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SAFER STREETS

CLOSE SHAVE?

Town officials, residents and police officers cheer installation of traffic signal at a dangerous intersection. 2A

The

Enquirer-Journal

December 15, 2009 • 50 cents

TUESDAY A few showers High: 63 Low: 38 Complete report: Page 8A

Deaths

Angel Greene Kenneth Lida, III Billy Prevatte Barbara Wells Richard Williams

WHO’S NEWS Wanted: Kids who need gifts

MONROE Rock Worship Center in Monroe is searching for children in need of Christmas gifts. The chuch will host a Christmas gala to distribute the gifts later this month. “We just want to show our heart and show a community that we still do care,” Pastor Scott Alexander said. Last year’s event event reached about 200 local children up to 16 years old who were “touched that they had something on Christmas morning.” It also meant a lot to their parents, he said, who were unable to afford gifts but could take the donations and wrap them before Christmas Day. Some families had up to five children, he added. The church is asking parents or guardians to submit children’s names, age and gender by filling out a brief application at the church this week. Once applications are submitted, the church will check the names with the Christmas Bureau to make sure families aren’t getting help from both sources and free up spaces for families receiving no assistance. The church will accept applications today and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visitors must show identification to apply, but there are no income requirements. Rock Worship Center is located at 3405 Old Charlotte Highway, Monroe. For more information, call the church at 704-283-5567. The gala will be held at 6 p.m. Dec. 22 at the Ag Center in Monroe.

BIRTHDAYS Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially: Marty Nelson, Kenneth Stegall, Alice Collins, Violet T. Cook, Richard Deese, Marty Nelson, and Kevin Philemon. Call (704) 261-2278 or e-mail birthdays@theej.com to add your names to t he list.

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Monroe, N.C.

County defers hospital decision BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE Hospital officials made a case for a Waxhaw emergency department, but commissioners deferred discussion until January. “It’s disappointing,” said Carolinas Healthcare Systems regional vice president Dennis Phillips after the decision. “Candidly, this could make the difference between life and death.” Commissioner Tracy Kuehler did not see it quite the same

way. “This is the first time this has been on our agenda,” she said adding that the county staff wanted more information from Phillips and Carolinas Medical Center - Union president Michael Lutz. County Manager Al Greene said that he and staff did not have “sufficient information to make a recommendation” to the commissioners. Kuehler said she wanted the staff to be satisfied before she would discuss it further.

The motion to defer a decision passed by a 3-2 vote with Commissioners Allan Baucom and Parker Mills opposed. CMC-Union, a nonprofit, wants to build a free-standing emergency department in Waxhaw at the corner of Providence and Gray Byrum roads. CHS owns the land and building and CMC-Union will operate the emergency department. Because CMC-Union is a nonprofit, it has a pot of money generated from excess revenues over

expenditures that must be reinvested in the community for better health care. It wants to spend about $5.173 million out of that pot mostly for medical equipment to operate the department. At the Monroe hospital, the county owns the building and land and CMC-Union operates the hospital through a lease. Because of that lease agreement, CMC-Union must seek commissioner approval for any expendi-

Town moves closer to park

Marshall: Gender is getting in the way By James Romoser

Media General News Service RALEIGH In recent years in North Carolina, female politicians have had lots of success. But in the race for the Democratic nomination to challenge U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, Elaine Marshall believes her gender is working against her. Marshall said in an interview last week that she believes some party leaders are tacitly supporting one of her opponents, Cal Cunningham, because they are looking for a male candidate to take on Burr, a Republican from Winston-Salem. “They’ve never looked at a female candidate to the extent that they’ve looked at male candidates. The proof is in the pudding,” Marshall said. She was referring to the power-brokers at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, or DSCC, the arm of the national Democratic Party that is devoted to winning Senate seats across the country. The DSCC’s full-fledged support can be critical in a general election because of the group’s ability to pour millions of dollars into the race. Officially, the DSCC doesn’t take sides in primaries. A spokesman for the group said Friday that it is focused on the general election and that it has a long record of supporting female candidates - including Sen. Kay Hagan in North Carolina in 2008. But in recent weeks, it has become clear to campaign officials and party insiders that, in the 2010 race, the DSCC prefers Cunningham, and not Marshall, who is North Carolina’s secretary of state, or the other Democratic candidate, Ken Lewis. Earlier this year, the DSCC tried to recruit Attorney General Roy Cooper and U.S. Rep. Bob Etheridge to run against Burr. When both declined, party leaders went to Cunningham and asked him to run. Both Marshall and Lewis had already been in the race for months. Cunningham, 36, agreed to run, and he announced his candidacy last week. He is a lawyer from Lexington who served one

See SENATE / Page 5A

See COUNTY / Page 5A

BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

E-J staff photos by Rick Crider

Cuthbertson High cheerleaders joined the Waxhaw Parade for this year’s celeration. It is the school’s first year in operation.

Christmas cheer comes to downtown Waxhaw

Parade queen Janna Wandzalak

Staff Writer WESLEY CHAPEL Wesley Chapel council members approved Plan B1 of the proposed Page Price Park, moving the village one step closer to acquiring its first park. The plan, selected from four choices, would include a picnic area, outdoor classroom, amphitheater, garden as well as a 0.5 mile walking trail. It would only have one parking lot, with its entrance off of Highway 84. With council approval of a specific park layout, the village will become an even better candidate for a grant from the state, said Councilwoman Sondra Bradford. The deadline for the application filing is Feb. 1. Some council members and residents did raise questions, however, about the logistics of some of the park’s features. For instance, the wetlands on the property ¬ ¬¬- which is located across from Wesley Chapel Elementary School – might be costly to build around. Village Clerk Cheryl Bennett also questioned how the park would affect traffic on Highway 84, which she said is “always busy.” The village approved the plan with the understanding that the contractor would come back with more cost analyses of the various limitations of the park. Kim Ormiston and Howard Brotton also took their seats on the council for the first time. Councilman Brad Horvath resigned from his position in order to take his elected position as mayor. “It’s been a great four years. I have a lot of memories here,” departing Mayor Tracy Clinton said. “I’m very happy to be out of the hot seat and am looking forward to watching from a distance and spending more time with my family.” Bradford was selected as the new mayor pro tem, following the departure of Rick Croffut. Bradford is the only senior councilperson since Croffut and Sonya Pierce did not seek re-election. “This makes the most logical sense,” Ormiston said.

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The Enquirer-Journal

DEATHS Billy R. Prevatte

MATTHEWS Billy Ricks Prevatte, 49, of Matthews, died on Sunday, December 13, 2009 in Matthews, Mecklenburg County. He was the son of Robert Ricks and Beulah Jernigan Prevatte and was born in Robeson County, on August 18, 1960. He was self-employed as a floor covering installer. He was preceded in death by his parents. He is also is survived by two brothers, William “Buddy� Prevatte and wife, Linda of Matthews, and Gene Prevatte of Indian Trail; five sisters, Rachel Townsend of Indian Trail, Ruth Allen of Indian Trail, Rene McKnight Proctorville, Alice Prevatte of Lumberton, and Patsy Mayers of Lumberton; a nephew, Ricky Britt of Lumberton; and numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 at 7:00 PM at Trinity Fellowship Church, 13232 Idlewild Road, in Matthews. A Funeral Service will be held on Friday, December 18, 2009 at 2 p.m. at Floyd Memorial Chapel in Lumberton. Burial will follow in Floyd Memorial Cemetery in Fairmont. The family will receive friends on Thursday, December 17, 2009 from 7:009:00 PM at Floyd Mortuary & Crematory, Inc., 809 E. 5th Street in Lumberton. In lieu of flowers memorials may be sent to Monroe Hospice & Palliative Care Charlotte Region, 1420 East Seventh Street, Charlotte, NC 28204.

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Richard Williams

MONROE Richard Ephraim Williams, 61, of 1519 Hwy. 218 East, Monroe, passed away Saturday, December 12, 2009, at Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte. Mr. Williams was born February 17, 1948, in Union County. His father, Troy Webster Williams, preceded him in death. He was a Credit Manager for CIT Bank in Charlotte and the First and current Mayor of Fairview. He also previously served with the Fairview Fire Department for 14 years. Survivors include his mother, Mary Alma Kizer Williams of Monroe; son, Jon Ryan Williams; and brother, Ronald Wayne Williams. Visitation will be Monday, December 14, at Hopewell Baptist Church, 420 Hopewell Church Road, Monroe, 7:00 – 9:00 pm. All other times the family will be at the home. The funeral service will be Tuesday, December 15, 2:00 pm, at Hopewell Church, officiated by Rev. Lee Pigg. Interment will be in the church cemetery. Memorials may be sent to the American Heart Association, 222 S. Church St., Charlotte, NC 28202 and to Hopewell Baptist Church, 420 Hopewell Church Rd., Monroe, NC 28110. Hartsell Funeral Home, Midland, is serving the Williams family. Online condolences may be sent at www. hartsellfh.com. PAID OBITUARY

Angel Greene

MONROE Angel Renee Thompson Greene, 36, of Unionville Road, Monroe, died December 11, 2009, at her home. Mrs. Greene was born May 15, 1973, in Union County. Her father, Edward Maurice Thompson, preceded her in death. Survivors include her husband, Chris, of the home; children, Alex Lee; Joseph Christopher; and Savannah Rose Greene of the home; and mother, Carolyn Sue Thompson of Mint Hill. Visitation will be Tuesday, 9-11 am, at Antioch Baptist Church, 6223 Love Mill Road, Monroe. Funeral service will begin at 11 a.m. in the church. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. All other times the family will be at the home. Hartsell Funeral Home, Midland, is serving the family. Online condolences may be sent at www.hartsellfh.com.

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Kenneth Lida, III

Monroe Kenneth “Trey� Eugene Lida, III Our beloved Trey was called home to take his place among the angels in Heaven on December 11, 2009. Born August 18, 1989, he was called into God’s care at the young age of 20. He lived his life to the fullest, always ensuring to put a smile on people’s faces wherever he went. Searching for his path in life after he graduated Forest Hills High School, he chose to be a servant for the Lord. He was an extraordinary leader to the youth of Covenant Baptist Church, making his faith a priority. He preached his first sermon just a few hours before he was lifted into the clouds of Heaven. He leaves behind his parents, Kenny and JoAnne Lida of Monroe; sister, Kelly Lida and niece Morganna of Winston-Salem; sister and brother-in-law, Jamie and Thomas Matthews and nephew Tommy of Monroe; grandparents, Reverend Ken and Ann Lida of Jefferson, SC; grandparents, Albin and Bernice Hellstrand of Charlotte; girlfriend, Casey Price of Monroe; many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. He was loved by many and will be missed for eternity. We will never understand why our sweet Trey was taken from us so early; we can only know that God had a plan for him by His side. The funeral for Trey will be held at 2:00 PM on Tuesday, December 15, 2009, at Covenant Baptist Church, 2706 Secrest Shortcut Rd., Monroe. Following the service, there will be a graveside ceremony at Lakeland Memorial Park in Monroe. The family received friends Monday evening. In lieu of flowers, Trey would have wished donations be made to the Youth Group of Covenant Baptist Church. Trey would like everyone to keep in their hearts Psalm 23:6, “Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.� Godspeed, Trey. We love you. PAID OBITUARY

Barbara Wells

MATTHEWS Mrs. Barbara “Bobbie� Wells, 59, died Sunday, December 13, 2009 at Carolinas Medical Center - Mercy. Funeral arrangements are incomplete. Good Shepherd Funeral Home, Indian Trail, is serving the family of Mrs. Wells.

Erma Henderson dies

DETROIT (AP) — Erma Henderson, a civil rights advocate who became the first black woman elected to the Detroit City Council, died Monday. She was 92. She was considered one of the most powerful black women in the city’s history.

Lake Park mayor Kendall Spence, left foreground (blue jacket) and Indian Trail mayor John Quinn, center, address the various agencies and individuals gathered to celebrate the completion of the roadwork and traffic signals at the intersection of Unionville-Indian Trail Road and Faith Church Road .

Town officials, police cheer addition of new traffic signal BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

INDIAN TRAIL One of Indian Trail’s most dangerous intersections got its traffic light, something that relieved Chris Labuda. Politicians, N.C. Department of Transportation officials, police, first responders and area residents gathered at the intersection of Unionville-Indian Trail Road and Faith Church Road, where a traffic signal and turn lanes were installed. Mayors for Indian Trail and Lake Park lauded the project and said it would make the road much safer. “It’s like a game of chicken,� Chris Labuda, an Arbor Glen resident, said about trying to drive past there at peak traffic hours. “This will make it a lot safer.� Adam Lamb also lives near the intersection and said there is an accident there at least once a week.

“The key word here is gratitude,� Indian Trail Mayor John Quinn said during a 15-minute ceremony to commemorate the new signal. He thanked especially the police and first responders who know the intersection all too well. “This is a good improvement,� said Hemby Bridge Fire Department Chief Johnny Blythe. “This is a heavy-traffic area where there have been several serious accidents.� With all the new development in the area funneling traffic to U.S. Highway 74 through Unionville-Indian Trail Road, Blythe said the road has gotten far more dangerous in the past decade. The light was still blinking red and yellow Monday afternoon; N.C. DOT district director John Underwood said it would be activated later this week or early next week, depending on weather conditions. The $600,000 project was funded with federal stimulus money.

