible for laundry or buy laundry products feel that many scents are too strong, while 16 percent are worried that they will have an allergic reaction to certain fragrances. Milder options, with low scents or even unscented formulations, could help to reassure consumers, while companies could also highlight hypoallergenic claims — currently only 10 percent of launches in North America — more prominently on packaging.

18

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

Scent is the top purchase influencer for detergents, fabric softeners and scent boosters in the United States, and is especially relevant for fabric softeners, with nearly half of shoppers citing scent as the reason that they buy. Consumer interest in floral scents is driving new product development, appealing to the one-third of American consumers who look for natural (floral, citrus) scents in fabric care products, and a break from the fresh/ clean fragrances that had proved popular in the past. About 20 percent of product launches touted floral scents, compared with 19 percent for fresh/clean. The most popular floral scents are lavender, eucalyptus, blossom and wildflower.


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All’s By Karen Buch

Egging Shoppers On The incredible edible item is due for a protein-centric in-store makeover.

P

rotein is top of mind when consumers think about a healthy diet, with 64 percent of Americans saying that they actively seek to consume more. Specifically, eggs are named by consumers as a protein most often consumed, ranking second only to poultry. Protein is sought for various reasons, including to help build and maintain muscle, improve appetite satisfaction, and displace less nutritious foods from one’s diet.

Two other studies support the notion that egg intake can help combat childhood malnutrition and reduce the incidence of stunted growth. Additionally, the simple act of adding eggs to a salad can lead to seven times higher absorption of vitamin E. What’s more, eggs play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy and eye health. IncorpoIncorporating rating science-based sound bites about eggs science-based into impactful consumer communications sound bites may positively influence consumer attitudes, about eggs into leading to healthier dietary patterns. impactful consumer Beyond the research showing what eggs A Nutritional Powerhouse communications can do to improve health, it may be just as Eggs offer an unmatched combination of versamay positively vital to look at what the research says eggs tility, affordability, portability and wholesome don’t do. Dose-response analyses show that goodness. Serving as an easily accessible source influence consumer egg consumption doesn’t increase one’s risk of many of the nutrients necessary for growth attitudes, leading of cardiovascular disease. Not only have and development, one large egg contains to healthier eggs been found to contain less dietary varying amounts of 13 essential vitamins and dietary patterns. cholesterol than once thought, but the 2015 minerals, as well as 6 grams of high-quality Dietary Guidelines for Americans advisory protein, for less than 20 cents. When asked committee recommendations no longer name dietary cholesabout the perceived healthfulness of various protein-rich terol as a nutrient of concern. This information is important to foods, nearly 80 percent of men and women named eggs convey, since many consumers may be unnecessarily limiting as being good or very good for you. eggs based on misconceptions or outdated recommendations. Recent Research What are some of the recent scientific research findings Resources for Retailers involving eggs? A recent meta-analysis study published in To make it easier to engage consumers, retail dietitians AJCN shows that eating one egg a day reduces the risk of can leverage free consumer marketing toolkits designed by stroke by 12 percent. Another study published in AJCN asthe Chicago-based American Egg Board to offer seasonal sociates egg intake with improved cognitive performance. egg recipes, videos, infographics and sample social media posts, along with a range of tactical elements. Given recent culinary trends placing eggs on top of every5 Ways to Encourage thing from salads to burgers, pasta dishes and soups, retailers and customers can tag #putaneggonit in social media camEgg Consumption at Retail paigns all year long. A few key times of the year to promote eggs to consumers Post nutrition education signage near eggs include January: New Year, New You; February: National Hot in the dairy case. Breakfast Month; March: National Nutrition Month; May: Feature the latest research and/or nutritional National Egg Month; June: National Egg Day; August: back attributes of eggs in media communications. to school; and September: National Breakfast Month. PG Create a #putaneggonit social media campaign to entice shoppers to submit meal photos of eggs. Offer seasonal egg recipes, how-to videos and in-store cooking demos. Capitalize on the protein snacking trend by selling grab-and-go snack boxes featuring hard-cooked eggs, fruit, cheese and nuts/seeds.

20

Karen Buch, RDN, LDN, is a registered dietitian/nutritionist who specializes in retail dietetics and food and nutrition communications. She is the founder of Nutrition Connections LLC, providing consulting services nationwide, and a health professional advisor to Egg Nutrition Center. Connect with her on Twitter @karenbuch and on Facebook @NutritionConnectionsLLC.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


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Store of the Month

Lowes Foods

Simpsonville, S.C.

T

his chant, following a clanging bell, echoes throughout the store, enticing shoppers to follow the sound, and the aroma, to the bakery counter along the perimeter of the Lowes Foods supermarket in Simpsonville, S.C., one of the newest locations among the Winston-Salem, N.C.-based chain’s nearly 100 stores. Not far away, a visiting group of grade-schoolers stops by The Cakery to sample the luscious frosting and play the musical chairs-inspired cakewalk game for a chance to win their own cake square to take home. Meanwhile, an animatronic poultrythemed chandelier suddenly comes to life, its “Cock-a-doodle-doo” summoning store associates to break into a chicken dance to celebrate the latest fresh batch of chicken to come out of the oven. Many grocery retailers talk about experiential shopping, but few deliver the level of interactivity that Lowes does, bold examples of food theater that entice folks to visit the store and bring the young’uns rather than sit at home and order groceries online — which Lowes also provides, if you’re not in the mood for breakfast, lunch or dinner and a show. “It’s all about ‘retail-tainment’ — the experience,” the company’s president, Tim Lowe, says during a visit to the store near Greenville. First and foremost is the food. “It has to be quality,” Lowe says, explaining the banner’s 200 percent refund-and-replace guarantee on all items. “And we want it to be fun.” The Simpsonville store is the first of

24

| Progressive Grocer | August 2017


On With the Show

New Lowes Foods store sets the stage for experiential shopping.

By Jim Dudlicek Photography by Fred Rollison curtain call From left: Brian Greenway, co-manager; Sami Kadhim, assistant brewer; Jessica langford, lead Boxcar barista; lisa cope, community table manager; lila rannells, Pick & Prep clerk; Ezra Jones, chicken Kitchen lead; Bobby Hames, co-manager; Molly Barker, guest service managet; lisa allen, assistant guest service manager; Bryan Saulpaugh, store director; nicole Grogan, Breadcrumb lead; Dave thomas, SausageWorks lead; andrew Powell, lead wine steward; cindy cummings, Sammy’s lead; tim lowe, president; christina clinkunbroomer, cakery lead; Harvin Bedenbaugh, Beer Den master; John Beck, bakery manager; richie Mckinney, produce manager; and Jeff Parks, division director


Store of the Month

Lowes Foods, Simpsonville, S.C.

Lowes’ supermarkets to feature The Cavern, an on-site microbrewery that creates beers that can be enjoyed in indoor and outdoor seating areas or at the bar of the Beer Den, which offers an extensive craft beer collection, including many Carolina brews. Additionally, the Simpsonville market features a special destination concept, Lowes Foods Originals, encompassing fresh meat, produce, prepared foods, baked goods and specialty items: the Chicken Kitchen, SausageWorks, Pick & Prep (vegetable

butcher), The Cakery (cake bakery), Boxcar Coffee & Chocolates, Breadcrumb (bread bakery), Smokehouse (barbecue), Sammy’s (sandwiches), Spice Bazaar, The Cheese Shop, and Sunmill Wines. “All of our Originals are truly unique, and together they create a village of different shops, our community,” asserts Heather George, Lowes’ SVP of brand strategy. “What really makes the experience in our stores stand out is our hosts,” how Lowes refers to its associates.

deliciouS deStinationS From the food to the decor to the displays and even to the choreography, lowes Foods’ signature departments are designed to excite and delight shoppers. the Smokehouse’s fresh barbecue stimulates the olfactories, the cakery’s sweet treats are fun for all ages, and the Pick & Prep produce butcher makes eating more fruits and veggies simpler. and when the chicken’s done, guests can join their hosts for a celebratory dance (bottom).

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


A focal point of the store is the Lowes Foods Community Table, where shoppers can gather to sample, enjoy and be inspired to prepare new foods. And for those who don’t have time for the show, the store offers the Lowes Foods To Go online personal shopping service, for delivery or pickup. To be sure, Lowes has created a community inside the store designed to serve the one outside its walls.

Be Our Guest The brand transformation and new store concepts were all inspired by customers, whom Lowes refers to as guests. “We started by doing extensive research in the homes of consumers around our stores,” George explains. “We determined that we needed to create an experience inside the store that made it worthwhile to come in to shop. We had an opportunity to build the experience around the idea of community. The heart of our store is to bring the community back to the table, and so the introduction of our community table was born.” Fashioned of wood reclaimed from Carolina tobacco barns, the Community Table hosts local groups as well as the store associates’ team huddle each morning. Wrapped around the table — as well as all of center store, as a device to drive traffic through the aisles — are the perimeter’s destination departments. The color and fragrance of produce, fresh-ground coffee and handmade chocolates greet shoppers at the entrance, but it’s likely to be the rustic aromas emanating from the meat smoker out in front of the store that draw folks in and around the perimeter back to the Smokehouse for the ribs, pulled pork and other hardwood-smoked meats offered daily. “We’re creating an entirely new shopping experience within our Lowes Foods stores,” says Chris Van Parys, VP of fresh sales and merchandising. “Our guests expect us to deliver unique, authentic, great-tasting products that they can also customize to meet their specific needs. Each of our concepts has a ready-to-eat component.” And each concept is built around a story. For example, the “proprietor” of Sammy’s sandwich shop is a mustachioed character who travels the world in search of the best sandwich concepts, Lowe explains. In reality, the hosts behind the Sammy’s counter draw from the store’s other signature departments to build their creations, touted as “hot and fresh in 30 seconds.” “Veggies from our Pick & Prep, barbecue from our Smokehouse, cheese from our Cheese Shop,” Lowe says. “A lot of stores have sandwich bars — we created a concept with a story behind it.” The stories are supported by a host of small details, many hidden in plain sight, that further enhance the experience, from PB&Js shaped like Sammy’s mustache to the bear tracks on the floor leading to the Beer Den, to the rustic decor carried from the walls to

the end caps to the vendor partner displays. “Our brand is metal and wood. A lot of burlap. Visual merchandising,” Lowe says — appropriate for a store with a sign reading “Welcome to our farm” over the front door, and other decor that evokes the community’s deep agricultural roots. A new end cap display — a giant upside-down grocery bag that looks like it’s spilling out product — is designed to catch the eye and promote the Lowes store brand that Lowe notes is clean label across the board. “We do a lot with our brand to catch people’s attention,” he says. Lowes is catching kids’ attention as well, from the musical cakewalk games and “magic” birthday candles they can blow out at The Cakery, to the chicken dances, to the pots and pans to bang on at the Breadcrumb bakery, and the gadgets and gizmos galore to play with at SausageWorks, right down to the free organic apples in the produce section. “The rituals bring it all to life,” Lowe affirms, explaining how the company hired former Disney trainers to advise them how hosts could more effectively interact with children. “It’s something we work hard on all the time — if we can get it right with the kids, we can get it right with the parents.”

just in casinGs Dozens of sausage varieties made on site from house recipes are among the favorites of shoppers at Lowes Foods.

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

27


Store of the Month

Lowes Foods, Simpsonville, S.C.

When you partner with Coca-Cola... nO dOdging The drafT guests of the Beer den can sample a wide variety of local beers and wines, including beer brewed on site in the store’s own microbrewery, seen at right, joining the region’s active craft beer scene.

© 2017 The Coca-Cola Company

On Tap Getting it right with the parents, as well as others over 21, is the Beer Den, supplemented for the first time at this location with The Cavern, an on-site beer-brewing operation. From a seat at the bar or at a table in the adjacent dining area, guests can enjoy beer created just a few yards away, along with other microbrews, as well as Sunmill Wines, Lowes’ own private brand. The Simpsonville Beer Den has eight taps — twice as many as at other stores to accommodate the housemade beers. Offerings change seasonally, and the retailer has created specific branding for each variety, most labels incorporating some variation on the den’s whimsical mascot, the Beer, or a bear with deer antlers. Beer also can be taken home in 32- or 64-ounce growlers, or in 32-ounce “crowlers” — cans that are filled and capped to order. The process reduces the amount of air in the container and lengthens the beer’s shelf life, Lowe explains. The glass-walled brewing room is visible from the indoor and outdoor seating areas, which also host tasting and music events (a schedule is posted at the bar). Rare among supermarkets, the operation is overseen by a brewmaster who also collaborates with craft brewers in the Carolinas’ vibrant craft beer community. The beers use as many local ingredients as possible, although hops must come from other regions. “This pipe is transparent, so people can see the hops move through the piping,” Lowe notes during a visit to the brewing room, describing the feature as one of the store’s “bits of theater, however small.” Lowes is working with local officials to get permission to sell Simpsonville-made beer at its other store locations. In addition to tasting events, the store hosts a “Brewniversity” to teach people about beer. “When people try new things, they expand their palate and get a fuller experience,” Harvin Bedenbaugh, Beer Den master, remarks while working the taps during PG’s visit. As if that weren’t enough, the store’s beer cooler boasts the longest beer run in the county — 47 doors over 94 feet, Lowe points out, with a huge variety of both mass-market and craft beers. “We’re using beer and wine as


YOU COULD DRIVE DELI SALES +11% Helping consumers with mealtime needs by co-merchandising Coca-Cola products can increase your deli food sales. Talk to your Coca-Cola representative or visit CokeSolutions.com/retail to learn more.

*Nielsen Retail Execution Audit Custom Study 2015 Š 2017 The Coca-Cola Company

*

.


Store of the Month

Lowes Foods, Simpsonville, S.C.

a catalyst to drive trips,” he says. “We do single facings on most varieties and work hard to keep them in stock. We’re big on firstto-shelf market launches.”

Be Prepared The perimeter at Lowes is all about having fun, but it’s also about solutions. The flow of the store was designed quite deliberately, Lowe says, to guide folks from produce to cheese to wine to custom-blended spices to meat (sausages, smoked and otherwise) to bakery to deli and prepared foods. It’s a tour that shouts quality, flavor and convenience. Lowes Foods #264 “We have a sous chef who will cut anything, 2815 Woodruff Road any way you want it,” Lowe says, describing Simpsonville, SC 29681 Pick & Prep, the vegetable-butcher service that Grand opening: Feb. 3, 2017 Lowes has offered since 2014. Total square footage: 53,186 In addition to slicing and dicing veggies to Selling area: 37,730 square feet order, the department offers grab-and-go cut SKUs: 32,000 produce, juices, salads, infused waters and spiralEmployees: 221 cut vegetables. Signature items include habanero Checkouts: Nine regular, guacamole, strawberry salsa and jicama slaw. four self-checkout “Fresh ingredients, no preservatives,” Lowe says. Hours: 6 a.m.–midnight “We don’t even add salt.” Store designer: api(+), design; Shoppers can even clip their own fresh D/FAB, fabrication; herbs — everything they can fit into a snackWilliams Spencer, architect size zip-top bag for 99 cents. Tomato and potato/onion bars allow folks to mix and match cherry and grape tomatoes, and different spud and onion varieties. The salad bar features more than 60 fresh items, plus signature soups like Lowes’ Cock-a-doodle Noodle soup made with hand-pulled, no-antibiotics-ever rotisserie chicken. That clean labeling carries over to to the Chicken Kitchen, featuring hand-breaded chicken and hand-tossed wings. About that chicken dance: Since starting the ritual to herald each fresh batch, “we saw triple-digit growth in a very mature category,” Continued on page 36

Lowes Foods History Founded in 1954, Lowes Foods employs about 9,000 people and operates nearly 100 full-service supermarkets in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. Locally owned and operated, Lowes Foods declares its commitment to “bringing community back to the table” by providing customers with fresh, innovative products from local suppliers. The company maintains a strong focus on exceptional attention to its shoppers, with services like Lowes Foods To Go personal shopping and gas rewards discounts. Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Lowes Foods LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of Alex Lee Inc. Founded in 1931, Alex Lee is the family-owned and -operated parent company of Lowes, as well as of Merchants Distributors LLC, which provides full-service wholesale distribution to supermarkets, and Just Save food stores in North Carolina. Alex Lee Inc. is based in Hickory, N.C. www.lowesfoods.com; www.alexlee.com

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

31


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Store of the Month

Lowes Foods, Simpsonville, S.C.

rolling out the dough Breadcrumb creates hearty loaves of fresh bread, some of which is wheeled up front to tempt shoppers.

Continued from page 30

Lowe says. “Why do we do crazy things? It’s a celebration, and it gives people permission to try something new. It’s a chance for us to interact with them.” One of Lowes’ newest solutions, found at the meat counter, is Ready. Chef. Go! Launched this past spring, the oven-ready bags of chicken, beef or pork with vegetables, which also can be prepared in the microwave or on the grill, are “taking off like

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wildfire,” Lowe says. “It’s a quick meal solution, and it’s all put together right here.” The offering is another way of making life easier for customers, for whom Lowes openly expresses its gratitude in myriad ways, such as walking meat orders around to customers, rather than handing them over the counter. “It’s a gesture of openness,” Lowe says. “It’s saying ‘thank you’ to the customers.”

Staying Fresh Lowes’ efforts to up its game on shopper engagement have paid off; response from the community has been overwhelmingly positive. “We’ve been welcomed into the community by local vendors, leaders and neighbors,” George says. “Prior to entering the market, we held a vendor fair to invite local producers to share their products with us. We also partnered with the chamber of commerce to host a dinner called Eat Like a Local.” Additionally, the grocer sends gift boxes directly to the homes of area residents, filled with locally made products and Lowes signature items. Local vendors are also invited to demo their products at Lowes stores, another foot in the door toward getting on shelf. “We have a commitment to supporting our local vendor partners,” notes Jason Ramsey, VP of center store. “This means thinking differently about community outreach and finding those unique, local, family-owned businesses that have a passion for what they do. We have a long history of helping these vendors reach a broader audience through our stores and our wholesale team. Altogether, we can help a local vendor reach over 450 retail stores in 12 states.” As the retailer declares on its website, “You can’t fake local,” and that goes for all 2,500 local products available in every one of its stores. Admittedly, some suppliers may be challenged to keep up with Lowes’ pace of innovation. “We continue to work together with our


vendors to ensure they are engaged in the earlijust the best grocer — the best retailer overall. est ideation phases of our new concepts,” Van Ask people where they want to go, we want Lowes Parys says. “Looking at SausageWorks, just the Foods to be at the top of their list.” PG flavor profiles for 54 unique sausages was a huge undertaking that takes test batching and formuLearn more about Lowes Foods and its lation changes to ensure it’s just right before our new Simpsonville, S.C., supermarket at guests ever taste their first bite.” progressivegrocer.com/lowesfoods. The Greenville region is significant to the company’s growth strategy for two reasons, George explains: “First, this was the first new market that we entered with our newly developed concepts, without the history of being a standard supermarket. Second, this was the first location where we were able to bring the concepts — our Originals — around the perimeter of the store.” By all accounts, the strategy is having the intended effect; the challenge will be to maintain the level of quality and service to continually overdeliver on shoppers’ expectations. “Certainly, there is nothing more exciting than opening a new store,” says Mike Clawson, SVP of operations. “As you can expect, this brings a great deal of work and anticipation. In each case we bring our guest — whether a new one who has never experienced a Lowes food store, or a longtime shopper — something new. The World Standard For Destratification But the words that make us the happiest are when we hear that something is different, not just the new paint and equipment, but our people. “We spend a considerable amount of time coaching and training friendliness, and the idea that everyone has a part to play in the show,” he continues. “When we see it happen, we know it was worth Airius fans help retailers turn the effort. Of course, the biggest challenge is continuing to invest in differ“Can you tell the manager it’s cold?” into entiated experiences to keep us fresh in “Can you tell the manager it’s crowded?” the eyes of our guests over time.” The southeastern United States has become a highly competitive grocery market, with German hard-discounter We move hot air from the ceiling to the Lidl the latest to tread on territory floor, where your customers are. held by Lowes as well as Aldi, Bi-Lo, Kroger’s Harris Teeter, Publix and Walmart, among others. But Lowe says he worries less about That’s why we’re a trusted partner in the competition than he does about building a better shopper experience. pleasing Lowes’ customers. “The goal is to be the best retailer in America — that’s what drives us,” he asserts. “We won’t stop until we’ve Read more at: airiusfans.com/retail-17 303.772.2633 built the best retail environment, not

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YOUR COLD AISLES ARE ABOUT TO GET CROWDED.

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

37


Category Management

New Ideas

Practical

Solutions Grocers and CPG companies find success as they embrace the evolution of category management. By Jim Dudlicek

R

etailers aren’t selling categories, they’re selling solutions — that’s a phrase we’re hearing more often these days. “Maintaining relevance today means simplifying the shopper’s trip — not by inundating them with more category choices, but by presenting disparate products as the holistic answer to an immediate need. Enter solutions management,” Wendy Liebmann, CEO of WSL Strategic Retail, wrote in a recent edition of the New York-based marketing consultant’s WSL Weekly Highlights. With that, Liebmann declared category management as we’ve known it dead, urging that a solution-based approach rise from its ashes. She’s absolutely right. It’s not enough just to sell stuff anymore, not with the fierce competition traditional grocery retailers face from physical and digital channels. To compete, traditional retailers need to sell the “why” instead of the “what,” because there’s so many places to get things. That’s likely why Cyriac Roeding, co-founder of digital shopping app Shopkick, based in Redwood City, Calif., thinks that, while “the future of retail looks really bright, the future of physical retailers looks really dark.” Even traditional retailers acknowledge this challenge. Steve Henig, VP of digital for Keasbey, N.J.-based Wakefern Food Corp., speaking at Nielsen CoNEXTions with Roeding, predicted that within a decade, some center store categories like health and beauty care will be sold exclusively online. Creating experiential destinations will be key, and many retailers are doing so, for HBC and other categories, to give people a reason to go to the store.

38

“Consumers buy more than just food, they buy what it delivers and represents,” remarks Andrew Mandzy, director of strategic insights for health and wellness growth and strategy at Schaumburg, Ill.-based Nielsen — exactly why retailers need to free themselves from the shackles of outdated category management practices and embrace the idea of shopper-centric solution management.

Shopper Solutions Planning In early 2015, Food Marketing Institute (FMI) asked Winston Weber & Associates Inc. (WWA), supported by Deloitte Consulting LLP, to study the future role of category management. The study included more than 70 retailers and manufacturers, insights from global experts, and the collective experience of FMI, WWA and Deloitte in addressing merchandising challenges in the food, drug and mass-merchandising sector. This led to the report “From Category Management to Shopper-Centric Retailing.” “The grocery industry is experiencing the most dynamic change in years, with expanding food lifestyles, digital connectedness, a solutions focus, Millennials and more,” says Win Weber, CEO of Tampa, Fla.-based WWA. “In this environment, category management has too many limitations to produce the desired results.” Weber notes that current category management processes focus narrowly on individual products or categories, rather than broader solutions. As a result, compartmentalization often creates barriers to optimizing complementary merchandising and creating solutions designed to enhance the shopping experience.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

Continued on page 42


This Snacking Moment Showcases Quality Ingredients & Better-For-You Attributes

• IN 2017, TRISCUIT WILL HELP DELIVER RELEVANT REAL FOOD SNACKS TO THE CRACKER AISLE. • Millennial consumers are focused on healthier foods with simpler ingredients.1 • They focus on foods that are minimally processed with simple and recognizable ingredients.2 • Non-GMO food sales growth is faster among millennial households.3

© Mondel ēz International group

Sources: 1. Nielsen US Ingredient Trend Report, January 2017; 2. Hartman Group, Millennial Trendsetters: Crafting Their Own Food Culture, April 2016; 3. Nielsen Homescan Panel 2013-2016


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Category Management

New Ideas

Continued from page 38

Shifts in the types of food that people are looking for and large changes in market importance of the younger generational cohorts have put pressure on traditional retailers to meet the changing needs of buying consumers. “ —John Persons, Tops Markets LLC

As such, Weber asserts that “retailers have no choice” but to move toward a shopper-centric model, “if they are to remain distinct and relevant in the marketplace.” By shifting the retailer-supplier collaborative focus to the shopper and shopping experience, he says, “the end result is improved sales and profits.” As defined by its authors, the shopper-centric approach is driven by consumer insights. Encompassing the whole store rather than individual categories, it shifts the focus to consumer needs, determining how best to group related goods together to deliver on these needs. The process is designed to be adaptable to changing trends and shifts in consumer demands. Implementing the approach requires the creation of a shopper solutions team structure administered by executive and store-level managers who collaborate closely with suppliers on how best to deliver on consumer needs. Among retailers adopting the shopperfocused model is Williamsville, N.Y.-based Tops Markets LLC. “Shifts in the types of food that people are looking for and large changes in market importance of the younger generational cohorts have

put pressure on traditional retailers to meet the changing needs of buying consumers,” says John Persons, Tops’ president and COO. “As a result, new competitors have have arisen, applying even more pressure. It’s a necessity for our industry to get to know its consumers in order to adapt.” In Tops’ movement toward the new model, “we started by aligning behind the simple notion that we wanted to have data drive our decisions,” Persons explains. “We have an incredibly robust database of customers and their shopping history that we hadn’t really tapped into.” Then Tops looked at its infrastructure and decided to pull together all of the analytical functions in the company under one umbrella. “Like most traditional retailers, all of our functional areas had their own analytics team: Marketing had consumer insights, merchandising had product data analysis, space planning and pricing weren’t linked in tightly, finance handled margin analysis, and so on,” Persons says. So the retailer created a “decision support” department that now services the entire organization. “It sounds easy, but the actual implementation took a year for the company to utilize the functions up to the potential,” Persons says. A key element of this new capability, he notes, is aligning consistent measurements: “For instance,

Shopper-Centric Retailing Vision—Srategy—Commitment Shopper Solutions Planning Infrastructure

Strategic Positioning

People

Organizational restructuring

Shopper Insights

Culture/ behavior

Descriptive job/ function titles

Solution Plan Implementation

Internal/External Assessment

Core merchandising processes Actionable shopper insights Repository of knowledge

Marketplace Assessment

Shopping Experience

Solution Goals and Strategy

Focus Shopper and Shopping Experience Source: Winston Weber & Associates Inc.

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

Business practices Cross-functional collaboration Required skills Performance appraisal


It’s no longer meaningful to simply look at lift of an item on promotion. Now we need to know household penetration, what demographic or generational cohorts engaged in the promotion, and what were the important affinity items. Our report cards look the same regardless of what we are measuring, and we now have a comprehensive view of our business.” With its merchants, Tops stripped away all administrative functions that would distract from their focus on their product categories. On the implementation side, Tops added key leadership positions that bridge the gap between merchandising and store operations. “They ensure seamless execution of the solution planning,” Persons explains. “Added to that, we created key promotionsplanning roles that now effectively pull together input from the merchants and develop key events.” Tops is also collaborating more closely with vendors. “In general, our goals are aligned and we now share data, insights and ideas at a higher level than in the past,” Persons says. “The manner in which Tops has set up our support structure will allow us to have a comprehensive view of our customers’ behavior as well as improve our alignment with our manufacturer partners,” he adds. “Both of these elements will improve our flexibility and responsiveness to consumers.”

