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CHOCOLATE'S PREMIUM PUSH CONTINUES SALAD DAYS

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

+ EXCLUSIVE

INTERVIEW WITH

CHRISTY MCMULLEN of SUMMERHILL MARKET

PM 42940023

THE NEW CHAIR OF CFIG

WHAT'S NEXT FOR MEAL KITS? A LOOK INSIDE THE BIG CARROT'S NEW TORONTO STORE


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CONTENTS COVER STORY

September/October 2018

INDEPENDENT MINDED

28

Volume 132 Number 6

OPINIONS

05 Front Desk 18 Food Bytes 20 Behind the Trends 22 Eating in Canada 58 Checking Out

Meet CFIG’s new chair: Summerhill Market’s Christy McMullen

PEOPLE

06 The Buzz

Comings and goings, store openings, awards, events, etc.

FEATURES

08 Bastien Poulain

NEW CARROT ON THE BLOCK

Spotlight on the founder of Montreal’s 1642 Sodas

IDEAS

24  A peek inside The Big

11 Zero-waste shopping

Carrot’s new Beach community store in Toronto

Having marked its first year in business, Ottawa’s NU Grocery is ready for more

STATE OF THE INDEPENDENT NATION

14 Global grocery

News and ideas from the world of food retailing

16 From clicks to bricks

Online grocer Fresh City Farms is expanding its physical retail presence

33  A new survey takes stock

of how Canada’s indie grocers are faring

AISLES

45 Chocolate’s premium push

WINNING THE MEAL-KIT MARKET

For consumers looking to treat themselves, premium chocolate is hitting the spot

37  Meal kits are shaping up to be

50 Sweet treats

a growing opportunity for grocers

8

Nielsen reveals its latest data on cookie and confectionery sales in Canada

52 The golden touch

Turmeric, that ancient healing spice, has reached a whole new level of popularity

44

45

54 Making waves

The growth in value-added options is making seafood more accessible

FRESH

COVER IMAGE: NIKKI ORMEROD

56 Salad days

Salad kits are moving up from side-dish status to the main attraction

FOLLOW US ON

24

@CanadianGrocer Canadian Grocer Magazine @CanadianGrocerMagazine September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

3


PRESIDENT, ENSEMBLEIQ-CANADA Jennifer Litterick

FRONT DESK

jlitterick@ensembleiq.com

GROUP BRAND DIRECTOR-RETAIL Kathryn Swan kswan@ensembleiq.com

VICE PRESIDENT/GENERAL MANAGER EVENTS Michael Cronin mcronin@ensembleiq.com

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Shellee Fitzgerald

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

MANAGING EDITOR Carol Neshevich

cneshevich@ensembleiq.com

ONLINE EDITOR Kristin Laird

klaird@ensembleiq.com

ART DIRECTOR Josephine Woertman

jwoertman@ensembleiq.com

CONSULTING EDITOR George H. Condon condug@sympatico.ca

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION & DESIGN CANADA Derek Estey destey@ensembleiq.com

PRODUCTION MANAGER Michael Kimpton mkimpton@ensembleiq.com

MARKETING DIRECTOR Alexandra Voulu avoulu@ensembleiq.com

Indie favourite The Big Carrot opens store No. 2

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Lina Trunina ltrunina@ensembleiq.com

WEB OPERATIONS MANAGER Valerie White vwhite@ensembleiq.com

SALES ASSOCIATE BRAND DIRECTOR Vanessa Peters vpeters@ensembleiq.com

SR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Chantal Barlow cbarlow@ensembleiq.com

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Tom Barlow, Ross Bletsoe, François Bouchard, André Gagné, Annick Gazaille, Denis Gendron, Lorelle Gilpin, Florent Gravel, Won Suk Ha, Jessica Kim, Les Mann, Ken Schley, Peter Singer, Mondella Stacey, Mike Venton SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Subscriptions: $85.00 per year, 2 year $136.00, Outside Canada $136.00 per year, Single Copy $12.00, Groups $59.00, Outside Canada Single Copy $16.00. Email: contactus@canadiangrocer.com Phone: 1-844-694-4422 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST weekdays Fax: 1-844-815-0700 Online: www.canadiangrocer.com/subscription

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CORPORATE OFFICERS

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN  Alan Glass CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER  David Shanker CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER  Richard Rivera CHIEF BRAND OFFICER  Korry Stagnito PRESIDENT, ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS  Terese Herbig CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER  Joel Hughes CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER  Jennifer Turner SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, INNOVATION  Tanner Van Dusen MAIL PREFERENCES: From time to time other organizations may ask Canadian Grocer if they may send information about a product or service to some Canadian Grocer subscribers, by mail or email. If you do not wish to receive these messages, contact us in any of the ways listed above. Contents Copyright © 2018 by EnsembleIQ, may not be reprinted without permission. Canadian Grocer receives unsolicited materials (including letters to the editor, press releases, promotional items and images) from time to time. Canadian Grocer, its affiliates and assignees may use, reproduce, publish, republish, distribute, store and archive such submissions in whole or in part in any form or medium whatsoever, without compensation of any sort. ISSN# 0008-3704 PM 42940023 Canadian Grocer is Published by Stagnito Partners Canada Inc., 20 Eglinton Avenue West, Ste. 1800, Toronto, Ontario, M4R 1K8.

JAIME HOGGE

Printed in Canada at Transcontinental.

IN PRAISE OF INDEPENDENTS

Facing big threats, indies are holding their own I SPEND A LOT OF TIME checking out grocery stores. Sure, it’s part of my job, but I find myself doing this off the clock as well, even on vacation. Especially on vacation, when the chance to visit an unfamiliar store is too good to pass up. Often, of course, the grocery stores I visit are independents. Rarely do they fail to impress, whether for their outstanding service, shelves filled with interesting specialty items and even the physical stores themselves: structures filled with unique, sometimes quirky features and special touches that make you want to return. Not so long ago a very gloomy future was predicted for these retailers (all retailers, really). Bricks-and-mortar retail was dead, we were told, and Amazon was going to wipe the floor with everyone. Luckily this hasn’t proven to be the case. Rather than triggering physical retail’s complete demise, Amazon has spurred the small guys to focus on what they do best: provide a compelling in-store experience. As a Forbes headline reasoned earlier this year, “Physical Retail Is Not Dead: Boring Retail Is.”

In this issue we’ve dedicated a lot of space to independents; grocers that are anything but boring. We visit The Big Carrot’s much-anticipated second location. The brand has developed something of a cultlike following, read why (page 24). We also take a look at two unique grocers: NU, a zero-­waste grocer in Ottawa (page 11) and Fresh City Market (page 16), an online grocer that is pushing into the physical realm with the opening of its second storefont. Finally, there’s our interview with Christy McMullen, incoming chair of Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers and owner of Toronto’s superb Summerhill Market. McMullen’s advice to indie grocers amid this changing retail landscape: “Wherever they can, independents should find their niche and be amazing at it.” Looks like many are doing just that.

Shellee Fitzgerald

Editor-in-Chief

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

The grocery industry is changing rapidly. Keep up to date on the latest news by signing up for our e-newsletter. It’s free and we’ll deliver it to your inbox three times a week. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

VISIT CANADIANGROCER.COM TO SUBSCRIBE.

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

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THE BUZZ

The latest news in the grocery biz

OPENINGS

ANNOUNCEMENTS KRUGER PRODUCTS has announced plans to invest $575 million in a new, stateof-the art tissue plant in Sherbrooke, Que. Construction of the plant, which will create 180 jobs, is set to begin next year and the company says it should be operational by early 2021.

Save-On-Foods’ Darrell Jones and Sierra Johnston at the opening of the new Signal Hill store in Calgary Senior VP of Pharmaprix, Éric Bouchard, unveils new Zone Marché concept

6

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

SEAFOOD CITY will open its second Canadian location in Winnipeg next summer. The Filipino-focused grocery chain is scheduled to open at the city’s Garden City Shopping Centre in a space formerly occupied by Sears. The California-based chain created much buzz and drew big crowds when it made its Canadian debut in Mississauga, Ont. in September 2017.

Loblaw-owned PHARMAPRIX has launched its Zone Marché concept at several Montreal area drugstores. The new program will make up to 750 fresh food items available at the stores, including fruit/ veggie and organic items. “Given the strong connection between food and well-being, it quickly became apparent that expanding Pharmaprix’s offerings to include fresh items was a natural choice,” says the company’s senior vice-president Éric Bouchard.

Calgary has a new SAVE-ON-FOODS. The grocery chain opened its fifth store in the city in Calgary’s Signal Hill neighbourhood. Among the store’s features: a chicken wing bar, a frozen yogurt bar and a make-your-own trail mix bar. The location also features an in-store Starbucks and offers a large number of organic and local products. Woodbridge, Ont. will soon be home to a new NATURE’S EMPORIUM . The health food retailer, which operates stores in Vaughan, Newmarket and Burlington, says the new store will open for business this fall.

In late August, Costco opened its 100th warehouse club in Canada in Nisku, Alta., near Edmonton. Pictured at the ribbon cutting are (left to right): Chris Fleming, district VP, Costco Western Canada; Tom Ruth, CEO, Edmonton International Airport; Leduc County Mayor Tanni Doblanko; Kelly-Lynn Lewis, Division 2 councillor; David Skinner, senior VP and general manager, Costco Western Canada; Tanya Crowskey, Costco Nisku associate manager; Earle Genik, Costco Nisku general manager; and Brian Fairwell, Costco Nisku associate manager.

TANYA GOEHRING, ERIN LAWRENCE, PHARMAPRIX

T&T had its grand opening for a new 70,000-sq.-ft. flagship store in Richmond, B.C. in August

Supermarket chain T&T opened its new flagship store in Richmond, B.C. in August. At 70,000 sq. ft., the store is the largest in T&T’s network and includes several features not seen in other T&Ts such as an in-store Starbucks, 14 self-serve checkouts and a weigh station in the produce department to help speed things along at the checkout. The store also features a seafood bar where customers can select items such as lobster and mussels, have them cooked on the spot, and eat them in the dining area. CEO Tina Lee told Canadian Grocer the concept was inspired by Asian markets and is a “first in Canada.”


THE BUZZ

 COMINGS AND GOINGS 

EVENTS

The  Coffee Association of Canada ’s annual conference will take place on Nov. 6 at Steam Whistle Brewing in Toronto. For info, visit coffeeassoc.com

METRO, MCCAIN FOODS, MAPLE LEAF FOODS, OKANAGAN SF

The Private Label Manufacturers Association’s 2018 Private Label Trade Show  returns to Chicago from Nov. 11 to 13 at the city’s Rosemont Convention Center. Visit plma.com for details. Canadian Grocer’s Thought Leadership CEO Conference plus the  Golden Pencil Awards take place on Nov. 19 at Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York Hotel. For more details and to purchase tickets visit canadiangrocer.com and goldenpencil award.com

Mathieu Robitaille

Danielle Barran

Metro has hired MATHIEU ROBITAILLE as its director of marketing. The former Coca-Cola executive joins the grocer’s Ontario operation. In this role, Robitaille will oversee and develop brand and shopper marketing. Robitaille has more than 15 years of experience in the marketing industry, holding positions at Coca-Cola Canada and Maple Leaf Foods. McCain Foods has named DANIELLE BARRAN president of its Canadian division where she will lead the “next stage of strategic development” for the company. Barran has more than 20 years of experience in the consumer packaged goods industry, most recently serving as VP of commercial strategy (pet division) at The J.M. Smucker Company. Parmalat Canada has named MARK TAYLOR president and CEO. Previously, Taylor was group managing director at Lactalis Group­—Parmalat’s parent company.

Mark Taylor

Curtis Frank

At Maple Leaf Foods, CURTIS FRANK moves into the role of chief operating officer on Oct. 1. Frank, who has held the role of senior vice-president, retail at the company since 2014, replaces GARY MAKSYMETZ, who is retiring at the end of September after spending most of his career at Maple Leaf. RICK WINSLOW, a former Nielsen Canada executive, has joined Crossmark Canada. Winslow steps into the role of vice-president of client and business development, a newly created role at the company.

Okanagan Specialty Fruits has announced additions to its management team. JF GAMELIN is now director of sales for the B.C.based company while JOEL YAEGER is the facility operations manager and ANDREW HOFER has stepped into the role of chief financial officer. Hofer replaces company co-founder LOUISA CARTER, who retired earlier this year.

AWARDS

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS! DO YOU KNOW A RISING STAR IN THE GROCERY INDUSTRY? If so, please tell us about them. Nominations are now open for Canadian Grocer’s 2018 Generation Next awards. Visit canadian grocer.com/ generation-next by Oct. 19 to nominate. September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

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PEOPLE

 Who you need to know  

The Facts Who

Bastien Poulain Position

Founder and CEO of 1642 Sodas What’s new?

1642 Orange, launched in September

EVOKING THE SPIRIT OF MONTREAL Bastien Poulain pays sweet tribute to Canada’s secondlargest city with 1642 Sodas By Danny Kucharsky Photography by Chantale Lecours


PEOPLE

30 SECONDS WITH...

W

hen Bastien Poulain left the hotel industry to start his own company, he was following in the entrepreneurial footsteps of his father and grandfather, both of whom owned their own businesses. “Ever since I was small, the culture of risk in my family was important,” he says. Poulain, who had held various sales and marketing jobs in Montreal’s hotel industry since moving there from France in 2008, knew he needed an idea that would make the risk worthwhile. Frustrated with always seeing the same old carbonated beverages that were high in sugar, artificial flavours and other “things people don’t understand,” he decided to create his own craft sodas using only simple, high-quality ingredients. The result was 1642 Sodas, which he launched in 2015. Given that the soft drink market is largely controlled by two major players, “the challenge was very big and very risky, but without a doubt there was a place for something different,” says 1642’s founder and CEO. Poulain’s sodas don’t contain the preservative sodium benzoate, nor do they contain high-fructose corn syrup; instead, natural sweeteners like cane sugar and maple syrup are used, along with spring water and natural flavourings. The 1642 Cola has a maple syrup aftertaste, while 1642 Ginger “is more of a ginger beer than a ginger ale,” and 1642 Tonic contains spruce. “The idea was to have something different, something that respects my values,” he says. Born in France’s Brittany region, Poulain has a master’s degree in marketing with a specialty in hospitality from the École supérieure de commerce in Pau, France. After stints working for five-star hotels in Spain, China and France, he opted for yet another hotel experience abroad to perfect his English. He chose Montreal, where he quickly landed a hotel job and made the city home. “When I arrived 10 years ago, I didn’t know anybody,” he says. “People here welcomed me, had confidence in me, and gave me work. Montreal, and Canada in

general, is really [a] land of opportunity.” Admittedly, Poulain’s initial timing for launching a line of refreshing beverages wasn’t perfect. It was January 2015, the height of the cold Montreal winter. But he was still able to quickly convince 70 retailers and restaurants around the city to stock 1642 Sodas. People were won over by his brand’s story: that all ingredient suppliers hail from within a 200-km radius of Montreal, and that the ingredients are 95% Canadian, including maple syrup from the Laurentians region. Initially, Poulain wanted to call the company Caribou Sodas, but there was a brewery in British Columbia with a similar name, so he chose 1642 instead—a nod to the year of Montreal’s founding. In retrospect, the new name turned out to be a better choice as it strongly evoked the company’s Montreal roots and its commitment to local sourcing. A 2015 appearance on the French-Canadian version of CBC’s Dragons’ Den (called Dans l’oeil du Dragon) was successful, netting Poulain $135,000 from four Dragons in exchange for a 30% share of the business. While a subsequent appearance on the show’s English version didn’t have the same success—Poulain blames a poorly prepared pitch—it likely helped with brand recognition. Today, the sodas are sold at about 1,200 locations throughout Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, England, Belgium, Holland and France. They’re available in Metro and IGA stores in Quebec and have recently been listed by Sobeys in Ontario. A fourpack sells for $8.99, and while Poulain is keeping sales figures confidential, more than one million bottles have been sold since the launch. “Consumers are looking for better quality products with less sugar. We arrived at the right time.” In September, Poulain launched 1642 Orange, which features bergamot orange, and three to four other new products are planned for 2019. Poulain’s long-term goal is to become nothing less than a leader in the craft soda market. “Our offerings are quite different than the big guys’ and there’s a place for it. I’m very happy that we’ve made a difference on the market.”  CG

BASTIEN POULAIN What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

Don’t give up. Lots of entrepreneurs shut their companies down before they’ve given 100%. You’re not going to obtain immediate profits in the first year. You have to persevere, talk to people, get out of the office and not give up. That’s what we’re doing. Yes, there are constant obstacles, but if you’re surrounded by positive people who don’t try to stop you, that’s important.

What do you like to drink (aside from 1642)?

I really like the cold-pressed juice trend. I like Dose, an organic cold-pressed juice company with values similar to ours. I’m also a big fan of craft beers.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

My favourite summertime activity is to go to the vineyards at Niagara-on-the-Lake. I love it. The quality of wine is extraordinary; the people are welcoming and they provide a lot [of information about the wine].

Do you miss your previous career in the hotel industry?

Not really. The hotel industry gave me the chance to get to know lots of people and obtain a lot of contacts, so when I decided to launch my company I reached out to my network. And since I have a lot of contacts in hotels, our drinks are available in many hotels. But I have a lot more fun doing what I’m doing today.

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

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IDEAS

Retailers, suppliers, shoppers, insights

NU Grocery is one of a handful of zero-waste grocers in Canada

ZERO-WASTE GROCERS

Waste-free shopping

ERIC STOLPMAN

Having marked its first year in business, an Ottawa zero-waste grocer is ready for more By Shellee Fitzgerald

S

tep inside Ottawa’s NU Grocery and you’ll see all the usual items you’d expect to see at a food store: fruit, veggies, pastas, spices, baked goods, cereals, jam, dairy and even toothpaste and beauty aids. What you won’t see is any disposable packaging. None. NU is one of just a handful of zero-waste grocery stores across the country (the first in Ontario), and is catering to a growing contingent of consumers looking to reduce the amount of waste they generate. At NU, customers bring their own bottles and bags and fill them up with goods from an assortment of bulk bins and other containers, weigh the items and pay. Inspired by the zero-waste grocery stores in Europe and a belief that Ottawa would support such a venture, Valérie Leloup and business partner Sia Veeramani, both adopters of the zero-waste lifestyle, opened NU in the city’s Hintonburg September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

11


IDEAS Has NU become a community hub also?

Is there anything that you’ve had to tweak at NU over the past year?

Are there lessons traditional grocers could learn from this model?

There are so many little tasks in retail, it never stops. Our big challenge is really to put in place processes to simplify things, but I think that’s the challenge for any retailer. There has been a steep learning curve for us in terms of products and what’s popular. I’d say we started off with an assortment of about 350 products and now we’re at over 700 [items that are organic or local wherever possible] and that is really the result of the many interactions that we’ve had with our customers, and also trying to identify the profile of our customers. We found we have a lot of vegan customers, for example, so we’ve added a lot of vegan items. We’re constantly trying to find products that will please our customers and that are also zero waste— that’s a challenge we have.

I think the No. 1 thing I would say is that as a traditional retailer, you don’t have to be a zero-waste grocer to significantly reduce your waste; there are so many low-hanging fruits. Do a waste audit and identify those low-hanging fruits, because they could cut waste significantly. Some grocery stores don’t even have composting in place—they don’t separate organic from non-organic waste. That is really something that is not difficult to put in place; it’s a small cost.

Yes, that’s what we always wanted. We have workshops very regularly. It’s a great way to get people into the space.

In recent years, more zero-waste grocers have popped up, indicating an appetite for these stores—why would you say that is? The issue of waste is coming on the radar much more. Two or three years ago you barely saw a headline on waste; now you see it more and more. But very often, people are aware of the problem and [know] that they should try to create less waste, but they don’t have the opportunity to do that. So, what we’re creating with the store is the opportunity.

What’s next? A second location. We’re really at the beginning of investigating where. We’re going to map out where our customers come from to see where it makes sense to open. We have some ideas, but we just need to narrow it down.

WHILE CLEARLY A NICHE FORMAT, ZERO-WASTE GROCERS ARE POPPING UP ALL OVER HALIFAX  Halifax will get its first zero-waste grocer when The Tare Shop opens this fall. Tare will also serve as a coffee shop (bring your own mug, of course) and community space.

Épicerie Loco

12

MONTREAL  In Montreal, shoppers can choose from two zero-waste grocery options: Épicerie Loco (three locations) and Méga Vrac. TORONTO  The country’s largest city will get its first zero-waste grocer when The Bare Market settles in its permanent location sometime this fall. WATERLOO, ONT. ­ Con­struction on Zero Waste Bulk is underway and the store should be ready for business later this year.

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

VANCOUVER  After experimenting with pop-ups, the founders of Nada opened a permanent location in the city last November. And the owners of The Soap Dispensary, a refill shop for household and personal care items (established in 2011), expanded into groceries last year by opening Kitchen Staples next door. SALT SPRING ISLAND, B.C. Inspired by zero-waste grocery stores in Europe, Crystal Lehky opened Green on the island in 2016.

E-COMMERCE

The goods on online grocery shopping WHAT’S THE CURRENT STATE OF GROCERY e-commerce in Canada? BMO Capital Markets recently conducted a survey of 750 Canadians to shed some light on their use and attitudes regarding online grocery shopping. Here’s a look at some key findings:

72%

of Canadians surveyed said they had never ordered groceries online, while 28% reported that they had

48%

of respondents said they order groceries online only occasionally, while 18% stated they order groceries online each week

71%

who ordered groceries online opted for home delivery, compared to 47% who selected click and collect (respondents could select multiple options)

27%

said they would not be willing to pay anything extra for oneday delivery, while 33% said they would pay 5% more for same-day service and just 8% said they would pay 25% more

SOURCE: BMO CAPITAL MARKETS, THE CURRENT STATE OF GROCERY E-COMMERCE IN CANADA, 2018

ÉPICERIE LOCO

neighbourhood in August 2017. While Leloup is no stranger to business—she racked up a decade’s worth of experience at Danone in Europe and Quebec—running a grocery store was new territory. But one year in, Leloup is pleased with the 1,500-sq.-ft. store’s progress. “We have a good base of regular, very loyal customers … and every day we see new people coming in, asking questions, so we feel that we probably opened at the right time and we’re very optimistic for what’s ahead of us.” We recently chatted with Leloup about the past year, the lessons traditional grocers can learn from the zero-waste model, and what’s next for NU.


RECOGNIZE THE RISING TALENT IN THE GROCERY BIZ!

In association with Golden Pencil Award, Canadian Grocer is now accepting nominations for the 7th annual Generation Next Awards to recognize the up-and-coming leaders in the grocery and consumer packaged goods industries

NOW ACCEPTING NOMINATIONS Deadline to enter: October 19, 2018

For full details, visit: CanadianGrocer.com/Generation-Next Powered by


IDEAS

GLOBAL GROCERY

News and ideas from the world of food retail PICK YOUR OWN EGGS

U.K. grocer Morrisons is going old-school with the launch of its new “farm shop style” pick-your-own local eggs feature at 200 of its stores. Customers can select a single free-range egg for purchase or a tray of 30 (or more). Morrisons said the new “egg stand” was a response to feedback from customers who said they wanted to select their own eggs and buy only what they need—helping them reduce waste.

 DRIVER-FREE DELIVERY Scottsdale, Ariz. residents are witnessing something unusual roaming their streets—a fleet of autonomous delivery vehicles. Since August, The Kroger Co. and tech startup Nuro have been piloting a service that offers same-day or next-day delivery from one of the chain’s stores. Customers place orders via the website or mobile app, and are alerted when the vehicle arrives. A code is used to retrieve their goods from one of the car’s compartments. Groceries are delivered for a US$5.95 flat fee.

Startup shelves With its “Startup Shelf” initiative, Dutch grocery chain Albert Heijn is giving new food companies a chance to get in front of customers. At certain stores, startups can show off their wares for one week. Most recently, Thijsthee, an iced tea maker that uses rescued fruit in its brew, was featured in-store.

Beloved U.S. grocer Wegmans is helping its blind and visually impaired shoppers through an app-based service at all of its 97 stores. Customers who need the service simply download the Aira app on their smartphone and use it to connect, for free, to a remote, sighted agent to access information in realtime. The agents can help the shoppers with such things as navigating the store, finding specific products or even the shortest checkout line. 14

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

In the U.S., consumers aren’t waiting for autumn to reach for pumpkin spice. Nielsen data reveals that for the week ending Aug. 25, pumpkin-flavoured products shot up nearly 10% in sales, reaching more than $6.9 million, compared to the previous year. And over a 52week span (also ending Aug. 25) pumpkin-flavoured goods racked up $489 million, a 15.5% jump from 2017. This is an alltime high, according to Nielsen, suggesting “demand for all things pumpkin should continue to play out this season.”

A NEW FACE AT TESCO

Jamie Oliver is teaming up with U.K. grocer Tesco. The celebrity chef, who has also had marketing tie-ups with Sobeys and Sainsbury’s, will help promote the retailer’s “helpful little swaps” program that offers shoppers healthier products at a lower price. Oliver will also create healthy recipes and tips for the retailer. Tesco said the partnership came about after a survey revealed seven out of 10 U.K. families think supermarkets should do more to help them make healthier choices, with the majority wanting more practical advice on healthier alternatives.

CUPCAKE: SHUTTERSTOCK/SCRUGGELGREEN, MORRISONS, KROGER, TESCO

HELP AT THE SHELF

Pumped about pumpkin spice


A BEER FOR THOSE WHO TAKE THE STAIRS

SOMETIMES.