COMING EVENTS Tuesday, Dec. 15

• MONROE INVESTORS, 8:30 a.m., Brown Derby, Skyway Drive, Monroe. Details, Elsie Smoluk, 704-363-8815. • TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 12 months to 36 months. For details, call 704-283-8184. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  BASIC SPANISH, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., must be member of Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center and age 55 or over. Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St. Details, 704-2824657. • BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS, 10 a.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-283-8184. •  STORY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-283-8184. • COUNCIL ON AGING CHRISTMAS PARTY, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 302 E. Windsor Street, Monroe. Bring a covered dish; door prizes and entertainment. The Christmas Party will take the place of the six regularly scheduled Union Seniors programs for the month of December. • MONROE GARDEN CLUB, 11 a.m., Christmas luncheon, silent auction, Monroe Library’s Griffin Room, 316 E. Windsor St. Details, Joyce Ingold, 704289-4644, ingold@carolinar.rr.com. •  MARSHVILLE ROTARY CLUB, noon, Pier Restaurant, Marshville. For details, call Johnny Pigg, 704-624-2602. •  MONROE ROTARY CLUB, noon to 1 p.m., Roll-

“Service, Staff and Prices as Comforting As Our Name� /LD-ONROE2OADs)NDIAN4RAIL .#(at Sun Valley Commons) (704)- 821-4484 sWWWGOODSHEPHERDFUNERALHOMENET

ing Hills Country Club. Details, 704-283-4645. • BOOKS FOR LUNCH, noon, Edwards Library, Marshville. Topic, “Holidays on Iceâ€? by David Sedaris. Details, 704-6242828. • HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704-283-8184, ext. 238. • UNION COUNTY HIV TASK FORCE, 5:30 p.m., Union County Health Department. Call 704-283-9188 for details. • UNION WEST BOOK CLUB, 5:30 p.m., Union West Library. Topic, “Eat, Pray, Loveâ€? by Elizabeth Gilbert. Details, 704-8217475. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. •  TOPS NO. 373 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting, 805 South Bragg Street, Monroe. For details, call 704-282-0073. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. •  UNION COUNTY WRITERS’ CLUB, 7 p.m., Union County Community Arts Council office, 120 N. Main St. For details, call Barbara Johns at 704-2917829; or visit www.unioncountywritersclub.org. • UNION COUNTY ANTIQUE TRACTOR AND POWER CLUB, 7 p.m., J.B.’s Fish Camp, N.C. 218, New Salem. For information, call 704-624-6105. •  MS SUPPORT GROUP, 7 p.m., Benton Heights Presbyterian Church, Concord Highway. Details, Carla Zottola, 704-282-0623. •  FARMERS MARKET EXTENSION CLUB, 7 p.m., Farm Bureau Directory Board Room. • OVERCOMERS OUTREACH, 7 p.m., Waxhaw Bible Church. For details, call 704-764-3960. •  BENTON HEIGHTS LIONS CLUB OF MONROE, 7 p.m.,Brown Derby Restaurant on Skyway Drive. For details, call 704283-6502 or 704-283-2400. •  PRENATAL CLASS, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., CMCUnion. Come during seventh month of pregnancy. For details, call 704-283-

3254. • PARENT MEETING, 7 p.m., Walter Bickett Elementary School, sponsored by Walter Bickett Parent-Teacher-Student Association. • BOY SCOUT TROOP 1, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian, 302 E. Windsor St. For details, call Gale Brown at 704-764-7589. • BINGO, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., American Legion Post 208, Highway 75 East, Waxhaw. Jackpot, $500. Smoke free. •  MEADOW BRANCH LODGE No. 578 A.F. and A.M. meeting, 7:30 p.m., Stewart Street, Wingate. Supper 6:30 p.m. For details, call Joe Moore, 704289-5911.

Wednesday, Dec. 16

• MONROE-UNION BREAKFAST ROTARY, 7:30 a.m., Golden Corral Restaurant. For details, call 704-507-3956. •  EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704-2824657. •  TODDLER TIME, 9:30 a.m., Marshville Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. • UNION COUNTY MOMMIES, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., meet and greet, Indian Trail Civic Building, 100 Navajo Drive. For information, call Heather Becker at 704-779-6577 or visit www.unioncountymommies.com. • STORY TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-843-3131. •  STORY TIME, 10 a.m., Marshville Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-624-2828. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • TODDLER TIME, 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m., Union West Regional Library. For ages 18 to 36 months. • BABY TIME, 11 a.m., Monroe Library. Details, 704-283-8184. • BASIC E-MAIL CLASS, 11 a.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-2838184. •  STORY TIME, 11:30 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 3 to 5.


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, December 15, 2009 / 3A

Appeals Court blocks inmate release RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The North Carolina Court of Appeals on Monday temporarily blocked the release of two convicted murderers sentenced to life in prison under a 1970s law, issuing an order an hour before they were to be set free. The court of appeals clerk gave no explanation for the decision. Earlier Monday, a Superior Court judge mandated the 5 p.m. release of Alford Jones and Faye Brown, who were sentenced when North Carolina defined life terms as only 80 years. The inmates argued they also earned a variety of sentence-reduction credits, and that their terms were now complete. Gov. Beverly Perdue was “furious” with the lower court’s ruling, and attorneys for the state scrambled to appeal. “This is not how government and courts are supposed to work for the people of North Carolina,” said Perdue, who was surrounded by Highway Patrol leaders and the head of a victims advocacy group. “I’ve been in politics a long time, and I’ve never been this disgusted with the system in my life.” There are some two dozen other inmates who are in similar situations to Jones and Brown. State lawyers had argued that the credits awarded to Jones and Brown were to be used for parole eligibility and other matters. They also said the Correction Department has never given sentence-reduction credits to inmates with life sentences. Superior Court Judge Ripley Rand disagreed. He said the inmates were allowed to and did receive credits that should be applied to the 80-year terms. “The Department of Correction could have put into effect rules awarding sentence reduction credits only for the purposes of parole eligibility, custody determinations, and sentence commutation calculations and not for the calculation of an unconditional release date,” Rand wrote. “It did not.” Jones was convicted of killing William B. Turner Sr., who was shot in the chest during an attempted robbery in January 1975. Brown was sentenced for her role in the 1975 shooting death of a state trooper during a bank robbery. Highway Patrol Col. Randy Glover said Brown’s involvement showed a lack of respect. “We are not expendable,” Glover said.

Firm to move 430 jobs to state

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

The production crew constructed a set to portray a sauna room for the commercial. Actor David Hensley, left, of Charlotte, interacts with NASCAR drivers, Denny Hamlin, center and Kasey Kahne in the steamy enclosure as part of the filming for the Gillette razor commercial .

On location with Gillette BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

INDIAN TRAIL If you think you recognize the setting for a Gillette commercial during the 2010 Daytona 500, you might be right. Four NASCAR drivers took a pit stop in Union County Monday afternoon to shoot a few commercial spots for the grooming-product maker.

“We needed an ice rink,” commercial producer Roger Jones said at Indian Trail’s Extreme Ice Center. “And the drivers are based out of Charlotte. This was the right size and just a good fit.” Four of the Gillette Young Guns, Joey Logano, Kasey Kahne, Kyle Busch and Denny Hamlin, did shoots at six locations in the area, including the ice center and Restaurant 74 in Indian Trail.

Logano’s parents own part of Extreme Ice, another reason it was a good fit for the commercial. In one of the spots, the drivers are riding Zambonis and in another they are decked out in their race suits in a sauna. The drivers were not available for comment. The commercials will first air during the Daytona 500 and run throughout the 2010 NASCAR season.

Confederate soldiler being identified RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Confederate private’s grave lay in the old cemetery at Dorothea Dix Hospital, anonymous and forgotten for more than a century. But in a queer twist of history, Aristarchus Lee Jenkins’ service to the Southern cause is now honored with a brilliant white marble headstone bought by his former enemy, the U.S. government. A foot soldier in the North Carolina Infantry, Jenkins survived some of the most horrific battles of the Civil War. He was twice wounded by Yankee lead and was likely present for the death of his older brother, a soldier in the same unit. Not long after the guns fell silent, Jenkins was admitted to the state asylum suffering from “mania.” He lived there until his death in 1891, according to the few hospital records still available. Like hundreds of other patients shunned by their families even in death, the Granville County native was buried in a plot in the Dix

cemetery marked with only his hospital case number, 821. “Aristarchus laid his life on the line to defend his homeland,” said Gracie Jenkins, a greatgreat-niece and amateur genealogist who uncovered the soldier’s story. “I didn’t think he should be forgotten about. His life, what he went through, was so hard.” The first body was buried in the asylum cemetery in 1859, about three years after the hospital opened. It is perhaps representative of society’s view of the value of those buried there that by the time the last grave was dug in 1970, the cemetery was abutted on two sides by a City of Raleigh landfill. “Those were times people just went to Dix and a lot of them were never heard from again,” said Burley Mitchell, a former chief justice of the N.C. Supreme Court who has worked to honor those buried on the hospital grounds. “They lived and died there, and were buried as paupers.” There are thought to be

more than 1,000 graves at Dix, some lost under the tall, dirt-covered mounds of rotting refuse in the now-closed landfill. A modest restoration effort began about 20 years ago after hospital workers noticed that garbage trucks had repeatedly run over a corner of the graveyard, exposing shards of decaying wood from some of the simple pine caskets crafted in a hospital workshop. Volunteers used dinner forks to probe the red clay for graves, and the hospital’s maintenance department erected a modest chain fence to delineate what were thought to be the cemetery’s boundaries. In the 1990s, hospital employees dug through decades-old records in an attempt to identify who was where. About 700 graves are now topped with brick-sized stones cut by a local headstone company from bits and pieces of leftover granite. There is only room on the small stones for a name and a date of death. Most are covered by a layer of grass, only visible if someone goes

rooting around for them. A handful of patients did have larger markers paid for by loved ones, but many had been broken or scattered over the years. With donations, the hospital erected a “Wall of Remembrance,” where some of the broken stones are mounted. Aristarchus Jenkins, long forgotten by even his own kin, was laid to rest with no such distinctive marker. Gracie Jenkins, a graphic artist from Raleigh, set out eight years ago to learn more about her ancestors. In researching her family tree, she learned her great-great-grandfather was one of 14 brothers raised on a family farm in Granville County.

RALEIGH (AP) — A Louisiana-based disaster management consultant said Monday it’s moving its headquarters to North Carolina in a move expected to bring 430 jobs to the state in the next six years. Innovative Emergency Management Inc. will move its headquarters from Baton Rouge, La., to Research Triangle Park. In return, the company was promised state tax breaks of up to $9 million if it meets job and investment targets. Local governments are also expected to sweeten the deal for IEM. The company will establish 430 jobs in North Carolina paying an average wage of nearly $63,000 a year, Gov. Beverly Perdue’s office said. It wasn’t clear how many of those jobs would be filled by current employees who transfer from other offices, IEM founder and chief executive officer Madhu Beriwal said. The company has 350 employees, with about 150 at its Baton Rouge headquarters, she said. “We have sent a message companywide today and we are offering a relocation package to any of the employees who choose to move to RTP,” Beriwal said in an interview. Once the number of workers willing to move becomes clear, IEM will hire locally to fill its remaining needs, she said. The new headquarters site will be fully operational by September, Beriwal said. A reduced Louisiana office will remain after the headquarters move, but staffing there will depend on needs and how many workers are willing to relocate, she said. The 24-year-old private company specializes in measuring and managing threats to people, infrastructure and information. Its clients include local, federal and foreign government agencies. The chairman of the U.S. House Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, U.S. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., attended the event announcing the move on Monday. “We do a lot of government work, but we also do a lot of work for private industry,” Beriwal said.

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Weekly Health Tips

By John Sink

Breastfeeding Benefits

Women with a family history of breast cancer may lower their risk if they breastfeed their babies. A study followed over 60,000 women for eight years. Overall, there was a 25% reduced risk of breast cancer for those who breastfed their children compared to those who never breastfed. However, those women with a family history of the disease who breastfed their babies had a 60% lower risk. The protective effect was seen with as little as three months of breastfeeding, and even when some formula was introduced.

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4A Tuesday, December 15, 2009

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A CAROLINA VIEW

New state laws take effect The N.C. General Assembly’s latest slate of new laws hit the books this week. State lawmakers made their mark on issues from probation to lizards. The new law that is getting the most attention is a ban on texting while driving. Texting involves typing a message on a cell phone keypad that will be sent from that phone to another electronic device. Attempting this feat while driving is, for most of us, in the realm of “Do we really have to make laws about this?” Apparently, we do. The new rules threaten drivers reading or writing a text message or e-mail while their car is moving with a $100 fine. Critics of the new law are concerned it is vague and does not go far enough in limiting cell phone distractions. “They need to definitely bring some clarity to this down the road, if we’re going to be able to enforce it,” Highway Patrol Capt. Everett Clendenin said. Last year’s murder of University of North Carolina student President Eve Carson at the hands of two men on probation led to some reforms to the probation system. Probation officers will now be given access to an offender’s juvenile records without a court order. And in a move that sends a tough message to repeat offenders, police will now be able to conduct a search on a probationer without a search warrant. In an effort to reduce the need for 2,100 prison beds by 2020, new laws will change the guidelines state judges have used since 1995 to determine the length of sentences offenders must serve. Some sentences will be less severe — up to 28 months lighter in some cases — and some slightly longer for other low-grade felonies. Second-time offenders guilty of less serious felony crimes will be more likely to receive probation. Also, offenders on probation and parole will have to appear before a District Court judge in order to be bonded out of jail if charged with a new felony. Previously, they only had to appear before a magistrate to arrange bond. Reptiles — snakes, lizards, turtles, alligators, etc. — get offered a bit of protection as it is now a misdemeanor to handle them in an unsafe manner. People keeping reptiles as pets could face up to 150 days in jail if someone other than a family member or employee suffers a life-threatening injury or dies as a result of reptile bite or interaction. Similar punishments await those who release nonnative reptiles into the wild, like the alligator found in the French Broad River in 2006. Other new laws on the books now will ban the sale, possession and manufacture of Salvia divinorum, a hallucinogenic herb popular among young people. Laws governing the solicitation of children via computer have been expanded to include cell phones. Owners of vehicles with a frame around the license plate will want to ensure the state’s name and the registration stickers are visible. After Nov. 30, 2010, a fine of up to $100 may be charged if officers determine they can’t easily read the plate because of a frame. All in all, these new laws make sense. We particularly applaud the new moves on checking in on probationers and parolees. There are a total of about 50 new laws, and we recommend North Carolinians familiarize themselves with all of them by paying a visit to the General Assembly Web site at www. ncga.state.nc.us The Citizen Times of Asheville

