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ENRIQUE GUZMAN

PORTFOLIO


Life is about the challenges and having no comforts.


behance.net/GuzLan (760) 680-1885 eguzma02@calpoly.edu

contact


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MbraMorphic CHULA VISTA, CA

5-8

Cannery Row MONTEREY, CA

9-12 Dana Adobe

NIPOMO, CA

13-16 Land Vest

Garden grove, CA

17-24

Construction Documents

TABLE OF CONTENTS


WATER BODY

OPEN SPACE

CHULA VISTA, CA

a

WALKING/ RUNNING PATH

BERM CIRCULATION

a

C

C

1


Embrace + Metamorhphic=

MbraMorphic

The literal translation of MbraMorphic is that of embracing change. With the growing challenge of global warming and the unpredictable climate changes that result, coastal towns like Chula Vista are preparing for the 50 and 100 year floods that create havoc for coastal towns across America.

MbraMorphic

B

The MbraMorphic master plan in Chula Vista, CA embraces those changes with an elevated boardwalk that would allow users to see the change around them. In addition, an extended topographical berm on the coastal side acts as a buffer zone that protects the park from full flooding but also acts as a circulation corridor where users can walk, exercise and enjoy the views of the ocean.

boardwalk view B-B

2

berm view C-C


100 YEAR FLOOD 50 YEAR FLOOD TODAY

HIGH POINT

Elevation of boardwalk by expected sea and 100 year

FLOOD ZONE

topographical berm and elevated coastal area indicates the level rise of potential 50 year floods.

3


BOARDWALK MbraMorphic ENGINEERED BERM

HIGH POINT

4

FLOOD ZONE

HIGH POINT

A-A

elevation


Monterey, CA

a

b

b

c

5


a

6

reaching back - looking forward

c

500 Cannery Row Concept:To integrate the people, history and marine life of cannery row with a space that celebrates the past but embraces the future. Reaching back-looking forward is about conserving the existing San Xavier Cannery and integrating it with modern eco-sensitive design. The site at 500 Cannery Row, currently lies vacant, but not un-inhabited. Cormorants, seals, sea otters and many marine wildlife which famously adorn the coastal waters of monterey inhabit this site. The design of this park frames the magnificent views of the ocean, highlighting the ecology of the site.

Framed view B-B

Boardwalk Perspective C-C


Rebar tree of thoughts

Tree grove

Tree grove

Boardwalk

7


Tiger shark bar and grill

ass valley

Cormorant frame

Boardwalk

5. earth handling, materials and placement costs and provided an efficient plan. The final configuration was a segment of a 8.23 m radius spherical shell formed over a mound of earth, fifty percent undisturbed and fifty percent built-up, as shown in Fig. 4 and 5. The final earth-form had a maximum profile slope gradual enough to retain pumped concrete and steep enough to provide an inside wall surface that would allow work space and adequate headroom near the perimeter. The earth mound was

8

Steinbeck museum of modern art

STRUCTURAL DESIGN

A practical structural design of the reinforced concrete shell was based on the available state-of-knowledge around 1980 when this concrete shell project was undertaken [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]. The reinforced concrete spherical shell was analyzed under gravity loads and the resulting membrane forces and their distribution is presented in Fig. 6.

A-A

section


Nipomo, ca

Proceedings of the International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS) Symposium 2013 „BEYOND THE LIMITS OF MAN” 23-27 September, Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland J.B. ObrĊbski and R. Tarczewski (eds.)

An Earth-Formed / Earth-Covered Reinforced Concrete Shell Design, Construction and Earthquake Performance Satwant Rihal1 1

Professor Emeritus, College of Architecture and Environmental Design, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California, U.S.A., srihal@calpoly.edu

Summary: The paper presents the design and construction of an innovative earth-formed/earth-covered reinforced concrete shell located in a seismic zone. The design considerations and the process for developing an optimum form of the shell structure are presented. Feasibility of an earth-formed

9


DANA ADOBE

dana adobe restoration

10

About: Rancho Dana Adobe is situated in Nipomo, CA between the Santa Maria Valley and greater San Luis Obispo county. Sitting on a hillside facing the foothills of the east cuesta ridge line, the once dilapitated adobe faces a dried up creek and picturesque hillsides. Currently undergoing a restoration process, the Dana Adobe is valued for its historical presence as the only postal stop between San Diego and San Francisco in the 1800’s.


11


N

12

Perspective


GARDEN GROVE, School CA

n the radar:

ool safety, by the numbers.

Casualties 1998-2014

33

28

Virginia Tech University Blacksburg, VA

Sandy Hook Elementary Newtown, CN

15

7

Columbine H.S. Littleton, CO

Oikos University Oakland, CA

5

Amish School Bart Township, PA

98-’99

‘00-’02

‘03-’05

‘06-08

‘09-’11

‘12-’13

‘14

7k

Incidents of firearm possesion on school grounds (’03-’04).