FROM CLICKS TO BRICKS Bit by bit, online grocer Fresh City Farms is expanding its physical retail presence By Rebecca Harris

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

IN SEPTEMBER, urban farm and online grocer Fresh City Farms opened its second brick-and-mortar location. The 2,000-sq.-ft. store on Toronto’s Ossington Avenue carries around 1,000 products, including organic and local produce; prepared meals such as salads served in jars; cheese and fresh meat; dry goods from small, independent brands; and organic meal kits. “We’re really focusing on fresh, and see ourselves as a neighbourhood store, similar to urban centres in Europe where people do their shop for a couple days at

a time,” says Ran Goel, CEO and founder of Fresh City Farms. “Our typical customer online is female, 25 to 45, and we expect that will be our bread and butter [at the store] as well. There are a lot of young families, couples and single people living in the condos in the neighbourhood and they’re looking to do a quick, quality shop.” Fresh City’s first location on Toronto’s Roncesvalles Avenue opened in April. The 600-sq.-ft. store was purchased from a former supplier that sold preserves and canned goods. “It was a bit of an opportunistic thing, where we were starting to think about bricks and mortar and their store became available,” says Goel. “It’s a micro version of what we’re doing at Ossington, which will allow us to put our full product line in play.” Goel, a former investment lawyer and 2016 winner of Canadian Grocer’s Generation Next awards, founded Fresh City Farms in 2011. It started off with a subscription model, delivering pre-set bags of produce grown on its city farm to customers in the Greater Toronto Area. Over the years, the company expanded its product assortment and made its model more customer-friendly. “The majority of our revenue is still subscription based—people subscribing to [produce] bags,” says Goel. “But we do have à la carte options where you can buy whatever you want and you can customize your bag and make substitutions.” He says the move into bricks and mortar happened for two reasons. “What we found is our typical customer gets delivery once a week. But that means they still do shops elsewhere to fill out their week. And for most people, that’s best done in a bricks and mortar context,” he says. Secondly, even the rosiest projections of online grocery penetration— anywhere from 10% to 20%—means that 80% to 90% of food will still be bought at a physical store. “We really felt we had a great product and a great brand … and bricks and mortar was our next logical step to expand.” Goel believes the Toronto market can support 10 to 20 small-format Fresh City stores in the central core. “We’re taking it one store a time,” he says. “We think there will be a lot of learning [from the Ossington store], which we think of as our first store in that we designed it ourselves and located it very consciously. But we do think there’s a hunger for this.” CG

FRESH CITY FARMS

IDEAS


Belgian fresh produce

e from th

heart of europe Here’s why Belgian leeks, bell peppers and endives are loved the world over

I

n the very heart of Europe, Belgium’s vegetables are among the most valued produce on the continent. This has everything to do with Belgium’s favourable climate and fertile soil, as well as the craftsmanship of its growers. Add state-of-the-art production systems, superb quality control and centrally located suppliers who are focused on personalized service, and it’s clear why Belgian fresh produce is loved the world over.

SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION

Europe has a wide variety of top quality vegetables, and Belgian endives (chicory), leeks and peppers are a vital part. For the highest-quality produce, look for the Flandria label, which guarantees environmentally conscious growing standards, quality and freshness.

Leeks In Belgium, the soil is ideal for growing leeks all year round. This results in leeks with dark-green leaves, a straight shape and a ‘white’ stem that is at least 15 cm in length.

TOP QUALITY

Only top quality products with exceptional taste and impeccable appearance deserve the Flandria label. In fact, Flandria growers are constantly working to improve the taste and shelf life of their products. In addition, growers who want their products sold under the Flandria label must adhere to strict regulations in terms of quality and size. All these specifications are enforced through an internal and external quality control mechanism.

GROWN WITH PASSION

Most Flandria vegetables come from family-run businesses so growers feel personally accountable for delivering quality fare. These growers are supported by scientists and product developers who are invested in showcasing this produce in the very best ways possible.

When it comes to greenhouse vegetables such as Belgium bell peppers, bumblebees are a key part of the fertilization process. Even the fertilization of field vegetables is based on expert advice and soil analysis to maintain an ideal ecological balance.

SURPRISE YOUR CUSTOMERS WITH THESE BELGIAN SPECIALTIES

Bell peppers Belgian suppliers offer peppers in all colours and shapes: bell peppers, baby peppers and sweet Palermo to name a few. All Belgian peppers are grown in glasshouses, which offer an ideal, controllable climate. These peppers are available from March until the beginning of November. Belgian endive Did you know that Belgium is the largest supplier of endives to Canada? The Belgian endive (also known as chicory) is the white gold and pride of Belgium. Not only is it available all year round, it’s versatile enough to use in all kinds of ways whether steamed, grilled, braised, or raw in a favourite salad. Find out what all the fuss is about. Try Belgian vegetables today. For more information about Belgium products and suppliers visit www. europeanvegetables.ca.


FOOD BYTES

Joel Gregoire

TOUTING THE REAL VALUE OF MEAL KITS

Focusing on how meal kits simplify meal decisions and food prep is the way to win the category MEAL KITS REPRESENT an evolution in how people cook. While much has been written about consumers’ cooking abilities, or the lack thereof, meal kits represent a way for those less familiar with the workings of a kitchen to have home-cooked meals prepared from scratch, guided by step-by-step instructions. The question is, do Canadians want meal kits? Mintel’s new report on Delivery Services and Meal Kits provides some answers. When asked, one fifth of Canadians claimed to have purchased a meal kit and would do so again. An additional 26% said they haven’t, but they’re interested in trying. Combined, this points to half of Canadians being potential consumers for the format, whether ordered online or purchased from a grocer. So, what appeals to Canadians when it

comes to meal kits and what turns them off? For those who have used or who are interested in meal kits, easier meal preparation proves the biggest draw, followed by new meal ideas and healthy options. For those not interested, the two biggest hurdles are the perception that the kits are “too expensive” and that they “don’t know enough about them.” One has to wonder if these concerns will subside should retailers invest more in meal kits and general awareness rises. A trip to Ontario-based grocery chain Longo’s, for instance, provides an example of a grocer that is doubling down on the format with an array of choices including “traditional” meal kits that come in a box, along with mix-andmatch and heat-and-eat solutions. These different options provide shoppers with

WHAT CANADIANS THINK ABOUT MEAL KITS

“How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements?”

73% 70% 69% 65% 50%

Any agree

Meal kits expose people to new cuisines Meal kits give people confidence to prepare meals they might not have otherwise made Meal kits make planning easier Meal kits save time Meal kits help me buy only the foods I need

SOURCE: LIGHTSPEED/MINTEL | ATTITUDES TOWARD MEAL KITS, MAY 2018 BASE: 1,584 INTERNET USERS AGED 18+ WHO KNOW WHAT MEAL KITS ARE

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the flexibility to create meals based on their individual taste preferences and also in terms of how much effort they want to expend come mealtime. Aside from ease, meal kits can make for a more efficient shopping trip, which can help negate concerns around cost. Half of those surveyed who know what meal kits are believe the format is a way to help them buy only the foods they need, which can also help them cut down on food waste and, by extension, financial waste. On top of that, twothirds agree meal kits save time, with seven in 10 respondents also agreeing that meal kits make meal planning easier. The inherent value of meal kits is also reflected in the time not spent trying to decide what to make for dinner. An added benefit of meal kits is that they allow consumers to venture outside their comfort zone. Three-quarters agree that meal kits expose them to new cuisines, which Mintel research consistently identifies as an area of opportunity. Furthermore, 70% view meal kits as giving them the confidence to prepare meals they might not have otherwise made. Meal kits, therefore, not only represent an opportunity to provide Canadians with convenient and efficient meal solutions, but also to expand consumers’ palates and provide greater assurance in the kitchen. Today’s demanding consumers want fresh, quality meals but often lack the skills or time to make them from scratch. Meal kits’ real value is in simplifying the meal-decision and preparation process and giving consumers a chance to try new things. Focusing on these areas can help retailers realize opportunity with this emerging format.  CG

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

Joel Gregoire is associate director, Food & Drink at Mintel, the world’s leading market intelligence agency. Based in Toronto, Joel researches and writes reports on Canada’s food and drink industry. @JoelDGregoire


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BEHIND THE TRENDS

Clare Butler

TARGETING THE CONSCIOUS CONSUMER

Adopting more sustainable business practices is a win-win for Canadian retailers CONSUMERS ARE becoming more conscious about what they buy these days, and sustainability is playing a bigger role in their purchasing decisions. From clothes to cars to food, consumers are placing a greater emphasis on where and how the goods they purchase are sourced. According to Euromonitor International’s 2017 Global Consumer Trends Survey, more than 67% of Canadian consumers said they try to have a positive impact on the environment through their everyday actions. A growing number of Canadian food producers and retailers are jumping at the opportunity to target this new ethical consumer by focusing on local production, plantbased food alternatives and reducing food waste. LOCALIZATION A source of pride for Canadians is their relatively strict regulatory environment and close oversight on food safety, processing and labelling. This has led to a growing preference for foods made in Canada or made with Canadian ingredients, and retailers are getting behind the local food trend. Loblaw and Walmart Canada helped facilitate the establishment of organic baby food in Canada through their support of two leading organic baby food brands—namely Baby Gourmet and Love Child. These brands grew from small, niche brands into major brands with national distribution and attained category leadership in

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

about five years. An IGA in the Montreal borough of Saint-Laurent took local food to new heights when it planted a rooftop garden. Now in its second year of operation, the store sells the produce directly to shoppers. As this trend progresses, retailers might consider sourcing more Canadian-produced ingredients in their private-label products, or using more local ingredients in their store’s prepared food sections. PLANT-BASED ALTERNATIVES Growing evidence of the health benefits associated with a plant-based lifestyle is convincing consumers to try more flexible diets that contain fewer animal products. Health Canada is even revamping the Food Guide based on the health and environmental benefits of cutting back on meat consumption. With Canada’s growing multicultural population, including many cultures that are rooted in a vegetarian lifestyle, this trend is surely one with staying power. Food companies and grocery retailers have an opportunity to look for ways to introduce the plant-based lifestyle into stores through plant-based cooking classes or private-label products, for example. REDUCING FOOD WASTE In stride with consumers’ growing awareness of the impacts of global food supply chains and animal-based products, consumers are also paying more attention to the amount of food waste they

generate. Often a cost-related concern for food operators, Canadians’ omnipresent concerns about the environment are driving a movement to eat root-to-stem, and they are taking up the challenge of zero-waste eating. Led by the National Zero Waste Council, the Love Food Hate Waste campaign is based on a similar U.K. model through which avoidable household waste was cut by 21% in its first five years. Walmart Canada and Sobeys are joining local and provincial governments to address food waste and educate consumers on ways to better use and avoid over-purchasing food. Restaurants are also a source of inspiration for food waste management. Craft Beer Market, the largest LEAF-certified restaurant in Canada, is all-in on reducing its environmental impact. In addition to its composting program, the company uses only biodegradable to-go containers and paper products, and even outfits its staff in Levi’s Water<Less technology jeans, which are made with considerably less water in the manufacturing process. Canadian retailers have an opportunity to join the movement to eliminate waste by implementing composting strategies in grocery kitchens or offering meal-planning services to customers. As consumers continue to focus on sustainability efforts in their daily lives, they will demand the same from the places they shop and the food they buy. Adopting more sustainable business practices is indeed a win-win scenario for Canadian retailers. Buying local, investing in plant-based alternatives and reducing food waste can cut operating costs and build a better brand image at the same time.  CG

Clare Butler is a senior business development account manager at Euromonitor International, an independent provider of strategic market research. Euromonitor.com.


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EATING IN CANADA

Kathy Perrotta

COME TOGETHER!

Encouraging togetherness at mealtime is not just good for consumers’ well-being—retailers stand to benefit, too IT HAS BEEN WELL documented that most meals these day are eaten alone. Almost two-thirds (62%) of meal and snack occasions are now eaten at a “table for one.” One key to the solo dining trend is that planning, cooking and pleasing multiple people at multiple times throughout the day is both labour- and time-intensive, while also being downright daunting. And without a doubt, our eating patterns have evolved to a more fragmented, less structured regime. This evolution has resulted in robust snacking and “mini-mealing” behaviour. Today,

messaging to millennials by life stage and occasion will be key to promoting sharing behaviour, particularly given current consumption habits. Millennials (21 to 37 years old) do not eat many meals with others, with less than a third (31%) reporting that they consume at least one shared meal on a daily basis. Compare this sharing rate with the more than half (51%) of boomers (age 52 to 71) who report sharing meals seven days a week. But all meal occasions, with regards to being shared or solo, are not equal. Breakfast has traditionally been a solo occasion, with sharing rates declining by 3% since 2015. Breakfasts sourced from restaurants, however, are more likely to be eaten with others than they are to be consumed alone. The Ipsos Foodservice Monitor (FSM) reports that individuals engaged in shared occasions also have a higher average eater check (19% higher) than solo diners, revealing a demonstrable benefit of shared breakfasts. While lunches consumed by kids and teens are most often shared, adult Canadians are more likely to eat lunch alone. Fifty-three percent of adult lunches are eaten alone, with this solo dining occasion rate growing 4% since 2015. It’s worth noting that lunch has become the most skipped meal of the day among adults. Would increased sharing encourage less meal skipping? There are some bright spots for lunch, however. A key opportunity, for instance,

Reconnecting consumers to the benefits and rewards of shared mealtime presents an opportunity to bring people together in an organized way, providing rhythm and predictability to the flow of the day most snacking occurs “o solo mio.” That said, a closer look at our daily captured, occasion-based research in Ipsos FIVE reveals a consumer willingness to invest more time and money when dining with others—both at home and away from home—which offers a strong rationale for manufacturers, retailers and foodservice operators to promote the eating together experience. As the spending baton gets passed from boomers to millennials, targeted

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

exists in the targeting of visible minority Canadians, who are more likely to share the occasion with others than to dine alone. Perhaps cross-acculturation forces can serve up an opportunity to shift our frenetic daily pace. Dinner is the most shared meal of the day, and Canadians spend more time preparing dinner when sharing it with someone else. They also consume a greater number of dishes on these occasions. The average shared dinner is prepared in 30 minutes or less and contains three items. In contrast, almost half of solo dinner occasions (49%) are prepared in 15 minutes or less, with an average of less than two items. Meal preparers are also incorporating more homemade items when eating with others. In fact, nearly two thirds (65%) of items consumed at shared dinners are reported as homemade, compared to only 51% percent of items consumed at solo dinners. While eating alone dominates our daily routines, perhaps instead of mourning the decline of meal sharing, sales growth can be achieved by continuing to expand the meal solutions that tend to reinvigorate our relationship with food, our families and our friends. Reconnecting consumers to the benefits and rewards of shared mealtime presents an opportunity to bring people together in an organized way, providing rhythm and predictability to the flow of the day. It also offers opportunity to position your brands as part of a convivial dining experience that contributes to consumers’ physical, mental and social well-being while forsaking the doldrums of the lonely lunch “al desko” or the lonely “cold computer” dinner.  CG

Kathy Perrotta is a VP of Marketing with Ipsos Canada and leads the FIVE service, a daily diary tracking of what individuals ate and drank yesterday across all categ­ories/ brands, occasions and venues. Kathy.perrotta@ipsos.com


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At The Big Carrot’s second Toronto store, it’s all about sustainability and community 24

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

IT’S OPENING DAY for The Big Carrot’s new store in Toronto’s Beach neighbourhood and a large crowd is gathered outside, long before the doors are set to open. It’s late June, sunny and there’s a definite jovial vibe in the air as young kids dance to live music, and people pose for photos with the store’s cheerful carrot mascot before joining the line for a cup of freshly squeezed carrot juice. After a round of speeches, the store’s doors open and the

crowd floods in; within minutes the aisles are so packed you can barely move. This may seem like a disproportionate amount of excitement for the opening of a small, 6,300-sq.-ft. natural health food store, only the second for The Big Carrot brand. But this is not your average health food grocer. First opened on Toronto’s Danforth Avenue 35 years ago, The Big Carrot is widely known as a pioneer in the natural health space.


STORE PROFILE

The all-organic produce section is one of the most popular areas of the new Beach neighbourhood store

By Carol Neshevich Photography by Jaime Hogge

As a worker-owned company, The Big Carrot has always prioritized organic, non-GMO, local, fair trade and sustainability in its purchasing. “The Big Carrot purchased organic products before organic was fully defined; they supported local farmers and vendors and helped build the organic industry in Ontario and in Canada,” says the store’s manager of public relations, Sarah Dobec. The original Danforth location

has developed a cult-like following in the city—and if the enthusiastic posts on the neighbourhood Facebook page are any indication, Beach residents had been eagerly awaiting the opening day of their own local Big Carrot for months. Fast-forward two months later and store manager John Gousvaris says reception of the store, known as the Beach Community Market, has continued to be positive. “We’ve had very, very good

NEW CARROT ON THE BLOCK feedback from everybody,” he says. Weekends seem to be the busiest times so far, he says, aside from the second Monday of each month, when the store offers 10 times the points on its loyalty card program. “We’re very busy on that Monday.” Although smaller than the original store, the new location features all the same departments—including grocery, fresh produce, fresh grab-and-go foods, a personal care and dispensary section, September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

25


STORE PROFILE and an organic smoothie/coffee bar. “We’re smaller than the Danforth location [which is about 10,000 sq. ft.], so we really had to think carefully about what we were going to sell. We took the bestsellers from Danforth, the popular and most requested items, and brought them here,” says Gousvaris, who has been with The Big Carrot for nearly 12 years, having worked as a produce manager at the Danforth location before becoming store manager at the Beach location. Upon entering the store, the first thing customers see is a collection of colourful signs on the right-hand wall that declare The Big Carrot’s various affiliations and commitments to sustainability and health. One sign states the store’s commitment to local while another describes its partnership with the Canadian Organic Growers, The Organic Council of Ontario and the Canada Organic Trade Association. Yet another sign affirms that The Big Carrot is a founding member of the Non-GMO Project while others demonstrate the store’s commitment to sustainable seafood and fair trade-certified coffee and sugar cane.

Once past the signs, your eye immediately goes to the all-organic produce section, which Gousvaris says is the most popular area of the store. “Everyone comes in to load up on their fruits and veggies.” That said, The Carrot Kitchen (a hot counter/foodservice area featuring organic meals made in house) and the grab-and-go section have both proven more popular than he expected. “Our grab-and-go section is constantly getting filled, and constantly getting emptied again,” he says. “There’s a lot of clientele here that just want a good meal, ready to go. That’s definitely the trend here.” While the new store sells a lot of the same grab-and-go items that are popular at the Danforth location, it has also added a several new items, including a meatless burger called the Southwood Smash (named after Southwood Drive, where the Beach store is located). “It’s our take on the Big Mac, basically,” laughs Gousvaris. “There’s no meat in it; it’s made out of chickpeas, but it tastes like it has the Big Mac sauce in it … everyone is going crazy for it.” The grab-and-go salads also sell well, and Gousvaris says

items like chicken wings, pulled pork and ribs at the hot food bar are big sellers, too. The success of the new location’s graband-go fare has prompted an expansion of the menu. “We’ve realized how popular the grab-and-go meal section is, so we’re in that development stage right now of trying to get new menu items,” says Gousvaris. “We’re expanding our bakery section as well, so we’ll be offering more cookies, muffins and baked goods that are made here in house.” Strolling through the store’s aisles, it’s clear that The Big Carrot isn’t just paying lip service to its commitment to local. There’s poultry from Peterborough, Ont.’s Yorkshire Valley Farms; baby food from Toronto’s Love Child Organics; cheese from Aylmer, Ont.’s Hope EcoFarms; cookies from Toronto’s Sweets From the Earth bakery; coffee from Etobicoke, Ont.’s Birds & Beans; chips and other savoury snacks from Richmond Hill, Ont.’s Neal Brothers Foods—the list goes on. “The clients in this area are really on board with [the local focus] and that’s obviously our big priority here,” says Gousvaris.

John Gousvaris, the new store’s manager, has worked with The Big Carrot for nearly 12 years

The Facts Location

Toronto, Ont. Size

6,300 sq. ft. Specialties

Organic, local and sustainable items; The Carrot Kitchen; personal care and dispensary section; Organic Smoothie & Coffee Bar

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer


FEATURE

The Carrot Kitchen is the hot counter/foodservice area featuring fresh, organic dishes made in house

Then there’s the Organic Smoothie & Coffee Bar, which can be accessed both inside the store and from the street via a window so passersby can quickly grab a coffee or smoothie without having to go into the store. Posted in the window of the smoothie bar is a sign promoting The Big Carrot’s new running club, which meets at the store every other Wednesday (in partnership with Fearless Fitness, a local gym). The running club seems to not only reflect The Big Carrot’s identity as a hub for health, but also its efforts to integrate itself into the community. “I started on this project when it was a hole in the ground. I came in here pretty much every day and I learned about the community,” says Gousvaris. He currently lives at the other end of the city, but says he’s reached the point where he and his wife are now considering moving to the neighbourhood. “If anyone asks me how it’s going at work, I say I’ve always loved my job—but I really love the people that live in this community, so I’m especially happy to be here.”  CG September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

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COVER STORY

Independent minded  As co-owner of Toronto’s  venerable Summerhill Market, Christy McMullen wears many hats. Now, she’s  about to don a new one: chair of CFIG By Shellee Fitzgerald Photography by Nikki Ormerod

ASK CHRISTY MCMULLEN how she feels about the grocery business and she’ll tell you it’s “in her blood.” It’s a sentiment you often hear from independent grocers with deep roots in the business. McMullen grew up in the grocery store her grandfather Frank opened in 1954. Back then, the small, 2,500-sq.-ft. store located on a quiet street in Toronto’s Rosedale neighbourhood served as a community hub. Summerhill Market remains so today, although a lot has changed. The Rosedale store has grown to 10,000 sq. ft. and is well known for its specialties and topnotch prepared foods, created in-house

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

by an army of kitchen staff. McMullen and her brother Brad now oversee the Summerhill operation, which includes a second store (on Mt. Pleasant Ave.) and a floral boutique. A third store, located in Toronto’s Annex neighbourhood, is also in the works and is scheduled to open early next year. On top of all that, a 30,000-sq.-ft. commissary is under construction. “We’re definitely in growth mode,” says McMullen. If running a growing grocery business wasn’t enough, McMullen will soon be adding to her workload. In October, she will take on the role of chair of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers


September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

29


COVER STORY

(CFIG); she’s just the second woman to hold the position at the organization that represents some 4,000 independent grocers across the country. We recently caught up with McMullen—who was also a 2015 winner of Canadian Grocer’s Star Women in Grocery awards—to talk about everything from Summerhill’s famous chicken pot pie to the need for a more level playing field in the grocery industry. Here are edited excerpts from the interview:

chicken pot pie. We also learned from the experience, worked through the process and the following year all went well.

Although you grew up in the grocery business, you did step away for a bit, correct?

I like that I never know what each day will bring. The grocery business is so different from one day to the next. One day I might be negotiating a million-dollar loan from the bank, the next day I’m helping [Wolverine actor] Hugh Jackman carry groceries out to his car, or I might be outside directing traffic—every day is something new.

Yes, I guess it was important to my dad [Bob] that I go out into the world and try something else, so I went to university and became a chartered accountant. I worked abroad for KPMG for years and learned what it was like to work for someone other than the family. It was good experience, but I think I always knew I would return to the grocery business.

What’s the key to Summerhill Market’s success? Listening to our customers has been a big part of it. Our long-term customers aren’t afraid to tell us what they want and they’re pretty knowledgeable and well-travelled; if they see something somewhere they’ll ask us to bring it in and we’ll try to get it. Another thing we’ve really focused on is making things as convenient as possible for our customers, whether it’s providing grab-and-go foods or hollowing out pumpkins for Halloween. Being an independent, it’s important to always come up with new ideas; some work, some fail, and when they do fail you learn from them and move on.

Can you provide an example of this? Hmmm. Well, a few years ago we introduced a holiday turkey dinner service that failed miserably. We had angry customers that had to wait in very long lines at the store. It wasn’t good. We miscalculated how long it would take to pack up the boxes. Everything was fine in the days leading up to the holiday, but the day before we got hit with a lot of orders to fill and we couldn’t catch up. We knew we had to repair the relationship with those customers so we sent out an apology in an email and offered them a free

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September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

You mentioned grab-and-go foods. Summerhill got into home-meal replacement (HMR) quite early, right? Yes, it all started with our chicken pot pie 30 years ago so we’ve been at HMR a really long time. Today it’s a really important part of the business.

What do you like most about your job?

How do you attract great staff? Staffing is a definite challenge in grocery, as staff can be very transient in this business. We try to promote people from within and we also like to let managers have some ownership over their work, so we’ll give them opportunities to test out their ideas and see how they work. We’re not afraid of failure.

In the larger grocery industry, what are some of the most significant changes you’ve seen over the last few years? Just how many new players are out there now. Competition is coming from everywhere: Uber Eats, Skip the Dishes, meal kits, Costco has really improved its food offering and, of course, Amazon. And then just the focus on fresh has become so important and the knowledge of consumers now is so great—they really want to know about their food and the products they buy.

How do independents best tackle the changing retail landscape? Wherever they can, independents should find their niche and be amazing at it. The chains do many things well but they don’t focus on some of these things, like service, as well as independents. And, of course, the other thing about independents is that they can respond very quickly and make changes in their business.

What’s the most interesting trend you’ve seen lately? The biggest thing right now is plantbased diets—there’s so much happening in this area. We’ve recently hired a vegan chef and some of the recipes she’s developing taste better than the traditional versions. With people looking so closely at their health, I think it’s a trend that’s here to stay.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Probably to join the CFIG board. In terms of professional development and building relationships with others in the industry, and learning best practices has been valuable—especially because grocery is so different from other industries. It’s nice to share with others and see how they operate their businesses.

What would you say are the top issues facing independent grocers today? Fairness. It’s not a level playing field; for example, independent grocers’ property taxes are high in comparison to the chains. We paid over $250,000 in property tax for a 10,000-sq.ft. business, whereas a nearby chain paid $80,000 for 40,000-sq.-ft. store—a big discrepancy. It’s grossly unfair and it’s an issue we [at CFIG] are passionate about; we want to get the word out, because people don’t know. And then there are credit card fees, which are higher for independents. I think another issue that’s going to become more important is plastic packaging reduction. We’re getting a lot of heat from our customers to reduce plastic. With a lot of prepared foods comes a lot of packaging, and we’re frantically trying to come up with a solution that will help reduce our use of plastic while keeping the food safe. Another thing we’re seeing is governments falling over themselves to attract Amazon’s [second] headquarters. Amazon is cutting into all of our businesses; it’s important to understand that with independents the money stays in our communities, and that’s not the case with Amazon.