YOUR VIEW County should do what is right for residents After reading the paper this past week, I’m very concerned about some of the moves our commissioners are making with our healthcare system here in Union County. My family and I reside in Waxhaw and to be honest, we’re very proud of our community and our county. For many months, I often ride by the land designated to be the new ER by CMC-Union in Waxhaw. As a former EMT I simply do not understand the delay in approving this life-saving medical facility. I can tell you from experience that it used to take us 20- 25 minutes to take a patient to the nearest emergency room. With this new facility a patient can receive emergency medical care within 10 minutes. A difference of 15 minutes can literally mean the difference between life and death. Commissioner Kuehler has written and stated that her delay in approving this facility is based on a concern of $5 million dollars and how that equates to a 2 cent tax increase on every citizen of Union County. How is this possible Ms. Kuehler when the money ($5 million) does not come from the general fund of the county but rather from the designated hospital fund which, according to the paper from Dennis Phillips, can only be spent on hospital capital expenditures. Why are the commissioners delaying this? Is it because they want to sell the hospital to the highest bidder? And if you sell the hospital will the money

go 100% to paying off our debt? What’s the cost of this? Can the money go toward paying off debt? From this resident’s point of view, a life-saving emergency facility is needed and it’s the citizens that lose if this project doesn’t go forward. And unfortunately it could well be the matter of life and death for some. I would encourage our County Commissioners to do what is right for the citizens of Union County and appropriate the funds needed. James H. Howie Waxhaw

Remember police officers this holiday The Christmas season is one which focuses on family. But there are persons whose jobs keep them away from family during the holidays. Police Officers are in that category, spending much of their time away from their families, not only Christmas for many holidays. Elizabeth Cooke Coordinator of Union County Project Blue Light thinks these officers should be recognized for their work. I think we need to remember the police officers at this time of year, more often than not they are not remembered They give up time with their families to protect us. As a way to recognize these officers I am asking citizens to put a single blue light in the window and/or blue in your Christmas Decorations during the Christmas season to show support for officers. I keep a

blue light in my window not only at Christmas but 365 days a year. This is a simple way the public has to let the police officers know that we appreciate them, especially during the holiday season. A single light in your window, sting of blue lights on your tree or a blue ribbon on your car antenna shows the officers that you support them and realize that their personal sacrifice make its possible for your family to have a safe Christmas season. In 1986 Danny Gleason a Police Officer in Philadelphia, PA was killed in the line of duty, his mother-in law Dolly Craig (now deceased) placed a single candle with a blue light in her window in memory of her son-in law. In 1988 Mrs. Craig notified the group Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS) to let them know what she had done. (COPS) adopted the idea and Project Blue Light began nationally. We need to show our support to all local Law Enforcement Officers who put their lives on the line 24-7-365 The color blue is symbolic of peace. By displaying your blue light your will be sending out a dual message that you support Americas peace keeps and that you hope the coming year will be a year of peace. Let’s Keep The Blue Lights Shinning in Union County If you would like more information on Union County Project Blue Light please contact me. Elizabeth Cooke Coordinator Union County Project Blue Light

My late Mom and the secretary of commerce Last year, when Governor Perdue selected Keith Crisco from Asheboro to serve as Secretary of Commerce in her cabinet, we had to admit that he was not exactly a household name in most of North Carolina. But his name has held an honored place in my household since….well, that is the story I want to tell you again. About 12 years ago, just a couple of years after my mother died, I visited Asheboro to give a talk to a civic club. Later, my host, Alan Pugh, took me to see Keith Crisco at Asheboro Elastics Corp. “He has a great business, and you all have some things in common politically,” he said. As I walked into the lobby of the mill, I saw a giant framed color picture hanging on the wall. It was a blowup of an advertisement for Asheboro Elastics. In the middle of the ad was an older, gray-headed woman seated in a rocking chair, surrounded by a shawl, smiling down towards her hands which were busy crocheting a long strip of elastic.

D.G. Martin Columnist

The woman in the picture was my mom. First I was shocked to see her, almost as big as life, and looking really alive, active and happy. What a coincidence, I thought. Just then, Keith Crisco appeared to explain that he brought out the poster just for me to see. He then explained the history of the ad. Asheboro Elastics wanted to find a way to tell its potential customers that its ultra modern equipment gave it an edge in responding to orders quickly and reliably. So they designed an ad with a “grandmother-type” woman

slowly crocheting elastic webbing side-by-side a photo of their modern machinery that could do the job thousands and thousands of times faster. My mom had just happened to be the model selected for the job. Seeing the ad brought back all the memories of my mom’s professional life as a model and actress--as it developed for her at an age long after most folks have retired. First, she broke into television ads, making a little bit of money and having a lot of fun with the production crews--and then watching for the ads as they appeared on TV. Then, when she was about 75, she was cast in a professional stage production of “Steel Magnolias”--so successfully that when the production was revived several months later, she was called back to play her role again. She didn’t let a little surgery for breast cancer get in the way. The play had to go on, so she recovered very quickly. Soon after the revival of “Steel Magnolias” came a stroke that took away my mom’s right

“As I walked into the lobby of the mill, I saw a giant framed color picture hanging on the wall. It was a blowup of an advertisement for Asheboro Elastics.”

side mobility and made it very difficult to speak. It meant the end of many things--including, of course, her acting career. But after a long hard rehabilitation, she figured out a way to get back into modeling, and she landed the job for Asheboro Elastics’ ad. I remember how proud she was of the photo in the rocking chair. She had lots of copies

made for family members and friends. “I could hardly hold the needles, and I surely couldn’t crochet in my condition--but it looks pretty good, doesn’t it?” It did. It does. Keith Crisco gave me a copy of the ad, which I treasure. So, after all this time, she is still there, looking “pretty good,” and saying to me strongly, “Don’t ever stop trying. We can all do more than we might think. And you can never know when something good we do might help someone else now. . . .or years later.” As it did me, seeing her there in the lobby of the Asheboro Elastics mill.

D.G. Martin is hosting his final season of UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch, which airs Sundays at 5 p.m. For more information or to view prior programs visit the webpage at www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch/


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, December 15, 2009 / 5A

Chemicals seized, two arrested BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE Hazardous chemicals were seized and two people arrested on drug charges Monday afternoon. The liquid chemicals were determined to be potentially dangerous, but not in enough quantity to pose a threat. Police believe the chemicals could be components of a methamphetamine lab. Mrunmay Vijay Mastakar, 19, of 5400 Ramsey St. in Fayetteville and Mistey Jean Norris, 19, of 1289 Chicora Road in Dunn were stopped on U.S. Highway 74 near the Tyson Foods plant after they were estimated to be driving a 2005 Volkswagon Passat 90 mph through a 35 mph zone in Wingate. After the stop, marijuana was found in the car, which led to a search of the trunk

where Sheriff ’s deputy Billy Osteen found liquid and powder chemicals and goggles. Monroe and Charlotte hazardous materials units investigated the chemicals and Sheriff ’s Chief Deputy Ben Bailey said they found only small quantities of potentially dangerous chemicals. Out of caution, however, three hazardous materials officers dressed in yellow, full-body suits equipped with gas masks sampled the chemicals for more than 30 minutes. Two hazardous materials trucks were also at the scene to help determine what the chemicals were. Norris was charged with possession with intent to sell and deliver marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, carrying a concealed weapon (stungun), speeding

in excess of 15 mph over the posted limit, following too closely, and a window tint violation. Norris was in the Union County Jail under a $2,000 secured bond, and given a Jan. 6 court date. Mastakar was charged with possession with intent to sell and deliver marijuana, simple possession of a Schedule II controlled substance (cocaine,) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mastakar was in the Union County Jail under a $2,000 Secured Bond, and given a Jan. 6 court date. “Deputy Osteen had every right to be concerned,” said Sheriff Eddie Cathey in a news release. “These were highly unconventional chemicals, not utilized in daily household applications. You absolutely cannot take chances with these substances.”

Bill of Rights anniversary is observed The League of Women Voters of Union County marked the 218th anniversary of the adoption of the Bill of Rights with a call for civic vigilance and participation in Union County. For almost 90 years, the League of Women Voters has defended civil liberties and promoted citizen engagement in democracy, and we continue this work today,” President Virginia Bjorlin said. “ It is particulary important for Americans, even between ‘big’ elections, to recognize the critical importance of perfecting and honoring our most cherished constitutional rights.” “Throughout the year, League members work in our community to protect our liberties and make the most of them by encouraging voting, discussing important is-

sues, and holding elected officials accountable for their actions.,” said, Bjorlin. The protection of the individual liberties laid out in the Bill of Rights has been important to the League’s work throughout its history. During World War II, the League worked to balance the preservation of civil liberties with the importance of national security. During the Communist “witch hunt” period of the early 1950s, the League conducted a community education program known as the Freedom Agenda, providing Americans with the opportunity to discuss and learn about the Bill of Rights. More recently the League has promoted a diverse and independent judiciary, advocated against warrantless domestic surveillance and other harmful elements of the Pa-

triot Act, and sponsored numerous education projects aimed at informing citizens of their rights. “The Bill of Rights is not only an important part of our nation’s history; it is a living document that will guide us into the future.” Bjorlin concluded. The League of Women Voters , a nonpartisan political oerganization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Membership in the League is open to men and women of all ages. With more than 89 yeatrs of experience and 850 local and state affiliates, the League is one of America’s most trusted grassroots organizations.

Decline in teen drug use tapering off DETROIT (AP) — A decade-long decline in teens’ use of pot has stalled and some teen attitudes on how harmful marijuana can be may be softening, according to a survey on teen drug use released Monday. The findings were based on a survey of roughly 47,000 eighth, 10th and 12th-graders conducted by the University of Michigan for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The national debate over medical use of marijuana could be making the drugs seem safer to teenagers, researchers said. In addition to marijuana, fewer teens also view prescription drugs and Ecstasy as dangerous, which often means more could use them in the future, said White House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske. “These latest data confirm that we

County Continued from Page 1A ture of more than $500,000 out of the excess fund. County commissioners put the hospital building up for sale, something Kuehler said could jeopardize the lease. If the lease were broken, she said the money from the fund would revert back to the county. Phillips said the lease is rock solid so the money would stay with CMC-Union until the end of the lease, which expires August of 2020. The biggest sticking point in this issue has been the dispute over who controls the pot of money. Phillips contends it belongs to CMC-Union while Kuehler says it is controlled by the county. The money must be spent for better health care in Union as long as the lease is in tact, but county commissioners must approve a large expenditure. Showing the support

must redouble our efforts to implement a comprehensive, evidencebased approach to preventing and treating drug use,” Kerlikowske, the director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, said in remarks prepared for his Monday speech at the National Press Club. Marijuana use across the three grades showed a consistent downward trend starting in the late 1990s. But the decline has since stopped, and use rates for the three grades showed a slight uptick between 2007 and 2009, from about 12.9 percent to about 14.3 percent, lead researcher Lloyd Johnston said Monday night. In the 2009 survey, reported pastyear marijuana use was 32.8 percent of 12th graders, 26.7 percent of 10th graders and 11.8 percent of eighth

they have during a presentation in front of the board of commissioners, Lutz and Phillips held up a binder with 1,200 pieces of paper in it. Each piece represented a support letter from an area resident. The binder was about five inches thick. The Waxhaw Board of Commissioners supports building an emergency department, but did not get in to funding recommendations In his presentation to the commissioners, Lutz pointed out that the nearest emergency department from Waxhaw is CMC-Union, 13.8 miles away. He said the Waxhaw facility would break even by the second year and would turn an annual profit of $900,000 by year 10; it would add 71 jobs with an average annual salary of $53,000 by the third year, he added. Kuehler had no qualms with the presentation or the request, she merely wanted to give staff more

graders, generally not much changed from 2008. Marijuana was at its recent peak in 1997, when 17.7 percent of eighthgrade students, 34.8 percent of 10thgrade students and 38.5 percent of 12th-grade reported using the drug at least once within a year of being interviewed. Students were asked how much people risk harming themselves if they smoke marijuana occasionally or smoke marijuana regularly. Fewer eighth-grade students said that people who smoked pot put themselves at great risk than a year ago. “When the perception of the danger goes down, in the following years you see an increase in use,” said National Institute on Drug Abuse Director Nora Volkow.

time to work out details and bring commissioners more fiscal information. This was the first time the emergency department has been brought to the board, she argued, so there should be no rush. Phillips said it was supposed to be on a November agenda, but was pushed because that meeting was only a work session. The commissioners consolidated their December meetings to have only one meeting. Phillips added that the Waxhaw facility had already been blocked at the state level for about

a year by its competitor Presbyterian Healthcare, Furthermore, the information was submitted “weeks ago,” he contended. The project was scheduled to begin Jan. 4. Commissioner Kim Rogers sympathized with the supporters. She said that as a parent she would be “foolish” to not support the emergency department, but that as a commissioner, she had to consider the financial implications. Discussion was deferred to the January work session.