120%

onwide Polls

Increase in school assaults from 2000-2004.

School faculty who do not feel safe on campus.

School shootings in

N 2014. Primer. 2nd ed. Department of Homeland Security, Jan. 2012. Web. 24 Jan. 2014. <http://www.ct.gov/demhs/lib/demhs/bips07_428_schools.pdf>. Guns and School Safety Survey. Midvale: School Improvement Network, 2014. School Improvement. Web. 24 Jan. 2014 <http://www.schoolimprovement.com/voices-of-education/ guns-and-school-safety-survey-results/>.

13


Landscape architecture + bullet proof vest=

Land Vest

Senior research project

14

Mission Statement To research innovative design paradigms that contribute towards the further development of school safety and the profession of landscape architecture. Land vest is about research, analysis and discovery, in the hope, that through careful analysis and critical thinking, the future of landscape architecture is about tackling the social challenges of the 21st century.

Thesis Statement

In the wake of the school shootings at Sandy Hook elementary in December of 2012, i began to question my own reasoning as a designer. I asked myself, what are we as a society doing wrong? How can we make schools safer? At the root of this conversation, many questions began to surge; questions that raised an intuition to have a deeper conversation about landscape architectureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role with regards to school safety. Land Vest is about, questioning, theorizing, defying the status quo of what we believe acceptable school safety should be. Since the inception of landscape architecture, nearly 100 years ago, the public landscape has evolved with the growing challenges presented. We are currently experiencing an era plagued by many challenges; challenges unlike any other; challenges that beg for attention and response. How the American landscape evolves with todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social ills, will depend on how well, we as a society respond. Land Vest is about people and the social responsibility we have as landscape architects.


CS

OFFICE

Hazard Screen

Placing trees against the side of inhabited buildings where wind circulation is coming from, reduces hazardous materials such as smoke and chemicals from being a health threat to inhabitants.

PC Pedestrian Circulation

Separating pedestrian circulation from that of vehicular reduces congestion and increases access control.

CV Clear Viewsheds

Maintaining unobstructed views from buildings increases natural surveillance.

Bus Circula tion

DI Direct Impact

Direct impact from vehicle access is to be avoided, screen inhabited buildings with trees, topography, bollards, stairs, or other built structures to protect students and faculty.

15


Prevailing wind from South

Class rooms

Main entry

CS Clear Shrubs

Maintaining clear shrubs at base of building limits the ability of external threats to hide or hide explosives.

50â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

SD Stand-off Distance

Stand-off Distances for non-load bearing walls should be 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; minimum from controlled vehicle access area. Stand-off distances are set based on explosive types. Explosive I (TNT, car explosive) has highest blast force, therefore requiring increased stand-off distances beyond 20 feet.

16

N

EVS External Viewshed Screen

Screening internal students and faculty with trees, shrubs, or topography reduces external threat viewsheds.

concept diagram


17


18

wall detail


19


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post detail




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planting plan


The design loads are defined as follows: Dead Loads: Self weight of 7.62 cm.thick shell…………= 1.82 kN/sq. m

Pivot Pivot Rotating template

Earth-fill (approx..) 15.24 cm. deep………. = 2.39 kN/sq. m Edge loading @ 1.22 m. opening at the top = 0.23 kN/m

a

R=7.62 m

Live Load: 0.96 kN/sq. m

a

Earthquake and wind Loads: 1982 Uniform Building Code and 2009 IBC 5.2 Material Properties

Fig. 4: Section showing shaped earth-form and the special template that rotates about a pivot at the very top

Earth-fill unit weight assumed to be = 15.71 kN/ m3 Compressive strength of concrete f’c = 20.7 MPa Steel Reinforcement: fy = 414 MPa 5.3 Results and Reinforcement Details:

Vent

The results of the gravity load meridional & circumferential forces in the concrete spherical shell are presented in Fig. 6. The reinforcement details for the concrete shell and the bottom edge beam are presented in Fig. 7.

b

Fig. 5: Concept section showing the earth-form excavated and replaced

The reinforcing details were based on accounting for bending resistance that has to be provided for, due to increasing shell thickness in the lower part of the dome and the effect of lateral soil pressures on the dome. A parabolic arch form entrance structure was designed on the north side of the shell to allow the backhoe and front-loader equipment to help in he removal of the earth from inside the spherical shell as shown in Fig. 8.