CatMan 2.0 The Category Management Association (CMA) has been rolling out the overhaul of its quarter-centuryold guidelines to tap the reams of shopper insights that technological advancements have made easy to access. This new iteration, known as CatMan 2.0, has been covered at length by Progressive Grocer, most recently in its 2017 Category Management Handbook, available online at http://magazine.progressivegrocer. com/i/758946-2017-category-management-handbook. CatMan 2.0 and Shopper Solutions Planning are similar in that they’re insights-driven and break away from old product-focused processes to develop ways to fulfill consumer need states. The ideas have aspects that are complementary; retailers can employ tactics from each that best help meet their goals. Minneapolis-based CMA has been partnering with CPG companies to help them leverage CatMan 2.0 principles to develop customized solutions for their retailer partners. One of these partnerships has been with St. Louis-based brewer Anheuser-Busch. A-B’s latest initiative, in collaboration with CMA and Chicago-based market researcher IRI, has yielded a process to identify the best assortment for retailers, based on local consumer demands. “A-B and IRI have for the first time combined all the new external syndicated data with their internal proprietary data and breakthrough analytical models to develop this core assortment presentation,” says Gordon Wade, director of the CatMan

2.0 initiative for CMA. “It is gold standard.” According to Wade, A-B presented a prime opportunity to employ CatMan 2.0’s best-practice process, because the company possesses high-value data and internal analytical resources. “This A-B work is the finest work I have ever seen, especially in an incredibly complex category with hundreds of local craft beers, a growing import business and constrained cooler space, all of which varies by shopper and store clusters,” he says. “What the new IRI data and the new CatMan 2.0 process enable is remarkable. What’s really new here is the confluence of the process, remarkable data from IRI, and a well-led, determined and capable organization.” A-B’s Balanced Portfolio Approach, an overarching strategy to drive growth by leveraging all segments within the category, evolved into Your Balanced Portfolio Approach, which was the framework to identify the winning elements that topperforming retailers were deploying, explains Adam Byrne, the brewer’s VP of category leadership. “The core assortment study is essentially the way to apply the Balanced Portfolio Approach, and evolves even further to identify the items in the category with the highest rate of sale and unique demand,” Byrne says. “By deploying the core assortment principles, retailers can ensure they are maximizing their reach with assortment and satisfying a large portion of demand from shoppers.” The core assortment project encompasses many aspects of CatMan 2.0 to address “why” and “how” shoppers are purchasing beer in the store. “The inclusion of the behaviors, attitudes and perceptions of shoppers in the project helps ensure growth for the entire beer category,” Byrne notes. Working with CMA and IRI, A-B identified four unique store clusters with common shopper demand patterns: value, premium, import and craft. Leveraging shopper data and CatMan 2.0 guidelines, A-B helps its retailer customers optimize their beer assortments in every store by identifying their “must-have” core items available nationally. On this foundation, retailers add critical regionally relevant and purely local items that provide incremental sales and variety for an optimal assortment, store by store. This approach optimizes the retailer’s alignment between the beer category and store strategy, ultimately driving total beer category performance across the grocery channel. “As retailers are faced with expanding categories, it is important for them to understand the impact of expanding item counts within categories, and the impact on total category efficiency,” Byrne says. “By understanding the core assortment philosophy, retailers can better plan assortment by focusing on the items with the highest velocity and unique demand, while offering a balanced assortment to meet the varying needs of all their shoppers.” PG

By deploying the core assortment principles, retailers can ensure they are maximizing their reach with assortment and satisfying a large portion of demand from shoppers.” —Adam Byrne, Anheuser-Busch

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Seasonal Marketing & Merchandising

Feature

Game On Tailgating and other fall seasonal events inspire programs across the store. By Bridget Goldschmidt

W

ith the onset of autumn comes football season, as well as such fall celebrations as Halloween and Thanksgiving, with consumers looking ahead to the winter holidays. To capture sales this time of year, suppliers across the store are bringing their A game by updating their playbooks to include online components and cross-departmental merchandising. With recent research from Jacksonville, Fla.based Acosta showing that 42 percent of shoppers surveyed grill at home before watching a game on TV and 31 percent grill at tailgating events, it’s a no-brainer to feature grill-ready meat items during the season. (For one grocer’s distinctive approach to this, see the sidebar below.) “Tailgating centers on steaks and burgers,” affirms Christy Johnson, director of advertising and marketing strategy for the Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand, in Wooster, Ohio. “They only take minutes to prepare, so there’s more time to enjoy the big game. … For busier weeknights, retailers may also want to feature roast recipes for the slow cooker. They’re quick to prepare in the morning so that a delicious and nutritious dinner is ready when the family returns home.” The brand helps its retail partners incorporate easy tailgating and holiday recipes into videos, social media posts, advertising, newspaper circulars, customer emails and in-store signage, according to

Johnson. “With promotions built around recipes, retailers have more opportunities to bring meal components from produce, bakery and center store to the meat case, providing easy meal solutions for customers to pick up for dinner tonight,” she says. Despite CAB’s emphasis on tech-savvy programs, supermarkets and their employees still have a crucial role to play, stresses Johnson. “We have evolved our toolkits to be more digitally focused, but retailers will still need physical promotions in stores and traditional formats,” she observes. “Into the fall season, as comfort food and roasts regain popularity, it’s important

Cross-cultural Touchdown During fall tailgating season, Cardenas Markets LLC gives the occasion its own unique cultural spin. According to John Gomez, CEO of the Ontario, Calif.based grocer, many of whose customers are first-generation emigrants from Spanish-speaking countries: “Some of the special occasions and holidays celebrated during the fall are new traditions for our consumers, particularly the recent immigrants; so, it is incumbent upon us to educate consumers on these celebrations. We do so through an integrated approach. We leverage weekly ads to promote items relevant to the holiday, we work with key vendors to host instore demos and offer ideas for cooking and

BrinG The BurGers Certified Angus Beef provides easy recipes for consumers to use while tailgating.

entertaining, and we update our POS to reflect flavors of the season and inspire new creations.” Continues Gomez: “Tailgating and certain holidays are great opportunities for grilling; therefore; we focus our promotions on the carnicería (meat department), offering special discounts on thin-cut steaks like beef flap meat (ranchera), pork ribs, beef flanken ribs, beef tri tip, beef chuck steak, (diezmillo) or beef clod steak (espaldilla).” He goes on to explain: “Tailgating is strongly related to American football, a growing sport among Hispanics, and holidays such as Thanksgiving are celebrated with a Latino flair. Our role in that acculturation process is to provide them with new ideas for cooking, such as barbecuing with hot links and sausages, or experimenting with American-cut steaks such as New York, T-bone or even pork chops, in an effort to immerse our customers in American culture, without losing the flavors and dishes that are part of their heritage.”

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Feature

The combination of both online and in-store merchandising will continue to be a powerful duo.” —Emily Klotz, Hormel Foods

Seasonal Marketing & Merchandising

for meat staff to be prepared to answer customers’ questions and point them to helpful resources such as our Roast Perfect app. We are actively engaged in helping our retailers bring this personal level of service to customers through their meat teams.” “The seasonal promotions for Star Ranch Angus beef focus on Mealtime Matters, celebrating the special moments around the dinner table,” says Rick Janke, senior brand manager at Dakota Dunes, S.D.-based Tyson Fresh Meats. “Our fall promotion kicks off this September and features the American tradition of tailgating. Elements in the promotion include signage, coupons and recipes, and are intended to create awareness and loyalty to help drive incremental sales at the meat case.” Tyson also looks beyond the store in its promotions. “As more and more consumers are getting their information online, it’s essential to engage with our Star Ranch Angus beef shoppers digitally,” notes Janke. “We recently refreshed our consumer website, and we incorporate digital media advertising and contests into all of our promotions. It’s important to us that our retail partners have the marketing tools — both online and in-store —

needed to increase sales of Star Ranch Angus beef and improve their bottom line.”

Party on a Platter Of course, seasonal opportunities abound beyond the fresh meat department. “During the tailgating/ holiday time frame, we offer an in/out opportunity for our retailers with the Tailgate Tray,” consisting of pre-cut meat and cheese with crackers, notes Emily Klotz, party tray brand manager at Austin, Minn.based Hormel Foods. “With our key seasonality taking place during the holiday time frame, we see the greatest lift when our products are … featured by retailers,” says Klotz. “This type of promotion puts us top of


Feature

Cross-promotion with relevant food partners that enhances the tailgating occasion will become increasingly integrated with the overall brand and promotion proposition.” —Edith Llerena, Heineken USA

Seasonal Marketing & Merchandising

mind for consumers and helps them understand how they can use our product in their upcoming events.” She adds that Hormel also teams with retailers on “co-marketing opportunities such as coupons and retailer-specific apps to help drive trial. We have seen a lot of success with these types of promotions.”

Cohesive Experiences Meanwhile, in center store and the refrigerated section, Chicago-based Conagra is teeing up tailgating and other seasonal promotions and products for its various brands. “Hebrew National’s targeted seasonal merchandising and focused promotional activity extends [into] early fall, as we look to engage consumers [during] tailgating season,” notes Amanda Perry, brand director, as an example of some of the company’s activities in this regard. “We’re working with our customers on omnichannel shopper marketing programs that include seasonal merchandising. … We also execute crosspromotions with other Conagra brands.” Further, since many fans enjoy a cold one while

watching a game or tailgating, Dos Equis, a brand of White Plains, N.Y.-based Heineken USA, “is giving fans a chance to win a VIP experience at the National Championship game in Atlanta, as well as numerous other exciting football-themed and tailgating-appropriate prizes,” says Edith Llerena, shopper marketing manager for the imported Mexican beer. She adds that “the program provides cross-merchandising opportunities with Avocados from Mexico and On the Border chips and dips, a perfect fit with game-day tailgating.” Llerena believes that such team-ups will only deepen going forward, noting that “cross-promotion with relevant food partners that enhances the [tailgating] occasion will … become increasingly integrated with the overall brand and promotion proposition.” Another strategy that’s here to stay, according to Hormel’s Klotz, is “[t]he combination of both online and in-store merchandising, [which] will continue to be a powerful duo, allowing both vendors and retailers to incorporate integrated go-tomarket strategies that provide a cohesive experience for consumers.” PG SPONSORED CONTENT

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

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Nicer Slices Balancing consumers’ concerns about health and transparency, and their desires for indulgence and fun flavors, could help boost a mature category. By Bridget Goldschmidt

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ow has the supermarket bread aisle transformed over the past few years? Whole grains have taken root there, along with such storewide trends as cleaner labels and more natural/ organic, gluten-free and non-GMO selections. “Customers are still looking for clean ingredients,” affirms James Armendariz, category manager at Salt Lake Citybased Associated Food Stores (AFS), a retailer cooperative supplying about 500 independent supermarkets throughout Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado, Montana, Oregon, Nevada and Wyoming. “Simply put, the least amount of ingredients on the label support the identity of this. High-fructose corn syrup is out, and sugar is in. The more natural we can make our products, the more likely the consumers are to buy them. Whole grains are still important to consumers.” Further, according to Armendariz, “Our organics continue to grow [by] double digits every year across our company. Consumers have responded positively to our offerings. In the last year, we have come out with two new [bread] offerings, in Honey Chia and Hemp flavorings.” As for AFS’ glutenfree breads, he notes: “This is always one of the first things people compliment us on. Our GF products are second to none and well recognized throughout the country.” Well aware of consumers’ increased scrutiny of labels, suppliers are promoting their products accordingly. “All 58 varieties of Pepperidge Farm breads, buns and rolls are free from high-fructose corn syrup, and contain no colors or flavors from artificial sources,” asserts Betsy Morreale, senior marketing director, fresh and frozen bakery at Norwalk, Conn.-based Pepperidge Farm, a Campbell Soup Co. brand that’s now in its 80th year. Overall, Armendariz notes: “We have a very robust and expansive product line. It’s streamlined and simple from a brand perspective, but we offer a wide range of common and specialty items. Depending on the demographics of the store or area, we trend differently on select items.” AFS doesn’t just depend on a great product lineup, however. “We promote and merchandise items from each category on a weekly basis,” says Armendariz. “We rotate items every two weeks and run monthly promotions on some items. We look for opportunities to participate in buy-and-save vendor events, rewards programs, and grand openings. I think we lead the way in innovation via off-shelf displays. These can be

The more natural we can make our products, the more likely the consumers are to buy them.” —James Armendariz, Associated Food Stores

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

51


Grocery

We recently launched Oatmeal Swirl in the spring, based on insights that families are looking for a more satiating, wholesome option in the busy morning timeframe.” —Betsy Morreale, Pepperidge Farm

Bread

a real key to capturing incremental sales.” Such action is imperative in a category that’s been flat or on the decline for the past few years. Figures from Schaumburg, Ill.-based Nielsen show that baked bread sales dollars dipped 1.9 percent for the 52 weeks ended May 27, with the bread segment down 2.3 percent and the lunch bread subsegment down 3 percent for the same time period. At least some of this may be attributable to consumers’ shifting relationship with carbohydrates in general and bread in particular as they seek the best ways to integrate a time-honored staple item into their various modern diets.

Swirls and S’mores But while the types of products mentioned above may meet consumers’ demands for better nutrition and greater transparency, they don’t always appeal to shoppers’ desires for indulgence and out-of-the-ordinary flavors. “Commercial bread doesn’t seem to have the innovation of other key items within center store,” admits Armendariz. “This is changing and evolving within our company. We are constantly looking for the next items that will drive incremental sales with consumers. From the perspective of Millennials, this is paramount as well.” With that in mind, some brands are bringing out breads in inventive varieties. Earlier this year, for instance, Pepperidge Farm augmented its popular Swirl line with two Oatmeal SKUs: Apple

Fun With Buns Buns and rolls haven’t been performing too well of late, with Schaumburg, Ill.-based Nielsen posting a sales dollar decline of 0.6 percent for the 52 weeks ended May 27, and hamburger buns falling even more precipitously, at 2.6 percent. Still, companies have been promoting the perennial items with engaging seasonal programs. “Respect the Bun is an exciting new marketing campaign around Pepperidge Farm buns for the summer grilling season, searching for the best burger creations in the country,” says Betsy Morreale, senior marketing director, fresh and frozen bakery at Norwalk, Conn.-based Pepperidge Farm, a Campbell Soup Co. brand. “Consumers are asked to take a picture of their burger, proudly served on a Pepperidge Farm bun, then post it to Instagram or Twitter through Sept. 5. Weekly winners get $1,000, and the grand-prize winner gets $10,000.” Meanwhile, Martin’s Famous Potato Rolls and Bread has hit the road with beef purveyor Schweid & Sons, of Carlstadt, N.J., for The Very Best Burger Truck tour. From May through August, the tour is visiting key East Coast and Midwest markets, among them Washington, D.C.; Indianapolis; Buffalo, N.Y.; Pittsburgh; Atlanta; Detroit; Charlotte, N.C.; Syracuse,

52

& Cinnamon and Maple & Brown Sugar. Notes Morreale: “Though the commercial bread aisle is very crowded, Pepperidge Farm remains a mainstay due to our premium quality, relationship with consumers and continued innovation. We recently launched Oatmeal Swirl in the spring, based on insights that families are looking for a more satiating, wholesome option in the busy morning timeframe.” Upping the ante on a product’s uniqueness, Thomas’, a brand of Horsham, Pa.-based Bimbo Bakeries USA, periodically rolls out limited-edition varieties, encouraging consumers to get a taste of something special before it disappears from store shelves. One recent example is Thomas’ summerinspired Blueberry Pancake Swirl Bread, available through September in select regions of the country.

N.Y.; and Philadelphia. Appearing at such venues as food and music festivals and community events, as well as at retail locations, the truck offers consumers free burger samples, with each stop showcasing a unique tailored recipe. Fans can follow along through photos, videos and recipes on social media; the Schweid & Sons blog; and a food truck tour event tracker. “Our potato rolls are the No. 1 branded hamburger roll in America, and Schweid & Sons prides themselves [on] offering high-quality beef, so it makes perfect sense to work together with them on The Very Best Burger,” says Julie Martin, social media manager of Chambersburg, Pa.-based Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe and a thirdgeneration Martin family member. hOt POtatO Martin’s Famous Potato Rolls teamed with Schweid & Sons beef on a summer truck-tour promotion.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


Grocery

We lead the way in innovation via off-shelf displays. These can be a real key to capturing incremental sales.” —James Armendariz, Associated Food Stores

Bread

“Blueberry pancakes are a nostalgic favorite for consumers and represent two of the most quintessential, all-American flavors,” says Richard Link, senior director of marketing, breakfast team. “We set out to bring fans the ultimate breakfast experience by ‘swirling’ this classic breakfast into our Swirl Bread line — creating a new offering that’s perfect for summer and can be enjoyed as a delicious breakfast, afternoon snack or sweet ending to the day.” In another seasonal example, the brand has rolled out s’mores-flavored English muffins nationwide and mini bagels in select regions, in an effort to evoke the beloved camping-associated treat. “Enjoying s’mores around the fire on a summer night is a nostalgic memory treasured by

generations,” observes Jon Silvon, Bimbo Bakeries USA’s VP, consumer and portfolio strategy. “We’re continually innovating our Limited Edition lineup, and with the recent demand for all things s’mores, we knew pairing this iconic flavor with the iconic Nooks and Crannies English Muffin would be a tremendous hit with our fans.” As for what’s up and coming, don’t be surprised by a more eye-catching look for various bread brands. “I think packaging is starting to come to the forefront of this category,” says AFS’ Armendariz. “The profile of all products can be bought or sampled simply because of this. I don’t see it getting to the level of New Age beverages, but this trend will and has already begun to gain traction.” PG

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Breakfast foods move beyond a single daypart and compete with a host of other products in innovation and format. By Lynn Petrak

reakfast is on the move. These days, it’s an all-day way of eating, as people spoon cereal, toss a muffin into a backpack, pick up an egg-cheese-andveggie burrito or crank up the juicer at virtually any time. Industry insights back up the notion that as the clock has opened up for once-morningonly meals, the timing is right for new ways of developing and selling breakfast foods and beverages, both in packaged products and in supermarket-prepared meals. According to the NPD Group, based in Port Washington, N.Y., the consumption of breakfast and morning snacks at home and away

from home will grow 5 percent through 2019, outpacing the expected overall population growth of 4 percent. In its 2016 “What’s for Breakfast” report, Chicago-based research firm Mintel found that consumers were open to the idea of breakfast foods for lunch and dinner. Earlier this year, Forbes magazine listed “Breakfast, updated” as one of the top five food trends for 2017, a trend that encompasses all-day breakfast as well as different and trendy breakfast foods. Phil Lempert, author and speaker at SupermarketGuru. com, says that the expansion of breakfast stems from a variety of lifestyle shifts. “Not only have people changed the model of working from 9 to 5 and are now working all day, but breakfast foods — in particular, egg dishes — are easy and relatively inexpensive,” he points out. “That appeals to Millennials, who like to customize and like value.” August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Be Prepared The all-hours drive for convenience and concurrent clamor for choice are evident in the expansion of prepared breakfast foods in many traditional and specialty markets. Whether offering something as simple as a breakfast sandwich and coffee, setting up a hot-food bar with different egg-based dishes and build-your-own oatmeal, or adding more breakfast-menu items to a grocerant area, stores are recognizing and, in some cases, latching onto the success that many quickservice restaurants have had with breakfast foods. In its most recent data on this segment, The Nielsen Perishables Group reports that sales of deli prepared breakfast foods are up 12 percent in dollars and 5.5 percent in volume over the past

year; much of that growth, according to Schaumburg, Ill.-based Nielsen’s research, has been driven by items like breakfast sandwiches and quiches, both of which ticked up double digits in growth and volume.

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


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“Convenience is likely the most important attribute consumers want from their grocery store when it comes to breakfast products, especially if it will rival weekday on-the-go options,” observes Sarah Schmansky, director at Chicago-based Nielsen Fresh. “However, variety in the assortment, including a little bit of indulgence for weekend breakfast occasions, while having healthful options for during the week, is also important.” To be sure, many supermarkets tout breakfast offerings in their in-store cafés, hot-food bars and grocerants. Roche Bros. stores, in the Boston area, offer breakfast foods like egg dishes, in addition to lunch and dinner items. Many Whole Foods Market locations set out breakfast dishes with a natural, organic or better-for-you twist. The breakfast menu at a Lunds & Byerlys store in Roseville, Minn., offers diner-like items with an upscale flair, such as Irish oat pancakes and a Smokehouse Scramble consisting of eggs, hash browns, sautéed onions, mushrooms and wild-rice sausage with hollandaise sauce, along with beverages like a morning mimosa. That store also has a special senior menu with smaller portions and prices. According to Lempert, having ready-to-eat breakfast foods in grocerants or other parts of the store is a way to maximize sales and kick off a profitable day. “I think grocerants need to look at expanding beyond having Starbucks and Caribou Coffee, and really promoting breakfast in those areas,” he advises. Bill Bishop, chief architect at consulting firm Brick Meets Click, in Barrington, Ill., says that there’s a host of merchandising opportunities for prepared breakfast foods at supermarkets, including items that can be eaten beyond the morning hours. “You have to think about what physical changes you can make in the store to be prepared to make the breakfast experience top of mind,” he observes. “If you’re going to major in breakfast, it can be 7 to 10 a.m., but how do you pull back from that for people who come in the store later in the day? I think that we’ll see more flexibility in the dayparts, and everyone who sells food for

60

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


an eating occasion needs to update the way they do that.” Looking at different days of the week, as well as different dayparts, is another approach. “We have seen some retailers get creative on the weekend by leveraging their hot-bar areas to promote breakfast offerings for those that don’t necessarily want to make a big breakfast in-home,” notes Schmansky. “This is seen mainly on holiday weekends.” On another note, Bishop says that supermarkets can borrow a page from convenience stores. “When you look at who has been successful with breakfast, c-stores have done a great job with a combination of things, including easy access to quick coffee and something that’s edible in the car without messing

yourself up too much,” he remarks. One example is Pittsburgh-based Giant Eagle’s GetGo stores, which allow consumers to fuel up in more ways than one. In addition to packaged snacks and fuel, GetGo cafés sell fresh made-to-order breakfast-menu items like breakfast subs and burritos, breakfast sandwiches, flatbreads, and oatmeal topped with dried fruit, nuts and brown sugar, all of which are customizable.


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To Your Health As many grocers explore and add prepared breakfast foods, supermarkets are also seeking to ramp up sales of breakfast foods in traditional spots like the in-store bakery and center store. To generate excitement in a competitive market, more innovative and on-trend products are showing up in these areas of the store. Bagels, muffins and doughnuts remain breakfast food staples in the instore bakery, for example, but increasingly, shoppers are looking for baked goods that meet their lifestyle and taste demands. In its “What’s In Store 2017” report, the Madison, Wis.-based International Dairy-DeliBakery Association (IDDBA) reports top trends such as the ongoing growth of organic products and clean labeling, along with more “free-from” claims and “flexitarian” options. The report also points to trending bakery ingredients like functional flour and sprouted grains. Indeed, better-for-you options are on point right now for a variety of breakfast foods. The fact that many traditional breakfast foods are high in protein bodes well for these types of products. “The thing about eggs and some meat is the high level of protein, as consumers recognize that protein is important,” affirms Lempert. To Lempert’s point, several brands have expanded or launched products with protein-rich ingredients. Sweet Earth Natural Foods, based in Moss Landing, Calif., offers a Protein Lover breakfast burrito with 20 grams of protein, as well as a Get Cultured breakfast burrito with probiotics, protein and fiber. The clamor for high-protein foods and natural ingredients likewise was a driver behind El Monterey’s Simply Egg, Turkey Sausage and Cheese breakfast burritos, according to Rachel P. Cullen,


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president of Ruiz Food Products Inc., in Dinuba, Calif. “They are made with real scrambled eggs and fresh-baked whole grain tortillas, and offer high protein and real ingredients delivering great taste and convenience,” she says. The push for healthier eating has also affected the cereal category. “If you look at the smaller cereal companies who are doing well, it’s because they are focused on nutrients people are looking for in breakfast,” notes Lempert. “For the last 50 years, mainstream cereal hasn’t evolved — 50 years ago, they saw it as entertainment, not nutrition.” There has been movement in the cereal category among major brands. Minneapolisbased General Mills recently added Cinnamon Toast Crunch varieties with no artificial flavors, colors from artificial sources, or high-fructose corn syrup. For its part, Battle Creek, Mich.-

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based Kellogg Co. recently debuted Special K Nourish Dark Chocolate Coconut Granola, which is a good source of fiber. Beyond the big companies, brands newer to the cereal industry are shaking things up with betterfor-you options. Back to the Roots, an Oakland, Calif.-based organic food startup, offers cereal in a

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The Quest for Clean HOW SHOPPER DEMANDS ARE CHANGING DAIRY

A

s shoppers increasingly demand clean, simple and healthful beverages, the appeal of milk has never been stronger. From millennial parents to empty nesters, grocery shoppers increasingly are on the hunt for “clean” foods and beverages. In fact, “Clean Supreme” ranks as the No. 1 food product trend for 2017, according to Innova Market Insights.1 This demand for clean that now crosses every category is especially present in dairy. A growing number of milk shoppers are opting for products that use sustainable farming practices, all-natural ingredients and pure processing. And because many of these clean-minded shoppers are willing to pay extra for products that meet their high standards, the quest for clean represents an opportunity to reinvigorate dairy and ramp up profits. As consumers continue to put their trust—and dollars— toward products that deliver sustainability, safety and quality, it’s even more important for retailers to invest in dairy offerings that meet those demands. SPONSORED CONTENT

Clean hits the mainstream “Clean” foods and beverages—items produced to safe, sustainable standards from farm to table—were still fairly fringe until recently, primarily the province of specialty stores and hyper health-conscious consumers. Today, however, clean consumption is undeniably mainstream, and a significant growth driver for grocery. In the past decade, all kinds of shoppers have begun

Top concerns of food shoppers Millennials

Generation X

Baby boomers

Amount of sugar

On sale

Amount of sugar

All natural

All natural

Sodium levels

Amount of protein

Amount of sugar

Trans fats

Sodium levels

Hormone free

Free from preservatives

Trans fats

Contains artificial sweeteners High fructose corn syrup

Source: C+R Research, 2016

DEAN FOODS

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Shopper attitudes about clean labeling

73%

68%

64%

loudly demanding pared-down labels, pure ingredients, and transparency across every step of the supply chain.2 In fact, millennial shoppers are proving to be some of the most conscientious ever to hit the grocery store. One in 3—more than any other age group—say they are “extremely” or “very” concerned about safety in the U.S. food supply.3 They’re most likely to consider clean eating a lifestyle versus a diet, and are significantly more likely to pay a premium for clean products, including dairy. 4 The fact that the incoming generation of shoppers feels so strongly about clean eating—a commitment sure to deepen as they age into parenthood—also suggests that this is a long-term shift in lifestyle, values and expectations.

