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CHURCH COOKERY

MORE TROOPS TO AFGHANISTAN

The Bethlehem United Methodist Women have produced a 354-page cookbook of family recipes. 10A

President Obama announced Tuesday that he plans to send another 30,000 troops to Afghanistan; some will go as soon as Christmas. 8A

The

Enquirer-Journal Your county• Your news•Your paper

December 2, 2009 • 50 cents

WEDNESDAY Rain likely

High: 57 Low: 51 Complete report: Page 10A

Deaths

James Brantley Harold Robert Hawk Patsy Hogan Mary Kindley John Russell McCollum Jr. Robert L. Steele Jr.

Doctors, patients talk money More are balancing medical and financial concerns in decisions By Richard Craver

Media General News Service The cost of health care has long been the elephant in the room of doctor-patient discussions. “Doctors generally avoid asking patients about health insurance and finances because physicians want what they believe is best for their patients,” said Mark Hall, a professor of law and

Hugo anthology signing slated

BIRTHDAYS Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially: Chad Pipes, Tamara Wilson, Brandi Medlin and Jeff Greene. Call (704) 261-2278 or e-mail birthdays@theej.com to add your names to t he list.

INSIDE Classified Comics Food Obituaries Opinion Sports State

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public health at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. “What’s best might not always be most affordable.” That’s changing. Millions of Americans have no health insurance, and many of those that do are facing increasing costs, higher deductibles and larger copays. The result: doctors and patients are being encouraged - if not forced - to talk money upfront like they would about buying a set of tires. Not having the conversation could prove financially devastating. Researchers at Harvard University reported that medi-

patient’s overall finances if they lose their job and health insurance and can’t afford the bill? • Is there financial liability and ethical accountability for recommending a lower-cost option that significantly affects the patient’s quality of life - living with more pain than necessary - or projected lifespan? • How much defensive medicine - ordering tests that are borderline necessary to defuse any potential legal action - should be practiced? Hall studied such issues for

See HEALTH / Page 9A

Quarry eludes police search BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

E-J staff photos by Ed Cottingham

Businesses like Carolina Courts may be displaced by the Monroe Bypass and Connector.

Officials worry that new road will hurt town image BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

INDIAN TRAIL It’s not just a gym. That’s what the mayor says, what neighboring business say, and what Carolina Courts President Ron Esser wants road planners to remember as they recommend the route for the Monroe Parkway. Right now, the preferred route would plow straight through the new basketball center, one of two family sports complexes that anchor Indian Trail’s family entertainment corridor. “It certainly would hurt the town in regard to this image that we were building as a youth sports center,” Mayor John Quinn said. For a town like Indian Trail to be vibrant, it takes “people caring and focusing on youth.” If the N.C. Turnpike Authority stays with the proposed route, it would take a swath out of Carolina Courts, forcing the basket-

ball and volleyball gym to find a new location, and take ancillary businesses with it. “It was shocking with everybody that we would lose Carolina Courts,” said Maureen Mulhall, general manager of the Extreme Ice Center, located minutes from Carolina Courts. Mulhall said the parkway route would likely benefit the ice center because an exit is proposed nearby, but she said that losing Carolina Courts could hurt Extreme Ice because parents might have to choose one over the other. While each center offers athletic outlets, the sports they provide are different. Because of their proximity to each other, parents of children with diverse interests can say “yes” to a wider variety of hobbies. Esser said he would like to stay in town if possible. “It’s really grown into a place where people from the commu-

See ROAD / Page 7A

Council seats new members BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

Staff Writer

MONROE In a swift decision, Monroe City Council voted unanimously for Councilwoman Dottie Nash to be mayor pro tem Tuesday night. “I want to thank council for the vote of confidence,” she said. “I didn’t even have to campaign.” Mayor Bobby Kilgore and the three recently elected councilmembers – John Ashcraft, Margaret Desio and Freddie Gordon – were sworn in. Although the meeting was over by 7 p.m., the council heard and

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cal problems caused 62 percent of all personal bankruptcies in 2007. Of those bankruptcies, 60 percent of the filers had private medical insurance. Then again, having the discussions could open a Pandora’s Box for physicians. Such as: • How much should a physician know about a patient’s job status, or consider the employer’s financial health, in determining ability to afford medical services? • Is there financial liability and ethical accountability for recommending the most costly surgical procedure, which could drain the

ELBOWED OUT

WHO’S NEWS

MONROE To commemorate the 20th anniversary of Hurricane Hugo, A. Borough Books, in cooperation with the Union County Public Library, has just published “Remembering Hurricane Hugo — LifeExperience Stories from Union County, N.C.” For this keepsake booklet, 37 local residents have contributed their personal stories of disbelief, horror, relief, coping and faith during and after the disaster. Their anthology, edited by Margaret G. Bigger, also includes some humorous anecdotes, vintage photos and an index. Other residents have provided many more photos, which will be included in a scrapbook, a project-inprocess by genealogy librarian Patricia Poland. The anthology will be officially released Sunday at a library reception and will be on sale after that date at local bookstores and gift shops. The reception and book signing will be from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Union County Public Library, 316 E. Windsor St.

Monroe, N.C.

voted on two public hearing items. Gordon recused himself from the second one, which requested that the city annex 1.95 acres on Lancaster Avenue for Gordon Funeral Homes. Interim planDottie Nash ning director Lisa Stiwinter said the company didn’t want to have to pay outside the city limits for water and sewer fees. The board unanimously approved the annexation.

Carolina Courts offers family friendly recreational activities.

MONROE Police searched a neighborhood in Wingate for a man who fled from a license check and into a wooded area. No arrest was made and the State Highway Patrol called off the search after about three hours. Police said they were looking into a possible link to a Monday morning shooting in Marshville, but did not confirm the man was a suspect. Trooper Bryan Kirkpatrick said the chase started at a license checkpoint on Monroe-Ansonville Road. Police told the driver the Ford Thunderbird he was driving was listed stolen and he tried to escape toward Monroe. After making several turns in the city, the driver came back down Monroe-Ansonville Road heading toward Wingate. Just after Bob White Circle he spun out, and ran into a wooded area toward a housing development in the northwest outskirts of Wingate. Police set up a perimeter from Monroe-Ansonville Road, along Bob White Circle to Maye Street. A bloodhound tried to track the scent and a helicopter made passes above the area. The search was abandoned after about three hours. Police were going to check into a connection from a Monday shooting in which Mitchell Gene Little Jr., of 127 Ridge Run in Monroe, was found dead in his car in Marshville

See SEARCH / Page 7A

The best pageant Melinda Plue and Tripp Helms rehearse a scene from “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” which will be staged by St. . Paul’s Episcopal Church this week. Story and photos on Page 7A. Photo by Rick Crider


2A / Wednesday, December 2, 2009

DEATHS John McCollum Jr.

MONROE John Russell McCollum Jr., 62, died Sunday (Nov. 29, 2009). Memorial service will be 2 p.m. Firday at Gordon Funeral Service, with burial in Lakeland Memorial Park. Born May 19, 1947, in

Mary Frances Dennis Kindley

INDIAN TRAIL The beloved Mrs. Frances Kindley, went home to her Lord and Savior on November 30, 2009. She was born August 19, 1924, in Mint Hill, North Carolina. Mrs. Kindley was the daughter of the late John W. and Essie Dennis. Mrs. Kindley was preceded in death by her husband and best friend Quentin R. Kindley of 54 years. Mrs. Kindley made her home with her husband and 5 children, Becky Plyler and husband Butch, of Wesley Chapel, Janice Barbour and husband Jimmy of Statesville, Theron Kindley and wife Becky, Larry Kindley and wife Terry of Indian Trail and Nancy Summerville and her husband Mike of Indian Trail. Mrs. Kindley loved her grandchildren Davey Plyler, Ronnie Plyler, Lisa Galliher, Nicole Engelbert, Anne Berryhill, Dawn Kindley, Bryan Kindley and Chris Summerville. She also was blessed with six great-grandchildren, Cassidy Plyler, Brett Plyler, Anna Plyler, Gracie Plyler, Hunter Galliher and Haley Galliher. Mrs. Kindley loved her church family and Indian Trail. Mrs. Kindley was a big asset to her husband who was mayor of Indian Trail for many years. She would attend meetings with him, every Sun-

COMNG EVENTS Union County, he was a son of the late John Russell and Reba Hinson McCollum Sr. Survivors include one brother, William McCollum of Monroe. Visitation will be from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Memorials may be made day they would ride the streets to report street lights out and many of the other things she needed to do to help make the city a better place for everyone. She also had worked in the Indian Trail Elementary and Sun Valley Middle school cafeterias. She was a lifetime member of the Indian Trail United Methodist Church. Only bad weather or illness would keep Mrs. Kindley from visiting her church family every Sunday. She loved her Sunday school class and the people in her church. One of the highlights of her day would be to join “Jo� and all her friends for Lunch Bunch at the church. She will truly be missed. Mrs. Kindley loved her very special and dear friends, Shirley Plyler, Mrs. Joyce Derrick and Mrs. Peggy Rowell. Especially the times they had at outings. She also enjoyed their daily chats and caring gestures. They were her guardian angels. Mrs. Kindley is survived by a sister, Mrs. Helen Yow and a brother, Charles Dennis. She was preceded in death by two sisters and two brothers. The visitation will be held at Heritage Funeral Home in Indian Trail from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. tonight. Funeral services for Mrs. Kindley will be conducted by the Reverend Jimmy Chrisawn at Indian Trail United Methodist Church on Thursday, December 3 at 2:00 p.m. with burial in the Indian Trail Cemetery. The family asks that memorials be made to Indian Trail United Methodist Church, Box 130, Indian Trail, NC 28079. Arrangements are in care of Heritage Funeral Home, Indian Trail Chapel.

to Wingate United Methodist Church, 111 Hinson St., Wingate, NC 28174; or Humane Society of Union County, P.O. Box 101, Monroe, NC 28111. Online condolences may be left at www.gordonfuneralservice.com.