What does the future look like for independents in Canada? I think there are tons of opportunities for independents; we just need to level the playing field.  CG


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Think you know beef? Here’s how beef stacks up1

1 serving = 75 g Cooked Beef 2 26 g protein, 2.5 mg iron, 1.83 µg B12, 6.5 mg zinc & 184 calories per serving

26 g Protein

2.5 mg Iron

6.5 mg Zinc

1.83 µg Vitamin B12

Almonds

Salmon

Boneless Chicken Breast

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Approx 3.5 servings

Approx 6.5 servings

Approx 7 servings

Approx 5.5 servings

1 serving = 1/4 cup 8 g protein/serving

1 serving = 75 g, cooked 0.38 mg iron/serving

1 serving = 75 g, cooked 0.26 µg B12/serving

1 serving = 2 eggs 1.16 mg zinc/serving

1

See www.thinkbeef.ca for nutrition information. Beef, composite cuts, steak/roast, lean and fat, cooked.

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Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide recommends Canadians enjoy a variety of foods from the four food groups, including a variety of foods from the Meat and Alternatives food group. Source of nutrient values: Health Canada, Canadian Nutrient File, 2015, food codes: Beef 6172, Almonds 2534, Salmon 3053, Chicken 842, Eggs 130.


SURVEY

STATE OF THE INDEPENDENT  NATION

How are the country’s independent grocers bearing up? A new survey sheds some light on the matter By Shellee Fitzgerald

F

ROM FENDING OFF competitive threats—both old and new—to managing costs, complying with regulations and myriad other issues, independent grocers in Canada have a lot to contend with in the dayto-day operating of their business. So how are they doing? According to a new survey, things aren’t so bad. According to the Canadian Independent Grocers Financial Survey 2018, prepared by FMS Solutions for the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG), the nation’s indie grocers are “faring well in an increasingly competitive landscape.” The report, which provides insights into fiscal year 2017, found that while 2017 wasn’t as good as 2016, stable profit (1.5% of sales), improved EBITDA (1.8%) and gross margin growth (1.9%) “reflect the resilience of the independent retailer segment.” Commenting on the report’s findings, Thomas Barlow, president and CEO of CFIG said that while margins continue to be thin, independent retailers will be “looking at the expense side of the ledger with a focus on how to offset increases to the cost of labour, increases in energy and strategies to offset the high cost of credit card transaction fees.” Indeed, grocery retailers have had to find creative ways to absorb costs related to legislated wage hikes. To set themselves up for success going forward, Robert Graybill, one of the study’s authors, says: “It will be critical that retailers develop good labour management solutions.” He adds that independent grocers also must consider stepping up their online game; the survey revealed that 70% of respondents do not have an online ordering offer. “This is the next real threat to topline sales.” Here’s what else the survey revealed:

THE HEAT IS ON—TOP COMPETITIVE PRESSURES Independent grocers rated the impact of five channels plus “other formats.” Here’s how they sized up the competition (on a scale of 1-6):

1  Conventional supermarkets (4.4) 2  Supercentres (4.1) 3  Dollar stores (2.0) 4  Limited assortment stores (1.7) 5  Online retailers (1.1) 6  Other (gourmet, drugstores, etc.) (0.7)

ON THE RADAR

Legislated minimum wage hikes in provinces such as Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia helped propel this issue to the top of the list

Issues that retailers said were having the biggest business impact (total Canada respondents) 01  Minimum wage increases 02 Competition from other physical retailers 03 Local/national economy 04 Staffing, hiring and retention 05 Local/federal government regulations 06 Food safety 07 Credit/debit card interchange fees/costs 08 Energy costs 09 Technology investments 10 Food inflation 11 Consumer health and wellness 12 Environmental concerns 13 Data security 14 Competition from restaurants/foodservice 15  Competition from online retailers 16 Consumer privacy concerns

Despite all the buzz generated by the perceived Amazon threat, online competitors did not even crack the top 10 areas of concern among Canadian independent grocer survey respondents

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

33


SURVEY LAGGING ON E-COMM

Independent grocers responding to the survey are dragging their feet when it comes to e-commerce. According to the survey, the vast majority (70%) have not yet implemented an online ordering service. Among those who have, click and collect is the most popular offering (15% of respondents offer this option). E-COMMERCE/ ONLINE ORDERING (Total Canada) 70%—None 15%—offer online ordering with pickup at store 11%—offer online ordering with home delivery 4%—offer another service

STAFFING & TURNOVER

Employee turnover at independent grocery stores varies significantly across the country and is much higher when it comes to part-timers: Employee Turnover

Total Canada

Quebec

Ontario

Other

Full time (average) Part time (average)

7.7% 24.6%

4.8% 27.5%

6.7% 22.7%

10% 23.6%

SAME-STORE SALES

Excluding sales of stores that underwent major renos or that opened in the previous year, the survey reveals that 40% of independents grew sales, while 42% lost ground. Across the country, Ontario and Quebec were the bright spots with retailers in those provinces managing to eke out positive same-store sales growth. Same-store sales gains: Total Canada: -0.3% Quebec:  1.1% Ontario:  0.6% Other: -1.8%

SOURCE: CANADIAN INDEPENDENT GROCERS FINANCIAL SURVEY 2018

Worth noting: 48% of employees work full time Part-time employees work an average of 20.3 hours At a single store (on average), independent grocers employ 26 full-time and 36 part-time employees

• • •

SHRINK Compared with 2016, 22% of survey respondents reported an increase in shrink (inventory lost during the normal course of business) while 22% also said they saw a reduction in shrink at their stores. The majority of respondents (56%) said shrink levels were unchanged.


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MEAL KITS

Once viewed as an online competitive threat, meal kits are now a growing opportunity for grocers By Rebecca Harris

LONGO’S

WINNING THE MEAL-KIT MARKET HEN MEAL-KIT DELIVERY COMPANIES BURST onto the scene six years ago, they were poised to take a bite out of the grocery industry. Their proposition was enticing: time-strapped consumers could cook fresh meals at home, using pre-portioned ingredients and chef-created recipes, without having to take a trip to the supermarket. Now, the subscription-based meal-kit model is turning on its head. Online providers are striking deals with brick-and-mortar retailers to sell their products in stores, while some grocers are outright acquiring meal-kit companies, and some retailers are creating meal-kit lines of their own. There’s been a flurry of activity in the United States, in particular, most recently with the Kroger chain’s acquisition of Chicago-based Home Chef. Walmart plans to roll out its own meal kits to more than 2,000 stores this year. Amazon, which bought Whole Foods last year, now sells meal kits on its site. And meal-kit providers Blue Apron, Hello Fresh

and Plated—which all launched in the United States in 2012—have all announced plans to bring their meal kits to grocery stores. Closer to home, Metro acquired a majority interest in Montreal-based meal-kit company MissFresh last year. “There are a couple of factors at play here,” says Sylvain Charlebois, professor in food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University in Halifax. “One is, grocers aren’t necessarily known to be good at foodservice in general. And so, they either decide to develop the talent within or they acquire it. And because grocers need to move fast in this space, more and more are deciding to either partner with a meal-kit provider or acquire one.” Secondly, while traditional meal-kit companies are ringing in sales (US$5 billion in the United States and $120 million in Canada), they’re struggling to make a profit. Faced with operational problems, the high cost of customer acquisition and retention, and logistics issues, it makes sense September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

37


MEAL KITS for meal-kit providers to team up with grocery retailers. “The financial performance of most mealkit providers is dismal,” says Charlebois. “They’re losing money and so I’m not sure there’s a future for standalone providers. If you can leverage your offering by using a network that already exists, you can generate some really interesting synergies between retailing and meal kits.” DELIVERING ON CONVENIENCE Despite the buzz about meal kits, the market is still in its infancy in Canada—as of 2017, only 4% of households purchased a meal kit in the past 12 months, compared to 25% of U.S. consumers, according to Nielsen. However, meal kits have the potential to deliver big returns to grocers. “Meal kits today have the opportunity to provide endless meal options to consumers, and this presents endless opportunities to retailers who sell in-store,” says Carman Allison, vice-president of consumer insights at Nielsen. While consumers are making fewer trips to the grocery store, “offering ready-to-go meal kits in the store is one way retailers can provide a new shopping experience that encourages consumers to spend on additional items in their basket,” he says. But what it really boils down to is capitalizing on consumers’ need for convenience. According to Nielsen, the top purchase drivers for meal kits are: saves time on meal planning (43%), saves time on meal prep and cooking (39%), ships directly to home (32%) and saves time on grocery shopping (31%).

Why do shoppers hit the store for meal kits? SHIPPING COSTS:

85% of consumers don’t like paying shipping costs IN-PERSON EXPERIENCE:

77% prefer to examine products in-store before purchasing QUALITY AND FRESHNESS:

53% are con­cerned about freshness and expiration dates FULFILLMENT AND DELIVERY:

49% are concerned deliveries may be lost/stolen/damaged EASE OF SITE USAGE:

34% do not think online shop­ ping options are easy to browse

38

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

THE GROCERY ADVANTAGE Choice is also key when it comes to purchase channels, and grocers in the meal-kit space are bridging the digital and physical realms. While the online MissFresh service remains the core of its meal-kit business, Metro is now selling MissFresh meal kits in its Quebec stores and plans to roll them out in Ontario over the next few months. In addition, subscribers to MissFresh online now have the option of picking up their weekly orders in a Metro store. They receive $5 off for other purchases they’re making in the store, which Plevano says is a great traffic driver. “It’s so convenient to have [your order] waiting at your door in the evening when you come home,” says Plevano. “But at the same time, you still need butter, bread and milk, so it’s a better solution to go in-store for some customers. And it’s bringing traffic to our stores, as well as complementary revenue and transactions.” Longo’s is another retailer making a bigger push

MISSFRESH/METRO

Thirty percent of consumers said they would like to purchase meal kits in their local grocery store, according to Nielsen. Here are five reasons shoppers may flock to retailers for their meal kits instead of e-commerce-only retailers:

While it would be easier for convenience-seekers to just buy ready-to-eat meals, they actually want to cook for themselves. “There’s a high interest amongst millennials and even Gen Z in preparing foods at home, but they don’t have the same knowledge base that older generations have,” says Rick Stein, vice-president of Fresh Foods at Food Marketing Institute (FMI) in Arlington, Va. “And so, what they’re looking for is the ability to do it with a bit help from these meal-kit companies.” Ran Goel, CEO and founder of Fresh City Farms, echoes that sentiment. Fresh City Farms started out as an urban farm, delivering pre-set bags of its own produce to customers in the Greater Toronto Area. It got into the meal-kit space about three years ago and quickly expanded its customer base with the acquisition of meal-kit company Fresh Canteen. Fresh City Farms now sells a range of all-organic meal kits, including gluten-free and vegan kits, and is going to start piloting the line at its new retail location in Toronto. “There is a drive to convenience, but there is a countervailing trend where people are seeking autonomy over how their food is made. I think meal kits provide both of those,” he says. “They provide them with this authentic experience of feeling like they’re cooking and not just taking something that’s prepared and microwaving it.” Customers are also drawn to meal kits because they go beyond humdrum, everyday meals. Gino Plevano, Metro’s vice-president, digital strategy and online shopping, finds that families and young professionals are the two biggest adopters of meal kits. “What they appreciate the most is the diversity and the fact that they can trial different recipes and different types of cuisines,” he says. “Sometimes, you end up in a routine when you’re doing the same meals over and over. With this, people can have variety and discover new meals and new tastes.”


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into the meal-kit space. Since 2000, the grocery retailer has been selling “Express” stir-fry meal kits that can be prepared in less than 10 minutes. The meal kit comes in a container that separates the protein, veggies, starch and sauce, and serves two for around $12. There’s also a “build-your-own option” with the four components sold à la carte. In April, Longo’s launched its new “Impress” line— more traditional meal kits with the ingredients and instructions in a box. This gourmet line has eight options, ranging in price from $19.99 to $26.99. Gary Wildman, Longo’s director of food services, says the advantage grocers have over purely online meal-kit companies is freedom of choice. “The one thing that we provide versus a Blue Apron is choice,” he says. “When you order a meal [from a strictly online player] on a Saturday for Monday fulfillment, you may be in the mood for salmon. But come Monday, you may not be in the mood for salmon. That’s why we’re well advantaged. You can come in our store at three or four in the afternoon and there’s dinner. And with just a few steps, you’re serving a wholesome nutritious meal to your family.” THE PRICE AND PACKAGING PROBLEM As with anything though, choice and convenience very often comes at a price. Consumers frequently cite the cost of meal-kit services as a major barrier to purchasing the kits. According to Nielsen, 63% of consumers would consider purchasing a meal kit if they were less expensive. Fresh City Farms’ Goel says meal kits definitely aren’t for everybody. However, a big part of the price issue is perception. “People under-value their time, whether it’s time they would need to research what recipe they want [or] shop for that recipe and put it all together,” he says.

40

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

FMI’s Stein recommends retailers educate shoppers about meal kits. “There’s a broad amount of consumers who just don’t understand meal kits,” he says. “They’re interested, but they don’t know how to do it. So, I think retailers should do some education, whether it’s in-store demos or videos, to explain how it works.” Another issue with meal kits is packaging waste. Individual ingredients are usually packaged in plastic bags, bottles and containers, and then there are ice packs and the box itself. “It’s huge, huge, huge,” says Goel, of the packaging problem. “But you can’t get around it, as you need the packaging to keep the integrity of the food and to make sure everything is fresh and safe.” Fresh City Farms does its part for the planet by using reusable ice packs, bags, coolers and pouches, which are picked up weekly. It also cuts back on packaging by not including kitchen staples such as salt, pepper and olive oil. Metro has launched a pilot at five Montreal stores to make MissFresh meal kits more eco-friendly. At the pickup location, meal kit orders are placed in reusable green bins. On their first order, customers are provided free reusable bags, which they use to bring their meal kits home. “It’s more difficult from a logistics perspective doing this for home delivery— picking it up afterwards—but at store level it’s an easier process for us,” says Plevano. “So, we’ll start there and we’ll see the customer reaction.” As for the future of meal kits, Metro’s Plevano says while it’s a small business right now, it will become more and more popular. “I think bringing the product in store is key so people can test it and trial the service. We’re going to follow this trend, see how it evolves, and make sure we’re answering customer needs.” In Stein’s view, retailers that are partnering with meal-kit providers will eventually launch meal-kit lines of their own. “In my mind, they are buying themselves some time to figure it out,” he says. “They’ll figure out how to cut down on the amount of time it takes to put the items together, they’ll figure out what are the more popular items, and they’ll figure out a way to promote them. And when they get that nailed, they’ll start severing the ties with the deals that they’ve made [with meal-kit companies].” And while meal kits and other meal solutions will evolve, the need for convenience isn’t going away, says Stein. “And I think the consumer interest in preparing foods at home and being shown how to do it isn’t going away.” Charlebois believes meal kits are indeed here to stay, and we’ll see more meal-kit providers working closely with grocers and restaurant chains. “It will only force companies to think differently about convenience and empowering consumers at home,” he says. “Meal kits are about empowering consumers for 10 to 15 minutes, making them believe they can be a chef at home. Why not do that?”  CG

MISSFRESH/METRO

MEAL KITS


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AISLES

Products, store ops, customers, trends

CONFECTIONERY

GETTY IMAGES/YELENA YEMCHUK

Chocolate’s premium push As consumers look to treat themselves with a higherquality indulgence, premium chocolate fits the bill By Carol Neshevich

T

he world appears to be on a health kick, with “eat less sugar and more veggies” landing on a growing number of consumers’ to-do lists. But if there’s one indulgence that people just don’t seem to be in any hurry to swear off, it’s chocolate. “We’re all supposed to be watching what we eat, and we’re supposed to be more careful, but people are definitely still eating chocolate,” says Marcia Mogelonsky, director of insight, Food and Drink at Mintel. “And they’re eating it because it’s comforting, or because they feel it’s a great reward—you know, all the reasons you can think of to eat chocolate.” Indeed, chocolate is a $1.75-billion business in Canada, with dollar sales increasing by 2% this year (in the latest 52 weeks ending June 23) and unit sales climbing by 7%, according to Nielsen data. And most analysts, retailers and chocolate manufacturers agree that one of the biggest trends right now is the shift toward premium September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

45


chocolate. More and more innovative, artisanal-style bars with high-quality ingredients are showing up on grocery store shelves, and discerning consumers seem to be gobbling them up. In fact, the premium chocolate category “is one of the main contributors to the growth within confectionery,” says Isabel Morales, consumer insights manager at Nielsen. Chocolate, she adds, is “a highly penetrated, very mature category but it continues to grow because of its high-impulse nature, also fuelled by the high level of innovation it offers.” Erica Gilmour, co-owner of Hummingbird Chocolate Maker in Almonte, Ont.

(near Ottawa), says recently customers have been increasingly asking for higher cacao content. “They’re looking for darker chocolate bars in the range of 80% to 100% cacao content,” she says, noting that Hummingbird—an award-winning artisanal “bean-to-bar” chocolate maker—doesn’t offer a 100% cacao bar yet, but they’re working on it. “So that’s 100% cacao, with no sugar or any other kind of sweetener added to it. We are working on that and it’s definitely something that we’ll have on the market in the fall,” she says. Where’s the demand coming from? Much of it is related to health, says

CHEWY CANDY GROWS UP

A new generation of sophisticated gummies and licorice is aimed at the more “mature” candy lover Just like chocolate, the candy market is experiencing an upscale trend. Higher-priced gummy candies in sophisticated packaging with flavours like champagne, bellini and bourbon are all the rage these days, and these are definitely not your kindergartner’s candies. “I think it’s a legitimate trend, because there is a desire for it, especially for adults as we become more mature. We love candy, but we don’t want to be seen eating those ‘baby’ things our kids eat,” laughs Marcia Mogelonsky, director of insight, Food and Drink at Mintel. She jokes that adults have always eaten gummy bears and Swedish fish, but they just might have been hiding in the closet while doing so.

46

Mogelonsky points to U.S.-based companies like Sugarpova and Sugarfina, both of which launched in 2012, as first popularizing the trend. “Sugarpova, started by tennis player Maria Sharapova, was one of the first to do this adult candy,” she says. “I think it’s really interesting that we’re now seeing a lot more adult candy coming on the market.” Frank Yunace, operations manager at Pete’s Fine Foods in Halifax, says he’s definitely noticed a surge in this kind of premium candy at his store. “We sell dry gin-flavoured gummies, prosecco-flavoured gummies … and [upscale] licorice has even recently become a big seller for us.” He points to Lakrids licorice bites, from Denmark, which he says are very popular and come in flavours

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

like Habanero Chili or Salt & Caramel Choc Coated. “They’re in these little, modern, nicely designed jars, and the marketing on the packaging is really sharp,” he says. “They’re not cheap—they’re like $10.99—but they sell like hot cakes.”

Gilmour. “There are so many people who are trying to avoid sugar completely now, so it’s attractive to them,” she explains. There’s also the widespread notion that dark chocolate is just better for you, with a broad range of benefits being attributed to dark chocolate—from antioxidants, to cholesterol control, to even boosting brain function. “A lot of people do perceive the dark chocolate as the healthier alternative,” says Adam Tully, director of grocery operations at Calgary Co-op. “We’re seeing more and more of the higher cacao content; Lindt even has a 90% bar now.” Tully notes that although many of the premium bars on the market come at a higher price tag than regular bars, many customers don’t seem to mind. “I’m seeing that people are willing to pay for that indulgence; they’re willing to put the money out there to get the treat they want.” Mintel’s Mogelonsky concurs. “There are still a lot of people who will grab a mass market chocolate bar, but I think a lot of people, especially older people, are being a little more conscious in their chocolate choice. So if they’re going to have chocolate, they’re going to have a small bit of a high-quality chocolate … and will spend a little more.” That said, when Hummingbird began working with Ontario retailer Farm Boy to get its chocolate onto the chain’s shelves, they collaborated with the grocer to modify their bars to fit what would work best for the store. “Farm Boy had an idea of what price point would work, and then we developed that sizing and packaging together with them to try to fit what they thought would work with their customers,” says Gilmour. Hummingbird created a 28-gram bar for Farm Boy that sells for $3.99, which is just less than half the size of their regular 60-gram bars that are sold at other stores and online (which are priced between $7.49 and $8.50). “I think it works in Farm Boy because people are often buying a last-minute indulgence, and it’s the perfect size to just eat by yourself in the car on the way home from the grocery store,” says Gilmour. As smaller artisanal chocolate companies make their mark, the big chocolate players of the world are definitely taking notice. When asked about what trends are influencing chocolate these days, May Zeibak, confectionery insights lead at Nestlé Canada pointed to (among

CHAMPAGNE BEARS: SHUTTERSTOCK/KEITH HOMAN

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AISLES other things) the artisanal hand-crafted trend. “Bean-to-bar, and its focus on pure but bold flavours is drawing fans the same way craft beer and artisanal coffee already have,” she says. She also points to the growing “desire for more sensorial experiences that surprise and delight all of our senses.” With these sorts of trends in mind, Nestlé recently introduced Kit Kat Premium Wrapped Pieces, which Zeibak describes as a “range of individually wrapped two-finger Kit Kat bars that deliver a multi-sensorial indulgent experience, with flavours such as Caramel Crisp, Hazelnut Crunch and Cookie Crumble.” Meanwhile, Hershey is jumping on the higher cacao trend with its premium Brookside brand by launching a 73% cacao lineup of chocolate-covered snacks. “Although chocolate has proven to be less vulnerable to rising consumer concerns around health, we know consumers are continuously look for ways to eat and drink more healthily, while still enjoying what they love,” says Brittany Satey, marketing manager, innovation, for Hershey Canada. Hershey is also launching Hershey Gold this fall, a non-chocolate Hershey bar made from “velvety creme with a hint of caramel combined with crunchy, salty favourites like peanuts and pretzels.” And like every other category in the food world, the “free-from” movement is becoming big in chocolate too. “We sell a lot of Moo Free chocolate bars, for instance, which are dairy-free, vegan, gluten-free products,” says Frank Yunace, operations manager at Pete’s Fine Foods in Halifax. He notes that kids with gluten restrictions get especially excited to see items like these. “You should see the looks in kids’ eyes when they find out it’s a gluten-free chocolate bar.” A large portion of the confectionery at Pete’s is actually imported directly from Britain—they have an entire British-themed section dedicated to the products, complete with British flags and the classic red British phone booths as part of the merchandising. It’s a popular section of the store, and they like to play it up. “We’ve had some blind taste tests around Christmas time at the store to have fun with our customers, comparing British to North American chocolate … and the British chocolates always seem to come out on top,” says Yunace. That said, Pete’s also likes to promote

48

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

local, and will feature East Coast products—including premium chocolate bars created by Nova Scotia-based Peace by Chocolate, famously started by a family of Syrian refugees who had been chocolatiers in their home country—right up front as much as they can. “We tend to merchandise that by our cashes, because we love to support local,” says Yunace. When merchandising chocolate in general, Calgary Co-op’s Tully says it’s important to position it out throughout the store at various high-traffic spots, not just at the checkout. “Confectionery can be spread anywhere in the store, at multiple points of interruption; make sure it’s always on the floor in the consumer’s face, and you’ll have additional purchases of it,” says Tully. Jean Tuteleers, retail and display confectionery lead at Nestlé Canada, adds that merchandising is particularly important for confectionery because it’s so often bought on impulse. “We believe that optimal merchandising is key to drive availability, visibility and accessibility of our products in order to maximize shopper conversion, especially since confectionery is such an impulse category,” he explains. From Hummingbird’s perspective, Gilmour says her company does a lot of in-store demos to spread awareness of their product. She considers sampling to be a very important outreach tactic. “I find with a product like ours, if people haven’t been exposed to higher-end chocolate, they often don’t see the value in it, because it is such a big variation in price point versus some of the other products available in grocery stores,” she says. “But if you can give them a taste of it, we hear people say all the time, ‘I thought I didn’t like dark chocolate, but I just hadn’t had yours yet!’ And then they become lifelong customers.” Sampling may become increasingly important as more new chocolate innovations hit the market. Mintel’s Mogelonsky notes that without sampling, many customers might opt to stick to their “tried and true” favourites, not wanting to spend the money on a pricey new chocolate bar that might disappoint them. And as Calgary Co-op’s Tully points out, consumers really do want to discover new innovations. “I think customers are always looking for different treats that they can indulge in—something different that will dazzle their taste buds.”


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AISLES

SWEET TREATS

As the weather cools, consumers traditionally turn their attention to those sweet indulgences: cookies and confectionery. Not surprisingly, Nielsen data shows that candy sales are at their highest during the Halloween period, while chocolate sales are highest during the winter holidays (6% of annual chocolate sales in Canada happen during Christmas week!). And, of course, cookies have long been a favourite fall and winter treat. This chart from Nielsen breaks down how the different confectionery categories have been performing over the past year, along with stats on how various cookie types—from chocolate chip to Danish butter— have been selling.

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CHUDLEIGH’S FROZEN-FRESH TREATS Full line of desserts now in grocery freezers Chudleigh’s signature Apple Blossoms were previously available in grocery stores, but the Milton, Ont.-based farm is now bringing its full dessert line to grocery freezers across Ontario, including Molten Chocolate Lava Cakes and Butter Toffee Sticky Cakes.

Confectionery and cookies  - 52 weeks, ending June 23, 2018 $ Sales (000s)

$ Vol % Chg

Units (000s)

Units Vol % Chg

CONFECTIONERY

2,492,287,543.0

2

2,423,411,903.7

6

1. CHOCOLATE

1,748,388,132.0

2

2,008,951,649.9

7

511,673,230.0

2

223,878,681.1

4

2. GUM

232,226,181.0

0

190,581,572.7

-5

COOKIES

813,556,066.0

1

303,708,733.6

2

41,765,417.0

5

6,725,020.6

-1

237,746,110.0

-2

94,725,775.6

1

COOKIES - TYPE - DANISH BUTTER

14,462,093.0

10

4,310,957.7

11

COOKIES - TYPE - ENROBED INCL. MALLOWS

59,309,767.0

3

21,470,158.6

5

COOKIES - TYPE - ASSORTMENT 3. COOKIES - TYPE - CHOCOLATE CHIP

COOKIES - TYPE - EUROPEAN

4,780,678.0

-9

1,724,868.7

0

22,198,241.0

-3

9,937,776.1

-2

COOKIES - TYPE - OTHER TYPES OF COOKIES

134,885,670.0

2

50,610,642.6

4

COOKIES - TYPE - PLAIN

120,793,535.0

-2

42,158,018.0

-4

COOKIES - TYPE - SANDWICH CREME

129,688,966.0

4

50,441,635.2

2

4. COOKIES - TYPE - WAFERS

47,925,589.0

10

21,603,880.5

14

COOKIES - TYPE - FRUIT CENTRE

1 Chocolate accounts for more than two-

thirds of all confectionery sales: out of a nearly $2.5-billion confectionery market, more than $1.7 billion is chocolate.