Senate Continued from Page 1A term as a state senator. He is also a captain in the U.S. Army Reserves and served in the Iraq war. Marshall, 64, is in her fourth term as secretary of state. She was the first woman in North Carolina to win a statewide election to an executivebranch office. In 2002, she ran for U.S. Senate and finished third in the primary. Lewis, 48, is a lawyer and Democratic fundraiser who has never held elective office. Even though the primary is not until May and the race has hardly begun, some Democrats are already describing Cunningham as the front-runner. They see him as an eloquent newcomer whose military service will be a big asset in the general election. That characterization clearly bothers the Marshall campaign. Her supporters believe that her political resume is far superior to Cunningham’s, and that she should be the natural favorite to run against Burr. In the 2008 election, she received the second-most votes of any Democrat on the ballot, trailing only Cooper, but ahead of Barack Obama, Bev Perdue and Hagan. Cunningham has won just one election, and that was for a state legislative seat in a district covering parts of Davidson, Rowan and Iredell counties. Marshall’s supporters feel that some party leaders are quietly overlooking Marshall’s experience because they want a younger, flashier candidate. Several observers have already compared Cunningham to John Edwards - and it’s hard not to notice that the two men look alike. Marshall said she believes the DSCC had a pre-set profile in mind for the candidate that it wanted to run against Burr. Asked what profile that was, she answered with two words: “A man.” Asked why she thought the DSCC might prefer a male candidate, Marshall said, “I can’t say. They did not disclose that to me. The women’s groups are very angry.” Eric Shultze, a spokesman for the DSCC, said that right now, the group’s focus is on defeating Burr, who some Democrats see as vulnerable in 2010. In 2008, Hagan was backed by the DSCC, which was widely credited when she defeated the Republican incumbent, Sen. Elizabeth Dole. Hagan could not be reached last week and her spokesman did not respond to requests for comment. Hagan has not taken a public position

in the race between Marshall, Cunningham and Lewis. Hagan is just one example of the rise of female politicians in North Carolina lately. Seven women were elected to statewide offices in North Carolina last year, including Perdue, who became the state’s first female governor. Most political analysts believe that female candidates tend to have a slight advantage in elections, because women vote in greater numbers than men. “I think it’s hard to argue that they don’t want a woman,” said Gary Pearce, a veteran Democratic strategist in Raleigh. “I think the honest truth is that the DSCC doesn’t really care - they just want somebody who looks like a winner.” In the eyes of party officials in Washington, looking like a winner entails showing an ability to raise money to compete with Burr. Marshall is not known for being a big fundraiser. Unlike other North Carolina politicians - such as Perdue - she has never run large, continuous fundraising operations or built up large campaign war chests. Of course, neither has Cunningham. But party officials will be watching the candidates’ ability to raise money on their own, early on in the race. “The financial piece, at this point in the race, is really about showing viability,” said Morgan Jackson, Cunningham’s chief political consultant. “Democrats need to elect the person who’s going to be the strongest in the fall. And that’s what our message is.” Jackson declined to comment on Marshall’s charge that Cunningham is being favored because he is a man. Lewis, who was the first candidate to announce he is running, has not been helped by all the recent attention on Marshall and Cunningham. “I don’t know what the DSCC’s or any voter’s process is for deciding who to support,” Lewis said. Marshall has been endorsed by several women’s groups, including the National Organization for Women. But Emily’s List, the politically influential group that supports pro-choice female Democrats, said it is still examining the North Carolina race. A spokesman for the group declined to comment on whether gender might be playing a role in the race. “We’re keeping an eye on the race, but no endorsement has been made,” said the spokesman, Matt Burgess. “Like any candidate, we need to see a path to victory before we would get involved in a race.” jromoser@wsjournal. com.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, December 15, 2009 / 7A

Dems battle against Dems in health care vote struggle By DAVID ESPO

AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — The end game in sight, Senate Democrats coped with stubborn internal differences as well as implacable Republican opposition on Monday in a struggle to pass health care legislation by Christmas. A liberal-backed call to expand Medicare as part of the legislation drew strong opposition from Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn. and quieter concerns from a dozen Democrats, raising significant doubts about its ability to survive. Congressional officials said the administration was recommending the provision be jettisoned to clear the way for the most sweeping health care legislation in a half-century. In response, a top presidential aide, Dan Pfeiffer, said, “The White

House is not pushing (Senate Majority Leader Harry) Reid in any direction, we are working hand in hand with the Senate leadership to work through the various issues and pass health reform as soon as possible.� Disputes over abortion and the importation of prescription drugs from Canada and other countries also flared. In an attempt to generate support for the bill, Reid promised late in the day that any final compromise with the House would completely close a gap in Medicare prescription drug coverage generally known as a “doughnut hole.� The Senate bill goes only part way toward that goal. Democrats are “looking for 60 votes,� said Dick Durbin of Illinois, the party’s second-ranking Senate leader — a statement that has characterized their effort to overcome Republican op-

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cal conditions. Obama has also urged Congress to slow the rate of growth in health care spending nationally, and several days after Reid submitted a package of revisions, lawmakers awaited final word from the Congressional Budget Office on that point. Additionally, a top administration economic adviser acknowledged Monday that the Democratic-backed health care measure would raise spending in the short run, but she said it would eventually generate more than enough savings to offset the expense of expanded coverage. “Our bottom line is that the bills as they are coming through will genuinely slow the growth of health care spending, both public and private, by about 1 percentage point a year for an extended period,� said Christina Romer, chair of the Council of Economic Advisers. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D.,

led the effort to lift a long-standing ban on the importation of prescription drugs from Canada and elsewhere. Obama favored the plan as a senator, but the pharmaceutical industry is opposed, and the White House appeared anxious not to jeopardize a months-long alliance with drug makers who have been helpful in trying to pass the overhaul. But the obstacle that loomed largest was a proposal to permit uninsured men and women to purchase Medicare coverage as early as age 55. It emerged last week as part of a framework agreement between moderates and liberals struggling to define the role of government in the newly revised health care system. Additionally, the proposal calls for creation of nationwide plans run by private insurance companies.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Variety is spice of life, and of gardens

W

ould it not be a dull and boring world if everyone looked pretty much the same? Imagine if everyone were the same height and weight. Then imagine if everyone had the same hair and eye color. The only way you could be somewhat different is with your clothes and hairstyle. Of course, it would sure shorten the descriptions from the FBI concerning the Top Ten Most Wanted list. In addition, APBs (All Points Bulletins) would be shortened. Since everyone would be the same, they would just say, “Suspect has a mullet cut or buzz cut hairdo”. You can easily see that our world would be rather boring. (Ignore everything I said earlier if we are talking about Catherine Zeta Jones!) Sometimes, you can create a rather boring garden or yard even though that is not your intention. That can especially be true if you have many perennials, not so much, if annuals are your thing. Why? It’s because annuals bloom, bloom, bloom until frost. There are usually flowers. Where there are flowers, there are colors that are different. In the shrub or perennial department though, after their bloom cycle, you have just foliage. That is

Tom Walden Garden Columnist

where the dull, drab, or just the same comes in. The point I am trying to make is, since the foliage will be seen a lot longer on perennials or shrubs, you will have a more interesting garden or landscape if you will select some plants with various colors. In other words, do not plant all the same. I like plants with purple leaves because they are different, unique and such a contrast to green plants. However, a large area of nothing but purple foliage creates a dark hole in a garden where individual plants cannot be seen. In years past, there was not much

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if the planting will be close to your home (foundation planting). Several years ago, I planted ‘Golden Euonymus’ beside our Rotty’s pen to shield her from the north wind. Two small 1-gallon containers are now 6 feet high and 10-12 feet wide. New growth has bright colors on this cultivar, which makes it especially attractive. ‘Silver King’ reaches 6 feet with green and silver/white leaves. ‘Emerald Gaiety’ is easily kept less than 3 feet with an equal spread. I think this is another great-variegated plant. In the past, euonymus shrubs have been known to attract scale (an insect that attaches to a leaf or stem and resembles a bump). Proper planting, regular inspection and keeping them healthy can help short circuit this. We have three different euonymus shrubs and have had neither pests nor disease with them. You cannot mention showy, standout shrubs without including barberry. Most have small, fine leaves. In addition, the ones I consider to be the best, are dwarf shrubs. You do not even have to stick with purple foliage on some varieties. ‘Rose Glow’ and some of the other barberries are outstanding in the warm months. The only negative I see is that this great shrub loses its leaves in the fall. For that reason, do not plant them up against the house. Otherwise, you will be looking at sticks for months. Like most plantings, purchase an odd number and group them together. They will look much better planted in this way. If you have sufficient moisture, there are some outstanding Pieris shrubs. ‘Variegata’ does not have the standard green leaves. Even some of the regular Pieris have leaves that emerge red, before changing to green. Remember, this is a shade plant. If you want winter interest, Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick will make your visitors stop and stare. This small tree is dull as dishwater when leaves appear. That is, unless they are the new hybrid I spotted in the spring. It had the demented shape and purple leaves. At 50 dollars, it was a steal. There are also acubas with colored foliage. In addition, do not forget several of the variegated liriopes (monkey grass). Skip the solid green as well as the spreading type. The clumping cultivars stay neater looking. If you have a bare bank or slope, the spreading liriopes are fine. During cooler months as you plan for the future, jump into buying, or planting, choose your varieties or cultivars carefully. It can mean the difference between plain and WOW!

variety in the leaf color of trees. With a couple of exceptions, green was it. Up north, and in the mountains, and to a lesser degree here, there are different colors in the fall. There are trees, though, that can give you different foliage without waiting for autumn colors. Obviously, Japanese maples are the first that come to mind. Most are dwarfs less than 8 feet tall. These beauties are easy to spot with their deep burgundy or other colored leaves. You do not even have to settle for burgundy as many people think. Now, there’s ‘Autumn Moon’ with red coloring in the spring that matures to chartreuse. Other cultivars are pink or red in the spring. ‘Oridono nishiki’ can reach 18 feet tall. Its other unusual feature is tri-colored foliage of pink, white and green. In the fall, these colors change to yellow and red. There are a number of other cultivars with multi-colored leaves. There are even a couple of flowering crabapple trees without the usual green leaves. ‘Candymint’ has leaves that start out a dark carmine. Although they slowly change to green, its veins and stems remain red. ‘Red Barron’ has purple and red-toned leaves in spring and fall, as well as pinkish-red blooms. Going beyond the usual is easier when you are talking about shrubs. You can more easily replace a shrub than a tree. On a personal note, our home is surrounded by many large oaks, a couple of black tupelos and some maples. These trees, especially the white oaks should be here long after I am gone. Knowing what I do now, however, if I had an empty landscape, it would not be mostly oaks. There is too much beauty and diversity available now. Eventually, I learned shrubs do not have to be green and all the same. I have talked before about how removing our old Japanese hollies was one of the best things we ever did in our landscape. To put color and diversity into shrubs around your home, two plants to consider are lorapetalum and euonymus. Since there are numerous cultivars for both, you should carefully consider which one is best for you. For instance, ‘Pixie’ lorapetalum is not much over 1 foot tall, but really spreads out. The regular form grows over 6 feet in 3 years and has green leaves. ‘Pixie’ and several others have purple leaves and pink to fuchsia flowers. If winter is not unusually cold, it will bloom three different times. Euonymus does not have significant blooms like lorapetalum, but it has cultivars with splashes of color as well as different sizes. Make sure you choose one that is evergreen,

The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Wednesday

Few Showers

Mostly Cloudy

Sunny

63º

38º

52º 28º

Today we will see cloudy skies with a 50% chance of showers, high temperature of 63º. The record high temperature for today is 78º set in 1971. Skies will be mostly cloudy tonight with an overnight low of 38º. The record low is 12º set in 1962.

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00"

Saturday

Sunny

Sunny

Mostly Sunny

52º 26º

55º 31º

52º 34º

Winston-Salem 61/33

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:23 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:12 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .6:44 a.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:28 p.m.

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

Moon Phases

Last 1/7

Full 12/31

Local UV Index

H

H

This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+ Cold Front

UV Index

Around Our State

Albemarle . . . . . .63/36 Brevard . . . . . . . .60/32 Burlington . . . . . .61/34 Cape Fear . . . . . .63/38 Emerald Isle . . . .65/46 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .63/39 Gastonia . . . . . . .63/37 Grandfather Mtn. .51/27 Greenville . . . . . .63/41 Hendersonville . .58/32 Hickory . . . . . . . .62/34 Jacksonville . . . .66/43 Kinston . . . . . . . .64/42 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .62/44 Mount Mitchell . .63/37 Roanoke Rapids .62/37 Southern Pines . .63/38 Swanquarter . . . .64/43 Wilkesboro . . . . .62/32 Williamston . . . . .63/40 Yanceyville . . . . .63/34 Zebulon . . . . . . . .62/37

sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh sh

.48/26 s .49/24 s .46/26 s .48/27 s .51/34 s .63/39 sh .52/27 s .39/20 s .49/29 s .48/24 s .50/26 s .50/31 s .49/30 s .47/38 s .51/26 s .45/26 s .48/27 s .47/32 s .47/23 s .49/29 s .47/26 s .47/27 s

Warm Front

L

H

Low Pressure High Pressure

High: 87° in Fort Pierce, Fla. Low: -21° in Westby, Mont.

Across The Nation

Around The World

Today Wednesday

Today Wednesday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Stationary Front

L

National Extremes

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

City

Durham 62/36

Tarboro 62/39 Washington Asheville 64/41 Greensboro Raleigh 56/30 62/34 62/37 Charlotte Cape 63/37 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 65/43 64/48 Shown is today’s weather. 63/38 64/40 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 66/44 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

First 12/24

Friday

North Carolina State Forecast

In-Depth Forecast

New 12/16

Thursday

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . .59/36 Baltimore . . . . . . .55/34 Chicago . . . . . . . .21/11 Denver . . . . . . . . .49/24 Detroit . . . . . . . . .35/20 Houston . . . . . . . . . .56/44 Indianapolis . . . .35/17 Los Angeles . . . .67/48 Miami . . . . . . . . . .83/73 Minneapolis . . . . . .7/-9 New York . . . . . . .51/32 Orlando . . . . . . . .84/64 Philadelphia . . . .55/32 Reno . . . . . . . . . .42/34 Sacramento . . . . .52/45 Salem, OR . . . . . .53/47 Salt Lake City . . .42/31 San Francisco . . .59/53 Seattle . . . . . . . . .47/44 Syracuse . . . . . . .39/24 Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/64 Washington, DC .56/33

t . .56/29 s mc .41/26 s pc .27/22 s pc .55/26 s sn .28/18 pc ra .57/41 pc s . .34/21 s s . .70/48 s pc .81/70 pc s . . .14/8 s s . .40/26 s mc .75/57 sh mc .40/26 s cl . .43/28 ra ra .53/42 ra ra .54/43 ra mc .41/26 mc ra .59/48 ra ra .50/42 ra rs .26/18 sn s . .76/55 sh mc .41/26 s

Today Wednesday

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .88/75 Athens . . . . . . . . .63/49 Baghdad . . . . . . .67/50 Beijing . . . . . . . . .33/13 Berlin . . . . . . . . . .35/27 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .74/58 Hong Kong . . . . .71/59 London . . . . . . . .40/36 Madrid . . . . . . . . .42/24 Mexico City . . . . .73/52 Moscow . . . . . . . . .0/-3 Nassau . . . . . . . .84/73 Paris . . . . . . . . . .35/24 Rio de Janeiro . . .79/73 Rome . . . . . . . . . .50/39 San Juan . . . . . . .85/76 Stockholm . . . . . .29/26 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .49/42 Toronto . . . . . . . .33/22

pc .89/73 pc ra .59/46 ra pc .68/50 pc s . .33/12 pc mc .31/24 mc s . .76/56 s sh .60/45 sh ra .41/35 ra s . .40/26 rs pc .65/49 pc s . . .2/-4 pc pc .84/71 pc s . .36/25 pc t . .85/72 t ra .51/40 pc sh .85/75 sh sn .27/21 sn mc .50/41 mc sn .26/18 sn

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy


S ports

Editor: Jerry Snow (261-2225) jsnow@theej.com

Struggling Panthers not effective in passing game 3B Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Rebels rally in 2nd half

WORTH A LOOK Pro basketball N.Y. Knicks at Charlotte 7 p.m., FOX Sports Carolinas

WHO’S NEWS

Parkwood boys overcome doubledigit deficit to beat Piedmont

Penn fires coach after 0-7 start

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Glen Miller did more than lose games at Penn. He struck the wrong chord with fans and alumni from the day he was hired because he had no previous connections to the Ivy League school. When losses piled up and attendance dipped at the famed PalMILLER estra, Miller was on his way out. Pennsylvania fired Miller on Monday after the Quakers dropped their first seven games, a rare midseason college basketball coaching change for a program that not long ago was a regular in the NCAA tournament. “This is not simply about the performance of the team this year,” athletic director Steve Bilsky said. “This really is about a sense of direction and leadership. Where we were at this point indicated it was time to make a change and this was the time to do it.” The Quakers replaced Miller on an interim basis with former school great Jerome Allen, who served under Miller as an assistant coach. Miller was 45-52 overall since being hired in 2006 to replace the departed Fran Dunphy. In his first season, Miller led the Quakers to a 22-9 record and an NCAA tournament appearance, but Penn has declined steadily since.