Harold Hawk

MATTHEWS — Harold Robert Hawk, 75, died Monday (Nov. 30, 2009). Arrangements will be announced by Heritage Funeral Home of Indian Trail.

Bob Steele Jr.

MONROE Robert L. “Bob� Steele Jr., 79, died Tuesday (Dec. 1, 2009) at home. Arrangements will be announced by Davis Funeral Home.

James Brantley

MARSHVILLE Mr. James Lloyd Brantley, 90, of Marshville, died Monday evening, November 30, 2009, at his home. Born June 20, 1919, in Union County he was a son of the late James Malcom and Connie Pope Brantley. Mr. Brantley was an U.S. Army veteran of WW II. A funeral service to celebrate the life of James will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, December 3, 2009, from the graveside of Fairfield Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends following the service. Mr. Brantley is survived by his wife Frances of the home; two sons, Jimmy Brantley and his wife, Cheryl, Dennis Brantley and his wife Becky all of Marshville; 5 grandchildren and 5 greatgrandchildren. The family suggests memorials be made to the Fairfield Baptist Church, 3129 Hwy. 205, Marshville, NC 28103. The Morgan & Son Funeral Home is serving the family of Mr. Brantley. PAID OBITUARY

PAID OBITUARY

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Patsy Hogan

JEFFERSON, S.C. — Patsy Ann Funderburk Hogan died Monday (Nov. 30, 2009). Funeral will be 2 p.m. Thursday at Jefferson United Methodist Church, with burial in the Jefferson City Cemetery. She was a daughter of the late Willis Hazel and Annie Coppedge Funderburk. She was also preceded in death by a daughter, Cathy Ann Hogan. Survivors include three sons Timothy Hogan (Debra) of Jefferson, Jackson Hogan of Rock Hill, S.C., Randolph Hogan (Robin) of Monroe; two brothers, Gerald A. Funderburk and Tony Funderburk, both of Jefferson; 11 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Visitation will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at the church. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society, 154 Milestone Way, Greenville, SC 29615. Sutton-Baumgartner Funeral Home of Pageland, S.C. (suttonfh@shtc.net) is handling the arrangements. PAID OBITUARY

(Editor’s note: To list the event of your nonprofit civic, social or governmental organization, call 704261-2252.)

Today

• RETIRED LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION, 7:30 a.m. Palace Restaurant. •  MONROE-UNION BREAKFAST ROTARY, 7:30 a.m., Golden Corral. For details, call 704-507-3956. •  EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704282-4657. •  TODDLER TIME, 9:30 a.m., Marshville Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  STORY TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-8433131. • COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 10 a.m., Walkersville Presbyterian Church. Bring a covered dish. •  STORY TIME, 10 a.m., Marshville Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-6242828. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • JOB SEARCH HELP, 10 a.m. to noon, Monroe Library. Details, 704-283-8184, ext. 232. • TODDLER TIME, 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m., Union West Regional Library. For ages 18 to 36 months. • BABY TIME, 11 a.m., Monroe Library. Details, 704-283-8184. • STORY TIME, 11:30 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 3 to 5. •  MONROE BUSINESS ADVISORY COUNCIL, 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. For details, call 704-2892543. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-283-7233. • ANIME CLUB, 4:45 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., Union West Library. For ages 13 to 18; permission slip required. Details, 704821-7475. • MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 5:30 p.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. Free. Registration required; call 704-624-2828. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704-377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • CLASSIC CRUISERS, 7 p.m., Poplin Place shopping center, West Roosevelt Boulevard, Monroe. For information, contact Jim Collura at 704-289-6208 or classiccruisers@hotmail.com. •  BINGO, 7:30 p.m., Vietnam Veterans Association Post No. 14, 620 Roosevelt Blvd., $2,500 program. Doors open at 5 p.m. For details, call 704-283-6165. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704-821-4256, 704-763-0784.

Thursday

• UNION WEST ROTARY, 7:30 a.m., civic building behind Indian Trail Town Hall. For details, call Sean Helms, 704-849-9332. • WAXHAW-WEDDINGTON SUNRISE ROTARY CLUB, 7:30 a.m., Rippington’s Restaurant, 109 W. South Main Street, Waxhaw. For information, call Arthur Lightbody at 704843-6048. • BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS, 10 a.m., Union West Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-821-7475. • BABY TIME, 10:30

a.m., Union West Library. Details, 704-821-7475. • MONROE LIONS CLUB meeting, noon, Quincy’s Family Steakhouse. Call Wanda Deese, 704-577-7669, for details. •  KIWANIS CLUB OF MONROE, noon to 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. For details, call Fran Dandridge at 704289-9429. •  SENIOR CITIZENS CANASTA, 12:30 p.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Center. For information, call Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center at 704-282-4657. • MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 3:30 p.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-283-8184. • HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704283-8184, ext. 238. • Wii-LEGO ROCK BAND, 4:30 p.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. For ages 8-12. Registration recommended; call 704-624-2828. • THURSDAY TALES, 5 p.m., Monroe Library. For ages 5 and up and their caregivers. Details, 704-283-8184. • MOTHER/DAUGHTER KNITTING CLASS, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Monroe Library. For ages 8 to 12. To register, call 704-283-8184, ext. 231. • WAXHAW BOOK CLUB, 5:45 p.m., Waxhaw Library. Book exchange party. Details, 704-843-3131. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. •  WAXHAW TOPS #613 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Waxhaw Bible Church, 6810 Pleasant Grove Road. Details, 704-8435518 or 704-254-3880. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • UNION COUNTY CRUISERS, 6:30 p.m., Monroe Mall, next to Pizza Hut. Custom and classic cars. Details, 704238-1600. • UNION COUNTY SADDLE CLUB, 7 p.m., Saddle Club grounds, East Sandy Ridge Road, Monroe. Details, 704-7635396. • SENIOR DANCE, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Center, Line dancing and ballroom dancing. Details, 704-282-4657. •  BINGO, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Indian Trail VFW, 100 VFW Lane, Indian Trail; $500 jackpot. For details, call 704-821-9753. • FOREST HILLS BAND BOOSTERS, 7 p.m., Forest Hills High School bandroom. Details, 704-233-0125. •  WAXHAW LIONS CLUB, 7 p.m., site TBA. For details, call 704-8435537. • BOY SCOUT TROOP 98, 7 p.m., Hemby Bridge Church, 6010 Mill Grove Road. For details, call 704-882-3482. •  WEDDINGTON HIGH PTSA, 7 p.m., media center. • UNION COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 7 p.m., Bear’s Lair Restaurant, 6751 Old Monroe Road, Indian Trail. Details, Terry Glesias, 704-243-3262 or secretary@ucncgop.org. •  UNION DISTRICT BOY SCOUTS district committee meeting, 7:30 p.m., Central United Methodist Church Scout hut, Hayne and Sunset. Details, 980-722-3787. •  WEDDINGTON HIGH BAND BOOSTERS, 7:30 p.m., Weddington High band room. For details, call 704-226-0205. • COCAINE ANONYMOUS meeting, 7:30 p.m., at the Friendship Home, 2111 Stafford St. Ext., Monroe. • CIVIL AIR PATROL, South Piedmont Squadron, 7:30 p.m., Indian Trail Town Hall. For details, contact Jerry Langley at 704-847-8304. •  UNION COUNTY SADDLE CLUB, 7:30 p.m., clubhouse. Open for novice and experi-

enced horse owners/ enthusiasts. For details, contact Rick Harmon at 704-764-9104, or Harriet Metrosky at 704-2895773. • AL-ANON, 8 p.m., First Step Recovery Center, 1623 Sunset Drive, Monroe. Details, 704-2830944, 704-764-7651.