Delivering a clean product lineup Feel positively about companies that are transparent about their product sourcing

Are willing to pay more for foods and beverages that don’t contain undesirable ingredients

Follow a diet that prohibits certain ingredients

Source: Nielsen, “Global Ingredient and Dining-Out Trends Report,” 2016

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DEAN FOODS

Research shows that consumers feel more positive about brands that deliver clean claims (see sidebar on page 4). Retailers can get in on the goodwill—not to mention the sales gains—by stocking trusted brands with clean credentials. Shoppers are looking for a range of healthy, sustainable choices in the dairy aisle, with purchase criteria ranging from animal welfare to specific ingredients or even packaging materials. All that underscores the importance of

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stocking a variety of organic, plant-based and free-from items alongside traditional dairy offerings. Retailers need to offer a range of product claims, and price points, to deliver the value that different shoppers may seek. Dean Foods’ TruMoo chocolate milk has become the nation’s leading refrigerated flavored milk5 in just a few short years, coupling a great-tasting, high quality product with clean label claims that meet today’s consumers’ demands. “We know that consumers are looking for real food with real ingredients,” says Wendy Poer, director of marketing for TruMoo. “We recently reformulated TruMoo with ‘No GMO Ingredients.’ This new claim joins our other ‘NO’ claims: no high fructose corn syrup, no artificial growth hormones, no artificial sweeteners, colors or flavors. We want to make sure that our ‘No’s’ translate to the consumer’s ‘Yes!’”

Fuel growth through transparency Now is the optimum time for retailers to get ahead of the curve. The number of clean claims across food and beverage is growing at over 70 percent annually, and brands that meet shoppers’ clean demands are thriving. In the past five years, products displaying clean labels saw a 5.6 percent boost in dollar sales and accounted for 30 percent of share in total food and beverage sales.6

evidence of those clean credentials. Currently, there are no official definitions for the terms “clean” and “natural,” and as a result many consumers say they do not fully understand what, if anything, those claims actually mean. A 2016 Consumer Reports study found that nearly half of respondents held incorrect beliefs related to both definitions and regulations around the term “natural.”7 Similarly, nearly half (45 percent) of U.S. respondents in a 2016 global survey from Canadean expressed confusion regarding the meaning of “clean.”8 To truly succeed on the quest for clean, brands and retailers need to commit to specific, tangible steps toward greening up their offerings—and then transparently communicate those efforts to their customers.

Shoppers who say these attributes would entice them to pay more:

36% 23% 18% 17%

If today’s grocery shopper views these product attributes as “nice to have,” the shopper of tomorrow will consider them table stakes. But as consumer demand for clean products grows, so too will expectations for clear-cut

Locally grown or made

Transparent/ honest about ingredients, sourcing, etc.

Responsibly sourced

Non-GMO

14%

Certified organic

Source: Kantar Retail ShopperScape, April 2016

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DEAN FOODS

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CASE STUDY: DairyPure® When Dean Foods consolidated a number of its regional brands under one national brand umbrella, it saw an opportunity to raise consumer awareness of its high quality standards across its production network to generate brand loyalty and drive consumer demand. The DairyPure® brand developed around its exclusive Five Point Purity Promise®, which starts on the farm with cows that are fed a healthy diet and are never treated with artificial growth hormones, continues to production where all milk is tested for antibiotics and is continually quality tested throughout processing, and finishes with shipment and delivery via Dean Foods’ expansive refrigerated distribution network. The Five Point Purity Promise guarantees that all Dean Foods milk is always delivered fresh from a local dairy. Dean Foods introduced DairyPure milk with its Five Point Purity Promise in May 2015, and it quickly began to eclipse its competitors. Within the first year, the brand saw $1.2 billion in multi-outlet retail sales (a 12 percent share) and $386 million in convenience sales (a 34 percent share).9 Today, 42 percent of U.S. households put DairyPure milk in the fridge. In addition to its commitment to quality and the Five Point Purity Promise, as the DairyPure brand extended beyond milk to multi-ingredient dairy products, focus was brought to bear on product formulations and

clean labeling. Clean labeling, in fact, has been an important differentiating strategy that has helped boost margins for retailers. DairyPure’s success demonstrates that shoppers will pay for high quality dairy products that can also provide the clean attributes they prize. The peace of mind that shoppers enjoy by serving their families clean dairy products can lend a halo effect to the entire store, boosting trust and loyalty—as well as overall store profits.

Innova Market Insights: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clean-supreme-leads-top-trends-for-2017-601079836.html Innova Market Insights: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clean-supreme-leads-top-trends-for-2017-601079836.html The NPD Group/Food Safety Monitor, October 2016 4 Kantar Retail ShopperScape, April 2016 5 IRI, total U.S. multi-outlet + convenience, flavored milk category, YTD data ending July 9, 2017 6 Nielsen Product Insider, 2017 7 Consumer Reports: http://www.consumerreports.org/food-safety/peeling-back-the-natural-food-label/ 8 Food Business News: http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Consumer_Trends/2016/02/Consumers_not_clear_on_clean_l.aspx?ID=%7B7B7BE175-2049-4403-B1D9-A1CB8F76CFBB%7D 9 IRI data 1

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Content of this article provided by Dean Foods Company. Dean Foods is a leading food and beverage company and the largest processor and direct-to-store distributor of fresh fluid milk and other dairy and dairy case products in the United States. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, the Dean Foods portfolio includes DairyPure®, TruMoo®, and well-known regional dairy brands. Dean Foods also makes and distributes ice cream, cultured products, juices, teas and bottled water.

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DEAN FOODS

Contact: Dean Foods 2711 North Haskell Ave., Suite 3400 Dallas, TX 75204 (214) 303-3400 www.deanfoods.com SPONSORED CONTENT


package that evokes a milk carton; among its offerings is an Organic Purple Corn Flakes cereal made with 100 percent organic, non-GMO purple corn from Minnesota, organic cane sugar from Florida and sea salt from the San Francisco Bay. In addition to cereal, other recent product launches support the idea that better-for-you breakfast foods are in shoppers’ sights across a variety of product types. Ozery Bakery, based in Vaughan, Ontario, offers Morning Rounds, toastable fruit-and-grain breakfast breads that are non-GMO, lower in sodium, vegan, and fat-, nut- and dairy-free. “We looked at the bagel, English muffin and crumpet category, and didn’t see a lot of innovation there. These Morning Rounds are portable and convenient, and you can have them toasted with butter, cream cheese or nut butter, or just as is, because they are infused with fruit,” explains Paul Vlahos, VP of sales, adding that a 70-calorie version was recently added to the line. Later this year, Ozery aims to shake up the market again with a vegan brioche. Even basic American flapjacks are getting a healthy makeover. Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods, based in Milwaukie, Ore., recently added protein pancake and waffle mix and Paleo pancake and waffle mix, both of which are high in protein. Fur-

ther, Pamela’s Products, in Ukiah, Calif., has come out with five sprouted-grain pancake mixes. In addition to smaller and boutique brands, established brands are switching things up when it comes to better-for-you profiles. Chicago-based Conagra Brands is introducing a line of Marie Callender’s loaf cakes, made with no artificial flavors or preservatives. “Consumers have told us that what they really want is an easy, convenient solution for baked goods that taste just like homemade and are made with the same basic ingredients that they can find in their own pantry,” says Casey Richards, brand director.

Grocerants need to look at expanding New and Notable The changing nature of morning meal consumption beyond having — increasingly on the go or packed to go — has led Starbucks and to new product development and competition from Caribou Coffee, other types of food products. An early 2017 report and really from London-based Euromonitor, with U.S. offices promoting in Chicago, noted that busy consumers are eschew- breakfast in ing sit-down breakfasts for portable snacks such as those areas.” snack/nutrition bars, muesli and Greek yogurt. Meanwhile, globally inspired ingredients are lending fresh flavors to breakfast fare. In its latest report on breakfast trends, the Chicago-based American Egg Board highlighted the influence of Asian flavors on breakfast items, noting that Millennials and Generation Z consumers enjoy Asian products like sriracha, fermented foods and chili sauces that work well with classic breakfast comfort foods. “Many common breakfast foods — like eggs — offer a mild flavor base to layer on the salty, tangy and spicy flavors of Asian cuisine,” remarks John Howeth, the board’s SVP, foodservice and egg product marketing.

—Phil Lempert, SupermarketGuru.com

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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The main way to ensure customers think about the grocery store for breakfast options is to make sure you have the product when the consumer is in the store, so they know you are a destination.”

Several brands that offer breakfast-style products are going international with new items. Earlier this summer, Minneapolis-based General Mills rolled out Oui French-style yogurt under the Yoplait brand, inspired by Yoplait’s French product line. The item is sold in a glass container, in which the yogurt was cultured in a “pot set” approach. Bolder flavors — which may or may not be ethnic in origin — are also a hallmark of many new breakfast products. The Eckrich brand, from Virginia-based Smithfield, for example, spotlights

—Sarah Schmansky, Nielsen Fresh

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bolder flavors in its American Regionals Line, with items like serrano brown-sugar ham and honey bourbon ham. Finally, bringing it full-day circle, there’s no time like the present to promote the next day’s breakfast. “The main way to ensure customers think about the grocery store for breakfast options is to make sure you have the product when the consumer is in the store, so they know you are a destination, whether it’s for an individual breakfast or office/family gettogether,” advises Schmansky. She continues: “Have breakfast options available during the early-evening rush hours for the next day, like doughnuts, bagels or yogurt parfaits, so consumers don’t have to stop on their way in to work, and ensure a large bakery breakfast display bright and early during the weekend.” PG

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Eggs

Refrigerated & Frozen Foods

Good

Eggs Producers, brands get cracking on innovations that appeal to consumers. By Lynn Petrak

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or a food that doesn’t stand upright, the egg doesn’t seem to need much help staying on top these days. Per capita consumption of eggs is expected to hit 274.6 in 2017, up from 267.4 in 2016 and 252.9 in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Once associated with breakfast and as an ingredient in various hot dishes and baked goods, eggs are being consumed in more ways and on more days. “What we are finding is consumption across all ages is up, and not just at breakfast, but at lunch and dinner,” notes Ashley Richardson, senior director of marketing and communications for the Chicago-based American Egg Board (AEB). Despite seasonal volatility in egg prices, the simple fresh egg — once by and large a foamcontainer commodity at retail — is more diverse and innovative in form, packaging, merchandising and applications. “The trends in the market are reflected in the mix of products at retail,” says Kristin Herzog, chief marketing officer for San Francisco-based Happy Egg Co. USA, noting the cage-free, pasture-raised, caged, liquid eggs, hard-cooked eggs and egg replacements that are part of the current market.

For Goodness’ Sake The uptick in egg consumption and accompanying product diversity can be attributed to a variety of factors in the marketplace, particularly burgeoning interest among consumers in foods deemed wholesome and healthy. Those broad descriptors cover a lot of attributes that apply to egg products sold in supermarkets. Consumer demand for the humane treatment of hens is one major influencer in the current egg marketplace. In recent years, hundreds of grocers and manufacturers have switched to or expanded cage-free egg offerings or production, according to the USDA, with an optimal time-

table of 2020-25 for conversion. Despite the fact that cage-free hens are currently producing about 10 percent of the total egg supply, and that cage-free eggs require considerable investments by farmers and producers to be passed on as a higher price point for consumers, sales of cage-free eggs are continuing to climb, while other product-related claims, like pasture-raised and free-range, are also emerging and expanding. Earlier this year, Boise, Idaho-based Alberstons Cos. revealed the expansion of its commitment to carry only cage-free eggs by 2025 to include liquid eggs. “Broadening our cage-free commitment will keep the conversation going and, hopefully, continue the industry’s work in humane sourcing and corporate social responsibility,” remarked Shane Sampson, chief marketing and merchandising officer, at the time of the announcement. Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, a Chicago-area-based specialty retailer that focuses on healthy and organic products, pledges to sell 100 percent cage-free eggs by 2022. “My customers are buying more cage-free eggs than ever before. They are ‘voting’ for cage-free with their purchasing power,” notes Simon Cutts, director of grocery, adding that the company recently updated its own brand packaging to call out cage-free eggs.

There is also a protein story to tell with eggs. Eggs are allnatural, highquality protein.” —Ashley Richardson, American Egg Board

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Refrigerated & Frozen Foods

In addition to the allergy/ sensitivity community, we have seen considerable growth in the number of vegans and plant-based consumers, which has reflected positively in the demand for more options and improved alternatives.” —Katherine Franklin, Follow Your Heart

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Eggs

For their part, many egg companies are zeroing in on consumers’ interest in, and knowledge of, humanely produced eggs. NestFresh, a Denver-based producer of sustainable, local, humane and natural eggs, recently launched a line of pasture-raised eggs, including organic, nonGMO and soy-free offerings, which has earned Certified Humane Verification from Herndon, Va.-based Humane Farm Animal Care. From her perspective of working with a brand specializing in free-range eggs, Happy Egg’s Herzog sees a parallel track in demand and education. “Alongside interest in humanely raised eggs, there is more interest in understanding certifications and claims in egg packaging,” she says, adding that consumers seem to link humane treatment and taste. “There are differences in how eggs are laid, but there is also a flavor and quality difference in humanely raised eggs.” In addition to production-related concerns about wholesomeness, the current market for eggs consumed at breakfast and, increasingly, at other times of the day, is shaped by interest in foods that are naturally high in protein. According to the Washington, D.C.-based International Food Information Council Foundation (IFIC), more than two-thirds (64 percent) of consumers say that they’re trying to consume more protein, compared with 54 percent in 2015. “Eggs are already a household staple — Nielsen data shows household penetration is at 94 percent — but there is also a protein story to tell with eggs,” asserts AEB’s Richardson. “Eggs are allnatural, high-quality protein.” In contrast to dietary concerns about eggs in the 1980s and into the ‘90s, today’s consumers recognize their benefits. “Eggs, along with dairy and meat items in the refrigerated case, are well

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

positioned to capitalize on these trends,” says Brandy Gamoning, marketing manager at NestFresh “Featuring a single ingredient or a short list of whole-food ingredients, these items are seen as inherently natural and an easy step to cleaning up and simplifying diets while providing protein.” Beyond protein, eggs are rich in other nutrients — some more than others. Eggland’s Best brand claims that its eggs provide 10 times more vitamin E, more than double the amount of vitamin B12, six times more vitamin D, double the omega-3 and more lutein, among other nutrients. “The extra nutrients in our eggs come from special feed given to our hens,” explains Dave Holdsworth, VP, marketing at the Malvern, Pa.-based company, citing the hens’ all-vegetarian diet comprising healthy grains, canola oil, and a special supplement of rice bran, alfalfa, sea kelp and vitamin A. Health-and-wellness concerns are spurring innovation in various types of egg replacements and alternatives as well. “In addition to the allergy/sensitivity community, we have seen considerable growth in the number of vegans and plant-based consumers, which has reflected positively in the demand for more options and improved alternatives,” says Katherine Franklin, director of marketing for Canoga Park, Calif.-based Follow Your Heart, which offers a pourable liquid egg replacement called VeganEgg. Meanwhile, given people’s penchant for all-day snacking, the ready-to-eat hard-cooked egg segment is worth watching within the overall egg category. “Although only hard-boiled eggs are overall still a small portion of the market, we are starting to see large growth,” says Richardson. “We’re encouraged by that, especially with consumers who want what they want when they want it.” “Further changing the way consumers eat, snacking has overtaken meals altogether,” agrees Gamoning, adding that NestFresh now offers a variety of hard-cooked eggs, including organic and cage-free SKUs. At Eggland’s Best, Holdsworth also points to the spike in demand for convenience foods, which has fueled interest in the company’s hard-cooked and peeled-egg products. Eggland’s Best introduced organic hardcooked peeled eggs earlier this year. PG


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Fresh Food

Fall Produce Preview

Harvesting

Opportunity This autumn, purveyors of produce look in-store and online to promote the season’s riches. By Jennifer Strailey

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s the bountiful fall produce and busy back-to-school season approaches, grocers and suppliers are gearing up to increase sales both online and in store. Last month, Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart Stores Inc. announced the expansion of backto-school essentials available through its Online Grocery Pickup and Pickup Today services. The mega-retailer also introduced Back-to-School Helpers, employees dedicated to saving customers time while they shop in store. Walmart’s website features a School Essentials tab from which users can shop a variety of categories, from lunch bags to calculators to snacks. Healthful produce-based snacks, including Wonderful Pistachios, SunMaid Raisins, Sunkist Fruit Chips and Blue Diamond Almonds, are all just a click away. The company increased its backto-school staples available for Online Grocery Pickup by 150 percent year-over-year, allowing customers to stock up on lunchbox favorites at

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

the same time that they shop for school supplies, and have them all delivered to their cars. It also doubled the number of items available for sameday pickup.Walmart currently has more than 800 Online Grocery Pickup locations across the country. Earlier this year, CNBC cited a report from Citi Research indicating that Walmart was “‘best positioned’ among the major food retailers to capitalize


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Fresh Food

Nearly half of our consumers enjoy pistachios during sports.” —Adam Cooper, The Wonderful Co.

Fall Produce Preview

on the next phase of growth in online grocery and take on Amazon.” The report, released prior to Amazon’s bid to purchase Whole Foods Market, ranked the Austin, Texas-based natural grocer at the bottom of the list. Citi Research considered profitability, brick-and-mortar pricing, online pricing, exposure to Seattlebased Amazon and early-adopter advantage in its analysis. Consumer spend on online grocery shopping could reach $100 billion by 2025, according to the initial findings of the “Digitally Engaged Food Shopper” study from Food Marketing Institute and Nielsen, released earlier this year. The study further found that “within the next decade, online food shopping will reach maturation in the U.S., far faster than other industries that have come online before.”

Sporty Sales With an eye to this burgeoning market and an understanding of how consumers — particularly

Millennials — shop today, The Wonderful Co., in Los Angeles, has heightened its investment in digital marketing. This fall, Wonderful Pistachios is making its largest digital investment ever, in tandem with in-store sports-inspired point-of-sale materials, and television spots during NFL games on Sunday and Monday. Healthful snacking with personality is a core theme of the campaign. “Nearly half of our consumers enjoy pistachios during sports,” notes Adam Cooper, VP, marketing

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Fresh Food

SAlAD DAyS Giumarra’s Persimmon and Burata Salad is one of a range of recipes offered by the produce marketing company.

Fall Produce Preview

for The Wonderful Co. The $55 million Wonderful Pistachios marketing campaign also boasts a new billboard in New York’s Times Square. With additional funding from Wonderful Halos and POM Wonderful, all three brands appear together in the billboard campaign for the first time. “We’re starting to see real success,” says Cooper of the company’s digital presence and online sales. He reports that online sales of Wonderful Pistachios are up 35 percent this year, and biggerpack ships are particularly strong sellers. Building on the success of last year’s footballfocused campaign, which included online videos of the Seattle Seahawks’ Richard Sherman and in-store display units featuring lifesize cutouts of the star athlete, this year’s campaign will also feature Clay Matthews, of the Green Bay Packers. New videos of Sherman touting Wonderful Pistachios as the healthful snack for game day are also on tap. The campaign runs from Sept. 10 through football season.

Savoring Mushrooms Foraging for fall flavors will invariably lead healthconscious consumers to the satisfyingly meaty taste and texture of mushrooms. “The Blend initiative is keeping mushrooms top of mind at restaurants and in supermarkets,” says Mike O’Brien, VP of sales and marketing for Monterey Mushrooms, in Watsonville, Calif. “This effort communicates how blending fresh mushrooms with ground meat — beef, pork or poultry — can enhance flavor, and substantially reduce fat, sodium and calories, in favorite recipes.” In addition to The Blend, promoting the health benefits of mushrooms, especially vitamin D, is a key marketing initiative for Monterey Mushrooms this fall and beyond. “Mushrooms are the only produce item with natural vitamin D, which is important for strong bones and essential to healthy immune systems,” asserts O’Brien. What’s trending in mushrooms? “The conversion from white button mushrooms to brown mushrooms continues,” he observes. “In fact, total mushroom category dollar sales

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A Digital Feast “Digital is a great channel for video, because a consumer shopping from the comfort of his or her home is likely to be more relaxed and captive than someone in a hurry at the store,” affirms Megan Schulz, director of communications for Los Angeles-based Giumarra Cos. From recipes to product information to grower stories, opportunities for greater depth in digital versus in-store marketing abound. This fall, Guimarra will dramatically increase its volume of persimmons. The produce marketing company is working with a new California grower of the fruit. “Persimmons are an excellent source of vitamin A and dietary fiber, and can be used to complement a variety of sweet and savory dishes,” Schulz ex-

growth is being driven by brown mushrooms.” Leading this trend are cremini mushrooms, which are actually young portabella mushrooms that are often referred to as “baby bellas.” “They look much like white button mushrooms; however, they are darker in color and have a stronger taste,” explains O’Brien. “They are very popular.” MuShrooMinG Growth Brown mushrooms are driving category sales increases.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


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Fresh Food

Digital is a great channel for video, because a consumer shopping from the comfort of his or her home is likely to be more relaxed and captive than someone in a hurry at the store.” —megan Schulz, Guimarra Cos.

Fall Produce Preview

plains. Guimarra has created several persimmon recipes that can be highlighted in store or online to generate excitement about the category. “Without a doubt, Millennials are connected to social media,” asserts Jacob Shafer, senior marketing and communications specialist for Mann Packing Co., in appLe empire Salinas, Calif. “More importantly, they New York apple are using it as their primary source to find growers are focused and hear about products, special deals and on flavor. shopping news/trends.” Mann’s recently launched a redesigned website with a new recipe format and product locator. The company has found that recipe dent and CEO Cynthia Haskins. “Consumers searches drive consumers to its site. It plans to reguare excited about apples again!” larly update the site with new recipes and more. Flavorful new varieties and old favorites alike are contributing to the resurgence. “New York state and Cornell University lead the industry in new variety Local Flavors innovation,” says Haskins. Cornell has introduced The New York Apple Association (NYAA), in Vicsuch new varieties as RubyFrost and SnapDragon, tor, N.Y., is encouraging retailers to focus on flavor both of which can be grown only in New York state. and buying local this fall. As local remains the hottest trend in food, New “This is a very exciting time to be involved York apple growers hope that area grocers will capiin the apple industry, as the category is undertalize on the fruit’s homegrown appeal. going a renaissance,” enthuses NYAA Presi-

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Fresh Food

We see tremendous opportunity for avocados across all channels, including ecommerce.” —Alejandro Gavito, Hass Avocado Board

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Fall Produce Preview

“New York state has the market advantage of being in the backyard of New York City, the largest consumer market in the country, and within a day’s drive of every major market on the East Coast,” notes Haskins. Grocers seeking to increase sales of New York-grown apples can turn to the NYAA and its custom marketing programs that are designed to meet the needs of individual retailers. “Our toolbox includes both ‘hightouch’ and ‘high-tech’ support, from demos to point-of-sale promotions to print advertising and digital coupons,” adds Haskins. While she says that building harvest displays with fresh apples and apple cider is a great way to highlight the flavors of fall, the NYAA has developed a host of merchandising and promotional ideas for grocers that are available through its YouTube channel, NewYorkApples1. “Looking beyond the fall, we would love to see the market keeping a spotlight on New York state apples for as long as we’ve got fruit in the marketplace,” urges Haskins. While New York growers and packers can typically supply fruit for three seasons, most grocers focus on apples in the fall.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

Fall Forward The avocado category is also ripe with opportunity this fall and beyond. Grocers that build on the momentum of peak-season sales can help drive purchases through the end of the year. According to the Hass Avocado Board’s (HAB) “Shopper Segmentation Study: Using Shopper Insights to Drive Retail Sales of Hass Avocados,” household avocado purchases are highest in Q3 and dip to a quarterly low in Q4.


Fresh Food

The product stands out on shelf, offers exceptional versatility, and can be served on its own or incorporated into dishes like salads, smoothies or other meals.” Jacob Shafer, Mann Packing Co.

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Fall Produce Preview

What’s more, 3 percent of “super heavy” user households and 7 percent of “heavy” user households drop out of the avocado category altogether in Q4. “Finding ways to keep these influential shoppers interested in avocados during Q4 has huge potential,” says Alejandro Gavito, HAB category data and research manager. Strategic marketing that leverages the seasonality and quality of the fruit is key in store. Taking a dual in-store and online approach also shows promise. Another recently released study from Mission Viejo, Calif.-based HAB, “Avocado Category Channel Overview,” reveals that despite competition from emerging channels, 73 percent of all avocado purchases (in dollars) were still made in traditional brick-and-mortar grocery stores in 2016. The study also found, however, that many households are shopping for avocados in more than one channel. “Avocados play a very prominent and important role in fresh produce departments,” asserts Gavito, “and, with the growing popularity of fresh avocados in the U.S., avocados are becoming available in an increasing number of retail outlets and formats. We see tremendous opportunity for avocados across all channels, including ecommerce.”

| Progressive Grocer AheadAd.indd of What’s PSF Prog Groc - SWEETIE COUNTRY 1/2 pg|horizontal 1

Next | August 2017

Colorful and Convenient Organics Mann’s recently expanded its organic line with the addition of Organic Green Beans, Organic Cauliflower Florets and Organic Super Blend, featuring kale, colored carrots, green cabbage and broccoli. “The product stands out on shelf, offers exceptional versatility, and can be served on its own or

7/13/17 10:11 PM


Fresh Food

Organic is definitely where the growth is.” —Alex Jackson Berkley, Frieda’s

Fall Produce Preview

incorporated into dishes like salads, smoothies or other meals,” notes Shafer. To capture the shopper’s attention in store, Shafer recommends creating “destination categories” to help consumers find innovative products. The specialty produce experts at Frieda’s Inc., in Los Alamitos, Calif., predict that purple and organic will reign supreme in produce departments this fall. “Our focus this fall is on Stokes Purple Sweet Potatoes, both organic and traditional,” says

Frieda’s Alex Jackson Berkley, adding, “Organic is definitely where the growth is.” Frieda’s exclusive Stokes grower is planting about 10 percent more organic Stokes Purple Sweet Potatoes (in pounds) each year. The company expects the growth in organic to continue. The well-touted health benefits of purple produce in general, and Stokes Sweet Potatoes specifically, are helping to drive sales. An excellent source of vitamin C and rich in anthocyanins, Stokes Purple Sweet Potatoes also have a low glycemic index when boiled, which is an important factor for diabetics. “Now is the perfect time to plan fall sets,” says Berkley, who recommends that grocers cut open a Stokes potato to give customers the opportunity to see the vibrant color within. Frieda’s labels also provide an image of the inside of the potato. “Stokes is the only true purple sweet potato grown in the U.S., and it’s exclusive to Frieda’s,” adds Berkley. The season runs from September through April. PG


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The Latino Pet Owner Make sure to market the category to your Hispanic customers. By Kathleen Furore

W Without a doubt, the Hispanic population as a whole is growing, and thus we expect Hispanic pet owners to represent a significant portion of the category growth over the next several years.” —Paul Cooke, Nestlé Purina PetCare

88

ith National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) fast approaching, now is an ideal time to consider how to reach out to Hispanic pet owners — a demographic segment that’s strong and growing. According to “Hispanics as Pet Market Consumers,” a report from Rockville, Md.-based Packaged Facts, the number of Hispanics in the United States with pets in their homes has skyrocketed from 11 million to 20 million over the past decade. Between 2007 and 2016, the rate of pet ownership among Latinos grew from 40 percent to 55 percent, and between 2016 and 2021, the growth rate in the number of Hispanic pet owners will be more than six times higher than that of non-Hispanic pet owners, according to the market research firm. “Without a doubt, the Hispanic population as a whole is growing, and thus we expect Hispanic pet owners to represent a significant portion of the category growth over the next several years,” says Paul Cooke, VP, trade and industry relations at St. Louis-based Nestlé Purina PetCare, when asked about the company’s approach to the category. “Hispanics are definitely important consumers to Purina, which is why we have a dedicated, crossfunctional team of people creating brand and retail communications, programs and experiences that connect with the Hispanic pet owner.” Paying attention to this growing group of pet parents is important for any retailer or manufacturer hoping to capture a share of the dollars that Latino customers spend in the pet aisle. Even a small share of those dollars, after all, can be substantial. “Latino pet owners as a whole spend nearly $5 billion annually on their pets,” notes Robert Brown, a Packaged Facts analyst, adding that those consumers “will account for half the growth in the population of pet owners over the next five years.”

| Progressive Grocer | August 2017

Who are Hispanic Pet Owners? The increasing level of acculturation among this demographic group is of prime importance when exploring how to create effective merchandising and marketing campaigns. “The percentage of Latinos owning pets rises from just 48 percent of foreign-born, Spanish-dominant Latinos to 64 percent of U.S.-born, Englishdominant Latinos with at least one parent born in the United States,” Packaged Facts reports. “English-dominant Latino pet owners, the fastest-growing segment of Hispanic pet owners, are an especially important consumer segment for supermarkets,” Brown adds. “Nearly half — 45 percent — of this group buy pet products at supermarkets.” That tilt toward more acculturated, Englishdominant customers puts the question of language front and center for anyone trying to


Your center store pet project! Why center store holds one of the most valuable categories in your store

here’s a lot that keeps you up at night. And while the center store may actually be one of your worries, it actually houses a category with tremendous potential to ease your mind.