- Compressive +Tensile

Symm. @ CL

3.11 m

17.08 m

Earth-fill .15 m

31.31 m 15.36 m 7.10 m

Concrete shell 22.32 m 22.92 m 23.81 m

5.66 m

26.15 m 26.91 m

17.26 m

N o kg/cm

No kg/cm

Meridional

Circumferential

Fig. 6: Distribution of membrane forces in the dome under dead loads

2

23


Keywords: Concrete Shells, Spherical Domes, Earth-forms, Earthquake Response, Seismic Design, Structural Design, Construction Process 1.

3.

INTRODUCTION

The design and construction of an innovative earth-formed/earthcovered reinforced concrete shell located in a seismic zone is presented. Over the years efforts have been made to develop more economical forming techniques to help reduce the forming costs for reinforced concrete shells e.g. domes, in the developed countries. These techniques have for example included the use of membranes, special reinforcement and pneumatic pressure as in the Bini shell system [1], among others. This project provided an opportunity for developing an economical, innovative, and sustainable design solution to meet the demands of the client. This project involved close-interaction between the architect, engineers, contractor and the client. 2.

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

The design program requirements called for an insulated, moisturetolerant structure for spawning and hatching catfish. The site was a gently sloping ridge of sandy loam sitting in open, rolling countryside. The spawning and hatching operations required constantly running water at temperature of 26.7 degrees C; and the outside temperatures ranged between -6.72 degrees C to 46.1 degrees C. The site was chosen because it was discovered that there are underground hot-water springs at the project site The client wanted an economical and inconspicuous structure that would blend in with the natural landscape of rolling-hills and oak trees at the site. The space and functional requirements lead to a spherical dome 15.24 m in diameter as shown in the plan view in Fig. 1

The configuration of the shell form evolved based on the site conditions; the demands of constantly running water at 26.7 degrees C; a 53 degrees C variation between outside and inside temperatures, and the desire of the client to develop an economical and inconspicuous structure that would blend with the natural landscape of rolling hills at this site. The geometry of the spherical shell is presented in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3.

Finished grade Natural grade

Slope Sewer

Slope Sewer

nce

m

4.88 m 15.24 m

Slope .91 m slab

[3] Timoshenko, Stephen P., and Woinowski-Krieger., Theory of Plates and Shells, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1959

Undisturbed soil

[4] Pfluger, Alf., Elementary Statics of Shells, Second Edition, F.W. Dodge Corporation, New York 1961 . [5] Ramaswamy. G.S., Design and Construction of Concrete Shell Roofs, Krieger Publishing Co., 1984

5.5 m

[6] Haas, A. M., Design of Thin Concrete Shells, Volume 1, John Wiley & Sons., New York, 1962 [7] San Simeon Earthquake of 2003, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, Oakland, California

Entra

83

[2] Billington, David., Thin Shell Concrete Structures, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1982

Fig. 2: Typical section of the shell and the earth-fill, showing a skylight at the top

Concrete shell 1.

[1] Binishells, www.binishells.com

1.22 m

Up Col.

[8] Quimby, T. Bartlett., Seismic Forces in Spherical Domes: Membrane Solution, Journal of Engineering Mechanics, ASCE, November 1995

Skylight

Finished grade Natural grade

Earth fill

10. REFERENCES

Skylight

Mechanical equipment Footing line

The author acknowledges the valuable assistance of Kimberly Orth of Smith Structural Group, San Luis Obispo, California, in the preparation of the drawings for this paper. The author acknowledges the valuable assistance of Enrique Guzman, senior student, department of landscape architecture, college of architecture and environmental design during the preparation for this paper. The valuable assistance of Brent Nuttall, Professor, architectural engineering, college of architecture and environmental design, in the SAP 2000 modeling and analysis of the project shell is gratefully acknowledged.

GEOMETRY AND FORM

[9] SAP 2000, Computers and Structures, Inc., Berkeley, California

Air cond. .91 m o Slope .91 m slab

[10] IBC 2009 edition, International Code Council, Washington, D.C. [11] Uniform Building Code, 1982 edition, International Conference of Building Officials, Whittier, California

Undisturbed soil 5.5 m

Independent light wood frame structure for electrical /mechanical equipment and distribution

Counter 4.88 m

Fig. 3: Typical section of the shell and the earth-fill, showing an independent light wood frame structure for mechanical/ electrical system

Independent light wood frame structure for electrical/mechanical equipment and distribution Fig. 1: Architectural floor Plan

4.

EARTH-FORM

Soil tests indicated sandy soil with layers of gravel to a depth of twelve feet, suggesting that an earth-formed shell would be feasible, providing that the functional, structural and forming considerations could be reconciled. Working together, the architect and engineer studied several configurations before arriving at an optimum form which minimized

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24

cad revisions

Enrique Guzman Landscape Architecture  
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