Friday

• EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704-2824657. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • MORNING BOOK CLUB, 10 a.m., Union West Library. Topic, “The House at Rivertonâ€? by Kate Morgan. Details, 704-821-7475. • BABY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. Details, 704624-2828. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-2837233. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Nicey Grove Baptist Church, 318 Camden Road, Wingate. Details, 704-221-7352. • OVERCOMERS OUTREACH ANONYMOUS, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., 1700 Secrest Shortcut Road. For details call 704-846-9223. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704-8214256, 704-763-0784. • CAROLINA SINGLES & MARRIED COUPLES CLUB DANCE, 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., Shrine Club, Phifer Street. Free line dance class, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission, $10. Band, The Delmonicos. Must be 21. Details, Ellen Benton, 704-283-1304.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 3A

YOU CAN HELP Editor’s note: News items for the “You Can Help” section may include poker runs, charitable fundraisers (charities must be registered 501(c)3 or 501(c)4 organizations), and volunteer opportunities. All items must be received by noon Friday to be considered for inclusion the following Wednesday.

Boy Scout Troop 55 craft fundraiser

MONROE Boy Scout Troop 55 will have its 18th annual Christmas Arts and Crafts Show Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church, 800 S. Hayne St. This is the troop’s main fundraiser. There will be craft vendors and a wide range of items.

New Salem Elf Run

NEW SALEM The New Salem Roadrunners will have their third annual Elf Run at the New Salem Elementary School track on Saturday. Registration for the family fun run/walk begins at 8:30 a.m. and the walk begins at 9 a.m. Entry fee is a new unwrapped toy. The Roadrunners hope to raise money and toys for local families in need at Christmas. Carolinas Medical Center-Union will conduct a health fair, Dwayne Carpenter will provide DJ service and Santa will pay a visit. Refreshments will be available and goody bags will be offered while supplies last. Awards, including some for best elf costume and best Christmas spirit, will be presented at 10 a.m. For information, call Beverly Little at 704-3859430.

Christmas donations for troops

Indian Trail Living Way Foursquare Church in Indian Trail will host a donation dropoff from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Donations will go to the 759th Military Police Battalion serving in Afghanistan. Items needed include three- to four-blade razors, shaving cream, hand sanitizer, lotion, cotton balls, cotton swabs, gum, Lance crackers, CDs, DVDs (not war related), twin bed sheets and boxes of greeting cards. Some of those serving in the battalion have family in Union County.

LOCAL BRIEFS Wesley Chapel December meetings

WESLEY CHAPEL The village of Wesley Chapel will be having the following meetings at Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church, 120 Potter Road, during December. All start at 7 p.m. • Dec. 10, Parks and Recreation Committee • Dec. 14, Village Council • Dec. 28, Planning Board The following meetings will be held at the town office at 4107 New Town Road, at the time indicated: • Monday, 7 p.m., Downtown Committee • Dec. 15, 6:30 p.m., Ordinance Review Committee • Dec. 21, 7 p.m., Board of Adjustment Any individual with a disability who needs an interpreter or other auxiliary aids or services for this meeting should call 704-243-7391 at least 48 hours before the scheduled meeting.

Hospital board to meet Friday

MONROE The Union Memorial Regional Medical Center Inc. board of directors will meet at 9 a.m. Friday in the Carolinas Medical Center-Union board room on the second floor of Sutton Hall.

Items will be shipped overseas on Monday. The church is located at 5501 Old Monroe Road, across from Brandon Oaks. For more information, call Deirdre Barbee at 704-3204375.

Red Cross schedules blood drives

MONROE The Union County chapter of the American Red Cross has the following blood drives scheduled: • Sunday, noon to 4:30 p.m., Faith United Methodist Church, 3708 Faith Church Road, Indian Trail. • Dec. 11, 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Baptist Church of Monroe, 109 Morrow Ave., Monroe, sponsored by Lions Club of Monroe. • Dec. 17, 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., District Court judge’s office, 400 N. Main St., Monroe. • Dec. 21. 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Hopewell Baptist Church, 420 Hopewell Church Road, Monroe. For more information on these blood drives or to schedule a blood drive, contact the American Red Cross, Union County chapter, at 704-283-7402.

CBC plans blood drives

MONROE Community Blood Center of the Carolinas will have the following blood drives in November in Union County:

Michael Bowman

Precious Memories Our Father God Almighty called you to His mansion but your immortal spirit still lives on within us, raw with grief our hearts are empty cause you are not here... We can reminisce about all the happiness and all the joyous days we shared together now and rejoice with a smile knowing in our hearts that you have traveled alone to a better place. We thought of you with love today but that’s nothing new; we thought about you yesterday and the day before that too...We think of you in silent prayer and often speak your name with all happiness. Now all we have are precious memories within our hearts and your picture in a frame, your memories are our keepsake which we will never part but the most difficult part we must go on but not without missing you deeply... God knows that life was meant to be passed on someday that’s why He said: “Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid”. God has you in His celestial hierarchy, we have you in our hearts. God moves in mighty ways to bring comfort in our emotional healing because we all cried uncontrollably... Certainly we miss you on this special day, your birthday, but God Almighty has you in His playground. Now we feel your infinite spirit shinning down from His pearly gates where you await with open arms and that big smile we feel from many, many miles. Eternal Peace:

R.I.P. “Happy B-Day” “Benzo” Missing U Deeply

• Monday, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mount Moriah Methodist Church, 6722 Highway 218 East, New Salem. • Dec. 12, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Joseph Asher Burn Replacement Drive, 2028 Wesley Chapel Road, Indian Trail. • Dec. 22, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Rehabilitation and Nursing Center of Monroe, 1212 E. Sunset Drive, Monroe. • Dec. 26, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Union Square Cinema 8, 1911 Dickerson Blvd.; free movie ticket to all presenting donors. Donors must weigh a minimum of 120 pounds. Call 704-972-4700 to make an appointment at any location.

Turning Point Christmas drive

MONROE Union County Mommies is collecting hygiene items for Turning Point, a domestic violence shelter for women and children, through Dec. 18. Items needed are deodorant, soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, shampoo, conditioner, tampons and pads. Scented body lotion, bath loofahs or sponges, liquid body wash or shower gel may also be donated. Union County Mommies

will pick up items anywhere in Union County. Donations will go to the shelter for Christmas. Items are tax deductible. To donate, call Sheila Jones at 704-281-7621 or email sheila@unioncountymommies.com.

Wingate VFD Christmas tree lot

WINGATE The Wingate Volunteer Fire Department has opened a Christmas tree lot, with proceeds going to the department’s operating expenses. The department has more than 100 trees. The lot will be open until trees sell out from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. The lot is located at the corner of U.S. Highway 74 and Bivens Street, near SunTrust Bank in Wingate.

Gel inserts for soldiers

INDIAN TRAIL Union West Rotary has issued a challenge to all Union County Rotary Clubs. The club will match up to $1,000 to purchase 500 pairs of gel inserts for soldiers. Gel inserts help

with foot comfort and fatigue, as they wear their boots for up to 20 hours a day. Union West Rotary is joining in this campaign with the Charlotte South Park Rotary Club by challenging the Union County clubs to help exceed the 500 pairs goal. Any Union County Rotarian, or anyone who would just like to participate in the challenge may send a check to Union West Rotary, P.O. Box 505, Indian Trail, NC 28079.

Literacy Council wish list

Monroe The following items will help the Literacy Council serve students and tutors this holiday season and into the new year: • Volunteer tutors to work with adult learners one-on-one or in small groups for two hours per week. Free training is provided. • Workshop snacks and paper products: nonperishable cookies, salty snacks, coffee, tea, bottled water, napkins, plates, Styrofoam cups for hot drinks. Gift cards to grocery stores will be used to purchase the above items for our workshops as needed.

• Postage stamps • Invitation envelopes, card stock, small notepads, manila folders or gift cards to Office Max, Walmart, Target, etc. • Empty Hewlett Packard and Lexmark printer ink cartridges, which can be redeemed for free paper • Financial contributions to the book fund

Soldier coin fundraiser

MONROE Members of the Family Readiness Group are raising money to purchase unit coins for soldiers in the Bravo Battery 1st Battalion 113th Field Artillery. These unit coins, also known as challenge coins among other names, identify their bearers as unit members. Family members are expecting the cost of the coins to be between $3,500 and $4,000. They have set up an account at the State Employees Credit Union under the name “Coins of Courage.” Anyone wishing to donate money can do so at any SECU. The unit would like to have the coins delivered for presentation while the unit is still deployed.


V

iewpoint

4A Wednesday, December 2, 2009

www.enquirerjournal.com

“A conscience which has been bought once will be bought twice.”