T

It’s the pet care aisle. And there’s a great case to be made that it’s not just any category in grocery, but one of those that should matter most.

Impressive size and growth. At $63 billion strong, pet care isn’t just ranked 8th out of 305 supermarket categories by IRI InfoScan, it’s also growing two times that of the overall center store, according to Nielsen Scantrack data. In fact, the voice of the industry, the American Pet Products Association (APPA), says the sector has been averaging $2.5 billion in growth each year since 1994. Pet care also has the potential to boost store traffic, triggering more trips to the grocery store than any other category, according to a Nielsen shopper study. Surprisingly, though, grocers haven’t made the most of their pet care prospects, squeezing out center aisles in recent years to expand their perimeters instead. And while that’s being done to capture interest in better-for-you foods, it’s often at the expense of the center store and store profitability overall.

Ahead of the trends. The great news is that the pet manufacturers are well positioned to meet these expectations, and they’re improving quality of life for people and pets in more ways than one. Take health and safety. Category leaders have invested heavily in nutrition with offerings that are now on par and even more affordable than those at specialty stores: Super premium pet food, for instance, was once seen as out of reach for many. Innovation has also been a focus, with tailored nutrition taking center stage to target the health needs of specific breeds and pets. So why wouldn’t every grocer spend more time in pet? Particularly when many of the same trends that have made categories like the baby aisle darlings of retailers are prevalent in pets, too—in many cases, more so.

Pets are babies, too. Take the fact that more U.S. households own a pet than have babies living in them (68 percent have pets, according to APPA, whereas just 30 percent have kids). Pet parents’ relationship with the pet care aisle is also longer-lived. A 2015-2016 APPA survey shows pet parents shop the pet aisle for 19 years over the lifetime of their pet, versus the few years parents spend in the baby aisle for each child.

For one thing, there’s the emotional side of the category. Baby Boomers were the first to humanize their pets, but, now, most everyone considers their pets a part of the family.

Then there’s the fact that, while Millennials are waiting longer to have kids (age 26, on average), they’re getting pets by age 21, according to Wakefield Research. And with $430 billion in discretionary spending, according to the Boston Consulting Group, you can bet they’re going to be making an even bigger impact on pet care going forward.

Pet parents are also insisting on the same health and wellness offerings they’re demanding for themselves, and they’re spending more to get them: The lifetime value of a pet owner’s retail purchases totals $14,000, according to APPA, up 27 percent since 2008.

Any way you look at it, there’s a real growth prospect here. It’s just a matter of embracing pet care, getting better acquainted with pet shoppers, and working with category leaders to unleash the opportunity that will unmistakably have you sitting pretty as top dog. Remember, if you’re not winning in pet, you’re losing. n

Unique in center store. Pet care is different than most center store aisles, though.


Latinos with pets are far more likely to agree that many pet products are becoming too expensive.” —Packaged Facts

communicate with Hispanic pet owners. “They are less likely to turn to Spanish-language media, depend on Spanish-language labels or be influenced by Spanish-language advertising,” Packaged Facts notes. Age also comes into play. Forty-three percent of Hispanic pet owners are under 35, making them part of the Millennial generation. Compared with older Hispanic pet owners, they are much more likely to be U.S.born, more likely to speak predominantly English at home, and less likely to watch Spanish-language television or to be influenced by Spanish-language ads. They’re also more likely than older Latino pet owners or non-Hispanic pet owners of any age to use a smartphone app for shopping, and more likely to buy products they see advertised on their cellphones, according to Packaged Facts.

The Price Equation As acculturated as today’s Hispanic pet owners are, and as much as they spend on pet products, price remains top of mind when they’re shopping the pet category. As the Packaged Facts report notes, Hispanic pet

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017

owners are much more conscious of the price they pay for pet products and pet food than their non-Hispanic counterparts. “For example, Latinos with pets are far more likely to agree that many pet products are becoming too expensive,” the report says. What’s important for retailers to bear in mind is that price sensitivity makes these consumers hesitant to reach for natural/organic pet products — even though they’re more likely than other pet parents to buy natural/organic items if those items were more affordable, the report observes.


Legal Notice

Fun Facts about Hispanic Pet Owners If you’re contemplating how to inventory your pet aisle to appeal to Hispanic pet owners, taking the following facts into account can help you create a successful marketing strategy targeted to this important and growing demographic group.

1

Preferred Pets Compared with other pet

owners, Latino pet owners are much less likely to bring a cat into the home, are more likely to have a dog, are more than three times as likely to own a bird, and are somewhat more likely to favor reptiles or fish. The population of Latino pet owners includes 16.2 million dog owners, 5.8 million cat owners, 3.2 million bird owners and 2.3 million fish owners. “One way supermarkets can increase sales of pet products and foods to Latino pet owners is to emphasize merchandising of foods and products for pets other than dogs or cats, since Latinos account for 15 percent of all pet owners, but 34 percent of bird owners and 18 percent of owners of fish or rabbits or hamsters,” says Robert Brown, an analyst at Rockville, Md.-based market research firm Packaged Facts.

2 3

Sizing Things Up Hispanics are more

likely than non-Hispanics to want to have a pet that they can take with them more places, and more likely to choose toy or very small dogs weighing under 8 pounds.

Ingredients Matter Hispanic dog owners are more likely than other dog owners to consider the food texture and taste that their dogs prefer, while Latino cat owners are more likely than non-Hispanic cat owners to consider factors such as product freshness and protein content.

Source: “Hispanics as Pet Market Consumers,” Packaged Facts

That attitude provides an opening to grow store brands in the pet category. “Latino pet owners exhibit a relatively high propensity to be concerned about the price of pet products and a relatively low interest in affiliating with national consumer brands,” Packaged Facts notes. “These tendencies suggest that Hispanic pet owners offer additional opportunities for manufacturers and marketers of lower-priced store-brand pet foods and products.” Whatever your approach to the pet category, reaching out in some way to Hispanic consumers who own pets is key to building sales in the pet aisle. The Packaged Facts report concludes, “As Latinos continue to enlarge their share of the pet owner population, marketers of pet care products will find that Hispanic pet owners are indispensable to achieving market growth in the years ahead.” PG

 IF YOU PURCHASED SHELL EGGS IN THE U.S. FROM 9/24/2004 - 12/31/2008 DIRECTLY FROM DEFENDANTS, YOU MAY BE A MEMBER OF A CERTIFIED LITIGATION CLASS AND A CLASS MEMBER IN A PROPOSED CLASS ACTION SETTLEMENT.  IF YOU PURCHASED SHELL EGGS OR EGG PRODUCTS IN THE U.S. FROM 1/1/2000 12/19/2014 DIRECTLY FROM ANY PRODUCER, YOU HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO SUBMIT A CLAIM IN CONNECTION WITH CERTAIN PREVIOUSLY-APPROVED SETTLEMENTS. This legal notice is to announce certification of a Litigation Class; to provide information regarding a new settlement with Michael Foods, Inc. (“MFI”); and to provide information for submitting claims in connection with previously-approved settlements with National Food Corporation (“NFC”), Midwest Poultry Services, L.P. (“Midwest”), United Egg Producers and United States Egg Marketers (“UEP/USEM”), NuCal Foods, Inc. (“NuCal”), and Hillandale Farms of Pa., Inc. and Hillandale-Gettysburg, L.P. (“Hillandale”) in In re Processed Egg Products Antitrust Litig., No. 08-md-2002 (E.D. Pa.).

What is this lawsuit about? Plaintiffs allege that Defendants conspired to decrease the supply of eggs which caused the price of eggs to artificially increase and direct purchasers to pay more for Shell Eggs and Egg Products than they would have otherwise paid. Defendants have denied all liability for this conduct and asserted that their conduct was lawful and/or exempt from the antitrust laws, among other defenses.

Who is included in the Litigation Class? The Litigation Class includes individuals/entities that purchased Shell Eggs in the U.S. directly from Defendants from 9/24/2004 through 12/31/2008. If you exclude yourself, you will not be entitled to share in any future distributions if Plaintiffs obtain money from a trial or future settlements. The deadline to exclude yourself is October 9, 2017.

Who/what is included in the MFI Settlement? The MFI Settlement Class includes individuals/entities that purchased Shell Eggs in the U.S. directly from Defendants from 9/24/2004 through 12/31/2008. MFI will provide the Class with $75 million and cooperation. Plaintiffs will release all claims against MFI. The deadline to submit a claim, submit an objection, or submit an exclusion is October 9, 2017.

Who may submit a claim in connection with the NFC, Midwest, UEP/USEM, NuCal & Hillandale Settlements? If you did not previously exclude yourself from these Settlements, and you purchased Shell Eggs and/or Egg Products in the U.S. from 1/1/2000 through 12/19/2014 directly from any Producer, you may be entitled to submit a claim form postmarked no later than October 9, 2017.

Who represents you? The Court appointed Stanley Bernstein (Bernstein Liebhard LLP); Michael Hausfeld (Hausfeld LLP); Mindee Reuben (Lite DePalma Greenberg, LLC), and Stephen Susman (Susman Godfrey LLP) as Class Counsel. You do not have to pay them to participate. You may hire your own attorney at your expense.

When will the Court decide whether to approve the MFI Settlement? A hearing to determine the fairness and adequacy of the MFI Settlement is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on November 6, 2017 at the U.S. District Courthouse, 601 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106-1797. The Court will also consider a motion for attorneys’ fees and costs and any objections. The Court may change the date/time of the hearing without notice. Check www.eggproductssettlement.com for updates and more information. This notice is a summary only.

1 (866) 881-8306 • www.eggproductssettlement.com


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Greeting Cards

Nonfoods

Stronger Connections New ideas enliven and draw shoppers to the greeting card aisle. By Barbara Sax

N

ew technological features, specialized content and merchandising innovation are helping to attract consumers and offset sales declines in the greeting card category. Stacey Howe, VP and general manager of national accounts at Kansas City. Mo.-based Hallmark Cards, says that the company is focused on breakthrough and newsworthy ideas, formats or inventions that inspire consumers to connect in new ways. This summer, Hallmark introduced Virtual Reality (VR) cards that come with an exclusive pop-up VR viewer that simulates skydiving, surfing, a journey in a hotair balloon, or a roller coaster ride. “One of the key trends we see is that consumers are always looking for the next epic experience in their everyday lives,” says Megan Baucco, associate manager of marketing communications at Cleveland-based American Greetings. “Our innovative products provide the opportunity for consumers to share an unexpected, delightful and surprising experience with family and friends.”

Catering to Diverse Consumers In addition to adding tech features to cards, manufacturers are beefing up lines targeted to specific demographic groups. This year, Hallmark launched an Asian-inspired line that celebrates the holidays and occasions important to diverse Asian cultures, and recently introduced eight cards with Islamic-inspired patterns and rich

colors to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, a Muslim celebration marking the end of Ramadan. The new products join Hallmark’s Mahogany line targeted to African-American consumers, the VIDA line for Hispanic consumers and Tree of Life cards for Jewish consumers. “We are introducing new premium Hallmark Signature cards later this year to celebrate Hanukkah,” notes Howe. “Today’s modern family is also represented with seasonal and everyday cards for same-sex couples, divorced or single parents, and blended families.” “Our best opportunity to grow the business lies in ensuring that we are fully satisfying the needs of shoppers as consistently as possible,” says Baucco. “Whether that means tailoring our assortments to provide relevant content in an urban ethnic market or providing a curated, premium product offering in an affluent market, our success lies in providing products that meet the needs of consumers within the communities that they shop.” American Greetings produces the La Rosa collection of Spanish-language cards, the Our Voices line designed for African-American consumers and L’Chayim to Life! for Jewish consumers. According to Steve Gimbelman president of Edison, N.J.-based Designer Greetings, Christmas and Mother’s Day cards make up the bulk of Spanish-language card sales at his company. “Those occasions each account for around 40 percent of sales, while everyday cards represent the remaining 15 to 20 percent of sales,” he says.

Consumers are always looking for the next epic experience in their everyday lives.” —Megan Baucco, American Greetings

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Nonfoods

We’ve always believed the one-size-fits-all approach does not work in the greeting card industry, and we always provide a custom solution to each store.” —Stacey Howe, Hallmark Cards

Greeting Cards

Everyday cards, including bar and bat mitzvah cards, account for half of Jewish-themed cards, while Jewish New Year cards generate 30 percent of sales, and Hanukkah cards account for the balance of sales. Designer Greetings also makes cards targeted to African-American consumers, as well as a full line of cards in French, German and Italian. “While these lines don’t represent huge turns, retailers offering these cards in areas with a significant pocket of ethnic consumers are signaling to their customers that they appreciate their business and are catering to their needs,” explains Gimbelman. “It’s like having an ethnic food section.”

Authenticity in Action Howe says that Hallmark’s diverse portfolio allows it to tailor offerings to each individual store. “We gain valuable consumer insights from an increasingly rich array of consumers, and use these insights to figure out where our products, including our diversityinspired products, need to go,” she observes. “We’ve always believed the one-size-fits-all approach does not work in the greeting card industry, and we always provide a custom solution to each store. An optimal card section is one that looks and feels authentic to the customer shopping in that store, from a product selection, merchandising and visual perspective.”

For its part, Designer Greetings works with retailers to merchandises specific lines within the main card section in 2-foot subsections with callout signage. Gimbelman notes that some stores in California expand the subsection to 8 to 12 feet. Perry Hallett, buyer at Seabrook, Texas-based Arlan’s Markets, says that two of the chain’s 21 stores include Spanish-language cards merchandised in-line in the card section. Cards can also be outposted on spinner racks or on rolling stands for specific seasons. “We typically merchandise cards for Jewish New Year, for example, in a set with other fall holiday cards, such as Halloween and Thanksgiving,” says Gimbelman. Retailers and manufacturers are experimenting with new ways to promote and merchandise the card category in general. Keasbey, N.J.-based ShopRite’s card rewards program offers consumers $2 off their shopping order for every $10 spent on Hallmark cards. Hallmark is also seeing positive results from a checkstand outposting program that it’s currently testing with several supermarket partners. One grocery chain, which placed a Hallmark display at multiple checkstands with a specifically curated assortment of Hallmark Flagship cards, premium Signature cards and Shoebox humor line selections, as well as key seasonal cards, reported increased unit sales as well as a higher average price per card. PG

Gift Bags Keep on Giving Gift bags are the star players in the wrap section, and retailers continue to find new avenues to promote these products. “Stores are seeing a larger portion of sales coming from gift bags, and a larger amount of space is being dedicated to this format in retailers’ overall gift wrap offering,” says Stacey Howe, VP and general manager of national accounts at Kansas City, Mo.-based Hallmark Cards. According to Howe, Hallmark recently introduced an innovative card pocket on many of its new gift bags to ensure that the greeting card is placed front and center on the gift. Hallmark’s recent Summer Lei collection features unique materials such as leis on the gift bags and on-trend prints like pineapples and flamingos. Perry Hallett, buyer at Seabrook, Texas-based Arlan’s Markets, notes that sales of gift bags have long outpaced sales of gift wrap. “Kids’ birthday bags are our best-sellers,” he says. Outposting gift bags can create significant sales lifts. Balducci’s, in Bethesda, Md., outposts wine gift bags from Caspari and Papyrus near the wine department, along with cocktail napkins. The store also outposts those products, along with gift candles and soaps, near fresh flowers. “We’ll do end cap side displays with gift bags in the wine department or in other sections of the store,” says one store manager. “For any major holiday, we see an uptick in sales.” The Kings Food Markets location in Ridgewood, N.J.,

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BAG it Kings Super Markets is among the retailers that spotlight various gift bag brands in more than one location.

positions Caspari and Papyrus gift bags on a spinner rack, as well as in a gondola designated an “Entertaining” section. The set, adjacent to the liquor department, includes paper tableware and an in-line gift bag section. One wine end cap at the store recently featured a shelf display of origami wine gift bags from Built. Other occasion gift bags are outposted as well. Safeway’s San Mateo, Calif., location features gift bags from Gift Card Impressions on an end cap, as well as gift bags from Papyrus on a spinner rack.

| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


© AGC, LLC

We promised results. We delivered. We promised P.S. Hello would drive incremental sales with sentiments that give consumers more reasons to send cards – at a price they can’t resist. We delivered a bright, fun and relevant collection for some of the most unique sending situations around. It’s one more way American Greetings is working to make the world a more thoughtful and caring place.


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Social Media

Technology

Social Study

Most grocers are investing in social media — so why aren’t more shoppers following? By Randy Hofbauer

F

or years now, social media has been a big deal for food retailers: Almost all are on social networks, while three-quarters are making significant or moderate investments in socialmedia-related outreach, according to research from Tampa, Fla.-based marketing and promotions management company Aptaris and Cincinnati-based analytics firm Dunnhumby. But while nine in 10 grocery shoppers regularly follow one or more social media sites, only one in four of that group is connected to her primary grocer, according to “U.S. Supermarket Shopper Update,” a recent report from the Retail Feedback Group (RFG), based in Lake Success, N.Y. Why the disconnect? Some grocers simply might not be on social media. However, it could be more likely that many are on social media but terrible at offering compelling reasons to connect. Therefore, grocers need to work harder to draw these people’s interest. “If the content is not relevant and updated regularly, shoppers will quickly lose interest,” says Brian Numainville, RFG principal. “Consider that content should include items that are helpful, fun and draw the shopper into a relationship with the retailer.”

Right Channel, Right Way First and foremost, social media is social — it’s not to be used just as a billboard, according to Margarita Fitzpatrick, Dunnhumby’s head of customer engagement, North America. Grocers have to be interactive and engage users, and make sure that they reflect the essence of their brand in the process. However, there’s no “silver bullet” strategy when it comes to succeeding with a specific platform, as different exchanges have channels more suited to them. Take YouTube, for instance. “Channels like YouTube … are great avenues to show videos, which can include informational topics, events or contests,” Numainville notes. But while RFG’s research shows 53 percent of consumers using YouTube, only 33 percent of

retailers are using the channel, according to an Aptaris study. This reveals not only a gap that needs to be addressed across virtually all age groups, but also a clear opportunity for grocers to connect with people in a specific manner on the social media channel. Coborn’s, a Minnesota grocery chain based in St. Cloud, incorporates videos through its YouTube channel, for instance, whether they feature recipes demonstrated by employees, or discuss the community — they’re compelling media from a local grocer to local people. Of course, not everything might draw strong interest on social media. A good way to know whether something will gain traction and generate excitement is if it first has a real buzz outside of the cyber realm. Reputations are built outside social media, and then expanded within it, argues Paul Lencioni, president of Blue Goose Market, an independent grocer in St. Charles, Ill.

In an area where immediate response is expected, we want to make sure to balance lightning speed with accuracy and thoughtfulness.” —Lydia McNabb, Nugget Markets

Speedy Delivery For platforms lending themselves more to twoway dialogue — such as Facebook and Twitter — many grocers don’t understand the importance of responding quickly. Lydia McNabb, social media coordinator with Woodland, Calif.-based grocer Nugget Markets, notes that she’s always finding room for improvement in terms of responding to August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

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Technology

Nothing says ‘I care’ better than a quick response to a frustrated comment left on social media.” —Brian Numainville, Retail Feedback Group

Social Media

shoppers in a timely manner. “In an area where immediate response is expected, we want to make sure to balance lightning speed with accuracy and thoughtfulness,” she says. “If our guests share a comment or question with us, we want to make sure we’re giving them a response that is relevant and helpful, as well as prompt.” U.K. grocer Sainsbury’s is a prime example of speed when it comes to conversing via social media, using its platforms to respond in real time to customers, even when they’re in the store. “If a customer … needs to find a certain item and they aren’t able to find it, they can go through the social media platform and engage with a real person in real time, if you will, to help them answer that question,” Dunnhumby’s Fitzpatrick says. But whether in real time or taking a little longer, grocers need to remember that shoppers use social media to connect with individuals. That being the case, a grocery business must find a way to present itself as an individual would. “Anything that’s institutional will bring a lack of authenticity, and will turn off a lot of folks on social media because they’re looking for authenticity and engagement,” cautions Fitzpatrick. In return, grocers need to let their fans respond in their own individual ways. Instagram is a great way to do this, and one grocer taking advantage in this space is AJ’s Fine Foods, a banner of Chandler, Ariz.-based Bashas’. To kick off summer, the grocer — which operates in a region known for its scorching-hot summers — invites fans to cool off with its signature iced teas and rewards them for doing so: By posting a selfie taken while enjoying the iced tea and posting it to Instagram along with the #ajsicedtea hashtag, fans enter to win two iced teas every day for the rest of summer.

Conversational Commerce For some time now, Facebook has been a great place for grocers to chat with their fans about everything from product favorites to suggestions on what to make for dinner. Now one East Coast grocer is using the platform’s chat app to help its fans receive those products and set the dinner table with ease. FreshDirect, a grocery delivery service that operates in the Big Apple, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas, partnered with Mastercard in April to use Masterpass-enabled bots to drive more seamless shopping via Facebook Messenger. The bots leverage artificial-intelligence technologies to let consumers interact with the New York-based e-grocer, build their order and securely check out via the Masterpass mobile payments app, all without

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Good With the Bad Authenticity and engagement go beyond the good times, however. No matter how beloved a grocer is, in the end, every business at some point has its detractors on social media. Proper communication — though difficult — can still bring these folks closer, or at least keep them from turning fans into foes. “Nothing says ‘I care’ better than a quick response to a frustrated comment left on social media,” Numainville assures. “Plus everyone else who sees that post will also see that the retailer is responding.” Reasor’s, based in Tahlequah, Okla., is one grocer that responds promptly to comments on Facebook, appearing both sincere and attentive. Sainsbury’s sets a good example here, too: Instead of leaving social media to the PR department — as retailers often do — it boasts a “very highly trained, creative set of folks” to “engender and create two-way communication,” explains Fitzpatrick. While PR experts might handle negative comments the same way they handle negative press — off the wire — Sainsbury’s has embraced transparency and responded to negative comments where they’re placed, right in the open. “It wasn’t something you would take offline and call a different number to get a resolution,” she says. “Part of the trend for social media within that customer service base is to resolve … within the channel the customer expressed it in, both removing the barriers to engaging, but also being very transparent about the exchange in public.” Always remember, though: Be quick, but not aggressive. Speed and openness are the most challenging parts of social media, as criticism moves quickly. “You have to handle it in the moment, and you cannot get defensive,” advises Blue Goose’s Lencioni. “Opportunity comes and goes in an instant, too — you have to be on time in social media. Be honest, open and available.” PG

leaving the Messenger platform. Masterpass-enabled bots work across multiple verticals, from restaurants to retail, making conversational commerce frictionless while delivering a more personalized experience. The bots allow consumers to engage with brands in new places where they’re already spending their time, as messaging apps and platforms such as Messenger currently represent many of the top 10 global apps used by billions of people worldwide.