2 Gum’s steady decline continues.

Although dollar sales growth for gum was flat at 0%, unit sales dropped by 5% in the latest 52 weeks ending June 23.

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

New pudding features real, whole blueberries The Dole Fruit ’N Pudding line uses real fruit to add a healthy twist to pudding. Previously available in two flavours—Diced Mango in Mango Pudding and Diced Peaches in Vanilla Pudding—Dole introduces a third in October: Whole Blueberries in Blueberry Pudding.

3 Canadians love chocolate chip cookies!

At $238 million in sales, they’re the highest-selling cookie variety by far. That said, dollar sales have declined by 2% since last year.

4 Wafer cookies are rising in popularity,

with 10% growth in dollar sales (to nearly $48 million) and a whopping 14% unit sales growth.

SOURCE: NIELSEN, NATIONAL, ALL CHANNELS, ALL SALES, EXCLUDING N.L.

50

DOLE FRUIT ’N PUDDING—WHOLE BLUEBERRIES IN BLUEBERRY PUDDING

SMARTFOOD ASIAGO & BLACK PEPPER Popcorn brand launches zesty new flavour Smartfood has added a rich new flavour to its air-popped popcorn line: Asiago & Black Pepper. Smartfood is positioning this new flavour as an indulgent savoury snack “for when you just need some me-time!”

GETTY IMAGES/YINYANG

CANDY CONFECTIONS


AISLES

The golden touch

Turmeric isn’t exactly new—it’s been used as both a cooking spice and a traditional medicine for more than 4,000 years. But today, it’s reaching a whole new level of popularity, showing up in an increasing number of crunchy snacks, teas and kombuchas, breads, dairy products and even breakfast cereal. Here are just a few innovative turmeric products popping up on store shelves. MODHANI YOGURT While the probiotic properties of yogurt already make it a beneficial food, all of Modhani’s Greek yogurts prominently feature turmeric as an ingredient, boosting the perceived health benefits even more. They’re all made with real fruit and all-natural ingredients too. Based in Brampton, Ont., Modhani’s yogurt flavours include Blueberry, Strawberry, Raspberry, Cherry, Mango and Pineapple.

BLUE MONKEY Vancouver-based Blue Monkey boasts that its Turmeric Coconut Chips can be enjoyed as a “guiltfree” on-the-go snack, crumbled onto salads, or even mixed into frozen yogurt. Sweetened with coconut nectar, these coconut chips contain no added sugar, no additives and no preservatives. They’re also vegan, non GMO and gluten free.

SILVER HILLS BAKERY The Organic Turmeric Tortillas from Silver Hills Bakery are sprouted, whole wheat tortillas designed to make soft and tasty wraps—and B.C.-based Silver Hills likes to highlight the anti-inflammatory properties of the added turmeric as well. These certified organic, handstretched tortillas are also Non-GMO Project Verified.

Drink your turmeric

BREW DR. KOMBUCHA NATURE’S PATH Blending turmeric, coconut, cinnamon and honey, Nature’s Path Golden Turmeric cereal is gluten free, certified organic and Non-GMO Project Verified. Based in Richmond, B.C., Nature’s Path also points out that this crunchy new cereal is packed with whole grains, and it always makes the milk turn a golden colour!

52

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

Portland, Ore.-based Brew Dr.’s Ginger Turmeric Kombucha is 100% raw, organic kombucha that includes both ginger and turmeric—a combination that leads to a zesty taste and a wide variety of health benefits. Available in 14- or 32-oz. bottles, 12-oz. cans, and kegs, this kombucha is gluten free and uses only organic ingredients.


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AISLES

SEAFOOD

MAKING WAVES Value-added options are removing fear, adding excitement and allowing consumers to be more confident when preparing seafood By Anna Sharratt FORGET PLAIN OLD frozen fish sticks. At Mississauga, Ont.-based Tree of Life, it’s all about basa, a type of catfish. Tree of Life (which acquired Green Ocean Seafood Products last year in order to expand its seafood capabilities) is introducing tikka masala marinated basa portions, as well as Indian curry-flavoured and sriracha-flavoured basa nuggets. These new introductions cater to consumers looking for a more adventurous fish fix that’s also convenient and easy to cook. The company says it’s responding to a desire for value-added seafood products—something gleaned from a study it commissioned last year. “One of the key learnings was that consumers across the country talked about the convenience of buying frozen seafood and the ability to buy a variety of species in the frozen seafood section,” says Glenn Grandy, senior director, seafood, at Tree of Life. Packaged seafood options are certainly

54

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

more numerous—and creative—than the bland, breaded fish options that used to dominate the market. They now include such items as fish sausages, salmon jerky, gluten-free seafood pizzas, salmon bacon and snow crab coquille. And they’re resonating with consumers who want to eat less red meat, and want a product that will taste good and be easy to handle. Indeed, a 2017 Nielsen study revealed that 20% of Canadian consumers said they intended to add more fish and seafood to their diets. Nielsen’s recent data shows that fresh seafood sales in Canada were $657 million in the latest 52 weeks ending July 21, 2018, while frozen seafood sales were $53 million—and both rose by 1% from the previous year. Carson Bonina, store manager at Stong’s Market in North Vancouver, says many shoppers have entered a better comfort zone with seafood, thanks, in part, to the growth in value-added options. “In the past, cooking seafood

MARKET NEEDS SOME MOMENTUM While new offerings are emerging, sales of these value-added products could be higher, says Jo-Ann McArthur, president of Toronto-based Nourish Food Marketing. “While the fresh seafood market is growing, the value-added market at retail has stalled,” she explains. “It was increasing in-line with population, but in the past year it declined by 1%.” To push sales of value-added seafood products, she says grocers need to ensure their offerings are as healthy as possible, offering fewer breaded and battered fish products. “Grocers and processors need to make it fast and simple to prepare while maintaining its health properties.” And while grocery HMR (home meal replacement) sections have done a better job offering other proteins, says McArthur, seafood seems underrepresented. “Where are those easy options in-store?” she says. “Prepared foods? Platters? Deli? Ready-to-assemble poke bowls?” Nielsen research backs up this idea, with a recent report on seafood out of the United States noting that meal kits could be the next big platform for seafood innovation. As in-store meal kit sales rise, “retailers could very easily bring seafood into this rapidly growing grocery option, especially since 29% of meal kit users say they eat more seafood with meal kits,” according to the report. Battaglia admits the value-added seafood market is still developing. “This market is one that has taken quite a bit of time to develop in the seafood industry, but it is one that seems to be picking up steam recently,” he says. Battaglia believes the key to growing it is ensuring the products taste good and are easy to prepare. “As long as we can still keep the price point friendly, this market will continue to grow in the future.”  CG

SHUTTERSTOCK/AS FOOD STUDIO

was intimidating for most consumers, with only the most well-versed cooks choosing to purchase seafood at the meat counter,” says Bonina. “With the growing popularity of value-added products, it has allowed seafood to become accessible to all types of consumers.” Sal Battaglia, vice-president of sales and marketing at Vaughan, Ont.-based Seacore Seafood, agrees. “By eliminating the consumer’s fear of handling fish and seafood or the fear of not being able to cook the seafood properly, we can meet the consumer’s demands.”


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FRESH

Salad kits

Salad days

By Danny Kucharsky

WITH CONSUMERS being busier and more mindful of health and wellness than ever before, interest in salad kits continues to grow, says Kevin Silver, vice-president, business development Canada at Taylor Farms. “If you can deliver convenience and healthy nutrition at the same time, it’s an instant hit,” he says of the category that has evolved to include bowls, jars and chopped kits that come with all the fixings for a complete meal—dressings, proteins, grains and more. The time is right for these products: according to a Nielsen Panelviews survey, 54% of consumers are looking for more vegetables in their diets. Incidentally, sales of vegetables are up 6% compared to a year ago (partly due

to price increases), according to Nielsen MarketTrack figures for the 52 weeks ending March 31, 2018. BOWLS  Jacob Shafer, senior marketing and

communications specialist at Mann Packing in Salinas, Calif., says the salad bowl trend began to emerge in foodservice and on social media a few years back. The company launched Nourish Bowls, a line of single-serve, “warm meals” with fresh vegetables and sauces back in 2016. These bowls feature “trending vegetables” such as kohlrabi, cauliflower, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, kale and sugar snap peas. There are seven varieties, including the newly launched Tomato Bolognese and Basil Pesto. Salad bowls appeal to millennials, says Shafer, because “they deliver flavour, convenience and quality ingredients.” CHOPPED SALADS  Silver says Taylor Farms’ line of chopped salads saves consumers time and labour. “You have everything in a kit format, (and) you can make the salad in under three minutes. It’s not a type of salad your average consumer can just whip up quickly.” California-based Taylor Farms first offered chopped salads in 2011, and currently sells the brand at Costco in Canada, including its Asian cashew variety that comes with vegetables, wontons, toasted almonds and a sesame dressing. The company also makes chopped salads for Canadian grocers’ store brands. To come up with new flavours, Taylor Farms conducts consumer panels and looks at foodservice menu trends. Clean labelling is currently a “big initiative,” with the company working with suppliers to ensure dressings and

56

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

toppings are 100% free from artificial ingredients and preservatives. Silver, who is still shocked to hear from friends who have never tried chopped salads, suggests grocers give the category exposure through flyers, social media and frequent samplings. “We’ve got to really get these items into consumers’ hands to try, because once they try them, they love them.” JARS  Meanwhile, Anne-Marie Verstraelen, president of salad jar brand Urban Picnik in Joliette, Que., says her products are a hit with environmentally-conscious consumers who can reuse the mason jars the salads are packed in. Launched in 2016 as Ma Vitrine Bio, an organic product, the company switched to non-organic varieties in May and changed the brand name to appeal to the English market. Urban Picnik products can be eaten directly from the jar and no preparation is required. “It’s a complete meal that easily replaces a sandwich,” Verstraelen says. The product taps into a desire among the young for healthy, meat-free meals and is targeted to millennials and early adopters on social media. About 80% of the brand’s customers are female. Developed by a nutritionist, Urban Picnik is available in four varieties, with Dragon (beets, carrots, kale, almonds, tofu and sesame sauce) being the top seller. Three additional varieties are in development. Currently sold at IGA, Metro and Couche-Tard in Quebec, Urban Picnik will be available at major grocers in Ontario this fall. With a shelf life of 12 days, these jars last longer than other salad kits and are considered main courses, as they contain a minimum of 15 grams of vegetable proteins. Verstraelen says salad jars can become better known through sustained promotions, adequate shelf space and good in-store positioning. David Wilson, program manager – produce and floral at Choices Markets in Burnaby, B.C., says prominent displays help bolster sales of salad kits from a grab-and-go demographic, as do advertising programs with suppliers. CG

SHUTTERSTOCK/IRINA MELIUKH

Innovation has bumped up salad kits from side-dish status to the main attraction


CHECKING OUT

COUNTDOWN TO CANNABIS SALES Cannabis will soon be legal in Canada, and some retailers have high hopes for the new category THE FACE AND BODY of retailing in Canada are about to change as legislation to legalize the sale of recreational marijuana comes into effect October 17. Both retailers and manufacturers are jockeying to take advantage of what are purported to be big additional sales from legalized pot. Although the federal government has legalized cannabis, each province gets to determine what restrictions they want to place on the sale, distribution and use of the substance. According to CTV, Quebec, Yukon, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick will restrict marijuana sales to government-operated stores, while in addition to government stores, British Columbia will also allow sales through privately-run outlets. Newfoundland/Labrador, Manitoba, Alberta

58

September/October 2018 Canadian Grocer

and Saskatchewan will allow sales through private storefronts while the Northwest Territories will sell through privately-operated liquor stores. Ontario will permit privately-operated stores to sell pot next year, but until then, sales will be online only. All provinces will allow online sales either through private or government-operated websites. Grocers across Canada are gearing up for the expected rush. Loblaw’s Dominion Stores in Newfoundland/Labrador, for example, have received licenses to sell cannabis products, while Real Canadian Superstore in Western Canada has applied for permits. Calgary Co-op plans to open 12 standalone stores to sell cannabis, accessories and vaporizers. Many more retailers are awaiting approval. The number of grocers applying to

sell pot is expected to climb dramatically once the sale of edible and drinkable cannabis products is allowed. In legalizing recreational cannabis, the federal government initially overlooked cannabis edibles and beverages, but later included them in the legislation. Their approval, however, has been postponed until sometime next year. It is not yet clear whether cannabis edibles and drinks will be permitted in grocery stores, but it seems likely that just like beer and wine, grocery stores will eventually be able to cash in on the demand. Sylvain Charlebois, professor in food distribution and policy, faculties of management and agriculture at Dalhousie University, wrote recently in The Globe and Mail: “Once edibles are available, things will get complicated in Canada’s food industry. But, with the right regulations, this is a profit opportunity that doesn’t come by every day. Edibles present a hugely profitable opportunity for the Canadian food industry.” He adds that in California, consumers purchased US$180-million worth of cannabis-infused food and drink last year—roughly 10% of the state’s total cannabis sales— while in Colorado, sales of edibles rose by about 60% per year over the past two years. “This kind of tremendous growth is what the food industry needs right now,” said Charlebois. Manufacturers are acutely aware of the potential of cannabis-infused products and are experimenting with product formulas to meet the expected demand. Big-name drink companies are looking to get a piece of the action; Molson Coors has partnered with Hydropothecary, for instance, to develop cannabis-infused non-alcoholic beers for the Canadian market. Many of Canada’s craft beers are already creating drinkable weed. It’s going to take time for this fundamental change in retail to settle out, but it will be interesting to see who the winners will be.  CG

George Condon is Canadian Grocer’s consulting editor. He’s based in Toronto. condug@sympatico.ca

SHUTTERSTOCK/WINDNIGHT

George Condon


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OFFICIAL

SHOW GUIDE

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE - NORTH BUILDING NEW S DATE

MONDAY, OCT. 22: 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM OPENING RECEPTION

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM CONFERENCE

11:00 AM – 4:30 PM TRADE SHOW

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GENERAL INFORMATION 5 ....... Welcome Message 7 ....... General Information 8 ....... 2018 CFIG Board of Directors 9 ....... CFIG Associate Members’ Council 11 ..... CFIG Staff 17 ..... Thank You to Our Sponsors

CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW 12 ..... Speakers 14 ..... Schedule

EXHIBITOR LISTINGS 18 ..... Trade Show Floor Plan 21 ..... Exhibitors by Company Name 35 ..... Exhibitors by Product Category

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Presented by GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2019 APRIL 1 & 2, 2019 VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE EAST BUILDING www.gsfshow.com GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers Fédération Canadienne des Épiciers Indépendants 401-105 Gordon Baker Road North York, ON M2H 3P8 Tel: 1-800-661-2344 | Fax: 416-492-2347 Email: info@cfig.ca | www.cfig.ca

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

LOOK BEYOND

OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW ▲

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

WELCOME TO GIC 2018! LOOK BEYOND! Welcome to Grocery Innovations Canada 2018; the annual conference and exhibition is the most direct route to grocery retail in the country! Now in its 35th year, there are some new features at this year’s show. The new show dates are Tuesday and Wednesday, with even more ways to grow, innovate and connect at the event. Be sure to start off your show experience the right way by downloading the GIC Show Mobile app and using the #GICShow18 hashtag! Starting on Tuesday, on the Farm Credit Canada main stage, there is a kickoff keynote session from Google Canada's Natalie Green that will get everyone ready to “Look Beyond” their typical ways of doing business. All exhibitors, attendees and guests are welcome to this session. That afternoon, following the end of the trade show, all are invited to the inaugural Merchandising Excellence Awards event. The best merchandising displays will be announced from thousands of entries, along with the Top 10 in Grocery as well as the Best Booth Awards winners. Day two of GIC 2018 will feature the morning conference and workshops, all focused on helping the sector succeed in the digital age of disruption. The evening will feature the gala dinner for the Independent Grocer of the Year awards. The best of the best are feted among their peers in the industry! There are also some exciting new trade show exhibition features this year to help you get connected to more innovations and to build and maintain business relationships. With the Retailer Connect program, the pavilions highlighting key categories such

as Canada Connect (Canadian products and services), the new Pan-Asian Pavilion, and the Small Business Exchange sponsored by Canadian Grocer, GIC has you covered. Importing and exporting products into Canada will be made even easier with the new

International Trade Pavilion. At the entrance of the Toronto Congress Centre, check out the displays featuring the New Product Showcases. These latest products and services featured at GIC this year are all vying to make the Top 10 in Grocery! Don’t forget over the two days, there are numerous learning sessions on the Interac Insights & Innovations Stage on the trade floor, as well sampling demos. MUST ATTEND EVENTS ARE: • Merchandising Excellence Awards (Tuesday) • Retailer Connect Meeting Program • Two Full Days of Conference and Trade Show • Top 10 in Grocery Awards (Tuesday) • Independent Grocer of the Year Gala awards night (Wednesday) For complete details, download the Show Mobile App. My team and I welcome you to connect and grow your business at Canada’s premier grocery show. Be sure to stop by our booth by the trade show entrance.

Thomas A. Barlow, President & CEO | Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers | Fédération Canadienne Épiciers Indépendants www.facebook.com/CFIGFCEI/

@CFIGFCEI

https://ca.linkedin.com/company/canadian-federation-of-independent-grocers

www.instagram.com/gicshow/

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2019 OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE www.GroceryInnovations.com

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ATTENDEE REGISTRATION HOURS

FIRST AID OFFICE

Monday, October 22, 2018 ................. 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Tuesday, October 23, 2018 .................. 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Wednesday October 24, 2018 ............. 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION HOURS

The First Aid Office is located in the northeast corner of the floor. For any emergency, contact Toronto Congress Centre Building Security (Door 4) at 416–688–6469 or 416–891–4768.

WHEELCHAIR SERVICES

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 ............ 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

There will be wheelchairs available at the First Aid Office, located on the northeast corner of the floor. Wheelchairs are provided on a first-come, first-serve basis. Attendees borrowing a wheelchair will be required to leave their driver’s license with the First Aid service agent until the wheelchair is returned.

CONFERENCE HOURS

MEDIA OFFICE

Sunday, October 21, 2018 .................. 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Monday, October 22, 2018 ................ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Tuesday, October 23, 2018 .................. 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING

Tuesday, October 23, 2018....................... 9:00 am – 11:00 am ALL EXHIBITORS & ATTENDEES WELCOME FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE – LOBBY

Wednesday, October 24, 2018................. 8:00 am – 10:45 am CONFERENCE/FULL DELEGATE BADGE HOLDERS ONLY BALLROOMS A, B (MEETING ROOMS 1-4)

Nancy Kwon is the key media contact for Grocery Innovations Canada 2018. All media must be registered before entrance into the trade show. T: 416–219–0952 E: nkwon@cfig.ca The media office is located beside the trade floor. (MEETING ROOM 9)

RECOMMENDED ATTIRE

Wednesday, October 24, 2018................. 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Tuesday Merchandising Excellence Awards ~Smart Casual Conference~Business Casual Trade Show~Business Casual Wednesday Evening Dinner & Awards~Business (Black Tie Optional)

EVENTS

BADGE COLOURS

TRADE SHOW HOURS TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING (HALLS H & I)

Tuesday, October 23, 2018....................... 11:00 am – 4:30 pm

✷PRE REGISTRATION REQUIRED

MONDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2018 Opening Reception............................... 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm ALL EXHIBITORS & ATTENDEES WELCOME TCC – NORTH (VIP ROOM 1020)

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018 Merchandising Excellence Awards........... 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm (Master Merchandiser Winners, Top 10 in Grocery, Best Booth Winners) OPEN TO ALL ATTENDEES & EXHIBITORS TCC – NORTH (FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE)

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2018 ✷ Independent Grocer of the Year Reception...5:30 pm – 6:15 pm TCC – NORTH (COLLABORATION CORRIDOR) ✷

Dinner & Awards .............................. 6:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Speaker/Staff

■ | CFIG Guest/Student Pass ■ Distributor/Importer/Exporter ■ | Media ■ Supplier/Service ■ | Retailer/Wholesaler ■ Exhibitor ■ | Special Event Only ■ SHUTTLE

DAILY COACH SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE — BEST TORONTO TOURS AND LIMOUSINES INC. DAILY SHUTTLE – EVERY 15-20 MINUTES

Westin Toronto Airport Hotel to/from Toronto Congress Centre Monday, October 22, 2018—4:45 pm – 8:00 pm Tuesday, October 23, 2018—8:30 am – 7:30 pm Wednesday, October 24, 2018—6:30 am –11:00 pm Sponsored by:

TCC – NORTH (BALLROOMS A, B)

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

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2018 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) is governed by a Board of Directors elected from the membership and reflecting a regional distribution. A national office consisting of the President and staff implement the federation's operations in a manner consistent with the policies established by the Board. The Board and the President also receive ongoing input from advisory committees consisting of members and established across Canada.

✷JIM

BEXIS Sun Valley Supermarket Inc., Scarborough, ON

✷DAN

BREGG Buy-Low Foods, Surrey, BC

✷PETER

CAVIN Country Grocer, Victoria, BC

BILL COLEMAN Colemans, Corner Brook, NL

SHANNON FORNER Valu-Plus Foods, Keremeos, BC

LAURIE JENNINGS Masstown Market, Masstown, NS

MIKE LONGO Longo Bros. Fruit Market, Vaughan, ON

✷CHRISTY

MCMULLEN Summerhill Market, Toronto, ON

JEFFREY MIN Korea Food Trading/ Galleria Supermarket, Vaughan, ON

JAMIE NELSON Save-On-Foods, Langley, BC

CRAIG SOLLITT The Bownesian Grocer, Calgary, AB

ISABELLE TASSÉ Marché Tassé (Provigo), Gatineau, QC

✷GIANCARLO

✷THOMAS

A. BARLOW CFIG, Toronto, ON

TOM VESELY Westlock Sobeys, Westlock, AB ✷Executive

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GARY SORENSON Georgia Main Food Group, Burnaby, BC

TRIMARCHI Vince’s Market, Sharon, ON

✷RON

WELKE Federated Co-operatives Ltd., Saskatoon, SK

Committee

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL Co-operation and communication between supplier and retailer have become increasingly important in grocery retail. CFIG’s Associate Members’ Council (AMC) has in turn become more integral to the direction of the federation as a whole. The Associate Members’ Council is a group of senior executives representing a variety of Canadian grocery product companies. The AMC meets quarterly, and provides professional guidance to the Board of Directors on industry news and trends.

PHIL ANGEMI VP, Sales, General Mills Canada

DOMINIC BOMBINO Sr. VP, Retail & Foodservice Sales, Saputo Dairy Products Canada

LAURIE COOPER VP Customer Development, Unilever Canada

STEVE FOX Sr. VP, Customer Development, Nestlé Canada Inc.

CURTIS FRANK Chief Operating Officer, Maple Leaf Foods

PETER HALL VP Retail Sales, Kraft Heinz Company

CARA KEATING VP Customer Development, PepsiCo Foods Canada

STEPHEN KOURI VP, Sales & Trade Marketing, Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

JIM LEISH VP, Sales, Procter & Gamble Inc.

SCOTT LINDSAY Sr. VP, National Sales & Marketing, Coca-Cola Refreshments

GARY LOCKE Head of Acceptance, Client Management, Interac

MICHEL MANSEAU Past Chair, Sr. VP & GM Consumer Business, Kruger Products LP

SEAN MATEER Sr. VP Sales, Parmalat Canada

CHRIS POWELL Sr. VP Business Development, Tree of Life Canada

MARK SMITH President, Acosta

TOM SZOSTOK Chair, VP Sales, Campbell Company of Canada

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW ▲

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

CFIG STAFF THOMAS A. BARLOW President & CEO ANDREA ALMARZA Executive Assistant to the President & CEO & to the VP of Finance & Administration

WHAT YOU SEE

TOM SHURRIE Senior Vice President & Chief Operating Officer

Food Safety

GARY SANDS Senior Vice President, Public Policy & Advocacy

Group Savings

FRAN NIELSEN Vice President, Finance & Administration

IT PAYS TO BE A MEMBER OF CFIG Personal & Professional Growth Opportunities

Advocacy

WHAT CFIG SEES

Succession Planning

Training

NANCY KWON Vice President, Marketing & Communications LAURA KNETSCH Director, Member Services & Operations IRMELI KOSKINEN Coordinator, Member Services JOE SAWAGED Director, National Accounts & Business Development DIANA STEVENSON Director, Conference & Events ROLSTER TAYLOR Director, Sales JASON AN Account Representative

Benefits include:

JOIN US

• Timely legislative updates on important issues • Networking at two annual conferences & exhibitions • Exclusive group savings on car rental, hotels, insurance and more! • Information/News via enewsletters

Who are members of CFIG?

Business owners like you looking for: • Improvement to their bottom lines • Benefits and resources specifically tailored to the independent supermarket channel • Ways to grow their business and prepare for future shifts in the marketplace • Members’ only login for tailored information

Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers Fédération Canadienne des Épiciers Indépendants The Voice of the Independent - Over 4,000 Members Coast to Coast www.CFIG.ca, email: info@cfig.ca Tel: 1-800-661-2344

NICOLE FANG Multimedia Designer JESSICA HERDSMAN Registration, Events & Operations Coordinator

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To learn more about the benefits of CFIG membership contact: 1-800-661-2344 x240, visit www.cfig.ca or visit us at the CFIG Members’ Lounge in the entrance lobby.

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

APPEARING AT GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2018 Dianne Del Zotto, Senior Program Officer, Labelling, CFIA, is a regulatory compliance professional with over 25 years’ experience in federal food labelling legislation.