Norbert Wiener

Editor: Stan Hojnacki / shojnacki@theej.com

The Enquirer-Journal

Since 1873, a heritage of commitment and involvement

Publisher: Marvin Enderle Managing Editor: Stan Hojnacki News Editor: Jim Muldrow City Editor: Betsy O’Donovan

A CAROLINA VIEW

Liability isn’t the taxpayer’s Drinking gasoline is not healthy - not even in amounts as small as one part per million. But with tens of thousands of underground storage tanks holding gasoline, other fuels and assorted toxic chemicals, very bad ingredients are seeping into the nation’s groundwater. And that means they are in the wells and aquifers that provide about half of all the drinking water consumed in this country. Leaking underground storage tanks have been a major concern in North Carolina for decades. In 1985, the General Assembly established a program for repairing or removing dangerous tanks and for cleaning up the mess they leave. It’s time to strengthen that program. Since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began tracking confirmed cases of storage-tank leaks nationally, the number has risen to approximately a half million, almost 25,000 in North Carolina, according to a June 2008 EPA report. North Carolina has spent $544 million since 1985 cleaning up leaking tanks. But that hasn’t been enough, the legislature’s Program Evaluation Division reported recently. The state will need an additional $513 million over the next 25 years just to tend to the current backlog. The Associated Press reported that North Carolina ranks ninth nationally today in total underground tanks 29,000 -with more than half older than 20 years. That’s not a good statistic. A portion of the state gasoline and kerosene tax goes to a state clean-up fund for leaking tanks. The legislative division is recommending raising that tax from one-quarter cent per gallon to seven-sixteenths. As much as we all hate paying higher taxes, if that is what must be done, then the legislature must do it. The health dangers posed by leaking tanks are too high. But before legislators raise any taxes, they should revisit the entire strategy of financing this program with taxes. In 1985, legislators were concerned about putting too much financial burden on tank owners. They feared that “mom-and-pop” owners of small gas stations would be forced out of business by clean-up costs. Taxpayers deserve a full accounting of who owns these tanks now. The division said many tank owners rely on the state to pay. That’s not fair, especially if the owners of the tanks are big, profitable corporations or even small ones. State law on leaking-tank liability needs to be strengthened before any tax increase is instituted. It’s time to assure both that our drinking water is clean and that the people who are polluting it pay to clean it up. Winston-Salem Journal

I have finally finished qualifying as Firefighter 1 As Thanksgiving dawned this past Thursday at High Grass Manor I had a lot to be thankful for. A wonderful wife and two great kids, a nice house, and a job I dearly love. But this year I had something else to be thankful- the night before I had completed the final class I needed in the patented W.S. Melton Firefighter I for Firemen with Lives and Wives to receive state certification as a Firefighter I. This course has taken up every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of my life since August 17 and then some. Over 225 hours of training that covered 18 individual blocks of instruction in subjects like Orientation and Safety, Personal Protective Equipment, and my two personal favorites Ladders and Rescue. Ladders I devoted an entire column too. Rescue I haven’t mentioned. That ‘un had a practical evolution that included having to dive through a window into a burning room wearing full turnout gear and air pack, finding a dummy, dragging it to a window, and then diving back through the window again. Let’s just say I learned from this exercise that at my age and size lift off can be problematic- and touch down can be even worse than that. After some of these classes me and the Ben Gay warmed up nicely together. So I’ve come full circle now.

Bill Melton Columnist

I started my career in public safety at the age 14 with East Gaston Volunteer Fire Department. I joined Mt. Holly Lifesaving Crew at 18 and ran rescue back before we had real paramedics in this county. About all we could give you was some big Bandaids, some oxygen if you were really bad off, and a fast ride to the hospital. I was so good at that last part I could’ve driven for NASCAR. I gave both those up for a career in law enforcement though. First as a Mecklenburg County Police officer in 1988 and then as Gaston County Police officer in April of 1990. I did rejoin East Gaston briefly back then but I didn’t stay long. Fact is, I was having too much fun being a County cop, a “Rural”, as we’re still affectionately known. And I have had a ball there ever since. It’s no trick of fate that my pickup truck is green and gray or that most everything I wear on or off duty has the department logo or name on it. The Gaston County Police

Department is my true passion. And currently as the captain over training, recruiting, records, victim witness, accreditation, and all the officers we have assigned to schools I’m having more fun than I’ve ever had in my life. It is a great job at a great police department working with great people. Then Jacob came along and wanted to join the fire department. There was no way I could say no. So back I came. Only to find a lot of water had shot out the fire hose since then. The best way I can explain it is when I left the fire service I was like the Professor on Gilligan’s Island. When the boat left the dock I was content professional in the fire service. I trained new firemen how to fight fire, drive fire trucks, and pump water out of them. But I came back from the Island some 20 years later I’d been bucked down to Gilligan. At least now that I’ve finished Firefighter I maybe I can at least aspire to be the Skipper. I’m at least built at lot like him anyway. *** • William S, Melton Jr, is a Southern numorist, an author and a good ol’ boy who was once a minister in Union County and now is a police lieuten-

Monroe native remembers December 7, 1941 Osborne “Ozzie” Ayscue Jr. would have been a member of Walter Bickett High School Class of 1951 had he not gone away to Phillips Andover in the eleventh grade. As a tenth-grader, he was the starting tailback on the Purple Pythons football team. The 1949 undefeated team (see September 2003 article) was that same team intact except for Marion Grantland taking his position. The team captain was Phillip Broome, Elsie Lee’s brother, whose name is on the Vietnam Wall. Ozzie and his crowd christened the Teen Age Club, watched Winton Clontz dance around the juke box at the local pool, listened to Jimmy Stack play the vibraphones, and generally mostly lived innocent lives. Ozzie, Claudia Duncan Ogden, Dorothy “Dot” Duncan Hodges, his cousin Sandra Penegar Mixon, and his late brother Quincy took art lessons at the USO during the war from Paul Bartlett, a nationally-known Charlotte artist who came down to teach the soldiers, and more “bodies” were needed to justify his trips. Ozzie Ayscue, wrote the following article three years ago on December 7, 2006, upon realizing that only three people in his law firm remembered what

Nita Kendrick Williamson Columnist had happened sixty-five years earlier on that fateful day. Ozzie has always felt that his generation, growing up in the middle of the Great Depression, living through the Second World War and watching the Gold Stars go up his neighbors’ windows, learned in a way that those who have come along since have not - what things matter and what things do not. “Sixty-five years ago today, I was an eight-year-old third grader at John D. Hodges Elementary School in Monroe. In those days, radio was our principal contact with the outside world. There was no television, and newspapers outside the major cities, were oriented towards their own communities. If you wanted to read the New York Times, it came in the mail several days later. Few did. “There were three radio sta-

tions, all AM, in nearby Charlotte, WBT, WSOC, and WAYS, carrying news from CBS, NBC and MBS, respectively. It was a ritual in my household for us to eat both breakfast and supper listening to the day’s news on a radio (Philco, wooden cabinet shaped in a cathedral arch, cloth covering over the speaker - they bring a great price now at the Metrolina Flea Market). Each program took all of fifteen minutes. “World War II commenced when Germany invaded Poland within a day or so on my first day in the first grade. Reports of the progress of the German armies across Europe had become daily fare. My family followed the news on a map of the world. (I am sure that I was a pest to my first-grade teacher, because every day when I got bored with what was going on, I would raise my hand and give her a report on the morning’s news, what country had been overrun that day.) We had gone to Sunday School and church on December 7, 1941, had come home, eaten lunch, and taken a nap. I remember that I was playing on the wooden back doorsteps outside of our breakfast room, where the radio was located, when the phone rang. (Our

number had three digits, which one called by giving the number to an anonymous woman known as “central.” The telephone earpiece, attached to a cord, hung from a hook on a black box on the wall in the downstairs hall. You stood and talked into a mouthpiece that protruded from the box, adjustable to the height of the user. Those too now bring a great price in the antique section of the flea market.) “My father quickly hung up and ran to turn on the radio. I spent the rest of the afternoon listening through static to fragmented reports from halfway around the world as the story of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was gradually pieced together, and I went to bed that night not knowing what was to come next, since this all seemed a long way from Monroe. “The next day, we were called in early from recess and assembled in the school auditorium, something that had never happened before. I remember that in those pre-airconditioning days, the windows were all open, so that we could hear the noises from outside, though, in truth, there was little noise in a small southern town in the early Forties. Mr. Kirkman, the stern principal of the school,

had placed a large radio in the center of the front of the stage. “In those days, there were few people who did not instantly recognize the voice that began to speak. From his radio ‘Fireside Chats’ that had chronicled our progression from the depths of the Great Depression, the measured voice of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, cultured by a classical education at Groton and Harvard, was at least as recognizable as those of Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy. “And so, a couple of hundred grammar schoolers (that’s what they were called back in the days when schools still taught grammar) sat and listened in silence as Roosevelt, in a speech that began, ‘Yesterday, a day that will live in infamy…’ asked the Congress to declare war on Japan. And then we filed back to our classrooms and turned our attention to our multiplication tables. “It is a mark of how fast time passes that there are, I believe, only three of us left in the firm who were alive and old enough to remember that day.” • Nita Kendrick Williamson writes a monthly nostalgia column for The Enquirer-Journal.