Supply Chain

Logistics

Planning for Success New technology helps retailers manage the complexities of farm-to-fork logistics. By Jenny McTaggart

E

ven in the Digital Age, getting service for Austin, Minn.-based Hormel Foods, food from a farm to a customer’s says technology has certainly been a game-changfork is as relevant as ever — er during his 37 years at the 125-year-old compabut the task has ny. “The biggest change I’ve seen is become far more a more varied item offering, with complicated than many in the many more choices and flavors for “When industry could have predicted, the consumer,” he notes. “This has supermarkets thanks in large part to logistimade things more challenging for succeed in cal challenges that range from our logistics team members, but streamlining their unpredictable traffic to ultrawe’ve been able to execute the lodelivery process, perishable fruit. gistics functions for food products logistics costs The onus is now on retailers and effectively within the environment are kept to a their supply chain partners to come of increased complexity, due to up with smart, cost-effective and greater use of technology.” minimum, farmers dependable solutions to keep them Hormel is also relying on have a lower at the front, or at least near the head smarter partnerships with its retailer return rate, and of, the retailing pack. partners, he notes, pointing to its customers get So far, one of the logistical participation in backhaul programs the freshest food front-runners in the race is Amaas just one example. possible.” zon, which recently formalized its —William Salter, commitment to gain ground in the Asda’s on the Right Route Paragon Software grocery business by bidding for the Of the many types of logisticsSystems country’s largest natural food rerelated technology to shape the intailer, Austin, Texas-based Whole dustry, transportation-related soluFoods Market. tions such as route optimization Ironically, it’s technology, which software are helping companies Seattle-based Amazon certainly better navigate farm-to-fork delivknows a thing or two about, that may ery. According to William Salter, be the most coveted tool to sharpen CEO and president of Dallasretailers’ logistical know-how as they based Paragon Software Systems, step up their competitive games. his company’s retail customers, inThomas Gravelle, director of locluding Asda and Stewart’s Shops, gistics, transportation and customer are seeing some advantages to using

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


Logistics of Local By Katie Martin

routing and scheduling technology. Deploying Paragon as a strategic planning tool, Walmart-owned U.K. supermarket chain Asda, based in Leeds, has been able to review and model best routes, which has resulted in better use of its fleet and lower capital expenditures, according to Salter. “Our software enables precise planning of delivery routes and vehicle use across all of the depots that serve Asda’s nationwide stores, which serve more than 18 million customers in store every week,” says Salter. “As a result, food miles and carbon emissions are reduced through improved use of its fleet of tractor units and trailer units.” Meanwhile, in the United States, Ballston Spa, N.Y.-based regional convenience store operator Stewart’s Shops has adopted Paragon’s routing and scheduling software to automate the manual process of planning deliveries to its retail outlets, which should ultimately lower mileage, reduce fuel usage and improve truckload efficiencies, observes Salter. “With growing demand from consumers for fresh food, the greatest logistics challenge for our grocery customers is ensuring that fresh food is available in store as quickly as possible after leaving the field, with the least amount of handling and at the lowest possible cost,” he notes. “Moving products quickly and efficiently through the supply chain not only ensures that customer demand for fresh food is met, but also increases the length of on-shelf time before use-by and best-before dates expire,” he adds. “This helps keep the customer happy, boosts sales and minimizes the amount of food waste or stock returned to producers.” Aside from technology, some of the commonsense solutions adopted by the industry include using the same container all the way from the point of packing at the farm or producer to the delivery journey and into the supermarket aisles, observes Salter, who adds, “Standardizing containers also allows vehicles to be better utilized, because transportation planners can better understand what will fit in each truck based on accurate volumetric data.” However, the advantages that technology brings to the table are unparalleled, he maintains: “Using a system like Paragon’s routing and scheduling software allows transportation planners to manage wide-ranging criteria. This includes restrictions on vehicle types and delivery times, time required for loading and unloading, and preferred delivery times for different types of food.” Salter continues: “When supermarkets succeed in streamlining their delivery process, logistics costs are kept to a minimum, farmers have a lower return rate, and customers get the freshest food possible. It’s a win-win for everybody.” PG

Locally sourced products are an increasingly big draw for supermarkets, with sales growing from $5 billion to $12 billion between 2005 and 2014 and expected to hit $20 billion by 2019, according to Rockville, Md.-based Packaged Facts. Creating and managing relationships — especially the deliveries — with local producers can be cumbersome and time-consuming. One of the largest departments for local products is the produce department, and stores and distributors are taking several different paths to make offering these products easier. One method is to use aggregators, or farmers’ exchanges. The aggregator serves as a central repository for farmers to sell their produce to, and for stores to buy the produce from. Several stores across the country are turning to such businesses to ensure that they always have the items they need in stock and aren’t relying solely on one farmer’s crop to supply their stores. “What we’re trying to do is to introduce as many opportunities and revenue streams as possible for the farmer and for the store,” says Marty Travis, owner of Fairbury, Ill.-based Spence Farm, a food aggregator that supplies Harvest Market, in Champaign, Ill., as well as more than 250 restaurants in Chicago. Harvest Market receives a shipment once a week, and all billing is handled by Spence Farm. Sourcing and billing are two of the largest pain points for the stores, which is where Forager comes in. The startup, located in Portland, Maine, has built a platform for both sides of the equation: suppliers and grocers. It allows farmers to post what they have for sale, and stores to compare prices, see what’s available, place items they want in shopping carts and make purchases. Forager handles all of the billing and payments, which helps reduce time on the grocer’s end. Portland Food Co-op, which uses the platform, has seen sales of local products increase 11 percent; overall, the store’s local sales have hit 40 percent. Other stores have turned to hosting farmers’ markets to satisfy their customers’ need for local products. Macey’s, Lin’s, Dan’s, Dick’s Market and Fresh Market in Utah host Eat Fresh, Eat Local farmers’ markets in partnership with 26 local growers. The farmers’ market, which runs from July 10 through the beginning of September, is held on Saturday mornings. Farmview, in Madison, Ga., also hosts a farmers’ market on Saturdays. Brad Kelly, business development and farm operations manager for Farmview, notes that the store was slightly concerned about possible poaching of sales when it started the farmers’ market, as the store itself is focused mainly on sourcing local products. “It’s been a draw,” he says. “If anything, it brings more traffic to the store.” Further, the farmers’-market vendors are typically different from those that supply the store. No matter how grocers choose to bring local products into the store, there’s no question that local is a draw. “Sixty-four percent of consumers will make a special trip to the store if they know their favorite grocer has local produce in season,” says David Stone, founder of Forager. “That person going to the store to buy asparagus in asparagus season — they’re more likely to put something in the shopping basket besides just that one item. It’s incumbent upon the grocer to get as much high-quality local produce on the shelves as possible and promote it to the consumer.”

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

101


Equipment & Design

Lighting

Light Switch LED is becoming the new norm for supermarket lighting. By Bob Ingram

T

FINE tuNED Simply Fresh by McCaffrey’s uses LED lighting to highlight various store areas.

hose that don’t have it now, will. LED lighting is the new reality for food retailers because of its efficiency, sustainability and profitability. “LED lighting in cooler freezers is nothing new anymore, and most brands have converted,” affirms Bryan Warner, VP of national accounts at MaxLite, in West Caldwell, N.J. “Other areas experiencing growth are LED track lighting and aisle lighting. This is due to the sensitivity of the margins below the track lights on products, and the lack of heat signature over items such as fruits and vegetables. LED operates much cooler, helping to extend produce shelf life, and lighting to enhance color has also improved.” According to Warner, LED lumen efficiencies have progressed to the point where the cost is going down and the performance increasing for general lighting such as aisles and high bays. ROIs are within acceptable ranges, and rebates are helping to speed up LED acceptance, he adds. The MaxLite LED High Bay Pendant is one of the company’s most popular supermarket products, Warner notes, because of its premium aesthetic, high quality of light, and 100,000-hour life. The future will see lighting with smart controls, wireless communication, data gathering and movement trends to drive marketing to a new level, he predicts: “The sky is the limit from a technology standpoint.”

Reinventing the Shopping Experience Karen Gough, VP of retail lighting systems and services at Philips Lighting, in Somerset, N.J., says that retailers can save up to 80 percent in lighting energy costs with Philips LED products when coupled with connected lighting controls like Philips StoreWise. “Beyond savings,” Gough asserts, “light can also help supermarkets reinvent the shopping experience. The connected LED lighting systems can help create different environments within the store by varying lighting levels and creating scenes that encourage shopper flow and interaction in a space. Gough points out that conversion to LED presents “a tremendous retrofit opportunity,” adding that products like Philips Day-Brite LBX Linear Suspended Highbay provide a versatile and efficient replacement for traditional fluorescent and metal high bay fixtures, with many optic options allowing the use of the same fixture in the front and back of the store. She further notes that the Philips InstantFit LED family of linear replacement lamps provides conversion to LED with savings and extended longevity to offer a quick payback, while the plug-andplay installation reduces labor and installation costs. Innovations in visible light communication (VLC) can provide mobile phoneservices like a map pinpointing shoppers’ locations, as well as every item on a shopping list, or delivering a mobile coupon or recipes in a particular aisle, according to Gough. “But VLC-enabled services can also be deployed to store staff to improve productivity and enhance profitability,” she concludes. Waste Not Jerri Traflet, manager of Current by GE’s Retail Channel, in Boston, says that “the value of LED investments goes beyond energy savings. Today, grocers are leveraging LED retrofits and new store builds to create infrastructure platforms that can enhance business performance.” As an example of this, Sainsbury’s brought in Current by GE to upgrade 250,000 LED fixtures across 450 stores to reduce lighting energy consumption by 58 percent, the largest project of its kind in the United Kingdom. The impact of intelligent lighting solutions, Traflet notes, will support reductions in supermarket food waste and spoilage, as Current uses an

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


open-software platform and works with a broad ecosystem of digital partners that are leveraging sensor data to build new retail applications. “Those apps could help with real-time tasks like inventory planning, refrigeration temperature monitoring, indoor positioning and wayfinding, and other valuable improvements,” she suggests. “We see a future where supermarket executives from facilities management, sustainability, marketing, merchandising, loss prevention and supply chain will all leverage the power of digital lighting infrastructure to drive business,” Traflet says.

Growing Demand Barry Kugel, president of Farmingdale, N.Y.based LaMar Lighting Co., says, “We’re seeing grocers change over to LED fixtures to not just reduce wattage and lower energy costs, but also enhance their lighting’s lumen output to better light up their aisles and shelves.” Products need to look good and all the shelves need to be well lit for customers to see clearly, so high output and good color are very important, Kugel notes. “There has been a strong demand for our LED products,” he says. “Our products have widths that range between 2.5 and 12 inches and lengths between 2 and 8 feet. I believe their popularity is due to the fact that they provide uniform lighting and aesthetic appeal.” Kugel sees LED technology improvements leading to further energy savings, better lumen output with improved Kelvin color temperatures for enhanced visibility, and more streamlined fixtures that look good, install quickly and spread light effectively. By Design From a designer’s perspective, Tom Henken, VP and director of design at api(+), in Tampa, Fla., observes: “The widespread use of LED technology has allowed designers the flexibility to integrate lighting throughout any component of supermarket architecture. Because of the compact size and wide range of

fixture types, lighting can be incorporated in areas that were a difficult fit for traditional light fixtures.” There’s a wider range of color temperatures available in LED lighting, Henken says, allowing designers to fine-tune areas of the store for contrast or emphasis. “While the upfront cost of LED lighting is often higher,” Henken says, “the cost of operation is significantly lower and, with its popularity, costs are coming down.” New government energy codes are aggressively more stringent, which further contibutes to the popularity of LED lighting, he adds. Organic Garage, which recently opened a 15,000-square-foot flagship grocery store in Toronto’s Junction neighborhood, the chain’s third location, has made creative use of LED lighting, in collaboration with api(+). “The lighting plan there is rooted in discussions with Organic Garage President Matt Lurie about his vision for the atmosphere and lighting in his two other stores,” says Judy Nortin, api(+)’s designer, studio director and associate. “The store has an urban, city-street theme, and lighting is tied tightly to the design.” She notes that in fresh food areas, LED lighting is on an adjustable track, and in the center store, direct/indirect LED was used, all with exposed conduit and j-boxes. Displays are highlighted with custom oil-barrel light fixtures, Nortin adds, and the frozen food department incorporates safety lights mimicking the kind often found under scaffolding in city streets. “To add to the ambience and create fluidity from inside to outside, we used gooseneck warehouse lighting in both the courtyard and interior to highlight signage and artwork,” she notes. Henken says: “It’s not new news, but LED lighting is far more efficient than the ordinary incandescent that’s been around since Edison. It represents a leap in energy savings and bulb longevity. Bulbs often exceed 50,000 hours before burnout.” In a typical supermarket, he points out, lighting and refrigeration account for 44 percent to 77 percent of total energy use, and “it makes sense to invest in LED technology when you see that a 60-watt incandescent bulb can be replaced with an LED of 8 to 12 watts and provide the same light output.” After all, as Henken sums up, “With supermarket profit margins so thin, this is one of the biggest saving programs a grocer can implement to directly affect the bottom line.” PG

RiGhT ATmosphERE philips’ LED products present many optic options.

We see a future where supermarket executives from facilities management, sustainability, marketing, merchandising, loss prevention and supply chain will all leverage the power of digital lighting infrastructure to drive business.” —Jerri Traflet, Current by GE

August 2017 | progressivegrocer.com |

103


Food, Beverage & Nonfood Products

Berry Good “Fresh” and “healthful” are two words not often placed next to the word “snack,” but Dole is helping to change that with its line of Dole Go Berries, which offers a strawberry variety and now blueberries. The product, which just received an award from United Fresh for its innovative packaging, offers three snap-apart snack-size packages, each of which contains 4 ounces of fresh berries. Additionally, the package is ventilated for freshness and easy rinsing. The SRP of the refrigerated item is $2.99 per pack. www.dole.com

Diet in a Bar Savory snacks and the Mediterranean diet converge in two new bars from Mediterra: Kale, Apple, Quinoa & Almonds, and Kale, Pomegranate, Quinoa & Almonds. The bars are all-natural, nonGMO, gluten- and dairy-free, certified kosher, vegan and low in calories. Each offering less than 3 grams of sugar, they contain nuts, herbs, protein-rich pea crisps and olive oil. Each 1.23-ounce bar provides 5 grams of fiber and 6 grams of protein, and has an SRP of $1.99. www.

Watermelon is a hot flavor right now, found in everything from yogurt to energy shots. Now Dry Sparkling has added a watermelon variety to its core line of sodas. With an SRP of $6.99 per 4-pack, the beverage contains only 50 calories and 12 grams of sugar per 12-ounce bottle. Made from only four ingredients and a touch of cane sugar, the item is Non-GMO Project Verified. Caffeine-, gluten- and sodiumfree, the OU-certified kosher soda can be used as a mixer or sipped alone.

mediterranutrition.com

www.drysparkling.com

Dry Goes Juicy

So Smooth “Less sugar and more protein” could practically be the mantra for today’s healthminded consumers. Clearly, Chobani has heard them, and in response has introduced Chobani Smooth, a low-fat classic yogurt that contains 25 percent less sugar and twice the protein of traditional yogurts. Noted for its “mild, not tart” taste, the new blend contains no artificial ingredients and comes in five flavors: Peach, Strawberry, Vanilla, Blueberry and Black Cherry. Chobani Smooth sells in 2-packs of 5.3-ounce cups at an SRP of $1.79. www.chobani.com

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| Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What’s Next | August 2017


Model R2200 Tabletop Portioning Machine Perfect for Supermarkets! Hollymatic’s compact self-feeding portioner forms a variety of products including seasoned mixtures and special recipe blends. Diferent shapes and sizes from ½ oz. to 10 oz. can be formed. Even nuggets! Learn more. www.hollymatic.com/formersportioners/ r2200-portioning-machine

Tabletop Grinders From restaurants and supermarkets to butcher shops and test kitchens, Hollymatic has new tabletop grinders to ft your needs. Tey feature all stainless steel construction with quick and easy disassembly. Now available in 12, 22, 32 & 52 sizes. Learn more. www.hollymatic.com/ equipment-view/mixers-grinders

“Give Customers A Reason To Return” “Fresh ground, fresh formed, fresh stuffed, and fresh cut… All fresh ideas to keep customers coming back.

Hollymatic Stainless Steel Hydraulic Stufers Available in 28, 55, and 88 pound capacities, these hydraulic Stufers have some of the smallest footprints available and are ideal for meat markets and processing plants. All stainless for exceptional quality and long life. www.hollymatic.com/equipment-view/ stufers

Hollymatic Hi-Yield Saw Tis rugged stainless steel Saw ofers signifcant safety features including a Quick Stop Brake that stops the blade within 1 second of shut-of or opening of doors to dramatically reduce risk of injury. www.hollymatic.com/ equipment-view/stainless-steel-saws

Higher standards begin with Hollymatic equipment. Outfit your backroom with Hollymatic grinders, formers, stuffers, and saws and promote meat freshness to your customers. The pride you take in your job will be evident in the product you sell. And that’s something your customers appreciate.”

Butch the Butcher

Fresh is Best

708-579-3700 www.hollymatic.com


Index

570 Lake Cook Rd, Suite 310, Deerfield, IL 60015 Phone: 224 632-8200 Fax: 224 632-8266 www.ensembleiq.com United StateS MarketS Convenience • Grocery/Drug/Mass Store Brands • Specialty Gourmet Technology • Hospitality • Apparel

Canadian MarketS • Convenience • Pharmacy • Foodservice

advertiSing SaleS & BUSineSS Staff Alan Glass Executive Chairman 609-276-2842 aglass@ensembleiq.com Richard Rivera Chief Operating Officer 973-264-4380 rrivera@ensembleiq.com Jeff Greisch Chief Brand Officer 224-337-4029 jgreisch@ensembleiq.com Ned Bardic Chief Customer Officer/President of Strategic Platforms 224-632-8224 nbardic@ensembleiq.com Katie Brennan Senior Vice President/Brand Director 201-855-7609 • Cell: 917-859-3619 kbrennan@ensembleiq.com Larry Cornick Southeast Account Executive 224-632-8248 lcornick@ensembleiq.com Angela Flatland CO, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MO, NE, Midwest, Marketing Manager (AR, ND, OK, SD, TN, WI) 224-229-0547 Cell: 608-320-4421 aflatland@ensembleiq.com Judy Hayes Senior Sales Manager 925-785-9665 jhayes@ensembleiq.com Theresa Kossack Senior Sales Manager 214-226-6468 tkossack@ensembleiq.com Rick Neigher Western Regional Sales Manager (CA, OR, WA) 818-597-9029 rneigher@ensembleiq.com Mike Shaw Northeast, Marketing Manager 201-855-7631 • Cell 201-281-9100 mshaw@ensembleiq.com Jackie Batson Advertising Manager 224-632-8183 jbatson@ensembleiq.com

Biro Manufacturing Airius American Greeting Ind. Anchor Packaging Beaver Street Fisheries Blount Fine Foods Campbell Soup Company Coca Cola NA Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, LLC Creekstone Farms CSM Bakery Products Dean Foods Co Del Monte Fresh Produce NA Inc. Dietz & Watson Inc. Emmi Roth USA Forte Products Garden City USA Goya Foods, Inc. Hollymatic Jack Link’s Beef Jerky Jelly Belly Candy Company Kimberly-Clark Co Mars Chocolate NA/ Wrigley MasonWays Indestructible Plastics MilkPEP MIWE Mondelez National National Pasteurized Eggs Inc. NBT Cooperative Nestlé Purina Pet Care Network Of Executive Women New Hope Network Niman Ranch Organics Unlimited Peri & Sons Farms Pharmavite LLC Premier Nutrition Ruiz Foods Products, Inc. Rust-Oleum Saltworks Saputo Cheese Usa Inc. Sealed Air Sticky Fingers Bakeries Stonefire Authentic Flatbreads Stout Beverages, LLC TH Foods The Happy Egg Company The Hershey Company The Wonderful Company The Wonderful Company/POM Wonderful Fresh Tosca Ltd. Trion Industries Inc. Tyson - Open Prairie Pork Tyson TFM Brand Portfolio Vital Farms Wild Friends Foods Zespri International Limited Zumex Usa, Inc.

36 37 95 22-23 50 40-41   32-35 28-29 9 44 65 Insert 67   5 Back Cover   48-49 90 91 17 105 69 87 19 13 76 56 54 Inside Front Cover, 39 66 8 89 96 85 Inside Back Cover 81 84 79 4 83 92 15 63 58-59 55 53 46-47 68 70 3 21 77 73 10-11   64, 99 7 61 6 82 60  

Progressive Grocer (ISSN 0033-0787, USPS 920-600) is published monthly by EnsembleIQ, 570 Lake Cook Rd. Deerfield IL 60015. Single copy price $10, except selected special issues. Subscription: $135 a year; Canada $164 (Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40031729. Foreign $270 (call for air mail rates). Periodicals postage paid at Deerfield, IL 60015 and additional mailing offices. Printed in USA. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to Progressive Grocer, P.O. Box 1842 Lowell, MA 01853. Copyright ©2017 EnsembleIQ All rights reserved, including the rights to reproduce in whole or in part. All letters to the editors of this magazine will be treated as having been submitted for publication. The magazine reserves the right to edit and abridge them. The publication is available in microform from University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the consent of the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for product claims and representations.


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A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO BUILDING THE BEER BUSINESS ACROSS MULTIPLE CHANNEL S

2 017


3 4 6 12 PAG E

PAG E

PAG E

PAG E

40 PAG E

An Update from Kevin Doyle

MillerCoors Advantage

Industry Overview

Off-Premise 12

30

CO N V E N I E N C E S TO R E S

e CO M M E R C E

18

34

L I QU O R S TO R E S

D R U G S TO R E S

24

38

G R O C E RY S TO R E S

D O L L A R S TO R E S

On-Premise 40 O N - PR E M I S E OV E R V I E W

S P O R T S BA R S

46

50

N E I G H B O R H O O D BA R S

2

48

C A SUA L D I N I N G


A new approach to selling beer. The beer game is changing. We see it every day. More brands. More styles. New flavors. More places to shop and dine. New occasions. Today’s consumers have more options than ever before when choosing a beer. Retailers who truly understand the trends and business drivers for beer in their store – and not just the hype – have a huge advantage in this new beer landscape. That’s where this Building with Beer® publication comes into play. The following strategy guide will give you a look at how beer contributes to the overall success of your store and the satisfaction of your consumers. Building with Beer® shares best practices from each of the industry’s key classes of trade and provides insights and solutions to help you navigate and win in today’s challenging retail environment. At MillerCoors we are committed to providing the tools and services to help you – our customers – grow the size and the value of your total beer category. A growing category benefits everyone – including your consumers. This strategic guide reflects this commitment. We hope you enjoy this Building with Beer® publication. To learn more about trends in your business and the full assortment of tools and resources MillerCoors can provide, we encourage you to reach out to your MillerCoors sales team. Thank you,

Kevin Doyle President, Sales and Distributor Operations MillerCoors

3


MillerCoors Advantage

Brands

Distributor Services

Innovation Profitable Category Growth

People

4

Business Building Solutions


M I L L E R C O O R S A D VA N TA G E

The MillerCoors Advantage is the bundle of goods and services we provide to our customers to help grow the size and value of our customers’ beer category. Brands We have a robust brand portfolio that includes industry-leading Premium American Lagers and Premium American Light Lagers, Crafts, Prestige Imports, Hard Ciders, Flavored Malt Beverages and more.

Innovation We create scalable and differentiated innovation that excites consumers, shapes the category and drives incremental value.

Business Building Solutions We bring a suite of space and assortment, retail marketing, revenue management and other tools to help convert shoppers.

People We have the most collaborative, passionate and results-driven talent in beer with the skills to meet the needs of our dynamic industry and increasingly sophisticated retailers.

Distributor Services In addition to MillerCoors brands, our network of distributors brings 67% of Import, 68% of Hard Ciders and 86% of Craft brand volumes to the U.S. marketplace. They are constantly looking for new ways to help retailers build their beer business.

5


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

TOTAL BEER SALES $105.5 BILLION (2)

Beer is the alcohol beverage of choice for most American consumers. Whether people are relaxing at home, reconnecting with friends or enjoying a casual meal, they choose beer more often than either wine or spirits.

B E E R CO N SU M P T I O N VS . W I N E & S PI R I T S SHARE OF SERVINGS

BEER (12oz.)

WINE (5oz.)

SPIRITS (1.5oz.)

50.6%

15.2%

34.2%

BEER

WINE

SPIRITS

6,431

805

543

2016

NUMBER OF BREWERIES (1)

2016: 4,981 20 07: 1,619

Beer represents >50% of total alcohol beverage servings.(2)

6

GALLON CONSUMPTION (MM) 2016 MillerCoors Industry Sales Estimates, December 2016

It’s an exciting time to be in the beer

way beer sales have grown to more than

business.

$105.5 billion.

It’s also a challenging one.

But despite all this excitement, beer volume has actually declined. Between

The United States is enjoying a beer

2007 and 2016, beer sales declined by

renaissance. Nearly 5,000 brew pubs and

more than 7 million barrels. Per-capita

brewers were in business in 2016 – with

consumption has declined as well.

new ones emerging all the time. More

Meanwhile, beer has lost share to wine

brands are on store shelves or behind

and hard liquor.

the bar than ever before. Consumers are interested in learning more about beer,

Brewers have been hard at work trying to

brewing beer at home and, of course,

win back drinkers, including introducing

sampling different beers. And along the

new innovation, new packaging and more


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

contemporary marketing. But getting

handle for Coors Light, Miller Lite and

beer right at retail is a critical part of

Bud Light is incredibly powerful, and

the puzzle. Amid all the excitement

that these brands make an impact

over the past few years, it’s been easy

when they’re displayed on the floor.

Beer’s

to lose track of some beer basics. The

opportunity:

conversation has been focused on Craft,

This Building with Beer ® publication

but it’s important to remember that a tap

details the strategies necessary in each

Expand into new

NUMBER OF U.S. BREWERIES

4,981

5,000

occasions, recruit new drinkers

3,920

4,000 3,373

54%

2,846

3,000 2,430

1,688

1,778

1,814

shoppers account for 2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

75% of 2008

1,000

1,619

2007

2,000

of beer

2,093

all beer sales.(3)

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), December 2016

7


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

FOUR MEGA OCCASIONS

DIFFERENT OCCASIONS CALL FOR

CONNEC T

SOCIAL

C E L E B R AT E

RELA X

DIFFERENT BEERS.

UNTAPPED

POTENTIAL: Recruit new consumers

class of trade for retailers to win the

All segments are important. Consumers

business of the beer consumer.

enjoy a wide range of beer styles, and different beers serve different roles. So

While every class of trade is different,

it’s important to look at the big picture

some common themes emerge.

when looking at which beers to carry and promote.

CORE CONSUMERS purchase

3X MORE BEER than non-core consumers.(3)

Core brands and packs matter. The vast majority of the business is driven

Premium American Light Lagers –

by a very small percentage of items that

including Coors Light, Miller Lite and

carry very high consumer demand. And

Bud Light – make up the largest portion

many consumers are loyal to specific

of beer sales and are the go-to beers for

packs. Retailers who don’t recognize

many consumers and many occasions.

these factors risk losing sales. Take small-format stores. Capturing the

B E E R CO R E S H O PPE R

business here means focusing efforts

74.0%

on the packages that consumers desire most. Most consumers enter beer through small packs (12-pack or smaller),

56.7%

which also give people the opportunity to experiment with new flavors and trade up to new experiences. Singles, in particular, are growing and represent WOMEN ACCOUNT FOR

a huge opportunity. Meanwhile in the on-premise, it’s

17 BILLION

important to keep core items available

BEER/YEAR. (3)

and profit can grow through the power

SERVINGS OF

8

to consumers and not get caught up in the “long tail.” This way topline sales of velocity.

% of Malt Based/ Hard Cider

SHOPPERS

% of Malt Based/ Hard Cider

DOLLARS

Nielsen Homescan Panel through Aug. 27, 2016


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

Above Premium segments – including

The right assortment is necessary

Imports, Crafts and Flavored Malt

to maximize the beer category.

Beverages – are in demand with

Building the right assortment starts

consumers who are seeking the everyday

with understanding what items are

indulgences they have come to expect

purchased at similar outlets. The use

in other categories (think gourmet ice

of demand-based clustering identifies

cream or that $3.99 cup of coffee).

items that have a high chance of success and more precisely pinpoints

Economy beer is an important segment

the core of the business. While

that has gotten lost in the mix amid

everyone wants to be first with new

the growing popularity of higher-end

news, remaining focused on core is

offerings. In recent years, brewers have

the best way to drive sales success

lost focus and retailers have reduced

and customer satisfaction over the

space. What was forgotten is that

long haul.

Economy beer drinkers are the most valuable shoppers in the business. They

Core shoppers matter … but new

make more trips, spend more annually

consumers are critically important.

and are more loyal to their brands.

More than half of beer shoppers –

Brewers once again are recognizing the

nearly 57% – account for almost 75%

importance of the Economy segment,

of all beer sales. These core shoppers

including in attracting new consumers.

purchase at a rate three times greater

So the time is right to win back this

than other shoppers.(5) So it’s important

shopper by offering the right brands,

to keep these important shoppers in

the right packs and a good value.

mind.

(5)

ECONOMY BEER DRINKERS HAVE VALUE • Highest annual spend • Most trips • Highest trip frequency(5)

AMERICAN LIGHT LAGERS are the LARGEST portion

S H A R E O F B E E R SA LE S BY CH A N N E L

6.3% 6.5%

of sales.(4)

5.9% 32.3%

Convenience Grocery Liquor

2.2%

Mass Merch

3.3%

Drug

19.9%

MAJORITY OF BEER

Bar Tavern

SALES ARE

Restaurant

DRIVEN

Other On-Pemise 23.6%

THE

MillerCoors Industry Estimates, December 2016

BY A FEW ITEMS.(3)

9


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

Understand

VO LU M E PR O D U C T I O N BY N U M B E R O F I TE M S

the right amount of

BEER.

is critical to the health of the category. For instance, beer has a big

20,000

SPACE for

That said, bringing in new consumers

15,000

13,564

15,101

16,038

17,518

opportunity with women, especially with women who think beer “is not for them.” Right now women account for 17 billion servings of beer per

11,673

year – which is actually lower than it

10,000

was a decade ago. Women represent untapped potential within the

RIGHT ITEMS + EASY-TO-

category.(3)

5,000

0

346

387

407

Number of items

Consumers buy beer for specific occasions. There’s an optimal time and place for every beer. We have identified four mega occasions.