Cowboys’ Ware OK, could play Saturday

IRVING, Texas (AP) — Dallas Cowboys linebacker DeMarcus Ware could play Saturday night, an encouraging sign after a scary headfirst collision that left him sprawled on the field for several anxious minutes. “He’s actually a lot better today,” coach Wade Phillips said Monday. “He’s really in a day-to-day situation as far as where he’s going to be, as far as being able to play. He took quite a hit but has really bounced back strong. That’s encouraging for him and us.” After Ware got hurt in the fourth quarter of a 20-17 loss Sunday against San Diego, the Cowboys on Monday described Ware’s injury as a strained muscle in his neck. Ware was taken off the field strapped to a stretcher and went to the hospital for further evaluation before being released several hours later. “It’s not anything more than that,” said Phillips, adding that Ware had no concussion-like symptoms.

Top QB returning for senior season

SEATTLE (AP) — Jake Locker walked into the football offices at Washington on Monday morning and quickly ended any lingering question about his future. Touted as a potential top 10 NFL draft selection, Locker is putting his professional aspirations on hold and instead will return for his senior season and one more shot at helping restore the Huskies to prominence. In a statement released through the university, Locker said he will not make himself available for the 2010 NFL draft. “After a great deal of careful thought and deliberation, I have decided to return to Washington and play my senior year,” Locker said. “I am very excited about this team’s opportunities and potential for the upcoming season and I am looking forward to being a part of it.” Locker’s decision is a major coup for coach Steve Sarkisian and a Washington program that showed signs of revival, going 5-7 this season after an 0-12 debacle in 2008. The Huskies won’t be trying to build on the momentum of their most wins since 2003 with a new quarterback. “I think Jake feels like he’s got some unfinished work here at the University of Washington and I truly believe he wouldn’t have done this if he didn’t feel we were headed in the right direction,” Sarkisian said during a conference call Monday afternoon.

+

Section B

on our heels. We felt like we had to match up more with a little bit ROUGHEDGE of man-to-man to get back into Despite trailing by double the game.” figures after halftime, the ParkMcGee said his team lacked enwood High boys basketball team ergy in the first half, but the Rebrallied to defeat Piedmont 55-51 els looked like a new team after on Monday. the break, holding Piedmont to The Panthers (1-6) came out just six third-quarter points while shooting accurately, connecting posting 21 points of their own. on four-of-five 3-pointers During the third quarin the first quarter — inter, sophomore guard cluding two from Cameron Justin Crowder knocked Leviner — to take a 16-12 down back-to-back into the second quarter. 3-pointers, then drew a Piedmont continued to foul that he converted add to its lead in the secinto two free throws. ond quarter and carried Crowder finished with a 31-22 lead into the halfnine points and six astime. sists. “I thought we shot too LEVINER “Crowder is playing good man, he’s one of many threes in the first half, I really did,” said Parkwood our better 3-point shooters – I’m coach Bobby McGee, whose team asking him to take open threes,” is now 4-2. “I thought we could McGee said. “Percentage-wise, he have went inside more to Marcus may be our best 3-point shooter. He seems to be shooting with con(Leak) and Joe (Gordon). “… We should have played more fidence, but he’s been playing big inside-outside, plus, Piedmont all year – and those free throws shot the ball very well in the first were big.” quarter and put us kind of back See REBELS / Page 3B By David Sentendrey

E-J Correspondent

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

Parkwood junior guard Deonte Hiatt soars in past Piedmont’s Ross Rushing for two of his 13 points during Monday’s home win.

After Piedmont, race is on for county’s top teams By Eric Rape

E-J Correspondent

MONROE While Piedmont High has solidified itself as the top wrestling team in Union County this year, the race for second is wide open. Among the candidates: Marvin Ridge, Central Academy, Porter Ridge, Weddington and Sun Valley. Sun Valley took second place at the Bobby Abernathy Memorial Tournament over the weekend, behind tournament host Piedmont. The Spartans finished just ahead of Porter Ridge.

Prep Wrestling The Spartans have performed well at some individual events — placing second in two tournaments this season, with Ryan Henson leading the way with only two losses on the season.

MR has grueling schedule

Marvin Ridge were tested over the weekend, going up to the Parkland Duals Tournament and finding the competition extremely tough. The

Mavs went 0-5, including a 79-0 loss to tournament host and perennial state powerhouse Parkland, which has won 132 matches in a row. Parkland has won three straight 3A state titles and are 14-0 this season with nine shutouts. The Mavericks are now 8-8 on the season, wrestling arguably the toughest schedule in the county, which they hope will help prepare them for the conference and postseason.

CATA coming on strong

Central Academy continues to built a strong program. The

Cougars are now 5-1 overall with a 3-0 record against conference opponents. Their lone loss is to Weddington. The Cougars have finished strong in the two individual tournaments they’ve wrestled, finishing second at the Redhawk Invitational and fourth at West Montgomery’s Warriors Classic. Heavyweight Will Robinson, a junior, has the best record on the team at 11-1. Robinson is among the returners on a team that qualified for the 1A Dual Team playoffs last season.

See WRESTLING / Page 2B

My View

Jerry Snow E-J Sports Editor

Jackson a short-term fix for Cats I’m not a Stephen Jackson fan. I respect his talent as a basketball player, but it takes more than that for me. I’m more inclined to pull for guys like Mark Ingram, the Alabama running back who even thanked the SIDs, trainers and tutors for their support when he won the Heisman Trophy on Saturday. Jackson’s more brash and critical, in the mold of an Allen Iverson. When players like Jackson and Iverson publicly criticize their coaches — as both have done in the past — I consider it selfish behavior. Conflicts within a team are common, but should always be handled behind closed doors. I thought it was a mistake when the Dallas Cowboys started bringing in players with checkered pasts: Terrell Owens, Pacman Jones, Tank Johnson. At some point, athletes that lack character will act selfishly and disrupt the chemistry of a team. Jackson is helping the Charlotte Bobcats this season, but he’s only a short-term solution. The Bobcats are desperate to win games, not only to become a playoff team, but to generate some enthusiasm for the struggling franchise. Charlotte has a 9-13 record heading into tonight’s home game against the New York Knicks.

See JACKSON / Page 3B

Photo by Jamie Belk

Kelly Godbout (20) and the Porter Ridge High girls basketball team are off to a 5-1 start, which means the Pirates will have a shot at the No. 1 seed for the Carolinas Medical Center Union Holiday Classic at Wingate University on Dec. 26-30.

Tournament will have new format BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer

MONROE For the fourth straight year, the Carolinas Medical Center Union Holiday Classic will have a differ-

ent format. The annual high school basketball tournament, held at Wingate University, will host 12 schools for the first time, but only eight teams on both the boys and girls sides

will have the opportunity to play for a title. The top eight teams will be selected for the championship bracket based on overall records through Dec. 18.

See TOURNEY / Page 2B


2B / Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Tourney

duce a champion. All 11 high schools in Union County, along with Anson County, will be participants in the tournament, which is being held Dec. 26-30. “The growth of the county has made change, so we’re trying to accommodate more than eight schools,” said Jones. “The tournament has outgrown itself with so many schools, so we’re trying to be fair to as many teams as possi-

Continued from Page 1B Those eight teams on each side will then be seeded by a committee, according to Union County Athletic Director Doug Jones. The four teams left out of the championship bracket will compete in a consolation bracket, which will also pro-

Wrestling Continued from Page 1B

WHS overcoming lack of depth

Despite being undermanned, Weddington has been one of the best teams in the county thus far.

The Enquirer-Journal

ble. We threw the idea around earlier in the year and everybody seemed to buy into it, so all the coaches knew this was how it was going to be.” Last year, the top eight teams in the championship bracket were determined based on records from the previous season. The year before, two boys and two girls champions were crowned in a bracket ‘A’ and ‘B’ format for the first time.

The Warriors have won seven straight matches but have not scored more than 47 points during that span. The Warriors are stacked in the middle to upper weight classes, which has offset their shortcomings in the lower weight classes. WHS has been giving up two forfeits a match, giving the opponent an automatic 12 points if they have a full lineup.

In 2006, only eight schools competed in one bracket since Marvin Ridge, Union Academy, Central Academy and Cuthbertson weren’t in existence. Jones believes the tournament will be a success. “The tournament itself has always been a crowd-pleaser, regardless of the criteria,” he said. “You just hope the best eight teams get in to make it competitive.”

The Warriors are young. Will Burch (130), Wes Chapman (160) and Kyle Koening (145) are the only seniors who have seen significant time. WHS also starts four juniors, a sophomore and a freshman. Juniors Jake Perkins (215) and Joe Centrella (189) have the best records on the team at 11-1 and 13-2, respectively.

Local Events Today High School Basketball Forest Hills at Cuthbertson, 6 p.m. West Stanly at Monroe, 6 p.m. North Stanly at Central Academy, 6 p.m. High School Wrestling Marvin Ridge at West Stanly, 7 p.m. Queens Grant at Parkwood, 7 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today COLLEGE BASKETBALL ESPN2 — Gardner-Webb at Duke NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — L.A. Lakers at Chicago NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. VERSUS — Philadelphia at Pittsburgh

Howard powers Magic to win over Pacers ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Dwight Howard was hacked, scraped, scratched, pushed and punished by the Indiana Pacers, emerging in the locker room with a wrap around his left knee and a few blemishes on his broad shoulders. So maybe he hurts after all. Fired up by all the physical play, Howard overcame a slow start to finish with 21 points and 23 rebounds, powering the Orlando Magic past the Pacers 106-98 on Monday night. “I don’t enjoy it,” Howard said. “But I just have to remain patient, remain calm and try not to get frustrated.” Howard endured hard-hitting fouls and a Pacers team determined not to let him dunk. He went 4 for 9 from the field, still struggled with free throws but helped Orlando snap its two-

game losing skid with some physical play in the paint. He was hit so much that Magic coach Stan Van Gundy was critical of the officials, again saying Howard is not getting the same calls as perimeter players such as Cleveland’s LeBron James and Los Angeles’ Kobe Bryant. “If you’re going to continue to hit him around the head and grab him around the neck, look I don’t care, those are flagrant fouls,” Van Gundy said. “I don’t care who you are, you’re only going to take that for so long. It’s absurd what’s going on.” The Magic center had some help with 28 points from Vince Carter, who missed the past two

days of practice because of a stomach ailment, sore right knee and slight hip discomfort. But Carter sympathized most for Howard. “It’s a scary feeling when somebody grabs your head and neck like that,” Carter said. “I just hope it stops before somebody gets hit.” Mike Dunleavy had 26 points, and Troy Murphy added 14 points after frustrating Howard early for Indiana, which had its twogame winning streak end. Celtics 110, Grizzlies 105 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Paul Pierce scored 19 points, Ray Allen and Rajon Rondo added 18 apiece and the Boston Celtics

won their 11th straight game, beating the Memphis Grizzlies 110-105 on Monday night. Rasheed Wallace added 15 points, while Kendrick Perkins and Kevin Garnett each scored 13. Rondo had nine of Boston’s 25 assists. Rudy Gay led the Grizzlies with 23 points and O.J. Mayo had 21. Zach Randolph added 20 for Memphis, which has lost two of three. Mavericks 94, Hornets 90 DALLAS — J.J. Barea scored a season-high 23 points and Dirk Nowitzki scored four of his season-low 10 points in the final 59 seconds, sending the Dallas Mavericks to a 94-90 victory over the New Orleans Hornets on Monday night. Barea scored 19 points in the

first half, helping Dallas build an early 21-point lead. Then New Orleans coach Jeff Bower benched all his starters except Chris Paul and the Hornets got aggressive on both ends of the court. They tied it at 60 and kept clawing back, even after the Mavericks were back ahead 90-83 when Nowitzki made a 20-footer in the final minute. But Paul and Darius Songaila made things interesting to the end. It took Nowitzki’s lefthanded layup off an inbounds pass and two free throws by Jason Terry with 12.9 seconds left to seal Dallas’ fourth straight victory and New Orleans’ second straight loss. Paul had 20 points, 16 assists and five steals. Songaila tied a season high with 12 points while playing only the fourth quarter.