The Enquirer-Journal

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 5A

Christmas gift ideas for the serious food lover By Betsy O’Donovan

City Editor I love food. I love cooking, I love eating, I love talking about and reading about and thinking about food. I spend a lot of Saturday mornings at the farmer’s market and Sunday afternoons dreaming over cookbooks. Sound like anyone you know? Then these might be the gifts to choose:

(Not) a cookbook

My pick: “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A year in food life” by Barbara Kingsolver ($11, paperback) I love Kingsolver’s non-fiction, but this book languished on my toread list until my friend Brooke gave me some heirloom tomatoes from her home garden and told me that I had Kingsolver to thank for them. The tomatoes were great, and the book was even better. Honorable mentions: • “The Nasty Bits” by Anthony Bourdain, a collection of PG-13 and R-rated essays about food and restaurant life ($11, paperback) • “The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry” by Kathleen Flinn, her story of going from fasttrack dropout to graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Paris ($10, paperback) • “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan, a fascinating and (mostly) apolitical natural history of food that will end any romance you may have with chicken patties ($10, paperback) • “The New Food Lover’s Companion” by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst, I was 18 when I was given the first edition of this dictionary, which includes every ingredient you will may

ever come across, and my copy is food-stained, dog-eared and beloved. Still, I might give it up for the new edition, updated with an appendix that includes interesting miscellany like substitution suggestions and meat charts. ($12, paperback)

Show you care with ... meat?

I spent the summer munching my way through the Matthews Farmers Market and my favorite find had to be sweet Italian sausage from Grateful Growers Farm ($5.50 per pound). Cassie and Natalie farm Tamworth hogs on 10 acres in Lincoln County — which means this is a great gift for any locavore. Visit ggfarm.com for order information. Honorable mentions: • Grateful Growers’ prosciutto is tissue-thin and meltingly marbled, but a serious indulgence at $20 per pound (although it’s available in 8-ounce packs, too). • The boneless loin roast is lean and packed — I mean jammed — with flavor. Since they have no fat, it’s easy for new cooks to murder a loin roast by overcooking it. Remind your favorite foodie that the USDA has relaxed its temperature guidelines, to the betterment of pork everywhere. ($9 per pound; most roasts are 2 pounds) • If you’re feeling generous, consider one of the packages from Baucom’s Best Beef (also a Matthews Farmers Market regular) from cattle raised in Union County. Prices range from the introductory special for $52.95 to the Family Feast for $199.95. To order, visit BaucomsBest.com.

Contributed photo

From left, ‘Animal, Vegetable, Miracle’ by Barbara Kingsolver; ‘The Nasty Bits,’ by Anthony Bourdain; ‘The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry’ by Kathleen Flinn; ‘The Omnivore’s Dilemma’ by Michael Pollan; and ‘The New Food Lover’s Companion’ by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst.

Spice it up

A gift certificate to Penzey’s Spices There are a lot of decent places to buy spices in our area, starting with the local carnacerias and Asian markets, but Penzey’s is amazing one-stop shopping for a foodie with a jones for high-quality spices and seeds. Even their spice mixes, which the average food nut would rather make herself, are fantastic. (I particularly recommend Chili 3000, which I received as a gift earlier this year and burned through at a scandalous rate). Visit penzeys.com; the Web site is pretty awful, so make sure you get a catalog with your gift card.

Just one amazing ingredient

How many cooks do you know who have tried a real (not chocolate) truffle (from $50 for 3 ounces of domestic black truffles to $300 for an ounce of white Italian truffles at Earthy Delights, earthy.com), or who have the guts to buy exquisite chocolate (like Scharffen Berger chocolate for baking, $9 for 6 ounces at www. scharffenberger.com)? When Heinz vinegar costs $2 for a 32-ounce

bottle, it takes damnthe-torpedoes hedonism to buy really great vinegar, which makes it the perfect thing to give as a gift. (Try Katz and Co. for a vinegar gift box, $35 for three 350-milliliter bottles.)

Go back to basics I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again

(I’ll say it forever): The three crucial kitchen tools are wooden spoons, rubber spatulas and very, very sharp knives. Rubber spatulas take a lot of abuse, and I don’t know a single cook who wouldn’t be thrilled with a bouquet of spatulas in different colors and widths. Wooden spoons are tricky — no, really —

but just ask: Does your favorite foodie prefer spoons with deep bowls or shallow? A dowel handle or a flat, paddle handle? When in doubt, buy a few. And if you’re willing to spend a little more cash, Cooking Uptown ($6 per blade, www.cookinguptown. com) offers professional knife sharpening.

Wednesday Is Senior Day Come In for One of Our 10 Senior Menu Items Country Style Dinner Country Style Fish, Fries, Slaw & Pups....$3.99

Small Crab Dinner 2 Stuffed Crab, Fries, Slaw & Pups....$3.99

2 Piece Fish Dinner 2 Pieces of Batter Dipped Fish, French Fries, Slaw & Pups....$3.99

Bite Size Shrimp Entree Salad Entree Salad topped with Bite Size Shrimp and choice of dressing....$4.99

2 Piece Chicken Dinner 2 Chicken Tenders, Fries, Slaw & Pups....$4.99

5 Piece Shrimp Dinner 5 Fantail Shrimp, Fries, Slaw & Pups....$4.99

Bite Size Shrimp Dinner Golden Fried Bite Size Shrimp, fries, slaw & 2 hushpuppies....$4.99

Broiled Fish Basket Broiled Tilapia filet served on a bed of rice with mixed vegetables...$4.99

Broiled Chicken Basket Broiled Chicken Breast served on a bed of rice with mixed vegetables...$4.99

Broiled Shrimp Basket Broiled Shrimp served on a bed of rice with mixed vegetables...$4.99 *Each Meal includes a 16oz. drink.

Conservation district meeting is Tuesday MONROE The Natural Resources Conservation Service, Brown Creek Soil and Water Conservation District and Union Soil and Water Conservation District will conduct a public meeting to evaluate the current

conditions of natural resources in Anson County and Union County and to identify where conservation efforts are most needed. This prioritization will become the foundation on which their future plans and projects will be based.

The meeting will be Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Union County Agricultural Services Center, 3230 Presson Road. For more information please contact Mark Ferguson, district conservationist, at 704-233-1621 ext. 3.

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6A / Wednesday, December 2, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Woman fears she loves newfound family too much DEAR ABBY: I am a 30-yearold woman who has recently discovered my biological family. I have a wonderful halfbrother and several other amazing people I can now call family. The issue I’m struggling with is my profound attraction to my half-brother. I know it’s morally wrong, and I may be confusing the newfound relationship with him. Your perspective would be very much appreciated. -- CONFLICTED IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DEAR CONFLICTED: Physical attraction is a reflex -- and not something we can control. Our BEHAVIOR, on the other hand, is something we CAN control. This is a case of wrong time, wrong place. If you had been a member of the royal family in Egypt 3,000 years ago, you could have married your half-

Dear Abby Columnist

brother and continued the dynasty. But this is 2009 and the USA, so you’re just going to have to satisfy your physical attraction with someone less incestuous. *** DEAR ABBY: Is it rude to label one’s leftover food when staying with relatives? My husband, daughter and I visit his family often. When we go out to eat and bring leftovers back to the house, we usually label them if we want to eat them later. It has never seemed out

of the ordinary to me. I was raised that way. My mother always said that if I didn’t want something eaten by one of my siblings, then I should label it. Recently, my husband’s sister (who is 16) asked if she could eat the rest of some pizza we had bought the night before. I politely responded that I planned to have it for lunch. She remarked that she thinks it is funny that we are so protective of our food. It got me to thinking -- is our behavior odd? -- TAKEN ABACK IN WASHINGTON DEAR TAKEN ABACK: Considering that you come from a family in which anything in the fridge was considered fair game among your siblings, it’s not odd at all. And when your sister-in-law said what she did, you should have explained that to her. Had you done so, she wouldn’t

Horoscopes Dec. 2, 2009

Dennis the Menace significant role in your affairs, Dame Fortune herself is directing your life. You could benefit greatly from something being run by another. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It behooves you to get involved in some type of activity that requires a unified effort. You may or may not be the leader, but there will be surprising benefits garnered from group undertakings. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -More opportunities than usual may open up in areas involving your work or career. Although there may be a plethora of them, you could miss out if you’re not on your toes. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Your open mind and powerful desire for learning might elevate you to a different level. You could encounter issues that could beneficially advance your most ardent interests. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Someone who thinks highly of you could help fulfill a material desire. You will be expected to make the most of it in ways that can better your life.