80% OF VOLUME

SHELVING

Nielsen, December 2016

IS

• Relax: When you’re just relaxing/ kicking back, either by yourself or with your spouse/partner.

S H A R E O F B E E R T Y PE DOLLAR SALES ($MM)

$ % CHG YA

CH A R T H E A D E R

PREMIUM AMERICAN LIGHT LAGER

$4,254.1

(0.3%)

IMPORT

$3,215.8

5.6%

CRAFT

$2,807.7

4.8%

NEAR PREMIUM

$1,224.5

1.0%

PREMIUM AMERICAN REGULAR LAGER

$1.173.8

0.0%

SUPER PREMIUM

$1,034.7

9.4%

FLAVORED MALT BEVERAGES

$986.7

8.3%

ECONOMY

$827.1

(3.3%)

HARD CIDER

$279.5

(9.5%)

MALT LIQUOR

$118.8

(15.9%)

COOLERS

$108.2

0.6%

$7.9

10.5%

ALTERNATIVE Nielsen xAOC 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016

10

456

ALL OTHER SKUS

NAVIGATE

CRITICAL.

442


C R E AT E T R A F F I C • I N C R E A S E CO N V E R S I O N • B U I L D P R O F I T

PREMIUM

ECO N O M Y B E E R D R I N K E R S A R E I M P O R TA N T

is still LARGEST SHARE, Loyalty Avg. % of Household Beer Purchases

Annual Spending

Avg. Drinks/ Week

Purchase Cycle (Days)

Above Premium

57.5

$67

4.9

31

Premium

45.2

$99

6.1

24

Economy

63.4

$142

10.7

15

• Highest annual spending • Most trips per buyer • Fewest days between purchases

• Almost 2/3 of purchases made in grocery with room to grow Nielsen Homescan through August 2016

ABOVE PREMIUM growing.

Unlike many categories, BEER has a HIGH incremental RATE OF

• Connect: When you’re with a small group of close friends and/

RETURN

or family, to mainly catch up and

with

connect, and just be yourself.

additional space.

• Social: When you’re socializing with a group of extended friends and others, where you feel a need to impress them or are conscious of how you come across. • Celebrate: When you’re celebrating at a large party or

grow the size and value of the beer category.

social event/gathering, with 10 or more people. This Building with Beer ® publication shares best practices of successful retailers in each class of trade, and it provides solutions to help

Sources: 1. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), December 2016 2. MillerCoors Internal Sales Estimates, December 2016 3. MillerCoors Behavioral Tracking Study, bi-annual, December 2015 4. Nielsen AOC through Dec. 31, 2016 5. Nielsen Homescan through August 2016 6. Nielsen Space Audit, July 2016 7. CPI Average Price Index, 2017

11


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S

CONVENIENCE STORES

C-STORE is the

#1 CLASS OF TRADE

for beer sales.(1)

C-store is the largest class of trade

The popularity of c-stores for beer

for beer sales, representing almost

purchases is not surprising because

one-third of industry volume and

c-stores are convenient – on the way

continuing to increase in importance.

(1)

• FAST & EASY:

They spend <2 minutes in store,

• RELAX - Shed the day • CONNECT - Chillin’ at home • CELEBRATE - Bringing the beer

PACK AGES THAT MATCH THEIR OCCASIONS

Video Mining, August 2016

Three beer occasions drive people

• FREQUENT SHOPPERS: visit c-stores daily • 92% of beer trips are for 12-pack or smaller • 55% of beer trips are singles purchases • 37% of beer trips are for small packs (4-pack–12-pack)

to c-stores: • Relax: An after-work transition to “me time” that usually involves singles • Connect: Reconnecting with a trusted group of buddies • Celebrate: Using beer to celebrate at a small party or tailgate

• DESTINATION: 55% of c-store beer trips are solely to

Beer shoppers buy packs that

purchase beer

perfectly match these occasions.

• HIGH TRAFFIC:

60% of beer sales occur

from 3 – 8 p.m.; 53% of beer is sold Friday, Saturday or Sunday • ON THEIR WAY TO AN OCCASION: Nearly 80% of beer purchases are for consumption within two hours, 62% within one hour. Therefore, cold beer from the cooler is essential MillerCoors Profitable Beer Marketing Transaction Study through Nov. 30, 2016 and NACS Convenience Tracking Program, August 2016

12

C-STORE BEER SHOPPERS BUY

<20 seconds at cooler

• 52% of beer shoppers

THREE C-STORE OCCASIONS

to beer shoppers’ occasions.

More than half of their beer transactions are singles. BUILDING WITH BEER ® The foundation of Building with Beer® starts with solid facts and insights. We’ve analyzed 1.8 billion store transactions, conducted more than 6,000 shopper exit intercepts, studied 30,000 singles trips via Video Mining, and talked with c-store shoppers across the country in focus groups. Through our partnership with NACS, we studied


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S B E E R I S WO R T H M O R E I N SA LE S T H A N T H E S PACE I T ’ S G I V E N VS . OT H E R C ATEG O R I E S

8.8

7.0

8.8

9.6

4.7 BEER

WATER

SODA

ENERGY

SPORTS DRINK

Average Days of Supply Nielsen Space Audit, bi-annual study, Q4 2015

8,000 shoppers in the Annual Convenience

TURN SINGLES INTO HOME RUNS

Tracking Program as well as firms

Singles continue to expand in c-stores

representing 25,841 stores in the State of

and now represent a 25 share of

the Industry report to fuel our thinking.

category dollars and 55% of beer transactions. Singles growth has been

Often beer is under-spaced in the cooler.

impressive and responsible for two-

With a lower average days of supply vs.

thirds of the beer category gains over

other categories, beer is worth more

the past five years.(4)

in sales than the space it’s given. On average, optimal c-stores have at least

Optimal c-stores dedicate at least 25% of

40% of cooler doors dedicated to beer.

the beer space to singles. Retail partners

(3)

BEER MAKES MORE MONEY THAN ANY OT H E R C AT EG O RY A S I T E X PA N DS S PACE

$4,754

Weekly sales by # of cooler doors $3,178 $2,081

$249 0

$3,503

$3,750

$4,031

of SPACE to beer.

$2,559

0.5

1

25% 2

3

4

5

6

7

# OF DOORS

Beer

Dedic ate 40%

$954

$311

CSD

Nielsen Space Audit Q4 2015

40%

Tea/Juice

Energy Coffee

Sports Drink

8

Dedic ate 25% of beer space

to SINGLES.

13


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S

Singles shoppers visit c-stores 24x a month and purchase 19 times.(9)

Only 2% of beer transactions have both a SINGLE and SMALL MULTIPACK in the same basket.(8)

have proven that more space for singles

the singles shopper find what he needs.

is beneficial for their bottom lines as

First, merchandising all of the singles

well. A leading retailer tested this across

together rather than dispersing the

20 stores by optimizing the cooler space

singles across all doors results in an

to add an additional door of singles.

average 18% higher sales rate.(5)

The result was increased revenue and profit across the cooler, not just beer.(11)

singles, and are all necessary for Singles shoppers are some of the most

growth. Merchandising singles within

valuable c-store customers; singles

these segments will help shoppers

shoppers visit a c-store 24 times a

quickly find what they’re looking

month and purchase singles 19 times!

(9)

1/3

will leave without a purchase.(9)

While the average shopper spends less than 20 seconds at the cooler, it is

FLAVORS: Flavored Malt Beverages,

important to simplify the shopping trip.

Hard Sodas, Cocktails

Nearly a third of shoppers will leave the store if they cannot find what they are

INDULGENCE: Imports, Crafts and Hard Ciders, Super Premium

looking for. However, if helped to find his/her first item in the first 10 seconds,

REFRESHMENT: Premium and Near

the shopper will buy more items.

Premium American Light Lagers VALUE: Economy

singles and multipacks in the basket.(8)

LARGE BOTTLES: 32-, 40- and

Creating a singles destination will help

42-oz. bottles

D R I V E B E V E R AG E SA LE S BY A LLO C AT I N G 4 0 % O R M O R E O F CO O LE R TO B E E R BEVERAGE $ SALES INDEX Coolers with <40% of space for beer

Coolers with 40%+ of space for beer

Small Stores

100

109.4

Medium Stores

100

107.7

Large Stores

100

107.5

C-stores devoting 40% OR MORE of t heir cooler space to beer have 7-9% HIGHER TOTAL BEVER AGE SALES Nielsen C-Store Cooler Space Audit Q4 2015

14

for, increase their basket size, and encourage trade-up:

Only 2% of beer transactions have both

If shoppers can’t find what they’re looking for, nearly

Next, five distinct segments drive


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S

On average the singles shopper

Premium and Economy small multipacks

purchases 1.5 singles per transaction,

are the ideal products for the relax or

meaning sometimes he buys one and

celebrate occasions. These segments are

sometimes he buys two. To encourage

the perfect beers for reconnecting with

purchase, utilize “2-For” promotions and

friends and account for more than 59% of

clearly communicate it with prominent

small multipack dollar sales in c-stores.(4)

shelf strips. Clear signage results in

In fact, 7 out of 10 small-pack units sold

a 5% sales lift even when the “2-For”

in c-stores are Premium American Lagers

pricing is just the single purchase price

and Economy.(2)

times two.(5) WIN WITH SINGLES

CORE ITEMS C-store shoppers are looking for

1. Allocate at least 25% of beer space

12-packs – the No. 1 multipack package

in dollar sales.(4) So, it’s not surprising

to singles.

2. Merchandise singles together from a

that c-stores that carry both 12-pack

cans and bottles for all three American

shopper perspective.

3. Simplify pricing at shelf by promoting

Light Lager brands sell 5.3% more beer

“2-Fors” across multiple singles

on average than stores that don’t carry

segments and clearly communicate it

all six packages.(6)

with shelf strips.

GROW BIG BY GOING SMALL

THIS STEMS FROM THREE KEY FACTS: 1. Premium American Light Lager brands

Beer multipacks make up three-quarters

have the highest penetration and

of category sales(2) and provide one of the

consumer reach in the beer

largest c-store basket rings (more than

category.(10)

twice the average c-store basket).(7) Small

2. Drinkers are very loyal to their brand

multipacks, which are 12-packs or smaller,

in this segment with the highest

account for 40% of beer transactions.(8)

exclusivity rates in the category.(10) 15


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S

% O F B E E R M U LT I PACK D O LL A R S Premium and Economy multipacks fulfill multiple consumer occasions and deliver dollars.

40% of beer transactions are small multipacks.(8)

10%

Premium

5%

Economy

8%

Imports

43%

Super Premium

19%

Craft/Hard Ciders

16%

7 out

Flavored Malt Beverages

of 10

small packs

Nielsen c-stores 52 weeks through March 25, 2017

sold in

c-stores are PREMIUM

3. Shoppers are particular about

THREE STEPS TO BIGGER BEER

AMERICAN

their beer containers. Half of

SALES WITH SMALL MULTIPACKS

Premium American Light Lager shoppers only buy cans, but

1. Make your multipack mix count –

LAGERS

about one-third only buy

bottles, so you need to carry

both packages.(10)

LIGHT and

ECONOMY.(2)

ensure availability of core 12-packs

and smaller.

2. Lean into Premium American Light

Lagers to drive conversion.

Create a beer beacon with the

3. Ensure availability of Economy brands

items your shoppers seek.

to satisfy shopper expectations.

CO N S U M E R S A R E PA R T I CU L A R A B O U T T H E I R B E E R CO N TA I N E R

12-pack is the

60% 50% 40%

#1

30%

multipack

20%

package in dollar sales. 16

49%

31%

10% 0%

Cans Only

Nielsen Panel Data Q3 2016

Bottles Only


S I N G L E S • 2 - F O R P R I C I N G • S M A L L M U LT I PAC K S

C-STORE DO’S AND DON’TS

Don’ts • Make it harder for the shopper to find his beer by spreading the singles

Do’s • Make it easy for shoppers to find what they want by getting all singles in one door; merchandising singles together results in an 18% sales lift(5) • Organize SKUs by singles segments

across segment doors or distributor doors • Confuse shoppers with several different price points to decipher • Make it questionable for the shopper to purchase the beer by not including price for each item

to motivate trade-up • Communicate front-line, singles price clearly with shelf tags • Utilize simple but impactful shelf strips to communicate “2-For” segment pricing • Ensure beer is always in stock, especially during 3-8 p.m. high-traffic period

Sources: 1. MillerCoors Industry Estimates, December 2016 2. Nielsen, 52 weeks ending December 2016 3. Nielsen Convenience Space Audits, bi-annual audit, Oct. 24, 2015 4. Nielsen c-stores, 52 weeks ending Oct. 15, 2016 5. Nielsen C-Store Audit, Q3 2016 6. Nielsen C-Store Analytics/Space Audit, Q4 2015 7. NACS Convenience Tracking Program, August 2016 8. MillerCoors Profitable Beer Marketing Transaction Study through Nov. 30, 2016 9. 5k C-Store Shopper surveys, January 2017 10. Nielsen Panel Data, Q3 2016 11. Coolermax Test, September 2014

17


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

LIQUOR STORES

#1

CHANNEL in total alcohol experience(2)

>47K liquor outlets(1)

Focused almost exclusively on total

of consumers includes Sophisticated

alcoholic beverages, liquor stores offer

TAB Enthusiast, Savvy Entertainer and

a unique experience for shoppers. This

Connected Beer Explorer, which include

diverse channel of more than 47,000 out-

Millennials, Gen Xers and over-40

lets is highly fragmented and comprises

shoppers. The liquor channel has a great

independent stores, local chains, state-

opportunity to both exceed shopper

run outlets and large wholesale depots.

expectations and prompt subsequent

Outlet size and product offerings range

beer trips by aligning to shopper

from less than 2,000 square feet, offering

trends, experiential demands, shopping

a few thousand products, to large-scale

convenience and desired value.

footprints of more than 50,000 square feet and more than 60,000 products.

38M

beer shopping trips(2)

22%

of total beer category sales(4)

1.3%

decline in dollar volume(4)

18

Liquor stores can accelerate their impact and relevance through simplified

WHO’S THE SHOPPER?

variety, improved shopability, enhanced

The shopper in the liquor channel is

assortment and delivery of value across

diverse and evolving. The wide range

segments and price tiers.

THE LIQUOR STORE SHOPPER IS DIVERSE AND EVOLVING SOPHISTICATED TAB ENTHUSIASTS

• Millennials • Look to drink and experiment with beer • Look for ratings, descriptions and pairings in store • Consider themselves Beer Connoisseurs • Prioritize ambiance, service and selection over price • Seek Craft and Imports often

SAVVY ENTERTAINER

• Skews Hispanic and Male LDA Millennials • Buys across all beer types to ensure there is something for everyone • Less likely to be loyal to a particular store or channel • Although they enjoy browsing, they are somewhat price conscious because they are buying TAB for themselves and others

CONNECTED BEER EXPLORER

• Under 40, mostly Millennial • Ethnically diverse • Price conscious • Will buy on impulse if product is new or ‘catches their eye’ • Buys across all beer types for Party Stop


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

The liquor channel has three distinct

up empty-handed, so smaller

formats, which shoppers describe as:

packs are usually picked up as

Destination, Neighborhood and Corner

others will contribute as well.

Stores. Regardless of the format, the

NOT ALL

STORES ARE CREATED EQUAL .

top-three consumer beer purchase

• CELEBRATE – Special times in

motivations are brands, cold beer and

life and special holidays are worth

pack size.

celebrating and a reason to bring

1. DESTINATION STORES are

everyone together. Shoppers are

designed for and appeal to the

looking for the right TAB to mark a

shopper seeking exploration and

special occasion. Beer is the

experimentation across a wide

beverage for the party without

variety of adult beverages.

breaking the bank.

that have large

described as familiar and comfortable

• SOCIAL – Relationship-building

specialized staff

places to shop for adult beverages.

opportunities in a casual, fun,

3. CORNER STORES are described

comfortable environment involve

as quick and cold with little to no

beer. Not everyone is close, and

exploration.

beer is chosen in an effort to socialize

2. NEIGHBORHOOD STORES are

DESTINATION 7% of outlets 13% of volume Large, warehouse, megastores selection and to help customers with questions

with a crowd-pleasing contribution.

NEIGHBOR-

As consumer behavior trends continue

As the industry has rapidly changed

61% of outlets

to evolve, it is essential that liquor

with the expansion of brewers,

65% of volume

stores address shopper expectations

liquor stores have been determined

in order to remain relevant and recruit

to make beer variety a channel

more beer shoppers and trips into

differentiator. However, it takes more

stores.

than wide selection to meet shopper

OCCASIONS

expectations. On average, liquor stores • CONNECT – The occasion is about

carry 2.2-times more beer product

spending time with one’s inner circle

selection than other large-format

in order to feel connected and be

channels.(4)

Medium-sized stores that vary in selection, size and staff to help with questions

CORNER STORE

oneself. The beer is a symbol of their bond. Shoppers don’t want to show

HOOD

During the rapid expansion of products

32% of outlets 22% of volume Smaller stores

SIGNIFICANT CONVERSION OPPORTUNIT Y (2)

with spaceconstrained

93% OF LIQUOR STORE SHOPPERS BUY BEER

YET ONLY

37% OF BEER SHOPPERS THAT SHOP LIQUOR STORES BUY BEER IN LIQUOR STORES

CONVERT MORE BEER SHOPPERS IN LIQUOR STORES

selection and minimal expectations for staff engagement(3)

19


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

Premium beer has

24%

more trips

than Above Premium

shoppers.(2)

21%

of FMB

shoppers

are exclusive to the

segment.(2)

78%

of the time

CRAFT BEERS are

consumed after 24 hours.

(2)

in liquor stores, beer trips are down

inspire more routine beer trips. Each

7.3%, and annual spending is down

segment has strengths, and when

7.8%. It’s important to prevent

balanced effectively with the right

barriers like a “lack of organizing

package mix will create incremental

principles making it difficult to

trips, velocity and revenue.

find what they need” and “too many options making selection overwhelming.”(5)

Economy

shoppers

SPEND 2X MORE than Above Premium

shoppers.(2)

20

D O LL A R S H A R E - M A LT B A SE D/ HARD CIDER

With all that choice, it is important to

12.0%

meet shopper expectations through a balance across segments and in-store

12-Pack 28.4%

12.2%

24/30 -Pack

expertise that elevate the experience

Singles

while maintaining an easy-to-shop environment.

6 -Pack

22.4%

25.0%

Remaining Packs

Liquor stores must offer a wide yet disciplined variety of brands and packages to improve conversion and

Nielsen Scantrack Data, 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016; Total Combined Liquor Plus; Liquor Channel is not projected to Total U.S.


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

Building with Beer ® Liquor combines

FASTGROWING SMALL PACKS

channel, category and shopper insights to support each format in identifying opportunities in their outlet. Neighborhood and Destination stores place a considerable emphasis on exploration and experimentation as a differentiator, but it only works for the shopper when accompanied

these items, especially singles, will help

by associate in-store knowledge and

capture shoppers seeking the variety

expertise.

and convenience the liquor store offers.

The right allocation of segment,

A disciplined balance of segment and

brand and package size is even

package mix provides liquor stores

more critical in the cooler as beer

with a competitive advantage over

shoppers purchase 91% of their

other channels, helping to drive

beer cold. Additionally, trends in

greater frequency as beer is purchased

the channel favor small pack sizes,

more than wine and spirits and plays

and investing in the expansion of

across broader occasions.

10,165,137

Premium Light

Premium Regular

12-PK = +3.6%(4)

38% BUY SINGLES

V E LO C I T Y PE R SK U D O LL A R S

18,456,142

6-PK = +5.4%

AND MULTIPACKS(2)

9,124,886

Budget

8,205,518

Near Premium

6,415,848

Super Premium

5,521,059

Impor t

3,165,030 FMB

3,282,891 2,452,523 Craf t

Hard Cider

Nielsen Scantrack Data, 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016; Total Combined Liquor Plus; Liquor Channel is not projected to Total U.S.

ECONOMY SHOPPERS BUY 1 CASE/

LIQUOR SHOPPERS SPEND MOST OF THEIR TIME AND MONEY IN THE COOLER. PERCENTAGE OF PURCHA SE COLD AMBIENT

Prominent brand/package placement in the cooler will drive conversion.

91% 9% 91% buy beer cold when beer is the primary reason for trip

MillerCoors Relevance Study, September 2016

WEEK VS. CRAFT SHOPPERS BUY 1 CASE/ 10 WEEKS(2)

21


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

Category

SPACE AND ASSORTMENT MAT TERS FOR SHOPABILIT Y

VARIETY ENCOURAGES routine VISITS.

PACKAGE MIX:

* Variety * Value

ABOVE PREMIUM

PREMIUM

* Occasion

ECONOMY

• Accelerate velocity

• Growth revenue

• Protect volume

• Double-digit growth trend

• Highest-velocity segment

• Most turns and trips

AVERAGE TURNS 26

7

Beer

Liquor

7

Wine

Willard Bishop Super Study, 2016

22

DISPL AYS MAT TER

important to their decision to

Location and relevance of beer

purchase, and 21% of their beer

displays have a significant impact.

purchases were incremental.(4)

1) Out-of-aisle beer displays

3) On non-beer-focused trips, 46%

generate higher lifts

of shoppers stated the display was

(45% vs. 16%).(4)

important to their beer purchase,

2) On beer-focused trips, 38% of

with 30% of the purchases being

shoppers stated the display was

incremental in some way.(4)


CO L D B E E R • A SS O R T M E N T • PAC K AG E VA R I E T Y

SHOPPERS EXPRESS A STRONG PREFERENCE FOR THEIR DESIRED PACK AGE T YPE

79%

}

EXCLUSIVITY

30%

49% CANS ONLY

BOTTLES ONLY

...CANS AND BOTTLES ARE NEEDED TO SATISFY SHOPPER NEEDS IN AMLL Nielsen Homescan Panel, Total US Grocery $2MM+, 52 weeks ending Aug. 13, 2014; Buyer Exclusivity; Total PL Container and 6-Pack PL containers

4) Family of brand or multi-brand

• Showcase beer early in the

displays drive 28% greater sales

shopping trip to drive greater

velocity than single brand

conversion and larger baskets

displays.

(4)

Don’ts LIQUOR STORE DO’S AND DON’TS

• Create out-of-stock issues in the cooler by reducing holding power of high-velocity Economy and Premium segments

Do’s • Implement a disciplined cooler management program • Balance variety and choice with a strong segment and package approach • Improve the in-store experience, matching knowledge and expertise with variety and selection • Create a clear path to cooler to drive more routine beer trips and expand

• Under-represent segments that alienate core, routine shoppers • Block the path and sightlines to the beer cooler creating a situation where the routine beer shopper feels alienated • Silo beer, wine and spirits when displaying. Instead, find basket building opportunities to appeal to shoppers looking for inspiration

occasions • Create cross-segment displays and inspiring points of interruption to improve conversion

Sources: 1. Nielsen TDLinx Total Liquor Channel, Jan. 13, 2017 2. Nielsen Panel Data, 52 weeks ending Nov. 26, 2016 3. MillerCoors STR Case Data, 52 weeks ending Oct. 22, 2016 4. Nielsen, 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016 5. MillerCoors Custom TNS Landis Landscape Study 2011-2016

23


F O O D + B E E R â&#x20AC;˘ M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S â&#x20AC;˘ A S S O R T M E N T

GROCERY STORES Grocery stores are the largest class of INCREASE STORE PRESENCE!

trade in the consumer goods industry, accounting for 40% of consumer goods 25% of beer is sold in grocery. This mix of conventional, value-oriented

65% MORE

VALUABLE than trips without beer.

(1)

and high-end operators competing for

ON

MULTIPLE

TRIP TYPES:

25%

stock-up trips

33%

fill-in trips

42%

quick trips(6)

been strong across routine stock-up occasions. However, consumer and shopper behavior is evolving into more

expectations of diverse trip missions. This is true for beer. Beer is the fourthlargest category in grocery year round and the No. 1 category during the summer months.(4) As beer SKUs have proliferated, grocery stores have expanded their selection. Grocery stores average about 268 SKUs per store while the amount of space has remained mostly unchanged.(4) This increase in brands has led to

Stock-Up Trip (16+ Total Items) Index: 52

33%

Fill-In Trip (5-15 Total Items) Index: 93

Grocery stores have traditionally

higher levels of out-of-stocks and a 24

Quick Trip (1-4 Total Items) Index: 259

the channel.

stores to change execution to meet PURCHASED

42%

declining physical shopping trips within

purposeful trips that will require grocery BEER IS

25%

volume and more than 33,000 stores. class of trade is very diverse with a

Beer trips are

G R O CE RY CH A N N E L T R I P T Y PE S

Video Mining, September 2016


F O O D + B E E R • M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S • A S S O R T M E N T BEER PLAYS A CRITICAL ROLE IN GROCERY: • HIGH CONVERSION RATE • BUILDS LARGER BASKETS

more challenging consumer shopping

opportunities to ensure beer is

experience. Unfortunately, grocery

purchased with food for specific

stores are losing shoppers, trips and

occasions.

share of total beer dollars. Beer plays a critical role in grocery

• COMPLEMENTS A MEAL

Crossdepartment

There are ways to turn this around, but

with high conversion rates, but

first it’s important to understand the

trip conversion can be improved.

reasons why people shop for beer at

This is a significant opportunity for

INCREASE

grocery stores.

customers to build larger baskets and

basket size.

DISPLAYS will

improve frequency of purchase while

THE SHOPPER

complementing occasions with food.

The beer trip is important considering it is 65% more valuable than trips that

• RELAX OCCASION: Shoppers enjoy

do not include beer. Additionally, beer

drinking beer to kick back, either at

is purchased on multiple trip types –

home alone or over a meal with a

25% on stock-up trips, 33% on fill-in

partner. Shopping trips for these

trips, and 42% on quick trips, where

routine, everyday occasions are

beer is the primary trigger category.

(6)

planned with hopes of getting everything bought in one place.

The basket value is 57%

GREATER

on beer trips vs. non-beer trips.(1)

There is an opportunity for retailers to leverage a large beer category and evolving shopper behaviors with a greater presence around the store to satisfy the shopper needs. THE OCCASIONS Meals are the cornerstone of the grocery trip. While shoppers have a variety of options to fulfill their beverage needs, there are various occasions where food and beer are

50% of Americans consider themselves foodies. Food is the #1 category on Pinterest.(7)

the focus. It is essential to identify 25


F O O D + B E E R • M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S • A S S O R T M E N T selves and live in the moment. Sharing

Beer

a meal with those who mean the most

displays

to us is a break in our routine and often

to support

means a fill-in trip to the shopper’s

feature

everyday store, which enables a fast trip

ads drive

with protein as the focus.