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East

New England Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo

W 8 7 7 5

L 5 6 6 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .615 .538 .538 .385

PF 348 292 275 215

PA 234 306 211 271

AFC 5-4-0 5-4-0 5-5-0 3-7-0

NFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-1-0 2-1-0

Div 3-2-0 4-2-0 2-4-0 2-3-0

South

W x-Indianapolis 13 Jacksonville 7 Tennessee 6 Houston 6

L 0 6 7 7

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .538 .462 .462

PF 359 235 293 311

PA 217 287 323 273

AFC 9-0-0 6-3-0 3-7-0 4-6-0

NFC 4-0-0 1-3-0 3-0-0 2-1-0

Div 5-0-0 3-2-0 2-4-0 1-5-0

North

Cincinnati Baltimore Pittsburgh Cleveland

W 9 7 6 2

L 4 6 7 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .538 .462 .154

PF 264 319 278 158

PA 217 218 244 315

AFC 6-3-0 6-4-0 4-6-0 2-7-0

NFC 3-1-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 0-4-0

Div 6-0-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 1-5-0

PF 362 256 155 206

PA 259 230 316 342

AFC 7-3-0 6-4-0 3-6-0 2-7-0

NFC 3-0-0 2-1-0 1-3-0 1-3-0

Div 5-1-0 3-1-0 1-4-0 1-4-0

West

San Diego Denver Oakland Kansas City

W 10 8 4 3

L 3 5 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .769 .615 .308 .231

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East

Philadelphia Dallas N.Y. Giants Washington

W 9 8 7 4

L 4 5 6 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .615 .538 .308

x-New Orleans Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay

W 13 6 5 1

L 0 7 8 12

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .462 .385 .077

y-Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 11 9 5 2

L 2 4 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .692 .385 .154

W Arizona 8 San Francisco 5 Seattle 5 St. Louis 1

L 4 7 8 12

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .417 .385 .077

PF 373 296 341 234

PA 273 233 331 251

NFC 8-2-0 6-3-0 5-4-0 2-8-0

AFC 1-2-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 2-1-0

Div 4-1-0 2-2-0 3-2-0 0-4-0

PA 274 305 282 356

NFC 9-0-0 5-6-0 5-4-0 1-8-0

AFC 4-0-0 1-1-0 0-4-0 0-4-0

Div 4-0-0 2-3-0 3-2-0 0-4-0

PF 389 344 247 209

PA 243 243 291 406

NFC 8-1-0 7-3-0 3-7-0 1-8-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-3-0

Div 5-0-0 4-2-0 1-3-0 0-5-0

PF 297 245 250 146

PA 234 233 301 361

NFC 6-2-0 4-4-0 4-6-0 1-9-0

AFC 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-2-0 0-3-0

Div 3-1-0 3-1-0 3-3-0 0-4-0

South

PF 466 302 225 190

North

West

x-clinched division y-clinched playoff spot Thursday’s Game Cleveland 13, Pittsburgh 6 Sunday’s Games Houston 34, Seattle 7 Green Bay 21, Chicago 14 Baltimore 48, Detroit 3 New Orleans 26, Atlanta 23 Buffalo 16, Kansas City 10 Indianapolis 28, Denver 16 New England 20, Carolina 10 N.Y. Jets 26, Tampa Bay 3 Miami 14, Jacksonville 10 Minnesota 30, Cincinnati 10 Tennessee 47, St. Louis 7 Washington 34, Oakland 13 San Diego 20, Dallas 17 Philadelphia 46, N.Y. Giants 38 Monday’s Game Arizona at San Francisco, late Thursday, Dec. 17 Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m. Saturday’s Game Dallas at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 20 Miami at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Arizona at Detroit, 1 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Houston at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Chicago at Baltimore, 1 p.m. New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 21 N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.

College football Bowl Glance

Saturday, Dec. 19 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Wyoming (6-6) vs. Fresno State (8-4), 2:30 p.m. (ESPN) St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl Rutgers (8-4) vs. UCF (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Dec. 20 New Orleans Bowl Southern Miss. (7-5) vs. Middle Tennessee (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 22 Las Vegas Bowl BYU (10-2) vs. Oregon State (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego Utah (9-3) vs. California (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU (7-5) vs. Nevada (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Ohio (9-4) vs. Marshall (6-6), 1 p.m.

(ESPN) Meineke Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina (8-4) vs. Pittsburgh (9-3), 4 p.m. (ESPN) Emerald Bowl At San Francisco Southern Cal (8-4) vs. Boston College (8-4), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Dec. 27 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Clemson (8-5) vs. Kentucky (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Georgia (7-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 29 EagleBank Bowl At Washington Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Champs Sports Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 30 Humanitarian Bowl At Boise, Idaho Bowling Green (7-5) vs. Idaho (7-5), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San Diego Nebraska (9-4) vs. Arizona (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 31 Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Stanford (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (7-5), Noon (CBS) Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Air Force (7-5) vs. Houston (10-3), Noon (ESPN) Texas Bowl At Houston Missouri (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Minnesota (6-6) vs. Iowa State (6-6), 6 p.m. (NFL) Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta Virginia Tech (9-3) vs. Tennessee (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 1 Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. Northwestern (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5), 11 a.m. (ESPN) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Penn State (10-2) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Florida State (6-6) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 1 p.m. (CBS) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon (10-2), 5 p.m. (ABC) Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati (12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 2 International Bowl At Toronto South Florida (7-5) vs. Northern Illinois (7-5), Noon (ESPN2) Cotton Bowl At Dallas Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Mississippi (8-4), 2 p.m. (FOX) PapaJohns.com Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Connecticut (7-5) vs. South Carolina (7-5), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. East Carolina (9-4) vs. Arkansas (7-5), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Michigan State (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 4 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Boise State (13-0) vs. TCU (12-0), 8 p.m. (FOX) Tuesday, Jan. 5 Orange Bowl At Miami

Iowa (10-2) vs. Georgia Tech (11-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Wednesday, Jan. 6 GMAC Bowl Mobile, Ala. Central Michigan (11-2) vs. Troy (9-3), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Pasadena, Calif. Alabama (13-0) vs. Texas (13-0), 8 p.m. (ABC) Saturday, Jan. 23 East-West Shrine Classic At Orlando, Fla. East vs. West, 3 p.m.

The top 25 teams in the USA TodayESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 13, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and previous ranking:

Saturday, Feb. 6 Texas vs. The Nation All-Star Challenge At El Paso, Texas Texas vs. Nation, 3 p.m. (CBSC)

Pro basketball NBA Standings All Times EST

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 20 4 .833 — Toronto 11 15 .423 10 New York 8 15 .348 11 1/2 Philadelphia 6 18 .250 14 New Jersey 2 22 .083 18 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Orlando 18 6 .750 — Atlanta 17 6 .739 1/2 Miami 11 11 .500 6 Charlotte 9 13 .409 8 Washington 7 14 .333 9 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Cleveland 17 7 .708 — Milwaukee 11 11 .500 5 Detroit 11 12 .478 5 1/2 Chicago 8 14 .364 8 Indiana 8 14 .364 8 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Dallas 18 7 .720 — San Antonio 12 9 .571 4 Houston 13 10 .565 4 New Orleans 10 13 .435 7 Memphis 10 14 .417 7 1/2 Division L Pct GB 7 .708 — 9 .609 2 1/2 11 .560 3 1/2 10 .545 4 21 .125 14

Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers 18 4 .818 Phoenix 16 8 .667 Sacramento 10 12 .455 L.A. Clippers 9 13 .409 Golden State 7 17 .292

College basketball USA Today/ESPN Top 25

Saturday, Jan. 30 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)

Northwest W Denver 17 Utah 14 Portland 14 Oklahoma City 12 Minnesota 3

Memphis at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m. Utah at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Houston at Denver, 9 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

GB — 3 8 9 12

Sunday’s Games Toronto 101, Houston 88 Atlanta 130, New Jersey 107 Memphis 118, Miami 90 Cleveland 102, Oklahoma City 89 San Antonio 115, L.A. Clippers 90 Monday’s Games Philadelphia 117, Golden State 101 Orlando 106, Indiana 98 Boston 110, Memphis 105 Dallas 94, New Orleans 90 Oklahoma City at Denver, late Minnesota at Utah, late Washington at L.A. Clippers, late Today’s Games New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Chicago, 8 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 8:30 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.

1. Kansas (30) 2. Texas 3. Kentucky (1) 4. Purdue 5. Syracuse 6. West Virginia 7. Duke 8. Tennessee 9. Villanova 10. North Carolina 11. Georgetown 12. Michigan State 13. Florida 14. Connecticut 15. Georgia Tech 15. Gonzaga 17. Butler 18. Ohio State 19. New Mexico 20. Texas Tech 21. Washington 22. Kansas State 23. UNLV 24. Clemson 25. Mississippi

Rec Pts Pvs 9-0 774 1 8-0 735 2 10-0 701 4 9-0 675 5 10-0 658 6 7-0 631 7 7-1 547 8 7-1 528 9 9-1 524 3 8-2 497 10 8-0 494 13 8-2 423 14 8-1 367 11 6-2 358 12 6-1 229 21 8-2 229 22 7-3 184 20 7-2 176 15 10-0 164 — 9-0 150 — 6-2 146 16 9-1 136 — 7-1 112 17 8-2 110 24 8-1 77 —

Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 76, Texas A&M 58, Wisconsin 58, Illinois 25, Temple 24, Memphis 21, Florida State 20, Brigham Young 17, Saint Mary’s 17, Oklahoma State 15, Wake Forest 15, Charlotte 14, St. John’s 14, Northwestern 13, Dayton 9, Seton Hall 9, Tulsa 9, Washington State 9, William & Mary 9, California 7, Missouri State 3, Western Carolina 3, Mississippi State 2, Baylor 1, Coastal Carolina 1, Northern Iowa 1.

Prep basketball Monday’s boxscores PHS boys 55, Piedmont 51

Parkwood (4-2) Maurice Leak 8 1-2 18, Deonte Hiatt 6 0-0 13, Justin Crowder 2 3-4 9, Marcus Leak 4 1-2 9, Joseph Gordon 2 0-0 4, Jimmy Richardson 1 0-0 2, Totals: 23 5-8 55. Piedmont (1-6) T.J. Doster 6 1-1 13, Ross Rushing 4 0-0 9, Cameron Leviner 3 0-0 8, Wesley Marsh 3 1-1 7, Wilson Broadway 2 1-1 5, Trenton Linville 1 2-2 5, Patrick King 2 0-0 4, Totals: 21 5-5 51. Piedmont Parkwood

16 15 6 14 - 51 12 10 21 12 - 55

3-pointers: Parkwood 4 (Crowder 2, Hiatt 1, Maurice Leak 1); Piedmont 4 (Leviner 2, Linville 1, Rushing 1); Rebounds: Parkwood 25 (Marcus Leak 7, Gordon 5); Piedmont 35 (Marsh 12, Doster 9); Assists: Parkwood 9 (Crowder 6); Piedmont 10 (Rushing 3).

PHS girls 83, Piedmont 43 Parkwood (6-0) Michelle Brown 9 5-11 24, Morgan Brown 8 3-8 19, Justice McKinney 3 3-4 9,Chelsey Rains 3 1-2 8, Kate Howie 2 2-2 6, Cadeja Hood 3 0-0 6, Tori Tsitouris 1 2-2 4, Courtney Elliott 1 0-0 2, Lynne Hall 1 0-0 2, Bailey Sims 1 0-0 2, Daven Barnett 0 1-2 1, Totals: 32 18-31 83.

Piedmont (3-5) Amber Weaver 2 2-4 7, Kristina McCallister 2 0-1 12, Sarah Wylie 2 2-4 6, Alison Florence 2 0-0 4, Nicole Hyatt 2 0-0 4, Alyssa McLamb 1 1-2 4, Callie

Rape 2 0-0 4, Hayley Whitely 2 0-0 4, Courtney Barrineau 1 0-0 2, Ashley Widner 0 2-4 2, Totals: 16 7-17 43. Piedmont Parkwood

5 14 16 8 - 43 29 19 19 16 - 83

3-pointers: Parkwood 2 (Michelle Brown 1, Rains 1); Piedmont 4 (McCallister 2, McLamb 1,Weaver 1); Rebounds: Parkwood 45 (Tsitouris 12, Howie 9, Hall 6); Piedmont 32 (Weaver 7); Assists: Parkwood 10 (Morgan Brown 5); Piedmont 5.

Transactions Monday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with LHP Cedrick Bowers, RHP Fernando Hernandez, RHP Marcus McBeth, RHP Matt Wright, INF Dallas McPherson and INF Matt Whitney on minor league contracts. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Agreed to terms with 1B Chris Richard, RHP Winston Abreu, RHP Joe Bateman, RHP Jeff Bennett, RHP Richard De Los Santos, LHP Jason Cromer, LHP Carlos Hernandez and LHP R.J. Swindle on minor league contracts. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with OF Jason Michaels on a one-year contract and LHP Gustavo Chacin on a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Randy Wolf on a three-year contract and INF Craig Counsell and RHP Claudio Vargas on one-year contracts. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms with LHP Scott Olsen on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended Houston F Trevor Ariza for one game for swinging his elbow at the head of the Toronto F DeMar DeRozan in a Dec. 13 game. MIAMI HEAT—Waived F Shavlik Randolph. PHOENIX SUNS—Recalled F Taylor Griffin from Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS—Signed OT James Marten from practice squad. Waived LB Cato June. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed FB Brock Bolen from the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS—Waived OT Ryan McKee. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Placed RW Derek Dorsett on injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 12. DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled C Kris Newbury from Grand Rapids (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS—Recalled F Corey Elkins from Manchester (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD—Placed C Andrew Ebbett on injured reserve. Reassigned C Nathan Smith to Houston (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Reassigned F Frazer McLaren and F Jamie McGinn to Worcester (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Recalled D Aaron Rome from Manitoba (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled D Karl Alzner and C Kyle Wilson from Hershey (AHL). Assigned C Mathieu Perreault to Hershey. COLLEGE ARKANSAS—Named Garrick McGee offensive coordinator. KANSAS—Named Carl Torbush defensive coordinator and Chuck Long offensive coordinator. MARQUETTE—Announced freshman F Jeronne Maymon is leaving the men’s basketball team. MISSOURI—Suspended senior F Amanda Hanneman and senior F Jessra Johnson indefinitely for being arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor assault on Dec. 13. PENNSYLVANIA—Fired men’s basketball coach Glen Miller. Named Jerome Allen interim men’s basketball coach. PFEIFFER—Announced the resignation of softball coach Todd Bradley, effective immediately, to accept the same position at Incarnate Word. Named Jessica Clack softball coach. SOUTH CAROLINA—Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Darrin Horn on a two-year contract extension through March 2015. Approved a oneyear contract extension for football coach Steve Spurrier through the 2013 season.