Once you’re prepared, don’t be afraid to think big in the year ahead because the higher you reach, the closer to the top you will finish. It could mean finding a bigger job, making a bigger salary, or even becoming a bigwig. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Having a partner or working in close conjunction with someone toward a common goal could be quite fortunate for you. You will complement each other’s thinking. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- This could be a good day to enhance your financial or material base. Don’t lower your expectations or settle for a lesser job when much more is being offered. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Because you have something extra that is quite captivating, others will find you enormously appealing and your popularity will rise considerably. Make the

most of it. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Beginnings will not be nearly as important as endings, so give it your all as you race to the finish line. The satisfaction of a job well done will influence you for a long time to come. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You won’t have to go far to increase your circle of friends. There will be people all around interested in your ideas and what your thinking can do for them. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- There are all kinds of doors opening for you, but the ones you’re apt to like best are those developing in areas that influence your career or finances. Big bucks can be made at this time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Success can be yours in areas that you can control or direct, so devote as much time as possible to matters that are personally significant. Be both the director and star of your own show. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Even though chance may play a

Blondie

by Dean Young & Mike Gersher

ASTRO-GRAPH By Bernice Bede Osol

Garfield

Frank and Ernest

Hagar the Horrible

Dilbert

have questioned it. *** DEAR ABBY: My 20-yearold daughter, “Marissa,” is self-centered, lies compulsively and does not consider the consequences of her actions. She has been diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder. We have just learned that she is now pregnant, and her father and I are not happy about it. We will eventually be meeting the parents of the child’s father. Is it our responsibility to discuss Marissa’s problems with them? Or should we keep our mouths shut and pretend we are happy? -- TRYING TO DECIDE IN WISCONSIN DEAR TRYING TO DECIDE: Does the young man know about your daughter’s diagnosis and what it means? If not, then HE should be told and the implications explained to him.

by Jim Davis

by Bob Thaves

by Chris Browne

Because your daughter’s personality disorder will affect their son and the grandchild, his parents should also be informed. Ideally, he is the person who should do it. But if he doesn’t, lay all the cards on the table because the other grandparents should be prepared. And no, you do not have to “pretend” to be happy about the situation. And neither do they. *** Good advice for everyone -- teens to seniors -- is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby -- Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.)

Family Circus

Encourage your children to read the newspaper. B.C.

The Born Loser

Andy Capp

The Wizard of Id

by Scott Adams Peanuts

by Johnny Hart

by Art Sansom

by Reggie Smythe

by Bryant Parker & Johnny Hart

by Charles M. Schultz


The Enquirer-Journal

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 7A

Road Continued from Page 1A nity are wanting to be there,� he said. He would not tip his hand on the preferred relocation spots, but said he would like to stay in Indian Trail. “We live here, we love the community feel,� he said, but added that he needs to do “what’s best for the long-term viability for Carolina Courts.� Combined with other places to play sports, join clubs or participate in hobbies, Indian Trail is set up to attract young families, said Quinn. “Between these businesses, your family would never have to leave Indian Trail,� Mulhall said. She compared 21st-century Indian Trail to American life in the 1950s when communities offered everything a family would want. Quinn feared that atmosphere could be dampened if Carolina Courts moved. The gym has been in Indian Trail for about a year, and Esser said he really felt the community impact during the Fourth of July parade. Esser said people in the crowd were waving to him and shouting out appreciation for the gym. “It gave us a sense of being part of the community,� Esser said. “It’s one of the rewarding things.� If Carolina Courts moves, that might change. “I hope they stay,� Quinn said. “It’s such a successful venture.� The Monroe Parkway is touted as a road that will bring jobs, especially in eastern Union County, but it could have the opposite effect in Indian Trail, Quinn pointed to the outlying economy that could suffer if the gym moved out of town. Esser said the gym hosted 20 tournaments in the past year and has plans for 30 in 2010. Each tournament brings about 1,000 people, most from out of town. For surrounding hotels, restaurants and other businesses, that translates to 1,000 more potential patrons. “I think we have had a pretty good local impact,� Esser said. The Turnpike Authority plans to announce the final route next spring.

Search Continued from page 1A

shortly after 12:30 a.m. Monday. Little was shot and his car was riddled with bullet holes, but it was unclear if he was shot while driving or if he was shot, then tried to drive. A cause of death has not yet been determined.

E-J staff photos by Rick Crider

Cast members from “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever� conduct a dress rehearsal for the production that opens tonight.

St. Paul’s production opens tonight BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

Staff Writer

MONROE It’s possibly the worst Christmas pageant ever, but will it be a good play? Director Ginger Heath seems to think so: “We have some really talented kids in the show.� St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Monroe will present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,� modeled after the 1972 book of the same name, Wednesday through Sunday. In the play, a mother named Grace is told she has to do the Christmas pageant at her church when the regular director breaks her leg. The Herdmans, who are the neighborhood’s worst children, hear

Want to go?

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets: $8 for adults, $4 for children (16 and under), $6 for seniors (over 62) and $20 for family (2 adults and 2 children) Open seating, cash or check only, no intermission Tickets available at August Lily Florist and Key Printing and Graphic You can also e-mail stpaulspageant@hotmail.com to request tickets.

about the play and havoc ensues. “In the end, they finally do figure out what Christmas is all about,� Heath said. “It’s not a big deal for all the other kids who have been in the play every year. But it’s a really big deal to the Herdmans.� Among the cast members: a District Court judge and a local advocate for people with developmental disabilities. Melinda Plue will play the lead role of Grace. She said she intended only to take her daughters to audition but Heath talked her into playing the part. Wednesday will be her theatrical debut. “I didn’t find the role as much as the role found me,� said Plue, executive director

of the ARC of Union County. “It might be a stretch to play a frazzled, overworked mom, but I’ll give it my best shot.� Tripp Helms told a similar story. He took his son and daughter to read for the play. By the time he got home, he heard he’d gotten the part of Grace’s husband. The play has meant fewer hours of downtime for Plue and Helms, but they both said it was worth it. Helms said one of the main reasons he agreed to perform was because of Heath. “She’s been so active in community theater productions for so long,� he said. “I really wanted my children to have the experience of working with her.�

City completes sewer improvement project MONROE The Monroe Water Resources Department has completed a sewer system improvement project that the city says is reaping benefits including cost savings and improved service. The city operates 21 sewer pump stations as part of its sewer collection system. When faced with pending upgrades of the radio-based telemetry system, the city began evaluating alternative technologies to see if improvement could be made. In a press release from the city, Monroe Water Resources Director Russell Colbath said

the project selection priorities included low cost, reliability and service area coverage, ease of installation, and meeting all N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources requirements. The city selected a cell-phone-based technology provided by Mission Communications. The installation was completed by Water Resources Department personnel with no outside contractor assistance. The initial cost was just under $25,000. Since installation, the press release said the new system has realized several benefits:

• The technology allows all sites to be monitored, improving regulatory compliance, customer service and saving more than $10,000 per year in required overtime. • Weekday savings of more than eight man-hours of labor because of avoiding the NCDENR requirement for daily site checks for any sewer pump not monitored by a telemetry system. (Equivalent labor savings of $7,500). • The new system provided higher accountability showing all staff log-ins and site visits, plus better alarm detection and

call out to all standby personnel. • The Web-based monitoring allows any standby employee to check site and alarm status from any home computer with Internet access. • This system allows immediate inflow and infiltration analysis following heavy rainfall. • Customer service enhancement providing water leak detection in certain commercial areas. For more information, call the city Water Resource Department at 704-282-4600.

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ROCKY RIVER SPRINGS FISH HOUSE • • • • •

704-474-3052 No additional charge for private party rooms. Our Gift CertiďŹ cates make great gifts! Only 35 minutes from Monroe Come to Aquadale and discover for yourself why we’ve been “Servin’em BIGâ€? for over 41 years! We DO NOT serve Baby Flounder. We serve the thick ones. We think we’re worth the trip and believe you will too!