33% lift.(4)

Beer is a preferred beverage option as the occasion requires a quality, smooth,

16%

refreshing drink to go with food while

state that

in the store perimeter or in the meat

allowing guests to relax and connect in a down-to-earth way. Providing beer

of shoppers

DISPLAYS

INFLUENCE them to make unplanned category purchases.(2)

$ SPENT PER SHOPPING TRIP

$75.77 with Beer $48.26 without Beer This basket drives

significant sales and

gross profit dollars per week for

the average store.(1)

26

department ensures conversion and Shoppers are realistic about what they

inspires incremental sales.

can accomplish at meal time, so crossdepartmental displays featuring simple

• SOCIAL OCCASION: Entertaining

meals and small packs will increase

at home or going to someone’s home

basket size and improve beer trip

for a get-together is an opportunity

conversion.

to build stronger relationships and feel accepted and confident. Food is always

• CONNECT OCCASION: Small get-

present, but often as a lighter, snacking

togethers with close friends and family

option. Alcohol adds a little

are used to reconnect, be our authentic

excitement. Creating simple cross-


F O O D + B E E R • M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S • A S S O R T M E N T merchandising interruptions with

is a key time to inspire cross-segment

basket-building snacking items is

displays, leverage larger packs and

an opportunity for customers to

interesting food pairings.

Grocery stores are

build baskets. BUILDING WITH BEER

®

• CELEBRATE OCCASION: An event to

Fortunately, there are steps retailers can

honor something special has a bigger,

take to capitalize on the opportunity.

more energized crowd. These events

First, balancing SKUs across segments

require a thoughtful plan in order to

and pack size is one way to simplify the

make it memorable. Shoppers will

shop, maximize revenue and profit, and

make special trips and shop across

reduce out-of-stocks while exceeding

departments to find everything they

changing shopper expectations. The

need while seeking inspiration and

increase in complexity and the focus on

variety to find just the right item. This

simplifying the shop by leveraging display

$

Share of

off-premise class of trade for beer.(4)

Velocity

LAGERS

Percent

Cider

YA

Distribution

24.4

(0.9%)

10.2

$91,665,265

7.1

(0.4%)

5.9

$49,025,264

with 11% of

Economy

12.7

(3.3%)

10.2

$48,134,133

the space.

Super Premium

6.0

6.9%

5.2

$43,292,444

Import

19.8

4.0%

18.1

$42,566,542

Craft

21.5

5.4%

33.4

$24,177,253

Hard Cider

2.0

(9.4%)

4.0

$16,969,447

Premium American Light Lagers Premium American Lagers

Change

Cider Item

per SKU

LIGHT

Malt/ Hard

Malt/Hard

largest

AMERICAN

Y E A R - E N D PE R FO R M A N CE BY T Y PE $ Share

the 2nd

Dollars

represent

25% OF THE GROCERY VOLUME

CRAFT

represents

21% OF THE VOLUME

Nielsen Scantrack Data, 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016

with 33% of TO P 2 % O F SK US (~4 0 0 I TE M S ) D R I V E C ATEG O RY 75% OF BEER CATEGORY $ VOLUME

the space.

IMPORTS represent

19% OF THE

80% OF BEER CATEGORY CASE VOLUME

92%

VOLUME

with 19% of the space.(4)

OF BEER CATEGORY $ GROWTH Nielsen Point of Sale Data, 52 weeks ending 2016

27


F O O D + B E E R • M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S • A S S O R T M E N T

2010:

M O R E I TE M S , LE SS ACCO M PA N I E D BY D I S PL AY

192 SKUs

2015:

Number of Beer (Malt/Hard Cider) Items Featured

269 SKUs

Number of Beer (Malt/Hard Cider) Items Featured with Display

+40% Avg

items per store(5)

18.8

INNOVATION

22.7

21.1

27.5

25.9

7.3

7.8

7.8

8.0

CAL YR 2012 W/E 01/05/13

CAL YR 2013 W/E 01/04/14

CAL YR 2014 W/E 01/03/15

CAL YR 2015 W/E 01/02/16

8.1

has

accounted for MORE

THAN 50% of beer

category

CAL YR 2016 W/E 12/31/16

Nielsen through Dec 31, 2016

VOLUME over the

past three years.(4)

execution serves multiple purposes to

When displaying beer it is important to

improve basket size, increase trips and

understand that not all segments,

maximize conversion.

brands and pack sizes yield the same efficiency and effectiveness for the

Effective display execution is a great PREMIUM

AMERICAN LIGHT

LAGER

generates 2X

VELOCITY per SKU than

other

28

way to cut through complexity and simplify the shop. Done right, displays

Grocery has historically been strong

will increase revenue with supporting

in stock-up trips and large-pack beer

feature ad activity, improve category

features, but as the shopper continues

engagement and inspire people to pair

to evolve, pack size matters to impact

beer with their meals.

meal and social occasions.

• Beer displays to support feature

MORE

segments.

category.

(4)

activity drives +33% lift

Finally, carry the right packs. Grocery

• Beer displays with discounted pricing

stores sell around 56% of the volume

are noticed three-times more than

in small packs (6- and 12-packs). Six-

other displays

packs are the fastest-growing pack

• Beer displays re-engage existing

size in grocery followed by singles

shoppers with 16% of shoppers

and then 12-packs. Driving points of

saying display impacts their buying

interruption throughout the store will

decisions (2)

meet the needs of the shopper.(4)


F O O D + B E E R • M U LT I P L E O CC A S I O N S • A S S O R T M E N T G R O CE RY Y E A R - E N D PE R FO R M A N CE Total U.S.

Total U.S. Food

Package

$ Share

$%

Units %

Units Share

Chg YA

Malt/Hard Cider

Size

Malt/Hard Cider

Chg YA

Singles

7.2

1.9%

(0.3%)

27.7

6-PK

25.6

5.4%

2.6%

27.8

12-PK

30.5

3.6%

3.3%

22.1

24-PK

12.1

(2.2%)

(4.1%)

6.0

30-PK

7.9

(2.0%)

(2.8%)

3.8

All Other

16.8

(1.9%)

(4.4%)

12.7

Nielsen Scantrack Data, 52 weeks ending Dec. 31, 2016

DO SHOPPERS RECALL IN -STORE DISPL AYS? YES! RECALL THE T YPE OF PRODUCT ON DISPL AY

62% RECALL THE BRAND OF PRODUCT ON DISPLAY

53% RECALL THE LOCATION OF THE DISPL AY

68% Great Northern Instore, February 2017

• Increase basket rings by creating points of interruption aligned with meal solutions • Maximize velocity and turns with the right execution of display support across segments and brands • Focus space on core items Don’ts • Replace highly effective and wide reaching ad boxes with less effective segments and brands • Create out-of-stock issues in the cooler by reducing holding power of high-

GROCERY DO’S AND DON’TS

velocity Economy and Premium segments • Restrict the basket-building beer category from being displayed and

Do’s • Improve feature strategy to generate traffic, drive points of differentiation and balanced trip missions • Balance space and assortment to align with variety and velocity needs across all segments to satisfy shopper demand, minimize out-of-stocks and generate greater efficiency

cross-merchandised with food offerings • Display non-featured beer segments/ brands in place of featured brands that act as an in-store reminder and drive conversion Sources: 1. Nielsen Homescan Panel Data, 52 weeks ending July 2, 2016 2. Display relevance study, September 2016 3. MillerCoors STR Case Data, 52 weeks ending Oct. 22, 2016 4. Nielsen ScanTrack Data 52 weeks ending Dec 31, 2016 5. InfoScout Panel & Survey, 2016 6. Video Mining, September 2016 7. Food Marketing Institute, US Grocery Shopping Trends, 2016

29


GROWTH • CONVENIENCE • STRONG CONTENT

eCOMMERCE

U.S. HOUSEHOLDS BUYING GROCERIES ONLINE 2016: 36% 2015: 31%

B E E R VO LU M E S H A R E BY

CHANNEL DYNAMICS Purchasing groceries online is no longer

e CO M M E R CE CL A SS O F T R A D E

a niche behavior. The percentage of U.S. households that bought groceries online has nearly doubled in just three years: 20% in 2014 vs. 36% in 2016.(1) Online

77.2%

grocery shopping will continue to grow at an accelerated rate as more than 50% of

3.3%

2014: 20%

consumers indicate that they are willing

ACCELERATED

available.(6) Projections indicate that by

3rd PART Y

2020 eCommerce will command a 10%

DIRECT CR AFT BREWERY

share of total grocery spend.

BRICK AND MORTAR

PACE OF

ADOPTION!

9.7%

to use online grocery ordering if it were

(2)

10%

PURE PL AY MillerCoors Projection, December 2016

ONLINE BEER SHOPPER IS: • male • higher-income

e CO M M E R CE

Beer household online beer purchase

EXPONENTIAL

penetration is only 4% but is poised

G R OW T H

for accelerated growth as the changing 10.0%

( S h a r e o f To t a l

more widely available to shoppers.(3)

Grocer y Spend)

7.1%

In 2016, online beer sales totaled 11.3 million equivalent cases representing

5.1%

2.4%

3.0%

retail landscape makes online beer much

only 0.4% of total industry volume, with

3.8%

third-party delivery apps commanding a dominant share. Moving forward, online beer is expected to grow at an

2015

2016

Willard Bishop

30

2017

2018

2019

2020

accelerated rate, reaching more than 5% of total industry volume by 2020 with Large Format Brick and Mortar


GROWTH • CONVENIENCE • STRONG CONTENT and Pure Play retailers achieving a dominant share as they roll eCommerce, including beer, out to a majority of their stores and distribution centers.(5) WHO’S THE SHOPPER? Compared with online grocery shoppers in general, the online beer shopper is younger (41 vs. 49 years old), 58% male and higher income ($123k vs. $96k).(3) While Millennials do index higher for online shopping, it is clear that all age groups appreciate the convenience and are increasing their use of online grocery shopping. BUILDING WITH BEER® There are three key retailer strategies for a successful online grocery and alcohol program. 1. Provide strong website content. 2. Deliver a convenient customer experience. 3. Optimize operational efficiencies

and profitability.

in-store AND online purchase intent. More than 50% of online beer shoppers do research online before going in

Mobile-first strategy is

imperative!

store to buy beer. The information they are looking for includes basics, such as beer item availability, price per ounce, container type and key product characteristics, including alcohol by

CORE

SHOPPERS WHO

BUY BEER

volume. But they are also looking for

Annual Beer Spend

more inspirational content, such as

(PER HOUSEHOL D)

information on what beer styles and PROVIDE STRONG WEBSITE CONTENT

brands to buy, food and beer pairings,

Strong online content can influence

and recipes.

TOP FIVE BEER PURCHASE OCCASIONS FOR ONLINE SHOPPERS BUY AS A GIFT

44%

BUY DURING MAJOR HOLIDAYS

42%

BUY FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS BUY FOR PLANNED SOCIAL ENTERTAINMENT BUY FOR OUTDOOR BBQS & PARTIES

Brand Hook Study, December 2015

39% 34% 33%

$121.40 Households Shopping In-store Only

+12% $135.97 Households

Shopping Both In-store and Online Willard Bishop 2016 eCommerce SuperStudy™

31


GROWTH • CONVENIENCE • STRONG CONTENT TR ADITIONAL PL AYERS ENTERING ONLINE CPG BRICK &

53%

MOR TAR Traditional brick-and-mortar retailers adding online purchase options for their shoppers NON TR ADITIONAL PL AYERS ENTERING ONLINE CPG

3RD PART Y Delivery apps that partner with brick-and-mortar retailers to provide online delivery

45%

of online beer

shoppers research online prior to

purchasing in-store

43%

of those using online

are searching for

are checking the

inspiration

prior to a beer shop

availability of the beer

some type of

Brand Hook Study, December 2015

Content and images need to work

an order. The key for the online retailer

across different platforms, including

is to employ a search algorithm that

desktop, tablet and mobile. In the

delivers what the consumer wants on

U.S., smartphones accounted for

the search results page, while also

the highest share of online traffic

supporting the brands it knows will

at 47%.

result in conversion.

(7)

Retailers need to take a

mobile-first strategy to content. Many shoppers also use website

PROVIDE

department filters instead of the

STRONG WEBSITE

search bar. It is important to organize

CONTENT BY:

category filters in a way that is intuitive

1. Providing complete

to shoppers so they can easily navigate

and accurate basic

to the beer styles and brands.

product content PURE PL AY

2. Offering inspirational advanced

Leverage on-demand analytics to

content solutions

make the shopping experience more

Online retailers that operate out of non-shoppable distribution centers

3. Focusing on mobile content first

personal. An important element

— if you get that right, the rest

of personalization is list-building

is easy

functionality that customers can

DIREC T CR AF T BREWER Craft breweries that are able to legally ship beer direct to consumers

32

easily upload to their shopping cart. DELIVER A CONVENIENT

Another is to provide suggestions for

CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

complementary purchases based on

Almost two-thirds of those

items selected as well as forgotten

placing an online grocery order that included beer did not repeat.

items generated by shopping history. (4)

Consumers are becoming accustomed Many grocery websites are not

to being offered what they want, how

optimized at this point, and the

they want it, when they want it. In the

experience isn’t great for online

context of online grocery this also

grocery shoppers. The sites are

includes the right fulfillment options in

clunky and take too long to build

the time windows that work for them


GROWTH • CONVENIENCE • STRONG CONTENT and at the right cost. Whether it is

Online beer is profitable. Only a

home delivery, “click and collect” or

handful of the top-selling online

refrigerated lockers, convenience is

categories outpace beer in per-unit

the key for consumers. The process

profits. In fact, an average beer SKU

becomes easier for customers after

generates more than twice the per-

the third order. Customers who

unit profits of an average store SKU.

order three times are significantly

Adding beer to the retailer’s online

more likely to become loyal online

offering provides a bigger opportunity

shoppers.

to generate higher per-unit profits

(4)

3

is the

MAGIC

NUMBER!

After three orders,

LOYALTY

SPIKES.(4)

than most other items in basket.(4) OPTIMIZE OPERATIONAL

EFFICIENCIES AND PROFITABILITY

eCOMMERCE DO’S AND DON’TS

Online economics are challenging and can be margin dilutive. Best-

TRAFFIC BY PLATFORM

in-class grocery retailers are taking a long-term view of eCommerce

eCOMMERCE

FORMAT

by providing a convenient online

Do’s

experience while simultaneously

• Deliver strong web content

testing various operational and

• Build convenient and powerful

fulfillment solutions to improve the

website navigation and search

economics of their online program.

functionality

9% 44%

47%

• Personalize the shopping experience Store Pick models experience high

• Offer convenient customer

Tablet

out-of-stock rates, which drive up

service

labor costs and contribute to a poor

• Optimize operational efficiencies

Smartphone

shopping experience.(4) In the beer

and profitability

category 40% of the SKUs represent

• Provide convenient fulfillment

95% of sales. Focusing on a core group

options for pick-up/delivery

of UPCs that are ordered frequently among most online grocery shoppers

Don’ts

will make it easier to manage inventory

• Complicate navigation with too many

and significantly reduce online out-of-

filters

stocks.(4)

• Go live unless user experience works

Desktop Demandware Shopping Index report, September 2016

well for mobile Beer can strengthen online programs

• Offer better pricing and deals in-store

in a number of ways. Core grocery

vs. online

shoppers who buy beer are threetimes more likely to buy beer online with their groceries than non-core shoppers and spend 12% more per week on beer when they shop both in-store AND online.(4)

Sources: 1. Lightspeed/Mintel August 2016 2. Willard Bishop Projection, 2016 3. Brand Hook Study, December 2015 4. Willard Bishop 2016 eCommerce SuperStudy™ 5. MillerCoors Projection, December 2016 6. A.T. Kearney 2015 Study of On-Line Grocery Shopping 7. Demandware Shopping Index report, September 2016

33


CO N V E N I E N C E • I M M E D I AC Y • VA LU E + A SS O R T M E N T

DRUG STORES

The drug store channel is a relatively

Beer is

WHO’S THE SHOPPER?

small class of trade, representing only

Drug is the preferred channel for

2% of beer industry volume. However,

convenience among female

MORE

the drug channel’s top three retailers

shoppers. They represent 66% of

all fall within the top 15 chain accounts

total store trips and 60% of total

for their total beer category volume.

beer sales.(5)

THAN $1.3 BILLION

in drug store sales.

(1)

Beer is a large business for drug retailers, ranking No. 3 among front-

The drug channel serves two

end categories and No. 2 based on

primary roles for most shoppers:

velocity per store.

• Provides convenience and

B E E R I S T H E T H I R D - L A R G E S T C ATEG O RY I N D R U G Ve l o c i t y o f b e e r t r u m p s c a n d y, b u t s t i l l l a g s b e h i n d t o b a c c o.

Beer ranks 2nd in

category velocity.

60

%

OF DRUG S TORE BEER IS BOUGHT BY FEMALE S.

BEER IS THE

3rd

L ARGEST DRUG

DOLLAR VOLUME

VELOCITY ($/TDP)

RANK

TR ADITIONAL TOBACCO

$2,874,977,689

$437,058

1

CANDY

$2,850,458,112

$77,819

2

BEER

$1,305,895,263

$359,733

3

SOFT DRINKS

$1,043,591,711

$158,050

4

LIQUOR

$919,908,808

$341,634

5

SALT Y SNACKS

$906,086,180

$75,714

6

WINE

$735,623,708

$177,705

7

NEW AGE BEVER AGES

$672,930,003

$100,376

8

WATER

$588,024,237

$152,606

9

NUTS

$445,931,963

$99,207

10

CATEGORY. Nielsen Scan Data, latest 52 weeks ending Oct. 15, 2016, Total Drug

34


CO N V E N I E N C E • I M M E D I AC Y • VA LU E + A SS O R T M E N T

87%

healthy lifestyle solutions.

and social occasions that support

• Serves as a convenient place

many drug shoppers’ expectations

for female shoppers to make

for a healthy lifestyle. Relaxing

quick, in-and-out trips.

and connecting with friends/family are key and these occasions account

WHAT ARE THE OCCASIONS?

for the majority of drug beer

Beer plays a key role in the personal

consumption occasions.

OF DRUG SHOPPERS BUY SOMETHING ELSE WITH BEER: Food

and snacks:

PR E M I U M A M E R I C A N LI G H T L AG E R & I M P O R T

55%

ACCO U N T FO R M O R E T H A N H A LF O F TOTA L C ATEG O RY

Pharmacy

$ SHARE

SHARE OF SKUs

$ / SKU

PREMIUM AMERICAN LIGHT L AGER

30.9

23.2

$302,324

IMPORT

27.2

22.5

$274,587

CR AFT

9.3

15.7

$134,010

PREMIUM REGUL AR

8.8

8.8

$227,804

PREMIUM AMERICAN L AGER

7.7

7.7

$229,532

ECONOMY

6.8

5.7

$272,135

SUPER PREMIUM

4.3

5.6

$177,729

FL AVORED MALT BEVER AGE

3.2

7.0

$103,220

HARD CIDER

0.9

1.9

$112,451

MALT LIQUOR

0.6

1.1

$121,803

COOLERS

0.3

0.9

$65,896

ALTERNATIVE

0.0

0.0

$74,506

items: 30%

Other

alcoholic

beverage: 27%(5)

Premium

American

Light Lager is the

#1 beer

segment

based on

share and $/SKU.

Nielsen Scan Data, latest 52 weeks ending Oct. 15, 2016, Total Drug

35


CO N V E N I E N C E • I M M E D I AC Y • VA LU E + A SS O R T M E N T

AWARENESS Physical

Most don’t know drug retailers sell beer.

HEALTHY 46%

54%

C+R Drug Shopper Research Study, May 2016

PERCEIVED VALUE

With price as driver, many perceive better value in other channels.

About 25% cite price as top reason for not purchasing beer at drug store. C+R Drug Shopper Research Study, May 2016

of drug chain beer buyers agree strongly/somewhat that: “Sharing a beer is an important part of how I connect with friends and family.”

Mental/Emotional

LIFEST YLE

Unsure/ Unaware Chain Drug Retailers Sell Beer Aware Chain Drug Retailers Sell Beer

70%

Spiritual

67%

of drug chain beer buyers agree strongly/somewhat that: “Beer is an important part of me-time.”

C+R Drug Shopper Research Study, May 2016

The majority of drug shoppers

AWARENESS

consider beer appropriate in the drug

• Capture leakage by building

store channel. They see a drug store

awareness through in- and

as a place for convenient, in-and-out,

out-of-store messaging that

immediate-need trips.

connects with occasions. Thematic

(3)

beer displays are a great way to BUILDING WITH BEER

®

connect. Beer displays drive

The biggest beer opportunities for

incremental sales and deliver more

drug retailers are low beer shopper

sales per square foot of floor space

conversion and trip leakage to

than wine or spirits in drug stores.(6)

competing channels. Of all the beer-

• Target in-store messaging to shoppers

buying households that shop drug

who are not necessarily visiting the

stores, only 10% of them buy beer in a

beer aisle (endcaps, special displays,

drug store, leaving the remaining beer

circular ads, etc.) while focusing the

purchases to competing channels.

messaging on small packs (6- and

(2)

12-packs) as these packs make up ASSORTMENT

The grocery channel captures the greatest

more than 50% of drug revenue and

share of non-drug chain beer trips and

are more likely to drive trial with

Do drug stores offer my favorite brands refrigerated?

is perceived as offering a wide beer

female guests.(1)

selection at a good value as part of a

• Also, try to leverage key equities in

Drug Beer Buyers

one-stop-shop destination. That said,

messaging (e.g., drug is considered

many drug chain beer buyers consider

less crowded/busy than grocery,

the drug channel to be better for quick

more pleasant to shop than c-stores

convenience trips (less crowded/busy)

and more convenient than liquor

and are making brief, focused trips that

stores) to take advantage of strengths

the drug channel could fulfill. The top

vs. other retail channels.(3)

67% AGREE

Drug Non-Beer Buyers, Aware Drug Sells Beer 22% AGREE

About 20% of drug non-beer buyers cite limited selection as big barrier to purchase. C+R Drug Shopper Research Study, May 2016

36

(3)

barriers preventing these shoppers from purchasing beer at drug stores center

PERCEIVED VALUE

on awareness and perceptions of value

• Let shoppers know how much they

and assortment.

will save by ensuring clear execution

(3)


CO N V E N I E N C E • I M M E D I AC Y • VA LU E + A SS O R T M E N T DRUG CHANNEL

IMPACT OF DISPLAY

BEER SHOPPER

AVERAGE DISPLAY SIZE

DISPLAY $ PER FT 2

LIFT $ PER FT 2

SPIRITS

8 Ft 2

$16

$3

WINE

8 Ft 2

$11

$1

BEER

10 Ft

$52

$12

2

Nielsen Drug Store Audit of TAB Displays, 2014

CONVERSION 10% 90%

CONVERTED UNCONVERTED

of promotional pricing at retail

• Cold beer assortment is critical –

– accurate shelf price tags and

82% of drug store shoppers buy

eye-catching value offer displays.

refrigerated beer, while 22% buy

• Leverage displays that cross-

room-temperature beer.(3)

Nielsen Homescan latest 52 weeks ending Aug. 27, 2016

merchandise beer with categories that have high affinity to beer

DRUG STORE DO’S AND DON’TS

baskets. • 87% of drug shoppers buy something else with beer: food and snacks – 55%; other alcohol

Do’s

beverage – 27%.

• Use displays to increase the

(3)

• Economy beer over-indexes in

awareness of beer availability in

drug (110 index vs. grocery ),

store

skewing toward Gen X and Baby

• Cross-promote beer with other

Boomer shoppers. Promoting

categories to communicate value

Economy beer on a regular basis

and increase the size of the

can be an effective way to

shopper’s basket

communicate value and reduce

• Focus assortment on core items

leakage to competition.

that fulfill the most consumer

(1)

(4)

occasions ASSORTMENT

• Clearly promote the price at retail

• Even though grocery and liquor stores are recognized as offering

Don’ts

greater beer variety, the most

• Allow beer items on shelf and

common beer purchases across the

display to have missing price

relax and connect consumption

tags

occasions are 6- and 12-packs of

• Include items that are not

regular domestic beer brands and

planogramed in the cooler

leading Imports, suggesting drug stores can meet the assortment needs of most shoppers by focusing on these segments and packs.(3)

Sources: 1. Nielsen AOD, 52 weeks ending Oct. 15, 2016 2. Nielsen Homescan latest 52 weeks ending Aug. 27, 2016 3. C+R Drug Shopper Research Study, May 2016 4. MillerCoors BTS Survey, 52 weeks ending Oct. 15, 2016 5. National Drug Retailer Shopper Card Data, 2015 6. Nielsen Drug Store Audit of TAB Displays, 2014

37


AWARENESS • CONNEC T & REL A X • IN -S TORE E XECUTION

DOLLAR STORES

Household

Penetration

Dollar stores are the fastest-growing channel, driven by consumer needs

$34.72 when beer in basket

for value and convenience. Since 2001 dollar channel household penetration

66%

has increased from 59% to 66%, and the

GROW TH

59% 2001

BEER RANKS 3RD in dollars per point of distribution.

PROJECTION:

10,000+

tripled in the same timeframe, totaling more than 27,000 outlets. (6)

were up 37%, while the number of dollar

10,000 dollar stores could be selling

stores selling beer has dramatically

beer within the next three years.(3)

increased since 2012, approaching 8,000 stores.(1) Beer sales per store are

Beer is the third-most productive

increasing, too, up 25% in 2016 vs. a year

consumable category tracked by

ago.(1) As volume and sales continue to

Nielsen in terms of velocity ($/point of

grow, projections indicate that more than

distribution), surpassed only by milk and bread.(1) Premium American Light

DOLL AR STORES SELLING BEER Number of Stores Selling Beer

beer

within

3 years

$28,208

on both revenue and productivity ($/ item). Beer also helps increase basket $34.72 when beer is in the basket.(4)

$22,632 $20,448

WHO’S THE SHOPPER?

$15,279

Dollar is the preferred convenience

$10,315

3,852

Lagers and Economy lead the way based

rings from $15.84 without beer to

Beer Dollars per Store

outlets selling

Nielsen Homescan latest 52 weeks ending Aug. 27, 2016

Total 2016 beer sales in dollar outlets

Dollar

5,023

6,260

7,203

7,927

channel for female shoppers, who represent 72% of total store trips. Dollar store shoppers also tend to skew lower income with 45% of shoppers earning

4YAG

3YAG

Nielsen through Oct. 15, 2016

38

$15.84 when beer NOT in basket

number of dollar stores has more than

2016

2YAG

YAG

L52

less than $30,000 per year.(2)


AWARENESS • CONNEC T & REL A X • IN -S TORE E XECUTION WHAT ARE THE OCCASIONS?

small-format shoppers buy cold beer,

• Connect: A time to spend with

it is critical to have a cooler door

friends/family • Relax: An after-work transition to me-time that usually involves singles

assortment strategy that focuses on the core items that consumers purchase most.(5) • Start with the right mix of singles and

Beer shoppers buy packs that perfectly

multipacks. Based on Nielsen space

match these occasions. Three-quarters

audits, the optimal beer cooler

of their beer purchase dollars are small

allocation is 25% singles and 75%

packs (multipacks of 12 or less) with less

multipacks.(7)

than 20% coming from larger than

• Ensure that each brand/pack choice

18-packs.(1) Singles are also a large

drives incremental revenue and profit

opportunity. They fit with the relax

based on the store’s consumer profile.

occasion and drive only 6% of dollar sales, but make up 22% of the unit sales.(1)

FEMALE SHOPPERS

3. IN-STORE EXECUTION Display execution and reducing out-

BUILDING WITH BEER®

of-stocks are the biggest execution

The biggest beer opportunities for

opportunities. Displays help to create

dollar retailers are low beer shopper

awareness for beer and serve as backstock

conversion and trip leakage to competing

for fast-moving items, especially if they are

channels. Of all the beer-buying house-

on promotion. Reducing out-of-stocks is

holds that shop dollar stores, only 3% of

critical to maintaining strong growth trends

them buy beer in the dollar channel.(4)

and requires a coordinated effort between

72%

82%

of shoppers

BUY BEER COLD.

the retailer, brewer and distributor network Dollar retailers must overcome three

supported by solid store-level execution.

barriers in order to drive continued growth and increase conversion.