DIANNE DEL ZOTTO, CFIA

NATALIE GREEN, Google Canada

SALISHA HOSEIN, Quality Smart Solutions

MARIA LIND, Toronto Fresh Food

STEVE FRENDA, Path to Purchase Institute/EnsembleIQ

Natalie Green joined Google Canada in late 2015 as Head of Industry for Food, Beverages and Restaurants. Her prior professional experience was rooted in brand strategy, marketing and communications roles in the CPG and retail industries. Natalie spent the majority of her career working at L’Oreal’s Montreal, New York and Toronto offices before joining Indigo in Toronto.

Salisha Hosein is an accomplished leader of food safety, quality and regulatory teams in the food industry with over 10 years of experience at a senior level and with four of those years working directly for the CFIA. Salisha’s experience is based on a solid foundation in manufacturing, and then progressing into implementing and monitoring complex quality programs and enforcing government regulations.

Maria Lind is a seasoned food expert with 24 years of experience. Maria graduated from Culinary Arts Management at George Brown College and worked for hotels and restaurants for many years. Maria turned to sales seven years ago and now works as a sales manager at Toronto Fresh Food helping to promote fresh, new, innovative products for the marketplace.

Robert Graybill, President & CEO of FMS, joined the company in 2000, and has over 20 years of experience in the retail grocery industry. Currently, Robert leads the FMS team in meeting their goal of helping retailers to succeed through benchmarking, best practices, and decision support. ROBERT GRAYBILL, FMS

Melissa Krakar is the National Food and Beverage Leader at BDO, and has extensive experience working with businesses in the food and beverage sector. She helps businesses by providing expertise in industry issues and connecting business owners with the resources to aid with growth strategies. MELISSA KRAKAR, BDO Canada

PETE LUCKETT, Luckett Vineyards

As National Retail Leader at BDO Canada, Eric Matusiak has a passion for retail and the broader consumer business sector. He has over 20 years of experience consulting consumer-facing businesses in North America on business and technology strategy and operations. ERIC MATUSIAK, BDO Canada

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Steve Frenda, Executive Advisor, is a veteran of the CPG industry with a mix of CPG manufacturer, retailer, infotech and industry association experience. Steve is a recognized authority and has been a frequent industry speaker on the topic of restructuring the interaction between manufacturers, merchants, service providers and shoppers. The focus is marketing to shoppers in a digitally enabled and retailer centric marketplace.

DAVID MARCOTTE, Kantar Consulting

Pete Luckett is a born entrepreneur. At age 14, he saw opportunity in the sights, sounds and flavours of England’s busy outdoor food markets. From a single retail outlet in New Brunswick in 1982, Pete’s Frootique grew to be one of Atlantic Canada’s best known and loved brands. His latest venture is Luckett Vineyards, which Pete opened in 2011.

David Marcotte is the Senior VP Strategic Advisory Services at Kantar Consulting, a WPP Company. He has responsibility for consulting, research, thought leadership, and client enablement. David is also a distribution industry expert on issues of complex systems and management, ECR, consumer finance, financial technology, and store operations.

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

TOM MARSHALL, Direct Energy Business

Tom Marshall is the Eastern Canadian sales leader at Direct Energy and has been working with clients for the past 13 years in Canadian energy markets on both the supply and demand sides of the meter to help clients manage their energy more wisely. Tom has worked with customers across the national retail, manufacturing and government accounts, helping them to use less energy.

LEAH MCHUGH, Amazon Operations Expert

Sangita Patel is one of the most engaging media personalities in Canada. Audiences are drawn to her daily as an entertainment reporter for ET Canada, and she’s also the host of HGTV’s high-stakes show Home to Win.

SANGITA PATEL, ET Canada; HGTV

GARY SAARENVIRTA, Daisy Intelligence

JOSH RAY, ShopHero

Gary Saarenvirta is one of North America’s preeminent authorities on artificial intelligence. He founded Daisy Intelligence in 2003, bringing autonomous machine intelligence to clients in retail, insurance and healthcare. Daisy Intelligence, operates an applied artificial intelligence (A.I.) software-as-aservice (SaaS) business delivering operational corporate decisions that are too complex for humans to make, resulting in efficiencies and profitability gains.

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Leah McHugh perfected the art of Amazon account management for a Boston-based lean start-up. For the past few years, she’s led clients through the process of brand marketing, business development, logistics and Amazon product listing trouble-shooting. Her areas of expertise focus around managing and protecting brands on Amazon, reviewing product quality and account management.

Josh Ray is a veteran in the tech industry with a unique background in logistics, marketing, and entrepreneurship – three key areas to eCommerce success. He has a passion for supporting small business owners and loves helping independent grocers successfully launch, market, and operate online grocery programs.

Sarah Seale is the President of CMR North Inc., a management resource company dedicated to the cannabis industry. Sarah brings over 15 years’ experience in the areas of operations, sales and franchise development to the cannabis market. SARAH SEALE, CMR North Inc.

Ken Wong is not your typical academic. With work that has earned him the cover of Canadian Business and Strategy magazine and a place in the Canadian Marketing Hall of Legends, he is known for his energetic, entertaining and content-rich presentations. He is the Distinguished Professor of Marketing at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s KEN WONG, University, as well as a board member and Smith School of Business, advisor to a number of retail, financial and Queen’s University consumer packaged goods firms.

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

PROGRAM MONDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2018 TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM OPENING RECEPTION ALL RETAILERS & EXHIBITORS WELCOME

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM BEST BOOTH JUDGING INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – ROOM VIP 1020 Title Sponsor:

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018 Conference Sessions

ALL RETAILERS & EXHIBITORS WELCOME

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE– ENTRANCE LOBBY

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM CFIG ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING CFIG President's Briefing; CFIG-FMS Annual Financial Survey Results, Robert Graybill, FMS Financial Solutions. FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE – ENTRANCE LOBBY Stage Sponsor:

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM KEYNOTE: WINNING THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY IN AN OMNI-CHANNEL WORLD Natalie Green, Head of Industry for Food, Beverages and Restaurants at Google Canada, dissects industry disruption and uncovers consumer insights to help you win the customer journey. FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE – ENTRANCE LOBBY Sponsored by:

DRAW FOR TWO FINALISTS FOR GRAND PRIZE TRIP TO NGA SHOW IN SAN DIEGO! Sponsored by:

10:45 AM – 11:00 AM OFFICIAL RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY HALL I

11:00 AM – 4:30 PM TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – HALL I

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM TOP 10 IN GROCERY JUDGING NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE DISPLAYS – ENTRANCE LOBBY

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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2018

INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE SESSIONS

Supporting Sponsor:

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – TRADE FLOOR

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM A.I.: POWERING THE FUTURE OF GROCERY DECISION-MAKING Learn how A.I. technology is different than traditional analytics approaches to merchandising planning. A.I. offers tremendous opportunity for retailers looking to transform their merchandising, marketing and forecasting and supercharge profits. Presented by Gary Saarenvirta, Daisy Intelligence. 12:15 PM – 12:45 PM DEMO/TASTING/SAMPLING 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM MERCHANDISING MAGIC! Join produce expert Pete Luckett to learn some merchandising tips and tricks for fresh. 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM DEMO/TASTING/SAMPLING: MEAL KITS The Grocery Opportunity: Personalization, branding and global flavours. Presented by Maria Lind, Toronto Fresh Food. 2:30 PM – 3:00 PM RULES & REGS FOR THE CANNABIS EDIBLES MARKET A look at what companies and retail channels need to do to prepare for the upcoming edibles and infusions market. Presented by Salisha Hosein, food safety, quality and regulatory expert. SHUTTLE

DAILY COACH SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE — BEST TORONTO TOURS AND LIMOUSINES INC. DAILY SHUTTLE – EVERY 15-20 MINUTES

Westin Toronto Airport Hotel to/from Toronto Congress Centre Monday, October 22, 2018—4:45 pm – 8:00 pm Tuesday, October 23, 2018—8:30 am – 7:30 pm Wednesday, October 24, 2018—6:30 am –11:00 pm Sponsored by:

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

4:30 PM – 6:30 PM EVENING EVENT ALL EXHIBITORS & ATTENDEES WELCOME

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

Presented by David Marcotte, Kantar Consulting BALLROOMS A, B Presented by:

MERCHANDISING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

2018 MERCHANDISING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Celebrate the Best in Merchandising, Suppliers & Manufacturers in Grocery. Emcee Pete Luckett TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE NORTH BUILDING – MAIN STAGE (LOBBY) FARM CREDIT CANADA MAIN STAGE

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM MIX AND MINGLE ALL EXHIBITORS & ATTENDEES WELCOME Complimentary hors d'oeuvres and drinks will be served. Presented by:

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM AWARD PRESENTATIONS Winners to be Announced in: Master Merchandiser Program, Top 10 in Grocery, Best Booth Winners GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

2018

8:45 AM – 9:30 AM THE “NEW PRICE BUYER" The focus is on how people are becoming more price conscious, but not price sensitive and how socioeconomic standing is no longer the major force behind the “frugal chic” consumer. Presented by Ken Wong, Smith School of Business at Queen’s University. BALLROOMS A, B Presented by:

DRAW FOR TWO FINALISTS FOR GRAND PRIZE TRIP TO NGA SHOW IN SAN DIEGO! Sponsored by:

9:30 AM – 9:45 AM COFFEE BREAK TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – COLLABORATION CORRIDOR Presented by:

Stage Sponsor:

9:45 AM – 10:30 AM CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Evening Sponsored by:

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE NORTH BUILDING – MEETING ROOMS 2-5 Presented by:

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2018 Conference & Workshop Sessions

OPEN TO CONFERENCE, FULL DELEGATE TICKET HOLDERS TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – BALLROOMS A, B

CANNABIS 101: An overview of the cannabis market one week after legalization with Sarah Seale of CMR North Inc., a management resource company dedicated to the cannabis industry. MEETING ROOM 2

CFIA LABELLING UPDATES Get the latest labelling updates presented by Dianne Del Zotto, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

7:15 AM – 8:00 AM BREAKFAST BALLROOMS A, B

MEETING ROOM 3

Sponsored by:

THE AMAZON OPPORTUNITY: It’s time to stop looking at Amazon as competition and embrace it as a viable sales channel. For grocers, private label owners, and large brands, Amazon represents an opportunity to get in front of the 49% of consumers that search Amazon first when looking for products. Presented by Leah McHugh, Amazon Operations Expert.

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM KEYNOTE: THE CANADIAN OMNI-DIGITAL REALITY: PLANNING BEYOND CHANNELS Omni-channel has been a constant theme of the future in the Canadian grocer marketplace, but the investments and costs are daunting and the returns too far in the future. But digital is now and already impacts the store, the supply chain, products, shoppers and employees. How will you leverage the omni-digital future to be profitable and competitive?

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MEETING ROOM 4

SHOPPER MARKETING: Join Steve Frenda, Path to Purchase Institute/EnsembleIQ, for successful strategies that allow retailers to more successfully market to their customers. MEETING ROOM 5

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

11:00 AM – 4:00 PM TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION

3:15 PM TRADE SHOW PRIZE DRAW

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – HALL I

CFIG MEMBERS' LOUNGE – LOBBY

11:00 AM – 4:00 PM TOP 10 IN GROCERY WINNERS DISPLAYED LOBBY ENTRANCE

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

Sponsored by:

EVENING EVENT – 2018 CANADIAN INDEPENDENT GROCER OF THE YEAR AWARDS *PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – BALLROOMS A, B

2018 INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE SESSIONS TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING – TRADE FLOOR

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM WHY YOUR LOYALTY PROGRAM JUST ISN’T ENOUGH Join Eric Matusiak and Melissa Krakar of BDO to discuss trends in the grocery industry, and what grocers need to do to stay relevant and competitive in the current market. Discussion will focus on the customer experience, the hybridization of retail, partnering with suppliers, and strategies grocers need to take to respond to these trends. 12:15 PM – 12:45 PM TECHNOLOGY: WHAT'S WORKING, NOT WORKING How grocers can leverage technology to extend their distinct brand and value propositions to 21st century shoppers. Presented by Josh Ray, ShopHero. 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM TIPS FOR MONITORING YOUR ENERGY USE A look at where to find opportunities in your energy strategy and how to prioritize projects. Presented by Tom Marshall, Direct Energy. 1:45 PM – 2:15 PM DEMO/TASTING/SAMPLING

5:30 PM – 6:15 PM AWARDS RECEPTION COLLABORATION CORRIDOR Sponsored by:

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM GALA DINNER BALLROOMS A, B Dinner Sponsored by:

Program Sponsored by:

Wine Sponsored by:

7:30 PM – 9:15 PM AWARDS PRESENTATIONS Hosted by: Tom Barlow, CFIG and Sangita Patel, ET Canada DRAW FOR FINAL FOUR FOR GRAND PRIZE TRIP TO NGA SHOW IN SAN DIEGO! Sponsored by:

EVENTS IN 2019

SHUTTLE

DAILY COACH SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE — BEST TORONTO TOURS AND LIMOUSINES INC. DAILY SHUTTLE – EVERY 15-20 MINUTES

Westin Toronto Airport Hotel to/from Toronto Congress Centre Monday, October 22, 2018—4:45 pm – 8:00 pm Tuesday, October 23, 2018—8:30 am – 7:30 pm Wednesday, October 24, 2018—6:30 am –11:00 pm Sponsored by:

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GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2019 APRIL 1 & 2, 2019, VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE EAST BUILDING www.gsfshow.com GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2019 OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019, TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE www.GroceryInnovations.com

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS* Grocery Innovations Canada 2018 thanks the following sponsors for their support.*As of Sept.10, 2018

OFFICIAL MEDIA SPONSOR

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW


TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

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Delivering Dairy Goodness, every time. All trademarks owned or used under license by Parmalat Canada, Toronto, ON M9C 5J1. Š Parmalat Canada, 2018. All rights reserved.


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

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#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME CFIG MEMBER

✪ SHOW SPECIAL

2GO ENERGY 120 Turnbull Court, Unit B Cambridge, ON N1T 1H9 T: (226) 926-2010 E: 2goenergyonline@gmail.com Manufacturer of gourmet gluten-free energy bars, cookies and protein cereal. Booth #1644 A&M GOURMET FOODS INC. 6813 Steeles Ave. W. Toronto, ON M9V 4R9 T: (416) 745-4545 F: (416) 745-4544 E: info@amgourmetfoods.com www.amgourmetfoods.com A&M Gourmet Foods is a manufacturer of dips, snacks and sandwich toppers and an importer of vegan mayonnaise and Non-GMO Project Verified sunflower oil. Booth #1632 A. LASSONDE 170 5e Ave. Rougemont, QC J0L 1M0 T: (450) 469-4926 E: info@lassonde.com www.lassonde.com Lassonde is the North American leader in the development, manufacture and sale of fruit and vegetable juices and beverages. Booth #1530 ACE HILL BEER 10 Alcorn Ave. Toronto, ON M4V 3A9 T: (647) 297-7516 E: sara@acehillbeer.com www.acehillbeer.com Ace Hill Beer is a beverage company focused on quality and simplicity. Booth #1730 ACOSTA 2700 Matheson Blvd. E., East Tower, Suite 101 Mississauga, ON L4W 4V9 T: (905) 238-8058 F: (905) 238-1998 E: gcarruthers@acosta.com www.acosta.ca Acosta provides trusted brands with integrated sales and retail merchandising solutions to move products off shelves and into shoppers’ baskets. Booth #1424 ADVANTAGE SOLUTIONS 160 McNabb St., Suite #330 Markham, ON L3R 4B8 T: (905) 475-9623 F: (905) 475-5439 E: tim.salter@advantagesolutions.net www.advantagesolutions.net A leading business solutions provider, we build brand value for manufacturers and retailers through insight-based integrated solutions. Booth #725

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✪ AGM BAKERY

107 Judge Rd. Etobicoke, ON M8Z 5B5 T: (647) 977-3977 E: wholesale@agmacarons.com www.agmbakery.com We are a GFSI bakery manufacturing premium French macarons in fun flavours! Booth #1638 ANDREW PELLER LIMITED 354 Davis Rd., 4th Floor Oakville, ON L6J 2X2 T: (289) 455-1874 E: info@andrewpeller.com www.andrewpeller.com Andrew Peller has been producing premium wines in Canada since 1961, and continues to make market-leading products for consumers across the country. Booth #1625 ARNEG CANADA 18 Rue Richelieu Lacolle, QC J0J 1J0 T: (450) 246-3837 E: sfeere@arnegdml.com www.arneg.ca Proudly built-in-Canada refrigerated cases and compressor systems that include bakery, dairy, deli, meat, frozen food, produce and specialty cases. Booth #1419 ARTERRA WINES CANADA 441 Courtneypark Dr. E. Mississauga, ON L5T 2V3 T: (905) 564-6906 E: gurston.allen@arterracanada.com www.arterracanada.com Arterra Wines Canada is Canada’s leading producer and marketer of award-winning, globally recognized Canadian and imported wines. Booth #728 ATLANTIC STAINLESS FABRICATORS LTD. 62 Howden Rd. Scarborough, ON M1R 3E9 T: (416) 285-5535 F: (416) 285-6649 E: atlanticstainless@bellnet.ca www.atlanticstainless.ca Manufacturers of stainless steel tables, sinks, carts, antipasto and olive bars; design and manufacturing of seafood displays and custom fabrication. Booth #1213 AUGER BAKERY 24 Rue John F. Kennedy Saint-Jérome, QC J7Y 4B6 T: (438) 871-1217 F: (450) 438-1217 E: info@boulangerieauger.com www.augerbakery.com

We are now a commercial bakery serving a part of Ontario and most of Quebec. We have approximately 50 trucks serving a network of DSD. Booth #512 AUTONETICS UNIVERSE 500-730 Woodbine Ave. Markham, ON L3R 6G2 T: (800) 939-3380 E: info@autonetics.ca www.autonetics.ca Autonetics Universe specializes in service robots and holograms. Modernize your business by employing robots as co-workers and engage customers with unique 3D holographic content. Booth #1102

✪ BANDING SYSTEMS

289 Broadway St. Orangeville, ON L9W 7L2 T: (416) 475-2583 info@bandingsystems.com www.bandingsystems.com Banding Systems is a 360-degree label that uses no adhesives or backing paper to efficiently market your product on the crowded retail shelf. Booth #1512 BANK OF CANADA 150 King St. W. Toronto, ON M5H 1J9 T: (416) 420-4604 E: nish.v01@gmail.com www.bankofcanada.ca/banknotes Information on the new $10 bank note featuring Viola Desmond and on bank note authentication will be provided. Booth # 607

✪ BARNIES HORSE AND PET

1375 Hopkins St. Whitby, ON L1N 2C2 T: (905) 428-2276 E: sales@barnies.ca www.barnies.ca Barnies is a Canadian pet food and treat manufacturer that uses all Canadian ingredients. Products are grain-free and preservative-free. Private label capabilities. CFIA, USDA, and FDA certifications. See CBC’s Dragons’ Den. Booth #1831 BDO CANADA LLP 1 City Centre Dr. Mississauga, ON L5B 1M2 T: (905) 272-6250 E: jbarry@bdo.ca www.bdo.ca At BDO, we tailor our strategies to help grocers proactively manage challenges and leverage opportunities. Join us for some table hockey and learn more. Booth #1129

BEE MAID HONEY LIMITED 625 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0T4 T: (204) 786-8977 F: (204) 783-8468 E: honey@beemaid.com www.beemaid.com Canadian beekeeper-owned, supplying quality 100% pure Canadian honey for over 60 years! True Source, SQF and HAACP certification equals quality you can trust. Booth #1021 BEVERAGE WORLD INC. 560 Arvin Ave., Unit #4 Stoney Creek, ON L8E 5P1 T: (905) 643-7713 F: (905) 643-9562 E: info@beverageworld.ca www.beverageworld.ca Brand owner of The PoP Shoppe and exclusive Canadian first importer of Alo, Calypso and Sanavi. Stop by our booth to see these great brands. Booth #819 BIG BRANDS INC. 2880, 45th Ave SE, Unit 112 Calgary, AB T2B 3M1 T: (587) 470-5810 F: (587) 317-7433 E: sales@bigbrandsinc.com www.bigbrandsinc.com Big Brands offers a comprehensive selection of national brand-name travelsize products in our innovative Gravity Pack merchandising solution. Booth #419 BINPAK COMPACTORS 23 Craig St., Unit #6 Brantford, ON N3R 7H8 T: (855) 953-5333 E: info@binpak.com www.binpak.com The BinPak Compactor is six-yard enclosed front-load container with builtin compaction for waste, cardboard and recycling. BinPak is safer, simpler and smarter. Ask us! Booth #918

✪ BIZERBA CANADA INC. 6411 Edwards Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5T 2P7 T: (905) 670-9498 E: ian.longley@bizerba.com www.bizerba.ca Bizerba offers its customers in industry, trade and logistics a globally unique solutions portfolio of hardware and software around the central value, “weight.” Booth #613

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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Product Sourcing

Packaging Design Supply and Fulfillment

Leading private label supplier with over 100 manufacturing partners across the globe

Indigo Global Trading

Tel : 289.997.3039, Email : irwin@indigoworldwide.com

www.indigoglobaltrading.com

CANADAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 1 GROCERY INFORMATION BRAND 89,000+ #

AUDITED* audience/mo.

275,000+

Visit us at Booth #420 at the GIC show

CHOCOLATE'S PREMIUM PUSH CONTINUES SALAD DAYS

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

+ EXCLUSIVE

INTERVIEW WITH

CHRISTY MCMULLEN of SUMMERHILL MARKET

WHAT'S NEXT FOR MEAL KITS? A LOOK INSIDE THE BIG CARROT'S NEW TORONTO STORE

THE NEW CHAIR OF CFIG

total impressions/mo.

50,000+

AUDITED* unique visitors/mo. _CG06_2018_F_CoverFinal.indd 1

2018-09-13 11:22 AM

For more information and advertising inquiries, please contact: Associate Brand Director, VANESSA PETERS vpeters@ensembleiq.com 437.889.0446 *AAM, ALLIANCE FOR AUDITED MEDIA


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

BOBCAYGEON BREWING CO. 191 St. David St., Unit 2 Lindsay, ON K9V 5K7 T: (705) 243-7077 E: info@bobcaygeonbrewing.ca www.bobcaygeonbrewing.ca Bobcaygeon Brewing Company was founded to achieve one goal, to brew great craft beers to be enjoyed among friends.That’s it. Nothing more, nothing less. Booth #1237 BOS SMOKED FISH INC. 1175 Pattullo Ave. Woodstock, ON N4S 7W3 T: (519) 537-5000 F: (519) 537-5522 E: rein@bossmokedfish.com www.bossmokedfish.com Smoked fish processor and supplier. Supplying deli, grocers, specialty, foodservice and airlines. Booth #1624 BRIDOR 1370 Rue Graham-Bell Boucherville, QC J4B 6H5 T: (450) 641-1265 E: info@bridor.com www.bridor.com Bridor offers a variety of artisan-style breads and pastries for the grocery segment. Clean label and high-quality products adapted to retailers’ needs. Booth #636 BURNBRAE FARMS LTD. 5434 Tomken Rd. Mississauga, ON L4W 1P2 T: (905) 624-3600 F: (905) 624-3363 E: general@burnbraefarms.com www.burnbraefarms.com Burnbrae Farms is excited to present our unique, innovative, ready-to-eat products. Real eggs! Real easy! Booth #1012

✪ C.B. POWELL LIMITED #1 - 2475 Skymark Ave. Mississauga, ON L4W 4Y6 T: (905) 625-4000 F: (905) 625-9413 E: cglaysher@cbpowell.com www.cbpowell.com We are a full-service sales and marketing agency covering all classes of trade. We can customize our services depending on client needs. Booth #534 & 1514 CADDLE 1 St. Paul St. St. Catharines, ON L2R 7L4 T: (905) 321-5255 E: sales@caddle.ca www.caddle.ca Caddle is a fast, cost-effective and hyper-targeted consumer insights platform used to test innovation, increase distribution, protect market share and deliver offline attribution solutions. Booth #702

#GICShow18

CALEDON FARMS 29 Melanie Dr. Brampton, ON L6T 4K8 T: (888) 478-4011 F: (905) 793-8459 E: info@crumps.ca www.caledonfarms.ca We are a Canadian manufacturer of pet treats and food made with limited, North American sourced ingredients, baked or freeze dried and minimally processed. Booth #1008 CAMPBELL COMPANY OF CANADA 60 Birmingham St. Toronto, ON M8V 2B8 T: (800) 410-7687 E: canada_custeam@campbellsoup.com www.campbellsoup.ca Stop by our booth to sample our new Goldfish flavours, our tasty new Chunky Soup and our new Tim Tam cookies! Booth #704 CANADA BEEF INC. 146, 6715 - 8th St. NE Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 T: (403) 275-5890 F: (403) 275-9288 E: dash@canadabeef.ca www.canadabeef.ca Canada Beef is a globally recognized leader of Canadian beef and veal innovation, training, education and category expertise. Come explore how we can help you. Booth #1328 CANADA BREAD COMPANY, LIMITED 10 Four Seasons Pl. Etobicoke, ON M9B 6H7 T: (416) 622-2040 E: bc.ConsumerEngagement @grupobimbo.com www.canadabread.com Canada Bread is the leading producer and distributor of packaged fresh bread, bakery products, snacks and sweet goods. Booth #1309 CAN-DAIRY INC. PO Box 501, 186 Marsh Street Clarksburg, ON N0H 1J0 E: drew@can-dairy.com www.emeraldgrasslands.com Emerald Grasslands is premium, Canadian, grass-fed, organic, Jersey butter—always barrel-churned to 84% butterfat. Booth #1828 CANADIAN FOOD & GROCERY GUIDE 4917 Prospect Ave. Victoria, BC Booth #1541

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

CANADIAN GROCER EnsembleIQ 20 Eglinton Ave. West; Suite 1800 Toronto, ON M4R 1K8 T: 437-889-0446 E: vpeters@ensembleiq.com www.canadiangrocer.com Canadian Grocer is the #1 trade publication serving the grocery industry in Canada. With an audited audience of 89,000+ (print & digital), we are the most efficient and effective way to reach Canadian retailers. Booth #737