Visit us at www.rrsfh.com for directions and info. Directions from MONROE:Take Hwy 200 North (200 intersects Hwy 74 at Quincy’s). Go about 5 miles, and turn right onto New Salem Road. At stop sign in New Salem, go straight toward Oakboro. At the only trafďŹ c light in Oakboro, turn right. Go about 150 yards and turn left onto Hwy 138. After about 7 miles, you will arrive at a stop sign in Aquadale. Turn right (onto Plank Road). Go about 100 yards and turn right on Rocky River Springs Road.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Obama: 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama announced Tuesday he was dispatching 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan, accelerating a risky and expensive war buildup, even as he assured the nation that U.S. forces will begin coming home in July 2011. The first new Marines will join the fight by Christmas. The escalation — to be completed by next summer — is designed to reverse significant Taliban advances since Obama took office 10 months ago and to fast-track the training of Afghan soldiers and police toward the goal of hastening an eventual U.S. pullout. The size and speed of the troop increase will put a heavy strain on the military, which still maintains a force of more than 100,000 in Iraq and already has 68,000 in Afghanistan. “The 30,000 additional troops that I am announcing tonight will deploy in the first part of 2010 the fastest pace possible so that they can target the insurgency and secure key population centers,� Obama was to say in his Tuesday night primetime speech. The White House released excerpts

in advance. The increased troops, Obama said, “will increase our ability to train competent Afghan security forces, and to partner with them so that more Afghans can get into the fight. And they will help create the conditions for the United States to transfer responsibility to the Afghans.� Looking to America’s experience in Iraq, Obama put said a U.S. withdrawal would be executed “responsibly, taking into account conditions on the ground.� “We will continue to advise and assist Afghanistan’s security forces to ensure that they can succeed over the long haul. But it will be clear to the Afghan government and, more importantly, to the Afghan people that they will ultimately be responsible for their own country,� Obama said. Obama also leaned heavily on NATO allies and other countries to join in escalating the fight. “We must come together to end this war successfully,� the president said. “For what’s at stake is not simply a test of NATO’s credibility. What’s at stake

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is the security of our allies, and the common security of the world.� Obama’s Tuesday evening speech to cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., to be broadcast nationally, ends three months of exacting deliberations that won praise from supporters and criticism from opponents. Former Vice President Dick Cheney said Obama was “dithering,� too inexperienced to make a decision on the troop buildup requested in September by commanding Gen. Stanley McChrystal. Senior officials said Obama also would underscore his commitment to stabilizing Afghanistan and scouring corruption out of the government of President Hamid Karzai. Obama has vowed to prevent Afghanistan from again becoming a safe haven for al-Qaida boss Osama bin Laden and his terrorist organization. Most of the new forces will be combat troops. Military officials said the Army brigades most likely to be sent will come from Fort Drum in New York and Fort Campbell in Kentucky. Marines, who will be the vanguard, will most likely come primarily from Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. There will be about 5,000 dedicated trainers in the 30,000, showing the emphasis on preparing Afghans to take over their own security. And the president is making clear to his generals that all troops, even if designated as combat, must consider themselves trainers. Announcing a start

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to a U.S. withdrawal by July 2011 does not tie the United States to an “end date� for the war, officials said. They all spoke on condition of anonymity because the speech had not been delivered. The address could become a defining moment of the Obama presidency, a political gamble that may weigh heavily on his chances for a second White House term. It represents the beginning of a sales job to restore support for the war effort among an American public grown increasingly pessimistic about success — and among some fellow Democrats in Congress wary of or even opposed to spending billions more dollars and putting tens of thousands more U.S. soldiers and Marines in harm’s way. A new survey by the Gallup organization, released Tuesday, showed only 35 percent of Americans now approve of Obama’s handling of the war; 55 percent disapprove. Even before the president spoke, his plan was met with skepticism in Congress, where Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wis., and liberal House Democrats threatened to try to block funding for the troop increase. Sen. Carl Levin, the Michigan Democrat who chairs a military oversight panel, said he didn’t think Democrats would yank funding for the troops or try to force Obama’s hand to pull them out faster. But Democrats will be looking for ways to pay for the additional troops, he said,

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including a tax increase on the wealthy although that hike is already being eyed to pay for health care costs. Another possibility is imposing a small gasoline tax that would be phased out if gas prices go up, he said. Meanwhile, Republicans said that setting a timetable for withdrawal would demonstrate weakness. “The way that you win wars is to break the enemy’s will, not to announce dates that you are leaving,� said Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee and Obama’s campaign rival in last year’s presidential race. If the timeline for the troop increase holds, it will require a costly logistical scramble to send in so many people and so much equipment almost entirely by air. It will also probably require breaking at least an implicit promise to some soldiers who had thought they would have more than 12 months at home before their next deployment. At the same time, NATO diplomats said Obama was asking alliance partners in Europe to add 5,000 to 10,000 troops to the separate international force in Afghanistan. Indications were the allies would agree to a number somewhere in that range. The war has even less support in Europe than in the United States, and the NATO allies and other countries currently have about 40,000 troops on the ground. The main mission of the new troops will be to reverse Taliban gains and secure population centers in the country’s volatile south and east. The addition of some Marines before year’s end would provide badly needed reinforcements to those fighting against Taliban gains in southern Helmand province. Obama briefed dozens of key lawmakers Tuesday afternoon, before set-

ting off for West Point. Late Monday, the president spent an hour on a video conference call with Karzai. The White House said Obama told the Afghan leader “that U.S. and international efforts in Afghanistan are not open-ended and must be evaluated toward measurable and achievable goals within the next 18 to 24 months.� On Tuesday Obama contacted Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari to tell him the United States wanted to open a longterm commercial and security relationship. Obama also had planned to speak of a need to help Pakistan stabilize itself from the threats it faces not only from al-Qaida but Taliban forces that are increasingly behind terrorist bombings in that country, officials said. The United States went to war in Afghanistan shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, al-Qaida terrorist attacks on the United States. Bin Laden and key members of the terrorist organization were headquartered in Afghanistan at the time, taking advantage of sanctuary afforded by the Taliban government that ran the mountainous and isolated country. Taliban forces were quickly driven from power, while bin Laden and his top deputies were believed to have fled through towering mountains into neighboring Pakistan. While the al-Qaida leadership appears to be bottled up in Pakistan’s largely ungoverned tribal regions, the U.S. military strategy of targeted missile attacks from unmanned drone aircraft has yet to flush bin Laden and his cohorts from hiding. *** AP White House Correspondent Jennifer Loven and National Security Writer Anne Gearan contributed to this report.

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• • • •

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Directions from MONROE:Take Hwy 200 North (200 intersects Hwy 74 at Quincy’s). Go about 5 miles, and turn right onto New Salem Road. At stop sign in New Salem, go straight toward Oakboro. At the only trafďŹ c light in Oakboro, turn right. Go about 150 yards and turn left onto Hwy 138. After about 7 miles, you will arrive at a stop sign in Aquadale. Turn right (onto Plank Road). Go about 100 yards and turn right on Rocky River Springs Road.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Health Continued from Page 1A three years and co-wrote a report that recently appeared in The Journal of Family Practice. “Each year, doctors are finding more and more that patients are coming in carrying substantial deductibles and having to pay more out of pocket,� Hall said. Physicians described patients who left prescriptions unfilled or refused to get diagnostic treatments because they couldn’t afford them. “Every level of stress needs to be identified and addressed, with job stress often going hand-in-hand with financial stress,� Hall said. “More physicians are finding a balance of something good enough at a lower cost, such as a generic drug over a brand name. They are using professional judgment with practical wisdom as they provide a tray full of options to their patients.� Richard Manis and his daughter, Mandy, are trying their best to “live within their box.� Their box being the boundaries of how much of Manis’ income can they afford to spend on Mandy’s medicine and equipment needs, which can reach $6,000 a year just for the basics. Eating out or buying a pair of shoes. Making do with a one-bedroom apartment at the Nissen building Mandy gets the bedroom, dad said - is a necessity. Mandy, 22, was diagnosed with cerebral palsy when she was 19 months old. Getting around is a major challenge. Yet her love of life and her passion for filmmaking led her and her dad to move from San Antonio about 15 months ago so she could enroll at the UNC School of the Arts. She has some acting chops, having landed the role of Rachel, the sister of Wake Forest football player Jon Abbate in the locally filmed movie The Fifth Quarter. Abbate’s sister also has cerebral palsy.