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, December 15, 2009 / 3B

Passing woes continue for 5-8 Panthers CHARLOTTE (AP) — Carolina’s John Fox has always been a run-first coach. This season, he’s become a run-only coach. No matter who plays quarterback, the combination of receivers or the playcalling, the Panthers’ passing game remains one of the NFL’s worst in their lost season. “Contrary to popular belief, I’d like to be able to throw the ball better,” Fox said Monday, a day after Carolina (5-8) lost to New England 20-10. “The reality is we haven’t.” Not with Jake Delhomme throwing 18 interceptions in 11 games, and not with replacement Matt Moore guiding a stalled offense to two touchdowns in two weeks. With Steve Smith the only reliable receiver and with a bangedup offense line, the Panthers rank 28th in the NFL in pass-

ing offense. Not even facing the Patriots’ struggling secondary Sunday could get the Panthers out of their funk. Carolina has two touchdowns and 32 points in the past three games. “There are a lot of moving parts. I don’t think it’s just the quarterback to be critical of,” Fox said. “Sometimes I think it’s been protection. Sometimes I think it’s been routes. Sometimes I think it’s been the throw. So that’s kind of where it is. All we can try to do is improve it.” Perhaps the best scene to show where the Panthers stand on offense these days came on the second of consecutive illegal shift penalties in the second half against the Patriots Sunday.

With the inexperienced Moore apparently trying to change the play at the line of scrimmage, there was confusion between receivers Muhsin Muhammad and Dwayne Jarrett on where to line up. Muhammad then went in motion, drawing a flag. Muhammad and Jarrett, by the way, have combined for zero touchdown catches this season. Smith, on pace for the fewest catches and yards receiving since his second year in the league in 2002, has all five of Carolina’s TD catches by a wide receiver. It’s meant that despite another solid season from running back DeAngelo Williams, the Panthers are all but mathematically eliminated from the playoff race and guaranteed to continue the franchise’s history of never

posting consecutive winning seasons. And while the defense has held its own despite numerous injuries — the latest a right ankle injury that had cornerback Richard Marshall in a walking boot Monday — the offense has been meek. The Panthers have scored 30 or more points once this season after doing it seven times in 2008. “I just can’t quite put my finger on it,” Williams said. There are several reasons for the passing game woes. Delhomme was having the worst season of his career before breaking a finger. Moore was the best option behind him, but he had started three NFL games before this season. The Panthers for years have been trying to find a reliable No. 2 receiver, and the aging Muhammad and disappointing Jar-

rett are struggling. Left tackle Jordan’s Gross’ season-ending broken leg caused an offensive line shuffle. Fox declined to declare Moore the starter next Sunday against Minnesota, saying Delhomme remains “day-to-day.” He also danced around whether Delhomme will return for meaningless late-season games ahead of Moore, who was 15 of 30 for 197 yards and one touchdown against the Patriots. “He’s an athletic guy. He’s got good mobility. He can make all the throws. I think he has a strong arm. I think he’s shown the ability to throw the deep ball,” Fox said of Moore. “There are some game mechanics and execution that I think we need to continue to improve. And I think that will happen with experience — or has a chance to happen with experience.”

Lawal, Jackets win big

Parkwood senior guard Maurice Leak, left, scored a game-high 18 points in Monday’s home win over Piedmont.

Rebels Continued from Page 1B By the fourth quarter, the Rebels turned the deficit into a 43-37 lead. The Rebels held a double-digit lead for most of the fourth quarter. Maurice Leak scored a game-high 18 points for the Rebels and Deonte Hiatt

added 13. Marcus Leak had a team-high seven rebounds and also contributed nine points. For Piedmont, senior forward T.J. Doster led the way with 13 points and nine rebounds. Wesley Marsh, a junior center, had 12 rebounds for the Panthers.

Parkwood girls roll

Senior Michelle Brown led the Parkwood

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

girls with 24 points, while her cousin, Morgan Brown, added 19 in an 83-43 win over Piedmont. The Rebels are now 6-0. The Panthers (3-5) did not have a scorer reach double figures, but had 11 players mark the scoring column. Amber Weaver had a team-high seven points. Both teams are at home on Wednesday. Parkwood hosts CATA and Piedmont plays North Stanly.

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Gani Lawal scored 29 points to lead No. 22 Georgia Tech to a 95-64 victory over Chattanooga on Monday night. Derrick Favors had 14 points, Glen Rice added 11 and Mfon Udofia and Maurice Miller had 10 each for the Yellow Jackets (7-1) in their first true road game of the season, about 2 hours from campus. Ty Patterson scored 22 points, one off his career high, on 8-of-14 shooting for the Mocs (5-5), while Vanderbilt transfer Keegan Bell added 13 on 5-of-17 shooting. The Mocs were hosting a ranked team for just the second time in 15 years. No. 10 Tennessee came into McKenzie Arena two seasons ago and escaped with a 76-70 win. Chattanooga trimmed a 16-point deficit to six before the Yellow Jackets closed the first half on a 13-0 run to take a 52-33 lead. They expanded the lead to 23 points by holding the Mocs scoreless for the first 3 minutes of the second half. Georgia Tech controlled the second half, never leading by less than 15 points and the largest lead was 32 points with 3:54 to go. The Yellow Jackets shot 60.8 percent from the field, including 43.8 percent from 3-point range, and finished with a 35-29 rebound advantage.

World Series MVP reaches preliminary deal with Angels ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Hideki Matsui is headed west. The World Series MVP and the Los Angeles Angels have reached a preliminary agreement on a one-year contract worth about $6.5 million, a person familiar with the deal told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because the contract was not yet final.

Jackson Continued from Page 1B Since Jackson’s arrival, Charlotte has enough offensive firepower to play with most teams in the league. He’s averaging 21.3 ppg this month, which is roughly what he averaged last season

“I can confirm that we are in serious discussions with the Angels,” Matsui’s agent, Arn Tellem, wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press. Tellem declined further comment. Matsui surpassed 100 RBIs four times in seven seasons with the Yankees after coming over from Japan, where he was an enormous star. He just completed a $52 million, four-year contract with

for Golden State (20.7). At 6-foot-8, Jackson can play shooting guard or small forward. He can create his own shot better than anyone on the team and also defends well. But at some point, Jackson will forget his manners. He was outspoken about wanting to be traded from Golden State, but didn’t

New York. Matsui hit .274 with 28 homers and 90 RBIs last season, then was selected World Series MVP despite starting only three of the six games against Philadelphia. He went 8 for 13 (.615) with three homers and eight RBIs, tying a Series record by driving in six runs in Game 6. Slowed by surgically repaired knees, the 35-year-old Matsui would replace

want to go to a losing team. As nice as that sounds, the Warriors were looking for the best deal. Contending teams don’t usually line up when selfish athletes hit the market. Jackson wanted out of Golden State bad. The negativity he spewed was dragging down the team, and both sides wanted out of the situation.

Charlotte might squeak into the playoffs this season, and if that happens, the trade for Jackson will look pretty sweet. But the relationship will sour, because it always does for these kinds of characters. Even if Jackson gets the Bobcats into the playoffs this year, I don’t agree with trading for his type.

Source: Red Sox set to add Lackey BOSTON (AP) — The retooling Red Sox made two key moves in one day, reaching tentative agreements with pitcher John Lackey and outfielder Mike Cameron. Lackey and Boston agreed on a five-year contract, according to a baseball official with knowledge of the negotiations. The deal is worth $16 million to $17 million a season, the official said Monday on condition of anonymity because the agreement was not yet final. The Red Sox also reached a tentative agreement on a two-year contract with Cameron, according to a person familiar with those negotiations. That deal is subject to a physical, the person said on condition of anonymity because the agreement was not yet final. The moves seem to indicate Boston has abandoned an attempt to resign slugging outfielder Jason Bay.

Lackey, the top pitcher on the free-agent market after spending eight seasons with the Angels, was in Boston for a physical Monday needed to complete the deal, the baseball official said. Red Sox president Larry Lucchino and co-owner Tom Werner declined comment in e-mails to The Associated Press. Team owner John Henry and general manager Theo Epstein did not respond to e-mails. The 31-year-old Lackey would give the Red Sox one of the best rotations in baseball, rivaling that of the New York Yankees, who added CC Sabathia and A.J. Burnett before last season and then won the World Series. Sabathia signed for $161 million over seven years, while Burnett got an $82.5 million, fiveyear deal. Lackey would join a rotation headlined by Josh Beckett and Jon

Lester. Boston also has starters Daisuke Matsuzaka, Clay Buchholz and Tim Wakefield on the roster. Lackey has a 102-71 regular-season record with a 3.81 ERA in eight seasons, all with the Angels. At Fenway Park, he is 2-5 with a 5.75 ERA in nine starts. The right-hander is coming off a strong postseason in which he struck out 14 batters in 19 2-3 innings for Los Angeles while allowing five earned runs and 19 hits. In the opener of the AL division series against Boston in Anaheim, Calif., Lackey allowed four hits with four strikeouts and a walk in 7 1-3 innings of a 5-0 win. Lester gave up three runs and four hits in six innings in that game. The Angels swept the series 3-0. As a rookie in 2002, Lackey won Game 7 of the World Series against San Francisco.

Vladimir Guerrero as Los Angeles’ primary designated hitter. Guerrero, also hobbled by injuries, will turn 35 in February. Both sluggers are free agents. Matsui and the Yankees beat Los Angeles in the AL championship series last season. The Angels have won three straight AL West titles and five of the past six, but haven’t reached the World Series since winning the 2002 title.

JACKSON


4B / Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Plans made now ease fear for elderly parents’ future DEAR ABBY: “Afraid for the Future in San Antonio, Texas” (Oct. 25), expressed concerns about having to provide care for her aging parents and in-laws. While the sentiments you conveyed were true, your answer didn’t go far enough. “Afraid’s” concerns are legitimate. While ill and elderly parents may die quickly, it’s also entirely possible that they won’t. People are living longer and prolonging life by any means, so the problem of long-term care and the financial and emotional burdens placed on adult children are very real. “Afraid” and her husband need to have an honest conversation with both sets of parents about the level of help they are willing to offer. They should also research resources with their state’s Department on Aging and check into supportive living facilities that

Dear Abby Columnist

accept Medicare. The preparation they do in advance will go a long way toward making their parents’ elder years easier for everyone. -- LAURA IN MONTGOMERY, ILL. DEAR LAURA: You’re right. Crossing one’s fingers and thinking positive does not go far enough. Thank you for offering a pragmatic approach to “Afraid’s” dilemma. You were among many readers who shared helpful experiences and resources. Read on: DEAR ABBY: I found a lovely assisted living facil-

ity for my parents when they were unable to care for themselves. They had a private one-bedroom apartment, and Medicaid paid for most of it. The facility had medical aides and a nurse, social activities, three meals a day plus snacks if they wished, with transportation included. After Dad died in 2007, Mom stayed on, surrounded by friends her own age. She keeps busy with life enrichment activities. “Afraid” should check with her state’s senior services for help. -- GAIL IN ASHLAND, ORE. DEAR ABBY: It is never too late to prepare for the future. That young couple should INSIST their parents see an elder care attorney NOW. This is a serious issue, and they should not risk the future of their marriage or children because their parents were selfish or ignorant. Everyone will

Horoscopes Dec. 15, 2009

Dennis the Menace What a wonderful day to get together with people you’d like to strengthen your relationships with. You can make your actions really count for something, simply by being a friend. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Not that you aren’t willing to help others out to begin with, but you could find yourself far more aware of their needs than usual. You’ll be more motivated to take action. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your ability to effectively blend old concepts with new ones will work to your advantage today. You’ll be progressive without disrespecting what came before you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Present conditions that could have a substantial effect on your finances are trending in your favor, so don’t hesitate to take advantage of them if you are so inclined to do so. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) - It is much smarter for you to tend to important matters instead of delegating them to somebody who may or may not fully understand the bottom line.

There’s a good chance that you will finally have more control over many conditions that directly affect your life in the year ahead. As new opportunities present themselves, you’ll be able to effectively take advantage of them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) - A couple of developments are stirring that will eventually affect you very favorably. You won’t notice them right away, but two early indictors may signal their presence. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) - You’re in a cycle where much more interaction with clubs or social organizations is probable. It behooves you to get involved as much as possible, because some valuable contacts can be made. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) - Don’t hesitate to establish a number of objectives all at once. If they are worthy ones, you will find a way to handle each-and-

every one quite effectively. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) It pays to associate with friends who stimulate your thinking and imagination. In discussing possible ideas, something of considerable value could come from it. ARIES (March 21-April 19) - It’ll be joint endeavors that’ll bring home the bacon, so team up with someone who is just as smart as you are -- better yet, one who is smarter than you. That’s when you’ll really make it big. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Don’t just watch and applaud successful people going about their business, learn how they handle difficult issues and imitate their wise moves. By doing so, you will know how to launch your own interests. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) There’s a good chance that it’ll be easier to be honest about your shortcomings right now and more willing to do something about them. Today’s aspects enable you to willingly take the necessary actions. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -

Blondie

by Dean Young & Mike Gersher

ASTRO-GRAPH By Bernice Bede Osol

Garfield

Frank and Ernest

Hagar the Horrible

Dilbert

be better off if they make an effort to educate themselves and their parents today. -BURDENED DAUGHTER IN FLORIDA DEAR ABBY: A more proactive response would have been to encourage “Afraid” to seek information on nursing and elder care options, including free-care funds through larger nursing centers. Then she and her husband should discuss their concerns, rather than ignore them. They may find greater peace once they know all the options. -- TRYING TO HELP IN PENNSYLVANIA DEAR ABBY: All parties need to sit down and have a frank discussion about what the financial expectations are and what will happen if their money runs out. “Afraid” and her husband should have their parents speak to a financial adviser, who can give them a realistic picture of what their

by Jim Davis

by Bob Thaves

by Chris Browne

life will be like unless they make provisions now. If they cannot have their parents move in with them, that fact needs to be clearly stated. -COLLEEN IN PITTSBURGH DEAR ABBY: My paternal grandmother lived with us while I was growing up. There were annoyances, of course, but it seemed totally natural to me. Grandma helped with us kids, making dinner and doing laundry. She always had time to read to us or do jigsaw puzzles. When my husband’s grandmother was no longer able to live on her own, she moved in with us until she passed. It was from her that I learned how to knit and how to make a pie crust from scratch. It was the most wonderful experience knowing she was happy in life. The wisdom, love and care we received from her shaped our lives. -- SATISFIED IN ST. LOUIS

Family Circus

Encourage your children to read the newspaper. B.C.

The Born Loser

Andy Capp

The Wizard of Id

by Scott Adams Peanuts

by Johnny Hart

by Art Sansom

by Reggie Smythe

by Bryant Parker & Johnny Hart

by Charles M. Schultz


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, December 15, 2009 / 5B

KWT Insurance Agency, Inc.

Austin Grading and Farm Service, Inc.