✪ CANATURE PROCESSING

5292 272 St. Langley, BC V4W 1S3 T: (778) 952-2926 E: jordan@canature.ca www.canature.ca A global leader in freeze-dried pet food and treats. Booth #928 CARLSBERG CANADA #102-1425 North Service Rd. E. Oakville, ON L6H 1A7 T: (905) 829-0299 E: kelly.fron@carlsberg.ca www.carlsberg.ca Deliver innovation—it’s one of our purposes. Don’t forget to check all innovation SKUs around the brandsCarlsberg, Kronenbourg 1664 and Somersby. Booth #524

✪ CAVENDISH FARMS

100 Midland Dr. Dieppe, NB E1A 6X4 T: (506) 857-7464 E: hudson.linda@cavendishfarms.com We’re a family food company that brings the goodness of the farm to homes. We will be showcasing new product launches at our exhibit. Booth #838

✪ CEDAR VALLEY SELECTIONS 25 Amy Croft Dr., Unit 30B Lakeshore, ON N9K 1C7 T: (519) 560-1251 E: ameenfadel@cedarvalleyselections.ca www.cedarvalleyselections.ca All-natural, preservative-free foods, made with high-quality ingredients. We produce a variety of salad dressings and pita chips for easy/healthy alternative solutions. Booth #1824 CF&R SERVICES INC. 1920 Clements Rd. Pickering, ON L1W 3V6 T: (905) 426-3891 F: (905) 426-3891 E: phrancis@cfrservices.com www.cfrservices.com Coupon services for retailers and manufacturers. Largest processing facility in Canada! Consumer promotion experts - contests, rebates and fulfillment services. Digital print capabilities! Booth #1015

CHICKEN FARMERS OF CANADA 1007- 350 Sparks St. Ottawa, ON K1R 7S8 T: (613) 566-5929 E: communications@chicken.ca www.chicken.ca Canadian farmers raise their chickens to the highest standards – yours. Chicken Farmers of Canada are proud to raise the chicken you trust. Booth #1036

✪ CIMA-PAK CORPORATION

7290 Torbram Rd., Unit 3 Mississauga, ON L4T 3Y8 T: (905) 612-0053 E: info@cima-pak.com www.cima-pak.com CiMa-Pak offers a variety of food trays and sealers for all your food packaging needs. Booth #1139 CINNAROLL BAKERIES LIMITED 2140 Pegasus Rd. N.E. Calgary, AB T2E 8G8 T: (403) 255-4556 F: (403) 259-5124 E: reid@cinnaroll.com www.cinnaroll.com Gourmet thaw-and-sell cinnamon rolls and pastries. Booth #508 CIS GROUP 55 Castonguay St., Suite 301 St-Jerome, QC J7Y 2H9 T: (450) 432-1550 E: mrock@cis-group.com www.cis-group.com Mobile solutions to automate direct store delivery, route accounting, and merchandising forces, linked to any ERP system. Booth #1115

✪ CLASSIC GROUP OF COMPANIES 75 Addiscott Ct. Markham, ON L6G 1A6 T: (905) 470-1926 E: Louie@classicgroup.com www.classicgroup.com Classic is a full-service food manufacturing facility. We provide our clients with a variety of ready-to-eat, home meal replacements, coffee and catering services. Booth# 1528

CLIK-CLIK SYSTEMS INC. 218 Hachborn Rd. Brantford, ON N3S 7W5 T: (519) 752-6628 E: daniel@clik-clik.com www.clik-clik.com Clik-Clik Systems Inc. delivers a unique Canadian magnetic hanging system— used by national retailers and manufacturers—that enables promotional POP signage to be hung level. Booth #1108

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

23


“They want to know the story behind the numbers – FCC wants us to be successful.” Dan Flanagan, President, Flanagan Foodservice Food Distribution

The food business is unique Your financing should be too Grow with a lender who understands Canadian food. With over 100,000 customers, big and small, and a portfolio that tops $30 billion, Farm Credit Canada can help build your business success story.

fccfinancing.ca


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

✪ COMPLETE RETAIL SOLUTIONS 660 Neal Dr. Peterborough, ON K9J 6Y8 T: (705) 748-4811 F: (180) 056-3918 E: info@completeretailsolutions.com www.completeretailsolutions.com Display participants: Gambles Produce, Southern CaseArts, St. Albert Cheese, Sign Nation, Pelee Island Winery, Corum Digital, Golden Loaf Bakery, Pan-Oston, Hubert Canada, Maintech, Airwave Modular Produce Systems, CRS Fixturing Group/Nationwide Service. Booth #843 ✪ CONGLOM INC.

2600, Marie-Curie Ave. Saint-Laurent, QC H4S 2C3 T: (514) 333-6666 F: (514) 333-4070 E: mleona@conglom.com www.conglom.com LED lighting, consumable/disposable foodservice products, hardware, health and beauty, paper goods, household cleaning items, pet products, storage bags and containers, stationery goods. Booth #429 COOKINA 236-3500 boul Matte Brossard, QC J4Y 2Z2 T: (877) 926-6546 F: (450) 641-8980 E: quality@cookina.co www.cookina.co Reusable non-stick products for grilling on the barbecue and cooking in the oven. Booth #518 COOL RUNNINGS FOODS 780 Fenmar Dr. Toronto, ON M9L 2T9 T: (416) 743-7778 F: (416) 743-0570 E: info@universalimpexcorp.com www.coolrunningsfoods.com Since 1992, Cool Runnings Foods has strived to offer unique seasoning blends and products that meet the diverse taste of a growing multicultural city. Booth #1709 COSTCO BUSINESS CENTRE 50 Thermos Rd. Scarborough, ON M1L 0E6 T: (647) 484-5850 E: w595mkm@costco.com www.costcobusinesscentre.ca Everyday items for all your foodservice needs with great quality and value, at Costco Business Centre. Booth #1034 COTTAGE COUNTRY DIP LTD. 38 Unsworth Ave. Toronto, ON M5M 3C5 T: (416) 482-3912 E: Sales@cottagecountrydip.com www.cottagecountrydip.com Cottage Country Dip Skinny Dip is a low-fat cottage cheese-based spreadable product. A unique taste that’s high in flavour and low in fat. Booth #1332

#GICShow18

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CROSSMARK CANADA INC. 300-5580 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 4Y1 T: (905) 366-6663 F: (905) 366-6664 E: kim.lindner-thompson@crossmark.com www.crossmark.ca Crossmark provides sales and marketing services (including headquarter sales, retail merchandising, field intelligence, 3PL distribution, shopper/consumer engagement) to manufacturers and retailers across all retail channels. Booth #925

DISTRIBUTION CANADA INC. (DCI) 3425 Harvester Rd., Suite 102 Burlington, ON L7N 3N1 T: (905) 681-3933 F: (905) 681-0314 E: admin@distributioncanada.ca www.distributioncanada.ca DCI is a national organization of retailers and wholesalers that fosters collaborative selling relationships between its shareholders, manufacturers and key stakeholders selling food in the Canadian market. Booth #1531

✪ DYNA-PRO ENVIRONMENTAL 575 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0T3 T: (800) 284-6315 F: (800) 411-4853 E: dynapro@dyna-pro.com www.dyna-pro.com Water purification and filtration systems, jugs and accessories, retail, industrial and commercial clients, 25+ years, thousands of systems installed/ maintained nationwide. NAMA/CSA certified, NSF/EDA compliant. Booth #836

✪ CUSTOM FOOD PACKAGING

D’ONT POKE THE BEAR VQA WINES AND ONTARIO CRAFT CIDER 178 St. George St. Toronto, ON M5R 2M7 T: (416) 968-7070 F: (416) 968-1876 E: andrew@vonterra.com www.dontpokethebear.com Producers of new VQA wines and Ontario craft ciders, with proceeds from every bottle/can sold donated to bully prevention group, Friends First. Booth #1728

✪ EAT TO LIFE INC.

9-855 Matheson Blvd. E. Mississauga, ON L4W 4L6 T: (647) 457-7876 E: info@customfoodpackaging.ca www.customfoodpackaging.ca With over 15 years of experience, Custom Food Packaging specializes in product development, packaging and fulfillment services for businesses of any size. Booth #415 DAISY INTELLIGENCE 2300 Steeles Ave. W., Suite 250 Vaughan, ON L4K 5X6 T: (905) 642-2629 E: contact@daisyintel.com www.daisyintelligence.com Daisy uses A.I. to analyze consumer data and simulate all the possible business scenarios that put retailers on the optimal path to increase revenue. Booth #741 DANONE CANADA 6755 Mississauga Rd. Suite 501 Mississauga, ON L4W 3S6 T: (800) 326-6638 E: customerservice-canada@danone.com www.danone.ca Danone: Bringing health through food to as many people as possible. Booth #629

✪ DICENTRA

603-7 St. Thomas St. Toronto, ON M5S 2B7 T: (416) 361-3400 E: info@dicentra.com www.dicentra.com A consulting firm specializing in safety, quality and compliance for the food, beverage, life sciences and cannabis industries. Audits, SFCA, FSMA, SQF, certifications, and more. Booth #1127 DIRECT ENERGY BUSINESS 251 Consumers Rd., Suite 1200 North York, ON M2J 4R3 T: (416) 434-2688 E: Mark.Gibson@directenergy.com www.directenergybusiness.com Direct Energy Business provides energy solutions for more than 240,000 businesses in North America. Companies trust us with their electricity and natural gas needs. Booth #1603

DRAKKAR INTERNATIONAL 910, Jean-Neveu St. Longueuil, QC J4G 2M1 T: (450) 651-9137 F: (450) 651-2714 E: info@chariotshopping.com www.chariotshopping.com In cooperation with global retailers, we’ve engineered a comprehensive set of tools for shipping, receiving, moving and (re-) stocking products that deliver a fast and proven ROI. Booth #1133 DURO-LAST ROOFING, INC. 525 Morley Dr. Saginaw, MI USA 48601 T: (800) 248-0280 E: information@duro-last.com www.duro-last.com Known as the “World’s Best Roof,” Duro-Last, Inc. is the world’s largest manufacturer of custom-fabricated, thermoplastic single-ply roofing systems. Booth #1231

✪ DUTCHMAN’S GOLD

300 Carlisle Rd. Carlisle, ON L0R 1H2 T: (905) 659-7730 F: (905) 659-7731 E: info@dutchmansgold.com www.dutchmansgold.com Dutchman’s Gold is a leading producer of pure Canadian honey products as well as bee pollen, royal jelly and propolis. Booth #1629

120 Armour Blvd. North York, ON M3H 1L9 T: (416) 800-1118 E: info@eattolife.com www.eattolife.com ETL Kinwa Bars are all-natural, plantbased protein bars. Free of the top 11 allergens, school safe, gluten free, vegan and taste great. Booth #1640 EDGE FOOD EQUIPMENT & RENTALS 110 Arrow Rd. Toronto, ON M9M 2M1 T: (416) 744-9995 E: info@edgefoodequipment.com www.edgefoodequipment.com Edge Food Equipment is a foodservices supply company specializing in selling, renting and leasing commercial food equipment. Booth #933

✪ ELEMENTAL

111 Queen St. E. Toronto, ON M5C 1S2 T: (416) 214-9998 E: chris.dunne@elementalinc.com www.elementalinc.com We’re a full-service creative agency that provides innovative marketing solutions to clients within the food and beverage industry. Booth #1005 EMERALD GRASSLANDS PO Box 501, 186 Marsh St. Clarksburg, ON N0H 1J0 T: (519) 378-4765 E: drew@can-dairy.com www.emeraldgrasslands.com Emerald Grasslands is premium, Canadian, grass-fed, organic, Jersey butter – always barrel-churned to 84% butterfat. Booth #1828 ETALEX INC. 8501 Jarry E. Montreal, QC H1J 1H7 T: (514) 351-2000 F: (514) 351-2100 E: acharbonneau@etalex.ca www.etalex.ca Founded in 1966, Etalex quickly became a leader in commercial development, both in terms of furniture stalls, commercial and industrial shelving, and storage systems. Booth #514

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

25


A Proud Canadian Company

CANADIAN GROWN & PRODUCED C ANOL A OIL S • M ARG ARINE S • PRIVATE L ABEL PRODUC T S

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NEW PREMIUM OIL BLENDS

BOOTH 407

Visit us at Grocery Innovations Canada in the First Time Exhibitors Pavilion

Learn more at richardson.ca


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

✪ EVERGREEN GROUP USA

380 Mountain Rd., Suite 206 Union City, NJ USA 7087 T: (551) 333-1119 F: (419) 818-9686 E: info@evergreenusa.co www.evergreenusa.co Evergreen Group is a certified importer and distributor of premium specialty foods and beverages from Europe and around the world. Booth #1529 FACILITY PLUS 151 Brunel Rd., Units 9 & 10 Mississauga, ON L4Z 2H6 T: (905) 071-2110 F: (905) 712-1101 E: David@facilityplus.com www.facilityplus.com Facility Plus is a leading complete facility service company with over 1,500 customers coast-to-coast since 1987. Service examples: handyman, professional trades, locksmith etc. Booth #1503

✪ FATEEL WOOD FIRE STONE

OVEN DATE COOKIES 2233 Argentia Rd. Mississauga, ON L5N 2X7 T: (587) 598-7777 E: info@fateel.ca www.fateel.ca Fateel Date Cookies is a Middle Eastern product. Healthy as it is sugarfree and gluten- free. It is baked by a wood fire stone oven. Booth #414

✪ FAUXMAGERIE ZENGARRY

209 Main St. N. Alexandria, ON K0C 1A0 T: (613) 525-4722 E: zengarry@gmail.com www.zengarry.com Fauxmagerie Zengarry is an awardwinning cashew cheese made in Canada. All seven flavours of cheese are dairy-free, gluten-free, vegan and free from artificial flavours. Booth #1627 FCC AGRIBUSINESS AND AGRIFOOD DIVISION 210-7025 Langer Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 0E8 T: (519) 827-5431 E: richard.gruener@fcc.ca www.fcc.ca We provide specialized financing service, products and resources for businesses that support primary producers all along the agribusiness and agri-food value chain. Booth #1542 FEDERATED INSURANCE 660-3100 Boul. Le Carrefour Laval, QC H7T 2K7 T: (514) 730-6781 F: (450) 687-6663 E: mauro.ditullio@federated.ca www.federated.ca

#GICShow18

Federated Insurance offers customized insurance solutions designed for the grocery store industry, featuring industry-leading coverage such as product recall, transit, computerized equipment and infestation. Booth #1320 FERRERO CANADA LIMITED 100 Sheppard Ave. E., Suite 900 Toronto, ON M2N 6N5 T: (416) 590-8211 F: (416) 590-0709 E: ted.sadinsky@ferrero.com www.ferrero.com Confectionery and hazelnut spreads packaged goods manufacturer and distributor. Booth #1702 FENTIMANS NORTH AMERICA 2286 Holdom Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 4Y5 T: (604) 324-0565 E: info@drinkfentimans.com www.DrinkFentimans.com Fentimans premium botanically brewed craft sodas are great as mixes for spirits or straight up refreshing. Booth #1329 FLORA MANUFACTURING & DISTRIBUTING LTD. 7400 Fraser Park Dr. Burnaby, BC V5J 5B9 T: (877) 463-5672 F: (888) 393-5672 E: sanderson@florahealth.com www.florahealth.com Flora, a family-owned and operated company, manufactures and distributes premium-quality healthy supplements, using plant-based, organic and nonGMO ingredients whenever possible. Booth #1611 FLOW ALKALINE SPRING WATER 97 Strachan Ave. Toronto, ON M6J 2S7 T: (844) 356-9426 E: hello@flowhydration.com www.flowhydration.com Naturally alkaline spring water (pH 8.1). Flow is a great source of healthy minerals and electrolytes. Our ecofriendly packaging is 100% recyclable and 70% renewable. Booth #1526

✪ FMS FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS 5511 Tomken Rd. Mississauga, ON L4W 4B8 T: (877) 435-9400 E: mikes@fmssolutions.com www.fmssolutions.com Accounting payroll and outsourcing company specializing in independent grocery retail. Over 4,200 stores use FMS including Vince’s Market, Freson Bros. Choices Market and Sun Valley. Booth #1605

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

FOOD DISTRIBUTION GUY 2785 Lindholm Cres. Mississauga, ON L5M 4P7 T: (416) 768-7648 E: richard@fooddistributionguy.com www.fooddistributionguy.com Food Distribution Guy provides industry expertise and creative strategies for food businesses that assist them in obtaining distribution, short- and long-term increased sales. Booth #820

✪ FOUR O’CLOCK/

TRANS-HERBE INC. 1090 Rue Parent St-Bruno-de-Montarville, QC J3V 6L8 T: (450) 441-0779 E: info@fouroclock.ca www.fouroclock.ca From the Greater Montreal Area, we are a Canadian family company making teas and herbal teas since 1992. At Four O’Clock, we create and craft innovative, functional, organic and fairtrade teas. Booth #1233

✪ FROM FARM

TO TABLE CANADA INC. 1721 Bishop St. N. Cambridge, ON N1T 1N5 T: (519) 621-1163 E: info@fromfarmtotable.ca www.fromfarmtotable.ca We are a Canadian popcorn and snack manufacturer. GMO-free, pesticidefree, gluten-free and dairy-free options. Working with local farms and suppliers. Booth #1636 GALA BAKERY INC. 190 Hempstead Dr. Hamilton, ON L8W 2E8 T: (905) 578-6485 F: (905) 578-6483 E: jjanosevic@galabakery.ca www.thegalabakery.com Gourmet European sweet and savoury pastries, baked to perfection with the finest quality ingredients that capture the flavours of the Mediterranean in every bite. Booth #1731 GALLAGHER 120 South Town Centre Blvd. Markham, ON L6G 1C3 T: (905) 305-5953 E: allison_posen@ajg.com www.ajgcanada.com Gallagher solves unique insurance challenges with industry-specific knowledge and insight. Our foundation of teamwork, ethics and service excellence, delivers insurance solutions to help you succeed. Booth #1543 GAY LEA FOODS CO-OPERATIVE LTD. 5200 Orbitor Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 5B4 T: (905) 283-5300 E: questions@gayleafoods.com www.gaylea.com

As a co-operative of 1,300+ dairy farmers, we are dedicated to innovative, high quality and locally made products. Stop by our booth for a taste! Booth #1118 GBS FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT INC. 2871 Brighton Rd. Oakville, ON L6H 6C9 T: (905) 829-5534 F: (905) 829-9914 pdouglas@gbscooks.com www.gbscooks.com GBS offers a full line of combi-ovens, blast chillers, heated and refrigerated display cases, fryers, rotisseries, ice machines, juicers, refrigerators and freezers. Training. Canada-wide support. Booth #1203

✪ GEMSYS MONEY

HANDLING SYSTEMS INC. 1108 South Service Rd. W. Oakville, ON L6L 5T7 T: (905) 847-9388 F: (905) 847-3071 E: sales@gemsysinc.com www.gemsysinc.com For 30 years Gemsys has been providing cash automation solutions that help to improve cash security and reduce labour costs for our customers. Booth #1003

✪ GENERAL MILLS CANADA 5825 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4P 5P6 T: (905) 212-4000 E: craig.teeple@genmills.com www.generalmills.ca General Mills prides itself on serving the world by making food people love. Every day, we make this purpose real through our brands and culture. Booth #619 GINDARA SABLEFISH/ WEST CREEK COHO SALMON 117-15272 Croydon Dr. Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 T: (604) 531-1228 F: (604) 531-1255 E: info@willowfield.net www.gindarasablefish.com, www.westcreekbc.ca We produce the world’s only sablefish in ocean aquaculture, and coho salmon in land-based aquaculture. Both are Ocean Wise approved and raised in B.C. Booth #422 GLOBE POS SYSTEMS 294 Walker Drive, Unit 12 Brampton, ON L6T 4Z2 T: (416) 900-4050 F: (416) 900-4050 E: sales@globepos.ca www.globepos.ca Globe POS Systems has been providing system solutions since 1970. We offer many easy-to-use, easy-to-manage point-of-sale systems, scales, printers and security products. Booth #1602

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GOOD FOR YOU DESSERTS LTD. 26-31 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON M1P 4S6 T: (416) 751-1444 E: goodforyou@bellnet.ca www.goodforyoudesserts.com Booth # 1226 GRANDMA EMILY INC. 9470A Charles De La Tour Montreal, QC H4N 1M2 T: (514) 343-3661 E: service@grandmaemily.com www.grandmaemily.com Grandma Emily is a manufacturer of organic and non-organic granola cereals and granola bars. Grandma Emily offers a variety of snack mixes. Booth #825

✪ GREAT CANADIAN

MEAT COMPANY 1390 Hopkins St. Whitby, ON L1N 2C3 T: (905) 706-1373 E: valerie@greatcanadianmeat.com www.greatcanadianmeat.com Since 1992, we have offered Canada’s best-tasting meat snacks as well as the Kurtzie’s Gourmet Deli line of fine charcuterie and premium meat products. Booth #1727 GROCERY BUSINESS MAGAZINE PO Box 23103 Longworth PO Bowmanville, ON L1C 0H0 T: (905) 697-0467 E: info@grocerybusiness.ca www.grocerybusiness.ca Grocery Business Magazine is Canada’s leading grocery publication and eNews provider, serving independents across Canada with trending information they can use to increase profit. Booth #1710 GS1 CANADA 800-1500 Don Mills Rd. Toronto, ON M3B 3K4 T: (416) 510-8039 E: corporate.affairs@gs1ca.org www.gs1ca.org GS1 is a neutral, not-for-profit organization that develops and maintains global standards for efficient business communication. Booth #1715 HALO METRICS INC. 230-21320 Gordon Way Richmond, BC V6W 1J8 T: (604) 273-4456 E: website@halometrics.com www.halometrics.com Halo Metrics provides theft prevention systems and solutions for retailers across Canada. We now offer actionable insights about the in-store customer journey with Ripple Metrics. Booth #609

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

HARPER GREY LLP 3200 - 650 West Georgia St. Vancouver, BC V6B 4P7 T: (604) 687-0411 F: (604) 669-9385 E: info@harpergrey.com www.harpergrey.com Harper Grey is a Vancouver law firm with experience advising and acting for self-insured businesses, retailers and retail chains in a variety of legal matters. Booth #403

✪ HOWELL DATA SYSTEMS INC. 170 Pennsylvania Ave. Vaughan, ON L4K 4B1 T: (905) 761-1712 E: sales@howelldatasystems.com www.howelldatasystems.com Omni-channel business solutions including online shopping, customized and private-branded mobile phone client apps, point-of-sale systems, customer self-scan solutions. Booth #1103

✪ HENRI BELGIAN PRODUCTS

✪ HUMANWELL

4-1920 Bloor St. W. Toronto, ON M6P 3K8 T: (647) 774-3227 E: info@henribelgiansauces.com www.henribelgiansauces.ca We import dipping sauces from Belgium. We distribute to restaurants, fast-food and grocery stores. We have seven flavours including Curry Ketchup, Algerian Sauce, Andalouse, Americain, Brazil and Samourai. Booth #427

✪ HEYJUTE

24 Manor Ridge Trail Mount Albert, ON L0G 1M0 T: (905) 473-4090 E: heyjute@megalith.net www.HeyJute.com Canada’s primary source for eco-friendly alternatives to shopping totes, hot/ cold bags, produce bags, promotional products and eco-branding made with jute and natural fibres. No plastic! Booth #421

✪ HILL STREET BEVERAGE COMPANY 44 Gwendolen Cres. Toronto, ON M2N 2L7 T: (647) 444-9269 E: info@hillstreetbevco.com www.hillstreetbeverages.com Hill Street Beverage Co. is a publicly traded, award-winning alcohol-free and cannabis-infused wine and beer company. Booth #1513 ✪ HONEY BUNNY INC.

#1 Main St. PO Box 289 Guy, AB T0H 1Y0 T: (780) 925-2282 F: (780) 925-2943 E: paige@honeybunny.ca www.peaceriverhoney.ca We are the largest producer of organic honey and only non-GMO verified producer of honey in Canada. Booth #1327 HORSE AND BUGGY BRANDS 120 Turnball Crt. Cambridge, ON N1T 1H9 T: (519) 620-8572 F: (519) 620-8573 E: scott@horseandbuggybrands.com www.horseandbuggybrands.com Horse and Buggy Brands is a peanut roaster and candy packager. Our peanuts are cooked the old fashion way in cooper pots, stirring by hand. Booth #1833

No. 130, Noi-Gil, Nongong-Eup, Dalseong-Gun Daegu, South Korea 42975 T: (201) 947-0300 E: yd21suk@hanmail.net www.humanwell.co.kr Humanwell manufactures a variety of seaweed-based snacks including Nori Sheet, Seaweed Rice Crisps, Seaweed Sheet Snacks. Booth #1229 HUSSMANN CANADA INC. 5 Cherry Blossom Rd. Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 T: (519) 653-9980 F: (519) 653-1408 E: lianne.tombol@hussmann.com www.hussmann.com Hussmann enables excellence in food retailing with merchandising and food display equipment, refrigeration systems, service, maintenance, energy solutions, food quality and expertise and store planning. Booth #903

✪ IGLOO REFRIGERATION LTD.