DOLL AR STORE DO’S AND DON’TS

1. AWARENESS • Capture leakage by building awareness for COLD beer through

Do’s

in- and out-of-store messaging.

• Build awareness for COLD beer

• Target messaging to shoppers who

• Implement an effective assortment

are not visiting the beer aisle (end-

strategy that includes singles

caps, special displays, circular ads,

• Reduce out-of-stocks

etc.) while focusing the messaging on small packs, as these are more

Don’ts

likely to drive trial with female guests.

• Under-order items that will be featured in upcoming ads

2. EFFECTIVE ASSORTMENT

• Deter distributors from building

• Dollar stores tend to have limited

mandated displays

cooler space. Given that 82% of

• Sell warm beer only

Sources: 1. Nielsen through Oct. 15, 2016 2. Nielsen Homescan, latest 52 weeks ending Dec. 30, 2016 3. MillerCoors Internal Estimate, December 2016 4. Nielsen Homescan, latest 52 weeks ending Aug. 27, 2016 5. C+R Research, May 2016 6. Nielsen TDLinx through January 2016 7. Nielsen Space Audit, July 2015

39


MILLENNIALS

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

ON-PREMISE OVERVIEW

$49.6 BILLION YEAREND BEER SALES 2 0 16

Beer is

47% of TAB

sales in the

on-premise.

Alcohol contributes 16% to

Putting the ON back in the ON-premise! The on-premise is THE place to seed

Beer continues to play the dominant

and build categories and brands. The

role in the on-premise environment.

channel is unique in that it offers the

The category contributes more than

opportunity to target demographics

40% to the total alcohol beverage

and occasions to create experiences

sales in three primary classes of trade:

that will surprise and delight guests. • Neighborhood bar: These local And on-premise accounts cater to

hangouts meet the needs for social

a desirable audience. Regardless

and connect occasions.

of demographics, the on-premise

• Sports bar: These venues provide an

consumer is one of the most valuable

opportunity to connect while

and engaged consumers out there.

watching the big game with friends.

They see the on-premise as the

• Casual dining: These restaurants

perfect escape – escape from work

give large and small groups the

and everyday demands and escape

opportunity to connect over a

to friends and family.

good meal.

2 016 TOTA L O N - PR E M I SE A LCO H O L B E V E R AG E SA LE S

total Food and Beverage sales. Tec hnomic, Ju ne 2016

Beer ($M)

Wine ($M)

Spirits ($M)

Total ($M)

$49,592

$19,898

$36,784

$106,274

Change vs. 2015

2.0%

2.0%

2.8%

2.3%

Contribution

47%

19%

35%

100%

Beer ($M)

Wine ($M)

Spirits ($M)

(3.1%)

(1.3%)

1.8%

Type Sales

Technomic, June 2016

Type Volume vs. 2015 Nielsen CGA, December 2016

40


MILLENNIALS

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

Combined, these three classes of

own or with friends) rather than

trade represent more than 75% of

going out. The occasion is not

total on-premise sales revenue.

changing – it’s shifting away from the on-premise. This trend is

But it’s no secret that the

made easier by digital technology,

on-premise is seeing ongoing

which enables people to “source”

challenges with decreased traffic

entertainment from the comfort

and increased competition.

of their homes. People can get

Consumers increasingly expect

virtually anything via an app

on-premise operators to make

(music, food and beer delivery,

leaving the house worthwhile.

etc.) and they can use their

21- to 27year-olds

SEEK new

and unique

experiences and

alternatives to

traditional venues.

devices to connect with others This is particularly true for the

all over the world. Why leave?

21- to 27-year-old set, which is constantly seeking out new and

The second challenge is a more

unique experiences and is finding

recent phenomenon: the rise of

alternatives to traditional

the beer tasting room. There are

on-premise venues. As as result

more than 5,400 tasting rooms

of this adventure-seeking trend,

doing business in the United

Millennial consumers are driving

States.

rapid changes in the on-premise landscape.

The impact they are having,

5,400+

beer tasting rooms in

the U.S., a big

on-premise competitor

Foursquare, August 2016

particularly on neighborhood bars, Solutions exist, but let’s first dig

is significant. That’s because they

into two big challenges confronting

are stealing the most valuable visits

the on-premise.

– weekends and late nights. These new, intriguing beer tasting rooms

The first challenge is a longstanding

provide unique experiences that

one – declining traffic. It’s the

21- to 27-year-old consumers seek.

primary reason for the decline in beer unit sales in recent years.

Consumers are able to engage

Restaurants and bars account for

the brewers, connect and have

approximately 95% of the estimated

quality conversations with their

300,000+ on-premise outlets in the

friends. Further, they get to enjoy

United States.(1) The traffic trend in

the product where it is brewed.

the key casual dining and bar classes

There is often entertainment and

of trade remains negative, and there’s

increasingly there is a kitchen (or

no sign of an imminent turnaround.

food truck) that provides food. There’s a sense of being part of a

This trend is driven in part by people

local community and it’s authentic

choosing to stay at home (on their

– a feature important to Millennials.

IN BEER TASTING ROOMS, THE FOCUS IS ON BEER!

Cash-

strapped

Millennials

are moving off-premise for

budgetary reasons.

41


MILLENNIALS

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

Y E A R - OV E R -Y E A R T R A FF I C G R OW T H ( %)

“Home-

tainment”

FY 2015

95%

of the

C A SUAL

=

(2.5%)

(0.6%)

O nP

Restaurants and bars

BAR S

is a rising trend.

(1.1%)

on-premise(1)

U.S. outlets’ challenge: Negative traffic

trends!

Technology is making it easier

to source

entertainment at home.

CY L52W

(3.5%)

(2.7%)

(2.7%)

estimated 300,000+

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

CY L24W

CY L12W

CY L4W

(4.1%)

(4.3%)

(3.9%)

(3.5%)

(3.2%)

(2.9%)

(3.4%)

(3.3%)

(2.8%)

Guest Metrics, October 2016

Compounding the impact is that

right for the category. Making

when consumers leave the tasting

radical changes to assortment

room, they are not visiting another

and offerings, and forgetting

on-premise outlet.

fundamentals, is unlikely to pay off in the long run.

SO WHAT TO DO? Is it all doom and gloom? No. But

BUILDING WITH BEER®

clearly the landscape in recent years

Strong category management is

has changed and on-premise operators

critical to ensuring growth of

need to change if they’re going to get

volume and value of the beer

consumers to visit and stay longer once

category.

they arrive. Successful operators have been leveraging social media to

Not all brands are created equal.

increase awareness of opportunities unique to the on-premise setting, as

• Core brands have the highest

well as premium specials and limited-

consumer preference, revenue

time offers.

and profit – 60 core brands drive 70% of category unit volume.(1)

42

But one thing that is critical is

• Tail brands offer wide variety

staying focused on doing what’s

but low velocity – 350 or 5% of


MILLENNIALS

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

the 7,000 new on-premise entrants

19 minutes longer than the

delivered 50% of the dollars

average guest.(2)

.(2)

Core brands

THE POWER OF THE

HEDGE YOUR BETS WITH

Satisfying the loyal and profitable

CRAFTS

Light Lager drinkers is essential to

The market is constantly flooded

to brands

growing beer category volume

with “shiny new things,” each needing

and revenue. In a 2016 study, when

space and attention, and not always

that don’t

a bar added one Light Lager on

delivering incremental sales or revenue.

draught, weekly unit sales increased

National/regional Crafts should be

by 9.2% and weekly dollar sales

prioritized over local in the tail.

AMERICAN LIGHT LAGER

are losing

NATIONAL AND REGIONAL

distribution

drive sales.

increased by 4.2%.

(3)

Big Craft brands serve as signposts

Tail brands average

• Light Lagers represent 1 out of 3

and offer a ‘safe’ entry point while

beers sold.

delivering higher velocity than local

• Light Lager drinkers are two-times

brands. Local Crafts can be a

more loyal than the average Craft

gamble; they create variety but

400 servings

drinker and also drive higher

national Crafts create velocity.

per account

(2)

annually.(2)

velocity, consuming on average 3.6 drinks per occasion,

• National and regional Crafts

approximately 50% more than

account for 87% of Craft dollars.(1)

the average Craft drinker.(4)

• 85% of new brands are local,

• Light Lager drinkers spend more

but national Crafts drive 17%

time in the on-premise, staying

higher velocity vs. local.(1)

Drive

VOLUME AND VARIETY

FOCUS ON WI NN I NG S T Y LES

$ S H A R E O F T O TA L B E E R B Y S T Y L E

AMERICAN LIGHT

Top 5 Styles Represent 70% of $ Share

INT’L PALE L AGERS IPA WITBIER

AM REGUL AR L AGER

with

optimal

assortment.

PALE ALE

PALE L AGER STOUT HARD CIDER

Bottom 16 Account for 30%

GOLDEN ALE FRUIT BEER

DARK L AGER AMBER ALE

AMBER L AGER

Careful! Too Much Focus on Niche Styles Doesn’t Translate to $$$

SE ASONAL BROWN ALE STRONG ALE PORTER

BELGIAN DARK STRONG SAISON SOUR

0.0%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

30.0%

LIGHT LAGER DRINKERS demonstrate high brand

LOYALTY.

Technomic, June 2016

43


MILLENNIALS

CONSUMER TRADEOFFS: PAY LESS but drink 1.2 more

PAY MORE but drink less

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

OPTIMIZING REVENUE

Craft, consumers pay more for

Category management also

the higher quality perception

focuses on driving the right

but they, too, drink less.

pricing strategy to optimize

Light Lagers are more price

revenue. Pricing plays a big role

sensitive than Crafts and Imports

in achieving revenue goals. Sub-

– a change in price will have

optimal pricing gaps can leave revenue on the table.

more influence on demand.

While American Light Lager

consumers are less price

Conversely, Craft and Import sensitive. To maximize draught

drinkers might be the most loyal,

sales revenue, national Craft and

they are also sensitive to price.

Imports should be priced 30%

If their favorite beers are priced

PREMIUM LIGHT

DRINKERS

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

too high, they may cut back.

higher than Light Lagers, and

When it’s a local Craft, consumers

be priced 45% higher. This

pay more for the local connection

typically translates to a

but they drink less. For national

$1 - $2 price gap.(9)

regional and local Crafts should

are price

sensitive.

NOT ALL MARGINS ARE CREATED EQUAL WHEN VELOCIT Y IS CONSIDERED LOCAL CRAFT

LOCAL

are willing to

3- 6 Drinks per Occasion

PAY MORE, but they

DRINK LESS.

1- 4 Drinks per Occasion

$ %

MAXIMIZE REVENUE with price tiers.

44

2-3 Drinks per Occasion

$ %

$ %

Pay more for local connec tion

Pay more for higher quality perception

Pay less but with high brand loyalty

Less price sensitive

Less price sensitive

More price sensitive

Guest Metrics, TUS On-Premise 2016

Margin Contribution %

CONSUMERS

LIGHT LAGERS

Margin $

CRAFT

NATIONAL CRAFT & IMPORTS


MILLENNIALS

• REBUILD TR AFFIC

• FOOD + BEER + EXPERIENCE

Elevate the Beer Category

76%

of consumers

CREATE WAIT STAFF ADVOCACY

TELL THE QUALIT Y STORY

Wait staff are the primary point of

It is critical to ensure a quality

contact for a consumer. They must

experience for the consumer! To

be knowledgeable about the beer

ensure this: 1) Wait staff should have

category and should be inspired

the correct training to ensure the

to make suggestions.

perfect pour and 2) Use the right

don’t know

glassware for the quality product. Consumers often feel lost and don’t know what they want prior to ordering.

An imperfect pour results in beer

When wait staff make a suggestion,

loss and lost dollars. The right

54% of those suggestions result in

glassware showcases the beer

conversion.(5) Further, 65% of consumers

credentials. Leave the generic pint

would pay more for a product

glass on the shelf:

recommended by a wait staff.(5)

• 62% of consumers prefer bars and

what they

want prior

to ordering.

NOT ALL

GLASSES ARE

CREATED EQUAL.

restaurants that serve beer in the When wait staff use their persuasive

proper glass(6)

power and get one extra beer on the

• 39% of consumers pay more for beer

check it boosts bar revenue and staff tips.

style-appropriate glassware, providing the opportunity to drive profit

(6)

Never underestimate the power of suggestion and the role wait staff play

A quality experience means a happy

in an on-premise outlet!

consumer and a happy retailer.

USE PERSUASIVE POWER TO BOOST BAR REVENUE AND STAFF TIPS

$750/ WEEK

PEOPLE PER WEEK

AND THEY CONVERT...

1 OUT OF 4 PEOPLE

TO SPEND $4...

FOR ONE EXTRA BEER

= Barrels wasted = Dollars down the drain

ALLOWS THE DRINKER TO...

LET’S SAY STAFF SERVES...

750

THE POWER OF THE PROPER GLASS

Imperfect pour

REVENUE FOR THE BAR

SEE THE BEER 3Cs OF BEER PRESENTATION COLOR, CLARITY, CARBONATION

SMELL THE BEER

=

80% OF BEER FLAVOR COMES FROM AROMA

$112/ WEEK

EXTRA FOR SERVER

MSS, Bartender Influencer Beer Report - January 2015

ENJOY THE BEER GLASS SHAPES CAN AMPLIFY TASTE & MAINTAIN BEER HEAD, MAKING IT FEEL LESS FILLING National Craft + Cider ASU 2014 Survey, Craft Journey Flow Segmentation, Technomic Co-Pilot

On-Premise Sources: 1. Guest Metrics, TUS On-Premise 2016 2. Guest Metrics, 2016 3. Guest Metrics, YTD August 2016 4. Nielsen Homescan, 2016 5. MSS, Bartender Influencer Beer Report, January 2015 6. National Craft + Cider ASU 2014 Survey, Craft Journey Flow Segmentation, Technomic Co-Pilot 7. TNS Brand Tracking Study, August 2016 8. Technomic, June 2016 9. MillerCoors Internal Data, 2016

45


CONNEC T

• OPTIMIZE ASSORTMENT

• RECAPTURE EVENING

NEIGHBORHOOD BARS

Millennial traffic has declined by

5%

(7)

WHO’S THE CONSUMER? There are two primary motivations for two different consumer groups:

total Food and Beverage sales

• “I want to connect with my

in bars. Tec hnomic,

Gen X, primarily male • “I want to get out and be social,” consumer, Millennial, 50% male,

3%

(7)

Ju ne 2016

friends,” for the older consumer,

for the legal drinking aged

Gen X traffic has increased by

Alcohol contributes 88.3% to

50% female The motivation to go out for

• Gen X – Going to the bar to relax and connect with friends over a beer • Millennial – Beer is convenient and great to share with friends in a social setting

Millennials hasn’t changed, but bars

WHAT ARE THE OCCASIONS?

are losing their appeal. Millennials

CONNECT OCCASION

are choosing to “get out and be

This occasion is all about spending

social” elsewhere. Beer tasting

quality time and catching up with a

rooms are attracting the Millennials.

small group of close friends. It’s about reconnecting and enjoying

The second trend causing the

UP: Digital Connections

DOWN: Face-to -face Socializing 46

conversations.

Millennial traffic declines in this class of trade is digital technology.

SOCIAL OCCASION

So much happens over texting or

Getting out, being social and living

social media today. And while we all

it up is the focus of this occasion. It’s

need some face time to truly connect

about meeting new people and

or to catch up with friends, face-to-

mingling while enjoying a drink.

face experiences are happening less and less frequently. Bars are visited

BUILDING WITH BEER ®

by most beer consumers and whether

To develop beer solutions for the

it’s a Gen X or a Millennial consumer,

neighborhood bar, the following

beer has a role to play in the

should be considered to attract new

neighborhood bar:

customers for the primary occasions:


CONNEC T

• OPTIMIZE ASSORTMENT

• RECAPTURE EVENING

LOSSES FOCUSED IN EVENING OCCASIONS Lunch

Happy Hour

0%

+1%

Dinner

-2%

Late Night

-17%

Draught is preferred(8)

T O TA L O N - P R E M I S E T R A F F I C V S . Y E A R AG O Guestmetrics, July 2016

To maximize revenue • CONNECT

NEIGHBORHOOD BAR DO’S AND DON’TS

1. He prefers draught but he is open to bottles. Both Premium American Light Lagers and national and regional Crafts play a strong role. Assortment

Do’s

optimization is key.

• Become a destination bar providing

2. He makes a beeline for his first

interactive social games, for example

beer and it’s non-risk, it’s his go-to.

• Focus on the core, Premium American

3. For his second beer he is open

Light Lagers

to trying something new, whatever

• Focus on draught

he sees on a chalkboard, on the

• Implement optimal price gaps between

tap handles or recommendations.

Light Lagers, national Crafts/Imports

4. Consumers expect to pay more

and local Craft

for Craft beers. Price gap

• Educate wait staff so they can make

management is the priority to

informed suggestions

maximize revenue.

• Train bar staff in the art of the perfect

price gap management!

Connect and Social occasions

pour • SOCIAL 1. Something light, no matter the

Don’ts

style. Most are looking for a brand

• Feature just alcohol

that is sessionable, one they can

• Prioritize local Crafts over national/

drink throughout the night.

regional in the tail

2. Draught beer is preferred, but

• Ignore package when package is easier

bottles are easier.

• Leave money on the table with reduced

3. Rounds are bought as a show

price gaps

of initiative and camaraderie.

• Underestimate the power of suggestion • Over-pour and serve a beer with too

In summary, bars need to ensure an

little head

optimal assortment and pricing, and tailor their offer to ensure more frequent and longer visits. 47


CONNECT • TELEVISIONS • SPORTS + BEER

SPORTS BARS

$19.3 BILLION

BEER SOLD IN SPORTS AND NEIGHBORHOOD B A R S (8)

Both

bottle and draught options

WHO’S THE CONSUMER?

are not immune to traffic declines. The

Primarily male, the sports bar is like

connect occasion remains unchanged,

man’s best friend – someone who

but it is now possible to reconnect with

is consistently fun and relaxed. This

a small group of friends over a game

consumer’s motivation is “to catch

somewhere other than a sports bar.

up over beers and a game.” Ultra-high definition televisions, surroundWHAT IS THE OCCASION?

sound systems and live-streaming have

The sports bar is all about the connect

all, over time, become more and more

occasion. The focus is on the people

common in the household. And with a

first and the game second. Beers in the

click of the remote, it’s easy to keep up

foreground and TVs in the background

with games across numerous sports in

set the stage for enjoying some easy

one afternoon – all in the comfort of your

conversation while watching a game.

own home. Sports bars are also impacted by the digital technology trend. While

“I’m catching up with buddies over

clicking through the television channels,

beers and sports, what’s better?”

taking in every game, it only takes a

The occasion is a natural fit for beer. Beer is a social drink; it fits within numerous places and activities. Sports and beer just go together! The sports bar consumer is not looking to experiment with his drinks at a sports bar because his mind is distracted with so many other things. Sports bars, like their neighborhood counterparts, 48


CONNECT • TELEVISIONS • SPORTS + BEER Connect occasion!

American Light Lager biggest player

moment to access one’s favorite food-

In summary, sports bars are a place where

delivery app and order in some food to

the right assortment is important, but too

get you through the day.

much assortment can be overwhelming and impacts service levels.

And if you haven’t had time to go to a liquor outlet, there are markets with online

SPORTS BAR DO’S AND DON’TS

liquor stores that deliver, too. It’s worth repeating, regardless of the location, sports and beer just go together. BUILDING WITH BEER

®

Do’s • Become a destination bar providing

To develop beer solutions for the sports

interactive social games, for example

bar, the following should be considered to

• Ensure sufficient facings, both draught

ensure the right brand, in the right pack, at

and bottle, for Premium American Light

the right price for the occasion:

Lagers

• Premium American Light Lagers play

• Clearly communicate and implement

the biggest role, as they fit the occasion

pitchers and bucket deals to increase

perfectly.

speed of service

• On arrival, the sports bar consumer

• Provide value offers that appeal to the

makes a beeline for his regular beer and

sports fan

defaults to his favorite Premium American Light Lager.

Don’ts

• He is open to both bottle and draught.

• Feature just alcohol

• Later on he is likely to try brands that are

• Under-face the core

on the specials list.

• Have too many specials for staff to have

• Rounds and buckets are the order of the

to repeat to customers

day, especially when the bar is busy, to

• Extend value offers across all brands

drive velocity.

and segments 49


SOCIALIZE • ASSORTMENT • FOOD + BEER

CASUAL DINING

ALMOST

$19

BILLION IN

C A S UA L DINING

S A L E S (8)

WHO’S THE CONSUMER? The casual dining restaurant is like a mini retreat where the consumer takes a break and enjoys good food and beer. Males and females go to a casual dining restaurant for a quick food break or to catch up with a group. The motivation typically is one of two things: not lost its relevance, and yet traffic • Food break: “I want to get food when

Alcohol contributes

21.1%

to total Food and Beverage sales. (8)

2016 CASUAL DINING ALCOHOL BEVERAGE SALES: Beer - 48% Wine - 20% Spirits - 32% Tec hnomic, Ju ne 2016

50

losses are not far behind those of bars.

I am hungry.” • Grub gathering: “I want to catch up with people over a shared meal.”

For one, the age-old reasons that prevent consumers from going out exist: “The service is poor,” “I don’t feel like I am

THE OCCASIONS

getting value for money,” and “Nothing

Casual dining can fulfill each of the

changes, it’s the same old, same old.”

mega occasions. It’s about taking

Second, occasions are no longer

time to enjoy some food along with

happening only in casual dining

beers, without worrying about cooking

restaurants:

or cleaning up. These are either

• Digital technology: There has been an

impromptu occasions taken alone or

explosion of apps that offer to deliver

with one other person, or planned

food from a restaurant to your door.

ahead to celebrate with friends

• “To Go” orders: Consumers would

and family.

rather collect the food and enjoy it in their own home. This is a lost

Beer is perfect in this environment – it’s

opportunity for restaurants to up-sell

a relaxing complement to a delicious

to diners or to offer them a beverage.

meal. It is proof that he/she is taking

• Channel blurring:

a breather for him/herself, and it

complements the flavor of dishes and

lowered prices, making it more

completes the meal. The occasion has

affordable to eat at home, while

º Many grocery chains have


SOCIALIZE • ASSORTMENT • FOOD + BEER

restaurants are increasing prices.

first order is a quick order of a favorite.

Something that complements the meal is

º Grocery chains have established

“grab-and-go” where shoppers

chosen once the food arrives.

can buy fully prepared meals and enjoy them at home.

In summary, the beer category provides a range of styles to complement all casual

It is time to move the occasions back

dining occasions.

to the casual dining restaurant! Visits to these outlets are primarily food-driven. CASUAL DINING DO’S AND DON’TS

They are not just places to eat, they are places to meet family and friends to

Use digital technology to complement experience.

connect and sometimes to celebrate. Digital technology can be used to remove

Do’s

barriers and get consumers in outlets.

• Offer menu differentiation and value

Many need reminders that these types

offers, such as bundling food and drink

of outlets still exist. Once consumers

• Offer the right glassware

are in casual dining locations, enhance

• Provide a mix of all beer styles in both

the occasion by facilitating the ordering

draught and package

process and making checkout fast.

• Implement optimal price gaps between Light Lagers, national Crafts/Imports

BUILDING WITH BEER®

and local Craft

To develop beer solutions for casual

• Provide value offers that appeal to the

dining, consider the following to ensure

price-sensitive consumer

the right brand is in the right pack, at

• Suggest simple beer/food pairings to

the price for the occasion:

complement the meal • Educate wait staff so they can make

Both Premium American Light Lagers

informed suggestions

and national and local Crafts have roles to play, all depending on the time of

Don’ts

day, the day of the week and whether

• Ignore social media as a means to

it’s before or during the meal.

communicate with consumers • Prioritize local Crafts over national/

The food break typically occurs at lunch

regional in the tail

time or a weekday dinner and the beer

• Leave money on the table with reduced

order is usually a favorite from the

price gaps

specials, specifically draught because

• Extend value offers across all brands

he/she can’t get it at home.

and segments • Complicate offers, slowing down wait

Grub gathering typically takes place for

staff

Friday and Saturday dinners, and the

• Underestimate the power of suggestion

Welldeserved break: away from home, no cooking, cleaning or chores Places to meet friends and celebrate special occasions

On-Premise Sources: 1. Guest Metrics, TUS On-Premise 2016 2. Guest Metrics, 2016 3. Guest Metrics, YTD August 2016 4. Nielsen Homescan, 2016 5. MSS, Bartender Influencer Beer Report, January 2015 6. National Craft + Cider ASU 2014 Survey, Craft Journey Flow Segmentation, Technomic Co-Pilot 7. TNS Brand Tracking Study, August 2016 8. Technomic, June 2016 9. MillerCoors Internal Data, 2016

51


At MillerCoors, we are committed to growing the size and value of the beer category. Our approach is simple: understand retailers’ businesses and objectives, and then work on opportunities to achieve those goals. Our network is ready to share with you the Building with Beer® suite of channel solutions designed to deliver total category results.

Building with Beer® On-Premise

Building with Beer® Grocery

• Demonstrate category leadership by leveraging the power of Premium American Light and appreciate the differentiation of national, regional and local Crafts • Drive operational excellence and efficiency with the optimal mix of brand, pack and price • Elevate the beer category and ensure a quality drinking experience for consumers

• Improve feature, space and assortment mix to drive revenue and trips • Increase basket ring by pairing meal solutions with beer • Optimize display velocity and turns to deliver profitable revenue

Building with Beer® Liquor Store Building with Beer® C-Store • Optimize cold space across all items to grow overall cooler revenue and profit • Merchandise singles by shopper segments to improve revenue and profit • Simplify singles pricing to drive incremental purchases, revenue and profit

• Recruit routine beer shopper visits by elevating the in-store experience • Grow profitable revenue through a disciplined variety in the cooler • Maximize total alcohol occasions with basketbuilding solutions • Simplify the shopping experience to help consumers quickly locate their favorite brands and discover new choices

PLEASE CONTACT YOUR MILLERCOORS SALES TEAM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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Progressive Grocer - August 2017  

Progressive Grocer - August 2017