Ladies’ Clothing Name Brands at Outlet Prices 108 North Main Street • Monroe, NC

Voted Best Place to find a BARGAIN

751 E. Roosevelt Blvd. Monroe 704-291-7070

4720 Hwy 74 East Wingate, NC 28174

122 S. Main Street P.O. Box 5070

Sales/Service On All Makes and Models

704-624-2351

Phone: (704) 289-6437 Fax: (704) 283-7797

704-624-2142

WAL MART SUPERCENTER

Unique Cabinets & Tops Inc.

AMERICAN PARTS OF MONROE, INC.

1st Choice Home Center

2406 W. Roosevelt Blvd. Open 24 Hours

2740 E. Gray Fox Rd. Monroe, NC 28110

315 W. Morgan St. • Monroe, NC 28112

704-289-5478

704-225-7500 Phil Pender

Joe Bourke

Personal Financial Representative Allstate Financial Services, LLC

1606 Skyway Dr. • Monroe, NC 704-283-7451 1157 Curtis Street Monroe, NC 28112

David Love Owner

MONROE TRUCK REPAIR Alignment & Suspension Custom U Bolts Parts & Service

Bus: 704-292-1180 Fax: 704-282-8235

The Renn’s Nest

Gift and Clothing Shop

Downtown Monroe 208 N. Main St. Monroe, NC 28112

(704) 291-3080

704-843-1288 www.summerfieldautoservice.com

704-289-1523 “W e D is c o u n t P rice , B u t N o t S ervice”

VISIT ONE OF OUR MODELS Mon.-Fri.10-3:30, Sat. 10-4

1443 US Hwy 52 Albemarle, NC 704-982-6208

3900 US Hwy 24/27 Midland, NC 704-888-8801

www.21stcenturyhousing.biz

BUILT BETTER The All American Way™

Grier

FUNERAL SERVICE “SINCE 1930” 704 Walkup Ave. Monroe 283-5423

A Kindred Healthcare Community

• Aggressive R ehabilitation Program -5 days per week

Market Express Convenience Stores

704-233-2600

704-225-8850 $500 Down Moves You In 1stchoicemonroe.com

L. Russel Wing Office 704-291-8908 Fax 704-283-9741 Home 704-282-0448 Toll Free 888-291-9956 Mobile 704-591-0254 email russell.wing@atcmail.com

Allen Tate Company 2602 W. Roosevelt Blvd Monroe, NC 28110 http://allentate.com

Compliments of

For the past 12 years JUNE BUG’S has built a reputation of providing a level of child care unequaled in this area! Open Mon.-Fri - 6:30am - 6:30pm (705)882-1465

Now Hiring!

1821 N. Rocky River Road N. Monroe, North Carolina 28110

phone: 704-292-1234 fax: 704-292-1112

“You do the Calling we do the Hauling”

9924 Concord Hwy Midland, NC

704-753-4176

Gerald and Amy Clontz

Now enrolling! 704-289-5977 Openings available Ages 2-5 No registration fee www.kidskooldaycare.com 1211 Skyway Drive • Monroe Hours: 6:30AM - 6:00PM

PARTS & SERVICE FOR: HARLEY-DAVIDSON, HONDA, POLARIS, SUZUKI, E-TON

Office 704-283-2809 Fax 704-289-7097

810 N Sutherland Ave. Monroe, NC 28110

www.mccollumtrucking.com

1600 West Roosevelt Blvd.

704-283-9467

www.ironhorsemc.com

1012 S K Y W AY D R IV E

704-283-6411

Those who voted in The Enquirer’s Reader’s Choice Awards must have never dined at the Brown Derby. For the BEST Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, TRY US!

Mon-Sat 7am-9pm Sun 7am-2:30pm

866-257-6640 3220 West Hwy 74 Monroe, NC 28110

w w w.b o b m a yb e rryh yu n d a i.co m

• O ut-Patient R ehab Services 5 days per week

Nathan Starnes Todd Starnes Mobile • Modular • Site Built Commercial & Residential Property NC/SC General Contractor NC/SC Real Estate Broker

704-283-8548 or 1212 Sunset Dr. Monroe, NC

Ronnie Billingsley Hampton Autry Res. 704-289-4673 Res 704-764-9777

2008 East Roosevelt Blvd. Monroe

Gerald Clontz Trucking

BROWN DERBY RESTAURANT REHABILITATION & NURSING CENTER OF MONROE

Telephone 704-283-8541

Brewer Hendley Oil Co. Custom Modular Homes

529 N. Broome St • Waxhaw, NC 28173

7112 East Marshville Blvd. Marshvillle, NC 28103

Monroe, NC 28111-5070

704-233-4238

FRANKLIN STREET PHARMACY Mark Wilson

Heritage Propane

704-289-8444

Mon-Sat 9am-8pm

www.HendrickChevy.com

1406 S. Van L Mungo Blvd. Pageland, SC 843-675-7555 Toll Free 877-238-HOME

Monroe, NC 28110 704-283-7571 www.tysonfoodsinc.com SUPPORTING EDUCATION! H&R Block

®

1774-A West Roosevelt Blvd. Monroe, NC 28110 Phone: 704-289-2487 Fax: 704-283-5826


6B / Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

CELEBRITY CIPHER

SUDOKU PUZZLE

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK 9EO694 ADMINISTRATOREXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J.R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of the Katharina H. Trinker, deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of March 2010 or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 4th day of December, 2009. Susanna Laxton 1284 Pear Dr. Conover, NC 28613 December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2009

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Don Wayne Hinson and wife, Kathy S. Hinson, to Dale Fussell, trustee for American General Financial Services, Inc., recorded in Book 4709 Page 871 Union County Public Registry, and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements therein contained and, pursuant to demand of the Owners and Holders of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Trustee will expose for sale at public auction to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale in the County Courthouse of Union County, in the City of Monroe, North Carolina at 12:00 NOON on December 28, 2009 all of that certain parcel of land situated and being in Union County, North Carolina, as said land is more particularly described as follows: Legal description: Deed Book 1862 Page 821, Book 1315 Page 624 Property address: 6602 & 6608 Love Mill Rd., Monroe NC 28110 Tax parcel number: 08006006, 08006006E Present Record Owner: Don Wayne Hinson and wife, Kathy S. Hinson The Trustee reserves the right to require of the successful bidder at such sale a deposit as provided in the Deed of Trust or by law. Subject to liens, encumbrances of record, unpaid taxes and assessments, if any. This sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. This the 2nd day of December, 2009. Dale Fussell, Trustee 447 South Sharon Amity Road Suite 140 Charlotte, NC 28211-2836 (704)365-6515 December 15, 22, 2009 AMENDED Notice of Foreclosure Sale NORTH CAROLINA 06-SP-0883 FR#: 200501372 Union County Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by David W.

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

Friendly and Richard Dean Whitlock to The King Law Firm, PLLC, Trustee(s), dated June 28, 2004, and recorded July 1, 2004, in Book 3487, on Page 643, Union County Public Registry, the undersigned Substitute Trustee declares as follows: There is a default by the Owner or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; and the undersigned, on behalf of Peter J. Underhill or Frances S. White or Kirsten K. Gallant, either one of whom may act, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the Owner and Holder of the Note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse door or other usual and customary location as designated by the Clerk's Office on December 29, 2009, at 10:00 am, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the real property secured by the abovedescribed Deed of Trust recorded July 1, 2004 in Book 3487, on Page 643, situated in Union County, North Carolina, as more particularly described

therein, which legal description is made a part hereof and incorporated herein by reference as if fully set forth herein. Said property as shown on the above-described Deed of Trust is commonly known as 2335 Lexington Avenue, Monroe, North Carolina 28110. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property within 10 days of the posting of this notice is/are David W. Friendly and Richard Dean Whitlock. In the event the property which is the subject of this Notice of Sale is residential real property with less than fifteen (15) rental units, an order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to N.C.G.S. 4521.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the Clerk of Superior Court. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon ten (10) days’ notice to the landlord. The tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of termination. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of forty-five cents (45¢) per one hundred dollars ($100.00), up to a maximum of $500.00. A cash deposit (cashier's check or certified funds, no

personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all of the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Should the foreclosure action be dismissed or any portion have to be redone for any reason, the bid deposit will be returned to the third party bidder and no other remedies will be assertable. The third party bidder acts upon their own risk if they expend any funds in favor of the foreclosed property prior to the receipt of a deed from the Substitute Trustee. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, and encumbrances of record. Dated:

004 Legals November 24, 2009 Peter J. Underhill or Frances S. White or Kirsten K. Gallant, either one of whom may act, Substitute Trustee NC Bar No. 6418 P.O. Box 30368 Charlotte, NC 28230-0368 704.909.5656 TAC: 874781N December 15, 22, 2009

005 Special Notices ★★★★★★★★★★★★

GENERAL INFORMATION

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm DEADLINES In Column Call before 1:30pm the day prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on Thursday and for Sunday call before 1:30 pm on Friday. Display Sunday Tuesday Wed. Thursday Friday Saturday

12 Noon Thurs 4PM Friday 4PM Monday 4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES The Enquirer-Journal reserves the right to edit or reject and correctly classify an ad at any time. The Enquirer-Journal will assume no liability for omission of advertising material in whole or in part.


6B / Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

CELEBRITY CIPHER

SUDOKU PUZZLE

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK 9EO694 ADMINISTRATOREXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J.R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of the Katharina H. Trinker, deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 12th day of March 2010 or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 4th day of December, 2009. Susanna Laxton 1284 Pear Dr. Conover, NC 28613 December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2009

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Don Wayne Hinson and wife, Kathy S. Hinson, to Dale Fussell, trustee for American General Financial Services, Inc., recorded in Book 4709 Page 871 Union County Public Registry, and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements therein contained and, pursuant to demand of the Owners and Holders of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Trustee will expose for sale at public auction to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale in the County Courthouse of Union County, in the City of Monroe, North Carolina at 12:00 NOON on December 28, 2009 all of that certain parcel of land situated and being in Union County, North Carolina, as said land is more particularly described as follows: Legal description: Deed Book 1862 Page 821, Book 1315 Page 624 Property address: 6602 & 6608 Love Mill Rd., Monroe NC 28110 Tax parcel number: 08006006, 08006006E Present Record Owner: Don Wayne Hinson and wife, Kathy S. Hinson The Trustee reserves the right to require of the successful bidder at such sale a deposit as provided in the Deed of Trust or by law. Subject to liens, encumbrances of record, unpaid taxes and assessments, if any. This sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. This the 2nd day of December, 2009. Dale Fussell, Trustee 447 South Sharon Amity Road Suite 140 Charlotte, NC 28211-2836 (704)365-6515 December 15, 22, 2009 AMENDED Notice of Foreclosure Sale NORTH CAROLINA 06-SP-0883 FR#: 200501372 Union County Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by David W.

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

Friendly and Richard Dean Whitlock to The King Law Firm, PLLC, Trustee(s), dated June 28, 2004, and recorded July 1, 2004, in Book 3487, on Page 643, Union County Public Registry, the undersigned Substitute Trustee declares as follows: There is a default by the Owner or other person(s) owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, or by their successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; and the undersigned, on behalf of Peter J. Underhill or Frances S. White or Kirsten K. Gallant, either one of whom may act, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the Owner and Holder of the Note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse door or other usual and customary location as designated by the Clerk's Office on December 29, 2009, at 10:00 am, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the real property secured by the abovedescribed Deed of Trust recorded July 1, 2004 in Book 3487, on Page 643, situated in Union County, North Carolina, as more particularly described

therein, which legal description is made a part hereof and incorporated herein by reference as if fully set forth herein. Said property as shown on the above-described Deed of Trust is commonly known as 2335 Lexington Avenue, Monroe, North Carolina 28110. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property within 10 days of the posting of this notice is/are David W. Friendly and Richard Dean Whitlock. In the event the property which is the subject of this Notice of Sale is residential real property with less than fifteen (15) rental units, an order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to N.C.G.S. 4521.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the Clerk of Superior Court. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon ten (10) days’ notice to the landlord. The tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of termination. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of forty-five cents (45¢) per one hundred dollars ($100.00), up to a maximum of $500.00. A cash deposit (cashier's check or certified funds, no

personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all of the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Should the foreclosure action be dismissed or any portion have to be redone for any reason, the bid deposit will be returned to the third party bidder and no other remedies will be assertable. The third party bidder acts upon their own risk if they expend any funds in favor of the foreclosed property prior to the receipt of a deed from the Substitute Trustee. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, and encumbrances of record. Dated:

004 Legals November 24, 2009 Peter J. Underhill or Frances S. White or Kirsten K. Gallant, either one of whom may act, Substitute Trustee NC Bar No. 6418 P.O. Box 30368 Charlotte, NC 28230-0368 704.909.5656 TAC: 874781N December 15, 22, 2009

005 Special Notices ★★★★★★★★★★★★

GENERAL INFORMATION

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm DEADLINES In Column Call before 1:30pm the day prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on Thursday and for Sunday call before 1:30 pm on Friday. Display Sunday Tuesday Wed. Thursday Friday Saturday

12 Noon Thurs 4PM Friday 4PM Monday 4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES The Enquirer-Journal reserves the right to edit or reject and correctly classify an ad at any time. The Enquirer-Journal will assume no liability for omission of advertising material in whole or in part.


8B / Tuesday, December 15, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

SKYECROFT .87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

Enjoy entertaining in this wonderful Marshville home: over 3500 sq. ft. on 2 acres. Holiday dinners a breeze to prepare in the spacious kitchen. Grand living and dining rooms. 5 bedrooms; 5 fireplaces; den; screeened porch.

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

Call Elsie: 704-363-8815 PRUDENTIAL CAROLINAS REALTY

$169,000

REDUCED New 2007, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, rec room, s/s appliances, ceramic tile, 1 ac lot, lots of extras. Must see! $167,400 CALL 704-243-4656

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.)

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath.

2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

REDU

CED!

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000

Lot $30,000 5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To advertise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

We accept cash, checks or Mastercard, VISA and American Express. Cancellable but non-refundable.

Chimney Cleaning

Concrete Work

To Subscribe Call 704-261-2219

Construction

Firewood

www.enquirerjournal.com

Mini Storage

Pressure Washing

Encourage your child to read the newspaper.

12152009 ej  

December 15, 2009

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