124 Norfinch Dr. Toronto, ON M3N 1X1 T: (416) 663-3051 F: (416) 663-5793 E: amir@igloo400.com www.igloofoodequipment.com Igloo provides refrigerated display cases and small-wares. In addition to equipment, we provide financing, floor-planning, design, permits and construction. Booth #1618

✪ IMPRINT PLUS

21320 Gordon Way #260 Richmond, BC V6W 1J8 T: (604) 278-7147 F: (604) 278-7149 E: l.jew@imprintplus.com www.imprintplus.com Imprint Plus is a leading supplier of premium high-quality reusable do-ityourself name badges and signage systems with over 37,000 customers worldwide in 102 countries. Booth #612 INTERNATIONAL DAIRY DELI BAKERY ASSOCIATION 636 Science Dr. Madison, WI USA 53711-1073 T: (608) 310-5000 E: iddba@iddba.org www.iddba.org

Non-profit trade association providing education, training and management resources for industry professionals. Annual show attracts approximately 9,500 registrants and features top speakers. Booth #1318

✪ INDIGO'S CANDY AND SNACKS

2233 Argentia Rd., Suite 302, East Wing Mississauga, ON L5N 6A6 T: (289) 997-3039 E: irwin@indigoworldwide.com www.indigoglobaltrading.com Leading global private label supplier of confectionery and snack foods to supermarkets, chain stores, gas stations and corporate distributors. Custom supplies at competitive prices. Booth #420 ISHIDA CANADA INC. 2220 Argentia Rd., Unit 7 Mississauga, ON L5N 2K7 T: (647) 428-0279 E: sales@ishidacanada.ca www.ishidacanada.com World leader in manufacturing of weighing and packaging solutions. Food wrapping, scales, high-speed weigh-price labelling, meat slicers, food preparation equipment, labels and film. Booth #936 ITALIA SALAMI COMPANY LIMITED 16 Fair Rd. Guelph, ON N1K 0A1 T: (519) 821-7430 F: (519) 837-0060 E: alex@italiasalami.com www.italianstylefoods.com Manufacturers of high-quality Italian cooked and dry cured products such as Prosciutto Salami, Sopressa Veneta, Pancetta, Capicollo, Cacciatora, Prosciutto Skinless, Soppressata and Rosemary Ham. Booth #1830 ITALPASTA LIMITED 116 Nuggett Crt. Brampton, ON L6T 5A9 T: (905) 792-9928 F: (905) 792-2381 E: info@italpasta.com www.italpasta.com Since 1989, Italpasta has been using only the finest 100% Canadian durum semolina to manufacture our premium pasta for Canadians. Booth #1125 J&J DISPLAY SALES 2230 Meadowpine Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5N 6H6 T: (905) 814-5252 F: (905) 814-8147 E: info@jjdisplaysales.com www.jjdisplaysales.com J&J Display Sales is your one-stop source for all your retail merchandising, POP display and store fixture needs. Design, supply, install. Booth #1024

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

✪ JAKEMAN’S MAPLE PRODUCTS

454414 Trillium Line, RR1 Beachville, ON N0J 1A0 T: (519) 539-1366 F: (519) 421-2469 E: chad@themaplestore.com www.themaplestore.com Jakeman’s is a family-owned company selling only the finest maple syrup and maple confectionery products. Booth #1725 K.T. VIVO IMPORT 855 Alness St., Unit 7 Toronto, ON M3J 2X3 T: (416) 228-8110 E: info@vivocultures.com www.vivocultures.com Vivo starter culture is a product containing living cultures that makes natural yogurt, kefir and cottage cheese. Booth #735 KEEPRITE REFRIGERATION 159 Roy Blvd. Brantford, ON N3T 5P4 T: (800) 463-9517 E: info@k-rp.com www.k-rp.com KeepRite Refrigeration is a leading North American manufacturer of commercial refrigeration products. Products include specialized applications in food storage/processing, industrial process cooling and energy management. Booth #502 KENT COFFEE COMPANY LTD. P.O. Box 96757 Major Mackenzie Dr. Maple, ON L6A 3N0 T: (647) 225-2152 E: tyler@kentcoffeecompany.com www.kentcoffeecompany.com Choosing to partner with our clients, we create bespoke coffee and equipment programs tailored to specific needs. Using our brand or private label to achieve. Booth #1643 KETCHUM MANUFACTURING 1245 California Ave. Brockville, ON K6V 7N5 T: (613) 342-8455 F: (613) 342-7550 E: lucasg@ketchum.ca www.ketchum.ca We manufacture and deliver POP signage to our clients, which helps them to increase awareness and exposure to their products in stores across North America. Booth #931 KOEN PACK CANADA 4684 Bartlett Rd. Beamsville, ON L0R 1B0 T: (905) 643-5300 F: (905) 563-1067 E: sales-canada@koenpack.com www.koenpack.com

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Innovative flower and plant packaging products, specializing in supermarket programs along with exclusive custom packaging. Booth #413 KOREA FOOD TRADING 8500 Keele St. Vaughan, ON L4K 2A6 T: (905) 532-0325 E: info@koreafood.ca www.koreafood.ca We supply thousands of private and national branded products that connect eastern and western, manufacturers to customers, and generations to generations. Booth #1337 KRAFT HEINZ CANADA 95 Moatfield Dr. Don Mills, ON M3B 3L6 T: (416) 441-5000 E: info@kraftheinz.com www.kraftheinzcompany.com Kraft Heinz is the fifth-largest food and beverage company in the world with iconic brands including Kraft, Heinz, Classico, KD, Jell-O, Philadelphia and Maxwell House. Booth #803 KRUGER PRODUCTS LP 200-1900 Minnesota Ct. Mississauga, ON L5N 5R5 T: (905) 812-6900 F: (905) 812-6910 E: reception@krugerproducts.ca www.krugerproducts.ca Kruger Products LP is a leading Canadian manufacturer and distributor of tissue and paper towels for consumer in home use and commercial away from home. Booth #1208 L.H. GRAY & SON LIMITED R.R. #7 Strathroy, ON N7G 3H8 T: (519) 245-0480 F: (519) 245-5829 E: crittinger@grayridge.com www.grayridge.com We are a grader and producer marketing regular and specialty shell eggs and further processed egg products under Gray Ridge, Gold Egg and Conestoga Farms. Booth #1131

✪ LABELS PLUS

121 McMaster Ave. Ajax, ON L1S 2E6 T: (905) 426-3551 F: (905) 426-3503 E: labelsplus@rogers.com www.labelsplus.ca Label guns and labels for price marking or date marking (best before etc.). Booth #509

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✪ LAKEVIEW FARMS

1600 Gressel Dr. Delphos, OH USA 45833 T: (800) 755-9925 F: (419) 695-9900 E: erniewilliams@sympatico.ca www.lakeviewfarms.com Lakeview Farms chilled deli and dairy items: Luisa’s Layered Dips, Senor Rico Rice Pudding, “Cheesecake Factory” decadent desserts, branded, private Label. Available across Canada. Booth #1525 LCBO 1 Yonge St., Suite 1101 Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 T: (416) 365-2674 E: wholesaleservice@lcbo.com www.doingbusinesswithlcbo.com LCBO is the vendor of record for beverage alcohol sales to authorized grocers. We aid in ordering eligible beverage alcohol products, and provide operational support. Booth #1232 LED IN ACTION PO Box 186, 1178 Bighorn Ave. Pincher Creek, AB T0K 1W0 T: (403) 627-1686 F: (403) 627-1684 E: info@ledinaction.com www.ledinaction.com LED Lighting solutions for commercial and industrial customers that reduces overall operating and maintenance costs, without sacrificing quality or safety. Booth #408 LIZOTTE MACHINE VISION 2 Montreuil St. Riviere-Verte, NB E7C 2S6 T: (506) 263-1204 F: (506) 263-1202 E: info@lizottemachinevision.com www.lizottemachinevision.com Lizotte Machine Vision is a worldwide provider of custom-built in-line quality control and grading solution for the food industry since 1985. Booth #837

✪ LOBLAWS INC. 1 President’s Choice Circle Brampton, ON L6Y 5S5 T: (905) 459-2500 E: Business.Development@loblaw.ca www.loblaw.ca The Affiliated Independent group services over 300 independent grocers in Canada. We offer Franchise and Independent programs. Come see our booth for more information. Booth #1509 ✪ LOUISE PRETE FINE FOODS INC. 1238 Dundas St. E., Unit 611 Toronto, ON M4M 0C6 T: (416) 988-6464 E: michael@louiseprete.com www.louiseprete.com

Locally made rich and hearty tomato basil pasta sauces and homemade fresh pasta and raviolis. www.louiseprete.com Booth #1626 MADE GOOD 2720 Steeles Ave. W. Vaughan, ON L4K 4N5 T: (416) 360-8200 E: l.sears@madegoodfoods.com www.madegoodfoods.com New MadeGood Soft Baked Mini Cookies and Crispy Light Granolas! Made in a nut-free facility, free from top allergens, school safe, organic, hidden veggies. Booth #603

✪ MANOTAS FOODS

93 Front St. E. #B30 Toronto, ON M5E 1C3 T: (416) 523-3577 E: manotasorganics@gmail.com www.manotasfoods.com Manotas is an outstanding product developer of authentic traditional Latin foods to sustain health and longevity. We specialize in organic and healthy recipes. Booth #1732 MAPLE LEAF FOODS 6987 Financial Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 0A1 T: (905) 285-5000 E: info@mapleleaffoods.com www.mapleleaffoods.com Canada’s leading protein company. Our goal is to be the most sustainable protein company on Earth. Raise the Good in Food. Booth #1025 MARK ANTHONY WINE & SPIRITS 150 - 259 Dufferin St. Toronto, ON M6K 1Z5 T: (289) 681-5722 E: info@markanthony.com www.markanthonywineandspirits.ca Mark Anthony Wine & Spirits is a family-run company based in Vancouver whose mission is to supply restaurants, wine boutiques and retailers with an unequaled range of estate wines. Booth #1539 METRO 360 120 Sinnott Rd. Toronto, ON M1L 4N1 T: (647) 989-8731 F: (416) 285-2056 E: mfung@metro360.ca www.metro360.ca Metro 360 partners with brands like Dish Fish, Handfuel, Cookie+ Protein to break into and succeed at retail. Booth #425

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METROWIRE, REPRESENTED BY IMAGINEXSOLUTIONS 39 Royalavon Cres. Etobicoke, ON M9A 2E7 T: (416) 821-2323 E: info@imaginexsolutions.com www.imaginexsolutions.com Premium wire shelving solutions in Super Erecta, polymer, epoxy, adjustable and 304 stainless. Boutique grocery. Retail display and storage. Booth #1331

✪ MEXIBAKE BAKERY

8100 Radcliffe St. Detroit, MI USA 48210 T: (313) 894-2000 F: (313) 894-2221 E: mexibake@gmail.com www.mexibake.com Mexibake Detroit produces authentic Hispanic bread (frozen, ready-to-bake) so our customers can provide delicious fresh bread rolls and sweet bread daily. Booth #405

✪ MIKE & MIKE’S ORGANICS

1 Royal Gate Blvd., Unit F Woodbridge, ON L4L 8Z7 T: (416) 987-2772 F: (416) 987-2771 E: info@mikeandmikes.com www.mikeandmikesorganics.com Mike & Mike’s Organics is Ontario’s only non-farm based distributor of exclusively certified-organic fresh fruits, vegetables, and a variety of grocery products. Booth #1219 MIWE CANADA INC. 3055 Lenworth Dr., Unit #10 Mississauga, ON L4X 2G3 T: (647) 297-0314 E: b.garisto@miwe.com www.miwe.com MIWE is associated with many advantages in the world of baking. MIWE’s product portfolio is focused on baking ovens, proofer/retarder and automated equipment. Booth #719 MOOSEHEAD BREWERIES 89 Main St. W. Saint John, NB E2M 3H2 T: (506) 635-7000 E: consumerinquiries@moosehead.ca www.moosehead.ca Moosehead Breweries is the last major brewery in Canada owned by Canadians. Booth #1412 MORRIS NATIONAL 100 Jacob Keffer Pkwy. Concord, ON L4K 4W3 T: (905) 879-7777 F: (905) 879-0400 E: info@morrisnational.com www.morrisnational.com

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

Morris National, Inc. imports and distributes Welch’s Fruit Snacks, Mike & Ike/Hot Tamale, Capricorn Liq., Cadbury Fingers, Go Better Protein Bars, Sweetarts, Nerds and Gobstoppers. Booth #1030 MUSKOKA BREWERY 1964 Muskoka Beach Rd. Bracebridge, ON P1L 1V4 T: (800) 881-4229 E: tap.room@muskokabrewery.com www.muskokabrewery.com Nestled in the heart of Muskoka, Muskoka Brewery handcrafts premium beers as unique and refreshing as the region they’re from. Booth #1141

✪ NAI WORLD

1300 Rue Beaulac St-Laurent, QC H4R 1R7 T: (514) 815-0023 E: info@naiworld.com www.naiworld.com Nai is a food and beverage snacking business offering a range of products that are unique, 100% natural; no preservatives or additives, lower in calories. Booth #515

✪ N’TAKE BY SYRACUSE ENVIRO GROUP 615 Orwell St., Unit A Mississauga, ON L5A 2W4 T: (905) 272-2247 E: s.mitchell@ntake.com www.ntake.com N’Take is Canada’s leading supplier of reusable Enviro bag/box programs with unsurpassed service levels and superior quality and competitive pricing. Let us customize your program. Booth #1215 NESTLÉ CANADA INC. Suite 1700, 25 Sheppard Ave. W. North York, ON M2N 6S8 T: (800) 563-7853 F: (416) 218-2654 E: Corporate.Affairs@ca.nestle.com www.nestle.ca Nestlé Canada has a wide variety of food, beverage and nutrition products to help you and your family live happier and healthier lives. Booth #811 NEW WAVE/LONDON ICE CREAM 3397 White Oak Rd. London, ON N6E 3A1 T: (519) 317-2680 E: abbi@newwaveicecream.com www.londonicecream.ca London Ice Cream started in 1995 making ice cream the “the way it used to be.” Products include ice cream (soft and hard), yogurt and sorbets. Booth #1838

NICKEL BROOK BREWING CO. 864 Drury Lane Burlington, ON L7R 2Y4 T: (905) 681-1226 E: info@nickelbrook.com www.nickelbrook.com Nickel Brook has been one of the leading players in the Ontario craft beer movement since our founding in 2005. Booth #1628 NIMBUS WATER SYSTEMS INC. 112 Oakdale Rd. Toronto, ON M3N 1V9 T: (416) 616-1184 E: steve@nimbuswatersystems.com www.nimbuswatersystems.com Full service to all makes and models of water equipment. Best range of equipment and options for vended and store-use. Purchase and revenue share. Booth #1037 NO BOATS ON SUNDAY 697 South Service Rd. Grimsby, ON L3M 4E8 T: (289) 455-1874 E: info@noboatscider.com www.noboatscider.com No Boats on Sunday is all about living oars up! Inspired by the East Coast, and made with 100% local, Ontario apples. Booth #1615

✪ NORTHERN PET PRODUCTS, INC. 595 Oster Lane Concord, ON L4K 2B9 T: (905) 660-7213 E: nick@northernbiscuit.ca www.northernbiscuit.ca Whole food specialty pet treats since 1992. Category leader in pet specialty channel. Locally sourced, human-food grade ingredients packed in 100% compostable eco-friendly packaging. Booth #1631

NUSTART MARKETING LTD./ CHOLULA & JOSE CUERVO/ PANOS BRANDS 2931-152A St. Surrey, BC V4P 3K4 T: (604) 531-5790 E: info@nustartmarketing.com www.nustartmarketing.com Cholula - flavourful hot sauce; Jose Cuervo mixers; Sesmark crackers for deli and grocery; Midel – gluten-free cookies, pie shells. Booth #1502 & 1504 OIC FOODS 5820 Kennedy Rd. Mississauga, ON L4Z 2C3 T: (416) 846-2929 E: info@oicfoods.com www.oicfoods.com We are a company that manufactures and sources the best vegetarian ethnic foods and brings them to consumers. Booth #1312

OLD DUTCH FOODS LTD. 100 Bentall St. Winnipeg, MB R2X 2Y5 T: (204) 632-0249 F: (204) 632-7016 E: consumercare@olddutchfoods.com www.olddutchfoods.ca Old Dutch Foods is a national snack food company, manufacturing and distributing a full assortment of your favourite Old Dutch and Humpty Dumpty snacks. Booth #1408

✪ ON GREEN GO SOLUTIONS

5800 Ambler Dr., Suite 210 Mississauga, ON L4W 4J4 T: (855) 777-0999 F: (855) 991-9919 E: sales@ongreengosolutions.com www.ongreengosolutions.com 100% compostable disposable products, straws, meat-food-ready meal trays, produce-shopping bags, salad-soup bowls, plates, containers, clam-shells, utensils and coffee cups. Booth #634 ONTARIOFRESH.CA 661 Yonge St., Suite 500 Toronto, ON M4Y1Z9 T: (416) 960-0001 E: info@ontariofresh.ca www.ontariofresh.ca Ontariofresh.ca is an online network and marketing service designed to help Ontario businesses buy and sell more local food. Booth #1743 ONTARIO MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS 1 Stone Rd W. Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2 T: (888) 466-2372 F: (519) 826-4335 E: about.omafra@ontario.ca www.omafra.gov.on.ca/ english/index.html The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is committed to the success of Ontario’s food and agriculture sectors. Choose Ontario Meeting Area ONTARIO PORK 655 Southgate Dr. Guelph, ON N1G 5G6 T: (519) 767-4600 F: (519) 829-1769 E: jeremy.yim@ontariopork.on.ca www.ontariopork.on.ca/retail Give your consumers the confidence to know they’re buying tasty, nutritious Ontario pork. Our checkmark logo tells consumers your pork is premium quality and Ontario grown. Booth #1330 OZERY BAKERY 11 Director Ct. Vaughan, ON L4L 4S5 T: (905) 265-1143 E: jlewis@ozerybakery.com www.ozerybakery.com

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Ozery Bakery produces and distributes non-traditional breads across North America. These innovative products include Morning Rounds, Snacking Rounds, Brioche and more! Booth #1228

www.pepsico.ca See the latest foods, snacks and beverages from Frito Lay, Quaker, Pepsi, Tropicana and Gatorade—some of Canada’s most loved and trusted brands. Booth #909

✪ P.K. DOUGLASS INC.

✪ PLAYDIO - BETTER MUSIC

1033 Jayson Ct. Mississauga, ON L4W 2P4 T: (905) 624-3300 F: (905) 624-3304 E: mclow@pkdouglass.com www.pkdouglass.com P.K. Douglass Inc. is your go-to source for margin-building seasonal goods, toys, cleaning supplies, gift bags and bows and wrap and general merchandise. Booth #1403

✪ PANELA BAKING FACTORY

2768 Slough St. Mississauga, ON L4T 1G3 T: (647) 389-7870 E: Panelafactory@gmail.com www.panelafactory.com We are a confectionery company located in Mississauga. Our products are made with the freshest ingredients and are available in a variety of grocery stores. Booth #1630 PARMALAT CANADA 405 The West Mall Toronto, ON M9C 5J1 T: (416) 626-1972 www.parmalat.ca Parmalat Canada produces milk, yogurt, cheese and other leading dairy products. Our brands include Beatrice, Lactantia, Black Diamond, Balderson, Astro, Galbani, President. Booth #1119 PECO PALLET 2 Bridge St., Suite 210 Irvington, NY USA 10533 T: (408) 842-2275 E: sales@pecopallet.com www.pecopallet.com PECO Pallet delivers high-quality rental block pallets and responsive customer service, with coverage across all of North America. Booth #635

✪ PEMBERTON & ASSOCIATES INC. 3610 Nashua Dr. Mississauga, ON L4V 1X9 T: (905) 678-8900 F: (905) 678-8989 E: pemco@pemcom.com www.pemcom.com Pemberton is dedicated to bringing the latest technology to the Canadian food processing industry. Booth #1533

PEPSICO CANADA 5550 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 0C3 T: (289) 374-5000 F: (188) 851-8523 https://cu.pepsico.com/caen/fritolay

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FOR BUSINESS 415 Hamilton Rd. London, ON N5X 1V9 T: (866) 381-3389 E: mat@playdio.ca www.playdio.ca Playdio provides licensed music solutions for your business. Our playlist-based platform allows you to select and create playlists targeted specifically to your clientele. Booth #416 PROCTER & GAMBLE 4711 Yonge St. Toronto, ON M2N 6K8 T: (416) 730-4711 E: www.pg.ca/en-CA/contact-us www.pg.ca/en-CA P&G has been doing business in Canada for more than 100 years. We are strongly committed to providing branded products and services of superior quality. Booth #625 QLD COMMUNICATIONS INC. 19 Kenview Blvd., Unit 31 Brampton, ON L6T 5G6 T: (647) 272-4606 E: lisa.hiles@qld.ca www.qld.ca Authorized Motorola two-way radio channel partner. Radio solutions; small, sleek, lightweight radios with clear audio performance and simple push-totalk features to rugged and heavy duty. Booth #1221

✪ QUAKER BAKERY BRANDS, INC. 1207 N Mason St. Appleton, WI USA 54919 T: (952) 836-5518 E: jdhofmeister@quakerbakery.com www.quakerbakery.com Quaker Bakery is the supplier of the first Ultra Thin and Crispy Sprouted Grain Pizza Crust. It is a Non-GMO Project Verified item. Booth #530

QUICKLABEL 3505 Rue Isabelle, Suite O Brossard, QC J4Y 2R2 T: (800) 565-2216 E: sales@quicklabel.com www.QuickLabel.com The leading manufacturer of production-capacity, full-colour digital label printers, barcode printers, media and labeling software that allow businesses to print their own labels on-demand. Booth #1214

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RATIONAL CANADA 2410 Meadowpine Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5N 6S2 T: (905) 567-5777 E: d.forget@rational-online.com www.rational-online.ca See how the Rational SelfCooking Center can grill, roast, bake, steam, and more — with a click of a button and within about 1m2. Booth #1225 RICHARDSON FOOD & INGREDIENTS 2800 1 Lombard Pl. Winnipeg, MB R3B 0X8 T: (866) 217-6211 E: ferro.krysko@richardson.ca www.richardson.ca A proud Canadian company - Richardson Food & Ingredients specializes in canola products, including gluten-free and vegan options. Sample our new Canola Harvest Oil Blends. Booth #407

✪ RIZOPIA

55 Leek Cres. Richmond Hill, ON T: (905) 709-8838 F: (905) 709-8088 E: ivan@rizopia.com www.rizopia.com Rizopia gluten-free pasta uses 100% natural ingredients without bleaching, additive or preservative. All vegan and kosher-certified. No gluten, nut, dairy, egg, wheat, corn or soy. Booth #1741 ROTOBALE COMPACTION SOLUTIONS INC. 7232 Arthur Rd #5 W. Kenilworth, ON N0G 2E0 T: (519) 323-3673 F: (519) 323-3816 E: info@rotobalecompaction.ca www.rotobalecompaction.com Canadian manufacturer of waste/ recycling compactors/balers. We handle every detail of your order—site measurements with AutoCAD drawings approval, ship/install, train with customer satisfaction follow-up. Booth #1238 RTS RETAIL 1027 Industrial Pl. St. Clements, ON N0B 2M0 T: (800) 663-2803 E: bsmith@rtscompanies.com www.rtsretail.com As a manufacturer of kiddie carts since 2003, RTS Retail has since then expanded its product line to service retailers in every way possible. Booth #1019 RUST-OLEUM CANADA 200 Confederation Pkwy. Concord, ON L4K 4T8 T: (905) 532-1926 E: dwhaley@rustoleum.ca www.rustoleum.ca

Krud Kutter is a certified, effective, environmentally friendly cleaning line. Moldex was designed to get rid of mold and keep the dangerous hazard from returning. Booth #924

✪ SAPUTO DAIRY PRODUCTS CANADA GP 101 Royal Group Cres. Vaughan, ON L4H 1X9 T: (905) 264-7600 F: (905) 266-8829 E: scott.price@saputo.com www.saputo.com Manufacturer and distributor of a wide array of fluid/cultured dairy products and cheeses. Some of our brands include Neilson, Milk2Go, Armstrong and Alexis de Portneuf Booth #1009 SCHAR 125 Chubb Ave. Lyndhurst, NJ USA 07071 T: (647) 454-1737 E: carmine.luongo@drschar.com www.schar.ca The best in gluten free. With over 35 years experience, Schar is a pioneer and Europe’s #1 gluten-free food manufacturer! Booth #818 SHERIDAN NURSERIES 12302 Tenth Line Georgetown, ON L7G 4S7 T: (416) 798-7970 F: (905) 873-9591 E: sales@sheridannurseries.com www.sheridannurseries.com 100+ years of innovation in Canada, providing the horticultural industry with quality plants, insight on consumer trends and profitable programs designed to wow all gardeners. Booth #1132

✪ SHOPHERO 673 N 1890 W. Provo, UT USA 84601 T: (801) 349-8981 F: (801) 805-1849 E: josh.ray@shophero.com www.shophero.com ShopHero provides easy and affordable online grocery services including delivery and pickup to Canada’s independent grocers. Booth #1104 SIR SOLUTIONS 2700 14th Ave., Suite 3 Markham, ON L3R 0J1 T: (844) 687-4747 E: info@sirsolutions.com www.sirsolutions.com SIR Solutions provide retail businesses with a point-of-sale and management software package, customized services and equipment that evolve according to their business growth. Booth #1313

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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✪ SKEDADDLE MAPLE 9110 Main St. Florenceville-Bristol, NB E7L 2A5 T: (506) 392-5202 E: info@skedaddle-maple.com www.skedaddle-maple.com Skedaddle Maple is no ordinary maple syrup: Oak aged and full of flavour, our range of syrups is unlike any others. Booth #1325 SMUCKER FOODS OF CANADA CORP. 80 Whitehall Dr. Markham, ON L3R 0P3 T: (905) 940-9600 F: (905) 940-5979 E: victoria.pittens@jmsmucker.com www.smuckers.ca Smucker’s is proud to introduce new Nature’s Recipe Dog Food, Jif Light Peanut Butter, Adam’s Dark Roast Peanut Butter, Folger’s 50ct Lively Columbian, and more! Booth #1319

✪ SOBEYS WHOLESALE 1020 64th Ave N.E. Calgary, AB T2E 7V8 T: (403) 560-1008 E: jim.garand@sobeys.com www.sobeyswholesale.com Exciting times at Sobeys Wholesale! Join us at our booth to discuss how we have consolidated our wholesale divisions into one national business unit. Booth #1209 ✪ SPRUCEWOOD

HANDMADE COOKIE CO. 628 Ontario St. Cobourg, ON K9A 3C4 T: (905) 372-0707 F: (905) 372-1771 E: info@sprucewoodbrands.com www.sprucewoodbrands.com HACCP Certified artisan bakery making both savoury/cheddar and sweet shortbread cookies. Nut-free bakery. 80% of our fine shortbread products are diabetic-friendly. Canada’s best shortbread! Booth #1637

✪ STATION COLD BREW COFFEE CO.

343 Horner Ave. Toronto, ON M8W 1Z6 T: (416) 523-2054 E: info@stationcoldbrew.com www.stationcoldbrew.com Deemed “the craft beer of coffee,” Station is heavily focused on craftsmanship in bringing premium Cold Brew Coffee to Canadians. Booth #1639

✪ STICKLINGS SPECIALTY BAKERY 11-637 The Queensway Peterborough, ON K9J 7J6 T: (705) 741-0777 E: parda67@gmail.com www.sticklingsbakery.com

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

Premium baker and importer of organic, gluten-free bread products: breadcrumbs, croutons, and pizza crusts, and sourdough breads. Booth #1740 STM 2230 Meadowpine Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5N 6H6 T: (905) 814-5557 F: (905) 279-0390 E: info@shelftalkers.com www.shelftalkers.com Shelf Talkers Manufacturing Inc. (STM) has been a leading supplier of POS, display and merchandising solutions for over 20 years. Booth #1028

✪ SUGAR & SPICE BODY CARE LTD. 22360 Dewdney Trunk Rd. Maple Ridge, BC V2X 3J2 T: (778) 317-3270 F: (604) 477-2471 E: sales@sugarandspicebbc.ca www.sugarandspicebbc.ca Natural personal care products. Cruelty free. Paraben free. Aluminum free. Phthalate free. Made with pride in Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Booth #410

✪ SUNSHINE PICKLES

30043 Jane Rd. Thamesville, ON N0P 2K0 T: (519) 692-4416 F: (519) 692-5590 E: info@picklesplease.ca www.picklesplease.ca Sunshine Pickles grows and processed a variety of conventional and certified organic vegetables. We offer private label and co-packing as well. Booth #1744

✪ SWEET N FUN PRODUCTS LTD. 260 Edgley Blvd. Concord, ON L4K 3Y4 T: (905) 760-2386 F: (905) 760-2386 E: info@sweetnfun.ca www.sweetnfun.ca Sweet Whirls, Gourmet Jelly, Krazi Twist and Roi Pop are very popular gourmet candies in grocery stores and supermarkets. Please try them! Booth #432

✪ TAMSCO FOODS

50 Copernicus Blvd. Brantford, ON N3P 1K5 T: (519) 751-1818 F: (519) 512-2601 E: steven@tamscofoods.com www.tamscofoods.com Fresh, fully cooked flame grilled chicken, peameal bacon and salmon. Canadian food products for the retail food industries. We can customize and do private label for you. Booth #535

TFB & ASSOCIATES LIMITED, IMPORTERS, DISTRIBUTORS 7300 Warden Ave. #210 Markham, ON L3R 9Z6 T: (705) 796-6047 E: maria.cernak@tfb.ca www.tfb.ca When you choose a company for the import and distribution of your food, beverage or health care product, you’re choosing a partner. We treat your brand with the care and consideration we’d give our own. Booth #1308 THE CANADIAN FOOD & WINE INSTITUTE AT NIAGARA COLLEGE 135 Taylor Rd. S.S. #4 Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON LOS 1J0 T: (905) 933-5129 E: expertedge@niagaracollege.ca www.canadianfoodandwineinstitute.ca Specializing in training options for the food & beverage industry. Training options for wine, beer, distilling and culinary. Booth #740

✪ THE CIDER KEG

1398 Vittoria Rd. Vittoria, ON N0E1W0 T: (519) 426-0705 E: info@ciderkeg.com www.ciderkeg.com 100% Canadian-made fresh cider and non-alcoholic sparkling ciders. Made with quality hand- picked apples and featuring complex and unique fruit and grape blends. Booth #1825 THE DENBAR FOOD GROUP 513 Division St., Unit 4 Cobourg, ON K9A 5G6 T: (289) 252-1509 F: (289) 252-2080 E: mmillman@brittanyacres.com www.brittanyacres.com Frozen entrées, frozen appetizers, specialty potato products. Product development. Booth #1840

✪ THORNLOE CHEESE INC.

999687 Hwy 11, N. Thornloe, ON P0S 1L0 T: (705) 647-7441 E: grandfromage@thornloecheese.ca www.thornloecheese.ca Ontario fine cheese makers producing Canada’s first grass-fed verified cheeses and butter. Grab-and-go curds, pre-cut portions and wheels. Goat and cow milks. Booth #1827

✪ TOTAL CLEANSE

1111 Finch Ave. W., Unit 21 North York, ON M3J 2E5 T: (647) 230-3699 E: info@totalcleanse.ca www.totalcleanse.ca Total Cleanse is Canada’s premier cold pressed juice company, providing you with a unique variety of fresh, high quality juices designed to detoxify your body. Booth #1726

TOUCHE BAKERY INC. 2110 Williams Pkwy #4 Brampton, ON L6S 5X6 T: (647) 484-7500 E: aswartz@touchebakery.com www.touchebakery.com Biscotti, cookies, meringues. Frozen cookie dough, muffin and brownie batter. Totally peanut, tree-nut and sesame-free and kosher. Booth #1633 TREE OF LIFE CANADA 6185 McLaughlin Rd. Mississauga, ON L5R 3W7 T: (905) 507-6161 F: (905) 507-2727 E: canada.sales@treeoflife.com www.treeoflife.ca Tree of Life is the leading distributor of natural, organic, specialty, ethnic, gourmet cheese and now growing in the frozen sector. Booth #1109 & 1112 TRINITY LOGISTICS 123 Woolwhich St., Suite 200 Guelph, ON N1H 1Y1 T: (877) 626-3317 E: sean.freedman@trinitylogistics.com www.trinitylogistics.com Since 1979 Trinity Logistics has been providing transportation solutions to companies of all sizes throughout North America. Booth #424 TWI FOODS INC. 40 Shaft Rd. Toronto, ON M9W 4M2 T: (647) 775-1400 F: (416) 649-7667 E: info@crispyjustbaked.com www.crispyjustbaked.com TWI Foods Inc. has been delivering high quality, affordable baked products to North American and international customers, reaching U.S., U.K., UAE, Europe and Australia. Booth #1739 UNILEVER CANADA 160 Bloor St. E. Toronto, ON M4W 0A2 T: (416) 964-1857 E: ryan.r.stewart@unilever.com www.unilever.ca Unilever is a world leader in CPG, playing in many categories including home and personal care, dry foods, and ice cream. Booth #711 VINELAND RESEARCH AND INNOVATION CENTRE 4890 Victoria Ave. N. Vineland Station, ON L0R 2E0 T: (905) 562-0320 F: (905) 562-0084 E: shelby.vanderende@ vinelandresearch.com www.vinelandresearch.com

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Vineland Research and Innovation Centre is a results-based, independent, not-for-profit organization focused on horticultural science and innovation. Booth #1837 WALKER ENVIRONMENTAL 3700 Steeles Ave. W., Suite 601 Woodbridge, ON L4L 8K8 T: (866) 946-6764 E: customerservice@walkerind.com www.walkerind.com/ walker-environmental-group Walker Environmental is Canada’s largest provider of grease interceptor cleaning and maintenance, used cooking oil collection and organics recycling. Materials we collect generate renewable energy. Booth #1136 WENDELL ESTATE HONEY Box 1439 Roblin, MB R0L 1P0 T: (204) 564-2315 E: info@wendellestate.ca www.wendellestate.ca Raw, creamed, organic honey sourced from a single producer in northern Saskatchewan. Artisan product, elegantly packaged in 340g and 500g European glass jars. Booth #1714 WESTERN GROCER MAGAZINE (MERCURY PUBLICATIONS) 1313 Border St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0X4 T: (204) 954-2085 F: (204) 954-2057 E: mp@mercury.mb.ca www.westerngrocer.com Western Grocer magazine has been servicing the western Canadian grocery industry since 1916. Drop by our booth and tell us about your store. Booth #507 WESTON FOODS 1425 The Queensway Toronto, ON M8Z 1T3 T: (416) 252-7323 E: WestonFoodsCCC@WestonFoods.ca www.westonfoods.com At Weston Foods, we are a leading North American bakery company with a specialized focus across all key bakery categories. Booth #525 WILLOWBROOK NURSERIES INC. 935 Victoria Ave. Fenwick, ON L0S 1C0 T: (800) 661-5237 F: (905) 892-3790 E: rob@willowbrooknurseries.com Wholesale nursery providing retail ready flowering shrubs, vines, perennials, broadleaves, groundcovers, evergreens, container grown trees under popular marketing brands including our exclusive popular Medallion brand. Booth #645

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✪ WONDERLAND FOOD AND EQUIPMENT INC. 930 Lakefront Promenade Mississauga, ON L5E 2C4 T: (905) 271-0221 E: laurens@wonderlandfood.com www.wonderlandfood.com Your fun food connection. Take advantage of a growing, highly profitable category. Enhance your shoppers’ experience by popping your own gourmet popcorn! Booth #1135 WORKPLACE SAFETY & PREVENTION SERVICES 5110 Creekbank Rd., Suite 300 Mississauga, ON L4W 0A1 T: (905) 614-1400 F: (905) 614-1414 E: customercare@wsps.ca www.wsps.ca Workplace Safety & Prevention Services: the largest health and safety association in Ontario, responsible for 167,000 member firms across the agricultural, industrial/manufacturing and service sectors. Booth #605 YAWDI’S 111 Mammoth Hall Trail Scarborough, ON M1B 1P8 T: (647) 405-3769 F: (416) 848-4697 E: info@yawdi.ca www.yawdi.ca Introduce exciting and robust flavours to your favorite dishes, with bold and diverse condiments and marinades, inspired by authentic family recipes! Booth #1736

✪ ZAST FOODS CORPORATION

222 Islington Ave, Suite 6C Toronto, ON M8V 3W7 T: (416) 539-9278 F: (416) 539-9299 E: info@zastfoods.com www.zastfoods.com/ www.nudefruit.com Featuring items for retail and HMR. Sample our newest items: Veggie Fries, Mexican Corn, Quinoa Stir-Fry and Ontario Soups from Nudefruit and Cookin’Greens. Booth #1537 ZEROODLE INC. 25 Sims Cres., Unit 1 Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1C9 T: (905) 889-9880 E: Mark.Gates@Zeroodle.com www.zeroodle.com Zeroodle bean pasta is healthy, delicious and very satisfying. Low-carb and high-protein, use Zeroodle pasta to make traditional recipes the whole family will enjoy. Booth #734

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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Supporting Independent Grocers for 132 Years HOW TO BE MORE CYBERSECURE WHAT’S BAKING? AUGUST 2018

+

INSIDE

GRAND PRIX

ORGANICS ON THE MOVE

WINNERS

MEET GOOD FOOD FOR GOOD'S RICHA GUPTA THE FUTURE OF WORK IN GROCERY

INSIDE NATIONS EXPERIENCE

FRANK HO ON THE STORE’S “FOODERTAINMENT” STRATEGY

Tech takeover: How tech is disrupting the grocery game

Bulking up at the supermarket

A LOOK AT LONGO’S Inside the new Ajax store P. 20

FEBRUARY 2018

MEAT MATTERS What consumers want from this key department P. 39

EXCLUSIVE

2017 ANNUAL MARKET SURVEY INSIDE

THE "FREE-FROM" TREND: WHAT'S IN IS WHAT'S OUT MEET FOOD FUTURIST IRWIN ADAM EYDELNANT THE U.K.'S PLASTIC PURGE

Strolling the aisles at

Vince's Market

Giancarlo Trimarchi, Vince's Market

MAKING MAKINGA MAKING AAMOVE MOVE ON MOVEON MEAL KITS ON MEAL Grocers, KITS Grocers, slowly, getting slowly, inSlowly, the game getting in grocers P. 11are the game getting P. 11 in the game P.11

MEAL KITS

Exclusive interview with Sun Valley Supermarket’s

JIM BEXiS

The new chair of CFIG

6 STEPS

TO MAKING YOUR STORE THE GO-TO FOR HEALTH-MINDED SHOPPERS

CANADA’S #1 GROCERY INFORMATION BRAND

VISIT US AT BOOTH #737 For more information and advertising inquiries, please contact: Associate Brand Director Vanessa Peters vpeters@ensembleiq.com 437.889.0446


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW ▲

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EXHIBITORS BY PRODUCT CATEGORY ADVERTISING/MEDIA/ MARKETING PROGRAMS Autonetics Universe Banding Systems Caddle Canadian Grocer CF&R Services Inc. Clik-Clik Systems Inc. Costco Business Centre Elemental Food Distribution Guy Grocery Business Magazine Ketchum Manufacturing Ontariofresh.ca Ontario Pork ShopHero Western Grocer Magazine (Mercury Publications) AGRICULTURE MARKETING BOARD Chicken Farmers of Canada Ontario Pork ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, DATA ANALYTICS, TECHNOLOGY & SOFTWARE Daisy Intelligence AUTOMATION SYSTEMS Autonetics Universe Banding Systems CIS Group Howell Data Systems Inc. Lizotte Machine Vision Pemberton & Associates Inc. BAGS HeyJute N’Take By Syracuse Enviro Group BAKED GOODS: FRESH/ FROZEN/REFRIGERATED AGM Bakery Auger Bakery Bridor Canada Bread Company, Limited Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited Gala Bakery Inc. Good for you Desserts Ltd. MexiBake Bakery Ozery Bakery Panela Baking Factory Quaker Bakery Brands, Inc. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Sticklings Specialty Bakery Touche Bakery Inc. TWI Foods Inc. Weston Foods

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BARCODING EQUIPMENT/ SYSTEMS Globe POS Systems SIR Solutions BEAUTY & PERSONAL CARE Big Brands Inc Crossmark Canada Inc. Sugar & Spice Body Care Ltd. Unilever Canada BEER/WINE/CIDER A. Lassonde Ace Hill Beer Andrew Peller Limited Arterra Wines Canada Bobcaygeon Brewing Co. Carlsberg Canada D’Ont Poke the Bear VQA Wines and Ontario Craft Cider Hill Street Beverage Company LCBO Mark Anthony Wine & Spirits Moosehead Breweries Muskoka Brewery Nickel Brook Brewing Co. No Boats on Sunday The Canadian Food & Wine Institute at Niagara College The Cider Keg BEVERAGE EQUIPMENT Kent Coffee Company Ltd. BEVERAGES A. Lassonde Ace Hill Beer Andrew Peller Limited Beverage World Inc. Crossmark Canada Inc. Danone Canada Evergreen Group USA Fentimans North America Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. Flow Alkaline Spring Water Kent Coffee Company Ltd. Mike & Mike’s Organics Nai World Nestlé Canada Inc. Nimbus Water Systems Inc. No Boats on Sunday NuStart Marketing Ltd./Cholula & Jose Cuervo/Panos Brands Parmalat Canada PepsiCo Canada Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. TFB & Associates Limited The Cider Keg

BUYING GROUP Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) CARTS Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. Drakkar International RTS Retail CHECKOUT EQUIPMENT Complete Retail Solutions Howell Data Systems Inc. CLEANERS & SUPPLIES Conglom Inc. Cookina Metro 360 P.K. Douglass Inc. Procter & Gamble Rust-Oleum Canada COFFEE & TEA Advantage Solutions C.B. Powell Limited Classic Group of Companies Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. Four O’Clock /Trans-Herbe Inc. Kent Coffee Company Ltd. Kraft Heinz Canada Nai World Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. Unilever Canada CONDIMENTS & RELISHES A&M Gourmet Foods Products Cool Runnings Foods Henri Belgian Products Kraft Heinz Canada Sunshine Pickles Yawdi’s CONFECTIONARY Advantage Solutions AGM Bakery Ferrero Canada Limited From Farm To Table Canada Inc. Grandma Emily Inc. Great Canadian Meat Company Horse and Buggy Brands Humanwell Indigo’s Candy and Snacks Jakeman’s Maple Products Morris National Nestlé Canada Inc. Panela Baking Factory Sweet n Fun Products Ltd. Wonderland Food and Equipment Inc.

CONSULTING SERVICES BDO Canada LLP Dicentra Elemental Food Distribution Guy Gemsys Money Handling Systems Inc. Halo Metrics Inc. Hussmann Canada Inc. Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Trinity Logistics Workplace Safety & Prevention Services COUPON REDEMPTION SERVICES Caddle CF&R Services Inc. CURRENCY Bank of Canada DAIRY & EGGS Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Can-Dairy Inc. Cottage Country Dip Ltd. Danone Canada Emerald Grasslands Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd. K.T. Vivo Import Kraft Heinz Canada L.H. Gray & Son Limited OIC Foods Parmalat Canada Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP Thornloe Cheese Inc. DIRECT MAIL SERVICES CF&R Services Inc. DISPLAY CASES Arneg Canada Carlsberg Canada Complete Retail Solutions Etalex Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hussmann Canada Inc. STM DISTRIBUTION Food Distribution Guy ENERGY SUPPLIER Direct Energy Business ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES BinPak Compactors Walker Environmental

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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FACILITY MAINTENANCE SERVICES Facility Plus FINANCIAL SERVICES BDO Canada LLP FCC Agribusiness and AgriFood Division Federated Insurance FMS Financial Management Solutions FIXTURES: STORE Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. Drakkar International Halo Metrics Inc. J&J Display Sales Metrowire, represented by imagineXsolutions MIWE Canada Inc. STM FOOD PREPARATION EQUIPMENT Bizerba Canada Inc. Cookina Edge Food Equipment & Rentals MIWE Canada Inc. Pemberton & Associates Inc. Rational Canada Wonderland Food and Equipment Inc. FOODS: CANNED C.B. Powell Limited Campbell Company of Canada FOODS: CEREAL 2Go Energy General Mills Canada Grandma Emily Inc. Made Good FOODS: DELI Great Canadian Meat Company Henri Belgian Products Italia Salami Company Limited Korea Food Trading Lakeview Farms NuStart Marketing Ltd./Cholula & Jose Cuervo/Panos Brands Parmalat Canada Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP FOODS: DRY Acosta Advantage Solutions General Mills Canada Italpasta Limited Quaker Bakery Brands, Inc.

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OCTOBER 23 & 24, 2018 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION | CANADA'S NATIONAL GROCERY SHOW

FOODS: ETHNIC Cedar Valley Selections Cool Runnings Foods Italpasta Limited Korea Food Trading Louise Prete Fine Foods Inc. Manotas Foods MexiBake Bakery OIC Foods Tree of Life Canada TWI Foods Inc. Yawdi’s FOODS: FROZEN Acosta AGM Bakery Cavendish Farms Danone Canada Gala Bakery Inc. MexiBake Bakery New Wave/London Ice Cream OIC Foods The Denbar Food Group Unilever Canada Zast Foods Corporation FOODS: GLUTEN-FREE Made Good Rizopia Schar Sticklings Specialty Bakery FOODS: HEALTH 2Go Energy Dutchman’s Gold Fateel Fauxmagerie Zengarry Honey Bunny Inc. Louise Prete Fine Foods Inc. Schar FOODS: KOSHER Bos Smoked Fish Inc. Bridor Eat To Life Inc. Rizopia Skedaddle Maple Total Cleanse Touche Bakery Inc. Wendell Estate Honey FOODS: NATURAL/ORGANIC Acosta Can-Dairy Inc. Cedar Valley Selections Crossmark Canada Inc. Dutchman’s Gold Eat To Life Inc. Emerald Grasslands Four O’Clock /Trans-Herbe Inc. General Mills Canada Good for you Desserts Ltd. Grandma Emily Inc.

Honey Bunny Inc. Humanwell K.T. Vivo Import L.H. Gray & Son Limited Louise Prete Fine Foods Inc. Made Good Manotas Foods Maple Leaf Foods Metro 360 Mike & Mike’s Organics NuStart Marketing Ltd./Cholula & Jose Cuervo/Panos Brands Rizopia Skedaddle Maple Sunshine Pickles TFB & Associates Limited Tree of Life Canada Wendell Estate Honey Zast Foods Corporation Zeroodle Inc. FOODS: OILS Richardson Food & Ingredients FOODS: PREPARED Classic Group of Companies Lakeview Farms Nestlé Canada Inc. The Denbar Food Group FOODS: SNACK 2Go Energy C.B. Powell Limited Campbell Company of Canada Canada Bread Company, Limited Eat To Life Inc. Fateel From Farm To Table Canada Inc. Great Canadian Meat Company Horse and Buggy Brands Humanwell Indigo’s Candy and Snacks Italia Salami Company Limited Made Good Metro 360 Morris National Old Dutch Foods Ltd. PepsiCo Canada Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Thornloe Cheese Inc. Touche Bakery Inc. TWI Foods Inc. Wonderland Food and Equipment Inc. Zast Foods Corporation FOODS: SPECIALTY Bos Smoked Fish Inc. Bridor Campbell Company of Canada Can-Dairy Inc. Cedar Valley Selections Cottage Country Dip Ltd.

Custom Food Packaging Emerald Grasslands Evergreen Group USA Fauxmagerie Zengarry Gala Bakery Inc. Gindara Sablefish/West Creek Coho Salmon Italpasta Limited Jakeman’s Maple Products Korea Food Trading Manotas Foods Northern Pet Products, Inc. Schar Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. Sticklings Specialty Bakery TFB & Associates Limited The Denbar Food Group Tree of Life Canada Vineland Research and Innovation Centre Yawdi’s FOODS: SPREADS A&M Gourmet Foods Products Bee Maid Honey Limited Cottage Country Dip Ltd. Dutchman’s Gold Ferrero Canada Limited Honey Bunny Inc. Mike & Mike’s Organics Richardson Food & Ingredients Skedaddle Maple Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. Wendell Estate Honey FOOD SAFETY & SANITATION Dicentra Rust-Oleum Canada The Canadian Food & Wine Institute at Niagara College FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT Edge Food Equipment & Rentals GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Igloo Refrigeration Ltd. Nimbus Water Systems Inc. GARDEN/FLORAL/SEASONAL Koen Pack Canada P.K. Douglass Inc. Sheridan Nurseries Willowbrook Nurseries Inc. GENERAL MERCHANDISE Dyna-Pro Environmental N’Take By Syracuse Enviro Group GOVERNMENT SERVICES Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TUESDAY, OCT. 23, 2018 Conference 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24, 2018 Conference 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM Trade Show 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

HOUSEWARES Cookina Dyna-Pro Environmental

MEAT PROCESSING Bizerba Canada Inc. Pemberton & Associates Inc.

HVAC & FREEZERS GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hussmann Canada Inc. Igloo Refrigeration Ltd.

MERCHANDISING RTS Retail

INSURANCE Federated Insurance Gallagher

MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES Playdio - Better Music for Business

JUICES A. Lassonde Ace Hill Beer Beverage World Inc. The Cider Keg Total Cleanse

NAME BADGES Imprint Plus NATURAL PRODUCTS Barnies Horse and Pet Beverage World Inc. Fauxmagerie Zengarry Flow Alkaline Spring Water HeyJute K.T. Vivo Import Northern Pet Products, Inc. Sugar & Spice Body Care Ltd. Zeroodle Inc.

LABELLING & PRICING EQUIPMENT Bizerba Canada Inc. Globe POS Systems Ishida Canada Inc. Ketchum Manufacturing Labels Plus QuickLabel LEGAL Harper Grey LLP

ONLINE GROCERY ShopHero

LIGHTING Conglom Inc. LED in Action MATERIAL HANDLING & BACKROOM EQUIPMENT Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. Clik-Clik Systems Inc. Drakkar International Ishida Canada Inc. KeepRite Refrigeration MIWE Canada Inc. Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. MEAL SOLUTIONS Classic Group of Companies L.H. Gray & Son Limited MEAT: BEEF Canada Beef Inc.

PACKAGING Banding Systems CiMa-Pak Corporation Conglom Inc. Custom Food Packaging HeyJute Ishida Canada Inc. Koen Pack Canada N’Take By Syracuse Enviro Group On Green Go Solutions PECO Pallet QuickLabel PAPER PRODUCTS On Green Go Solutions Kruger Products LP PET FOOD & SUPPLIES Barnies Horse and Pet Caledon Farms Canature Processing Northern Pet Products, Inc. Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

MEAT: PORK Maple Leaf Foods Ontario Pork Tamsco Foods MEAT: POULTRY Canature Processing Chicken Farmers of Canada Maple Leaf Foods Tamsco Foods

#GICShow18

MONEY/CURRENCY HANDLING SYSTEMS Gemsys Money Handling Systems Inc.

#GICSHOW18 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

POINT-OF-SALE SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT Clik-Clik Systems Inc. Etalex Inc. Globe POS Systems Howell Data Systems Inc. Ketchum Manufacturing ShopHero SIR Solutions

STATIONARY SUPPLIES P.K. Douglas Inc. Trinity Logistics

PRIVATE LABEL A&M Gourmet Foods Products Canature Processing Custom Food Packaging Evergreen Group USA Indigo’s Candy and Snacks Jakeman’s Maple Products Lakeview Farms Panela Baking Factory Richardson Food & Ingredients Sobeys Wholesale Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Sunshine Pickles TWI Foods Inc.

TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION Autonetics Universe

RECYCLING/BALERS BinPak Compactors Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. REFRIGERATION, HVAC & FREEZERS Arneg Canada KeepRite Refrigeration RESEARCH & HORTICULTURE Vineland Research and Innovation Centre ROOFING Duro-Last Roofing, Inc. SEAFOOD Bos Smoked Fish Inc. Gindara Sablefish/West Creek Coho Salmon Tamsco Foods SECURITY SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT Gemsys Money Handling Systems Inc. Halo Metrics Inc. SIGNAGE & GRAPHICS Complete Retail Solutions Imprint Plus J&J Display Sales STM SPICES & FLAVOURINGS Cool Runnings Foods

STORE FURNISHINGS & DESIGN Etalex Inc. Igloo Refrigeration Ltd. J&J Display Sales RTS Retail

TRADE ASSOCIATIONS Canada Beef Inc. Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) GS1 Canada International Dairy Deli Bakery Association TRADE PUBLICATIONS Canadian Grocer Grocery Business Magazine Western Grocer Magazine (Mercury Publications) TRAINING & EDUCATION The Canadian Food & Wine Institute at Niagara College TWO-WAY RADIOS Communications QLD Communications Inc. UNIFORMS Imprint Plus VITAMINS & SUPPLEMENTS Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. WASTE MANAGEMENT BinPak Compactors Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. Walker Environmental WAREHOUSING KeepRite Refrigeration PECO Pallet WATER Dyna-Pro Environmental Flow Alkaline Spring Water Nimbus Water Systems Inc. WHOLESALE Loblaws Inc. Sobeys Wholesale WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY Workplace Safety & Prevention Services

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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Canadian Grocer - Sept/Oct 2018  

Canadian Grocer - Sept/Oct 2018