“Each year, doctors are finding more and more that patients are coming in carrying substantial deductibles and having to pay more out of pocket.� Mark Hall Professor of Law and Public Health Wake Forest University

Moving to Winston-Salem, though, meant starting from scratch with her health-care needs, whether finding housing that could accommodate her wheelchair, securing a new primary physician in Dr. Blake Long or searching with Long for the lowest-cost option for her medicine, which costs about $160 a month. It also meant her dad scrambling for the $1,000 that his insurance plan wouldn’t cover for the $5,000 electric wheelchair - “my Hummer,� Mandy said with a wide smile that’s necessary for her to navigate the hilly UNCSA campus. “Dr. Long was the catalyst to get the wheelchair immediately improved, as well as great medical referrals for all needed medical services and care,� Mandy said. When asked when a doctor should address medical costs with a patient, she said “always and as often as possible.� “Ultimately - it is the patient’s choice - but being informed well of the options, possibilities, treatment, recovery,e tc., is important. Why wouldn’t all patients wish for this type of care?� Long, an instructor of general internal medicine at Wake Forest’s medical school, said he and Mandy’s father have been fortunate they have not had to compromise her care to lower costs. “We have to be persistent in wringing out what costs we can, to come up

with other alternatives, which sometimes takes some creativity,� Long said. “But that’s true of many of my patients in this economy. There’s no question patients are having to portion out their health-care dollars.� Freda Springs, a spokeswoman for Novant Health Inc., said that its physicians view discussing health-care costs “as an obligation in caring for the whole person.� “Patients will often confide in their physician when they will not confide in others,� Springs said. “What we try to do is coach our physicians to ask pertinent questions, and if they believe the patient needs assistance, to get them to the customerservice navigator while they are in the office.� Families USA, a consumer-advocacy group in Washington, recently released a consumer guide that offers strategies, tips and warnings to consumers to manage medical debt and avoid bankruptcy. “Medical debt is a stealthy fiend, striking unexpectedly and feeding

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 9A on both a family’s rising health-care expenses and what may be a growing inability to pay because of a loss of a wage-earner’s income,� said Ron Pollack, the executive director of Families USA. The group said that medical debt is a growing problem for both people who are uninsured and people who are underinsured - those with coverage with high deductibles, high co-payments, many uncovered benefits and what it considers as insurers’ arbitrary limits on coverage. Pollock said that medical debt contributes to mounting credit-card debt and can threaten a family’s housing security by putting rent or mortgage payments out of reach. Dr. David Miller, an associate professor at Wake Forest who focuses on general internal medicine, treats mostly low-income patients at the Downtown Health Plaza. Five years ago, he was the one initiating conversations on the cost of treatment. “Nowadays, it’s more like 50-50,� Miller said. “It often starts when I begin to recommend a course of treatment. They are more upfront about saying ‘I really don’t have a lot of money right now.’ “It’s most uncomfortable when I talk with patients who want to put off further treatments for several months, or don’t get a prescription filled, because of concerns about cost. “There are others who put off treatment out of a hope that they’ll land a job with health benefits by the time something might get serious,� he said. A recent study of North Carolina employers by

Mercer Human Resource Consulting found that they expect to pay a smaller increase in employee health-insurance costs next year. The survey of 99 North Carolina employers - all with at least 10 employees - found an average projected increase of 4.7 percent over 2009 costs. The employers said they expect to achieve that goal by passing on more costs to their workers or by changing insurance plans or insurers. Without making those changes, the average increase would be 7 percent. Steve Graybill, a senior consultant for Mercer, said that consumers could “benefit immensely� from having a discussion on the cost vs. the benefit of treatment options. “That way, the doctor and consumer can agree upon an informed course of action,� Graybill said. “Most insured consumers do not even understand their maximum out-ofpocket cost should they have a major event. “We will be unable to get medical cost under control unless we are all more educated on the cost of treatment.� Hall said he encourages patients to bring up financial concerns in the

examination room. “You shouldn’t be afraid to talk to doctors about having to pay for things,� he said. It’s not like having those conversations would be groundbreaking, Hall said. Several generations ago, before employersponsored health insurance was standard, doctors hashed out payment with patients daily. Hall said that many doctors need training on how to effectively talk with patients about money. “The experienced physicians interviewed for this study suggested asking patients not about ability to pay, but instead about the extent of the patient’s insurance coverage,� Hall said. “That way, they could avoid the embarrassment some patients feel admitting they can’t afford their doctors’ bills. This is just a fact that the doctor wants to know about.� Hall said that by having the cost conversations, “if a patient subsequently chooses to take a cheaper route, there’s little chance of a lawsuit because the choice is ultimately for the patient, not the doctor, to make.� Reach Richard Craver at rcraver@wsjournal. com or 336-727-7376.

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The Enquirer-Journal

A tasty Christmas gift idea from Bethlehem The Bethlehem United Methodist Women have produced a collection of family recipes that fills more than 350 pages and covers everything from Almond Cheddar Appetizers to Sweet Potato Casserole and much much more. Proceeds from the sale of the cookbook will be used to further their missions locally, nationally and world wide. Contact cookbook committee members, Jane McWhorter, Terry Richardson, Sandra Malkin, Mary Mosley, Linda Ducombs or Mary Alice Wilson to get a copy. Here are a few sample recipes from the book:

Breakfast Scones by Jenny Gay INGREDIENTS 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup whole wheat flour 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 Tablespoon baking powder 3/4 cup cold butter 1 cup buttermilk

Corn Salad by Betty Couick INGREDIENTS 1 (11-ounce) can of whole kernel yellow corn, drained. 1 (11-ounce) can of white shoepeg corn, drained. 1 green onion 2 stalks celery, finely chopped 1 (4-ounce) jar pimientos, drained and chopped. 1 green pepper, chopped 1 small can tiny sugar peas

The women of the Bethlehem United Methodist Church of Waxhaw have produced a cookbook that preserves family recipes so they can be relished by many more families. To get one for yourself or a loved one, call Jane McWhorter at 704-764-3555. Salt and pepper to taste 1/2 cup canola oil 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup of vinegar

1 Tablespoon minced, seeded, jalapenio pepper. 8 to 10 flour tortillas (about 7-inch) Salsa or picante sauce

DIRECTIONS Mix all ingredients together. Refrigerate overnight. May drain to serve. Good for reunions.

DIRECTIONS Combine the first six ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Spread on one side of tortillas and roll up tightly. Wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour. Slice into -inch pieces. Serve with salsa or picante sauce. Makes about five dozen

Tortilla Pinwheels by Jenny Gay INGREDIENTS 1 (8-ounce) carton sour cream 1 8-ounce) package cream cheese 3/4 cup sliced green onions 1/2 cup finely shredded cheddar cheese 1 Tablespoon lime juice

Mango and Cucumber Soup by Billie Thomas INGREDIENTS 2 mangoes, peeled and pitted (2 pounds total) 2 seedless cucumbers (1 1/2

The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Rain Likely

Rain Likely

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Partly Cloudy

Sunny

57º

51º

63º 37º

54º 29º

44º 27º

49º 31º

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00"

Winston-Salem 57/54

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:12 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:11 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .5:29 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:40 a.m.

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

Moon Phases

Last 12/8

First 12/24

New 12/16

Local UV Index

H

L This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

Cold Front

UV Index

City

Albemarle . . . . . .61/56 Brevard . . . . . . . .49/43 Burlington . . . . . .59/57 Cape Fear . . . . . .63/62 Emerald Isle . . . .68/62 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .63/61 Gastonia . . . . . . .54/50 Grandfather Mtn. .50/38 Greenville . . . . . .67/60 Hendersonville . .50/43 Hickory . . . . . . . .52/47 Jacksonville . . . .69/61 Kinston . . . . . . . .68/60 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .64/59 Mount Mitchell . .56/51 Roanoke Rapids .60/60 Southern Pines . .63/60 Swanquarter . . . .67/61 Wilkesboro . . . . .53/47 Williamston . . . . .66/60 Yanceyville . . . . .57/51 Zebulon . . . . . . . .61/61

ra ra ra ra sh ra ra ra sh ra ra sh sh sh ra ra ra sh ra sh ra ra

.62/36 s .53/31 pc .61/36 s .66/38 pc .69/45 sh .63/61 ra .60/36 pc .41/29 sh .68/40 sh .52/31 pc .56/34 s .69/41 sh .68/40 sh .66/50 t .61/36 s .65/37 pc .65/38 pc .68/46 sh .55/33 pc .68/40 sh .62/35 sh .65/37 pc

Warm Front

L

H

Low Pressure High Pressure

High: 82° in Fort Myers, Fla. Low: -7° in West Yellowstone, Mont.

Across The Nation Today

Thursday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Stationary Front

National Extremes

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

Around Our State

L

L

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+

Today

Durham 61/60

Tarboro 63/62 Washington Asheville 68/60 Greensboro Raleigh 51/42 58/55 61/61 Charlotte Cape 55/51 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 68/61 66/61 Shown is today’s weather. 57/51 64/62 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 68/61 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

Full 12/2

Sunday

North Carolina State Forecast

Today we will see cloudy skies with a 90% chance of rain, high temperature of 57º, humidity of 91% and an overnight low of 51º. The record high temperature for today is 76º set in 1991. The record low temperature is 15º set in 1953.

pimientos, sage, pepperand remaining salt; fold into squash mixture. Spoon over crumbs. Sprinkle with cheese and the remaining crumb mixture. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Yield: 8 servings.

DIRECTIONS Finely chop one mango and one cucumber and set aside. Coarsely chop remaining mango and cucumber and puree with 1/4 cup of water in a blender until almost smooth. Transfer to a bowl and stir in finely chopped mango and cucumber, onion, lime juice, and 2 cups of cold water. Place bowl in a larger bowl of ice and cold water. Stir until cool. Just before serving, stir in cilantro and 1 1/2 teaspoon salt.

Brunswick Stew by Mary P. Mosely

Calico Squash Casserole by Grace Goldy

DIRECTIONS In a bowl, combine flours, brown sugar, baking powder and baking soda. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in buttermilk until a soft dough forms. On a floured surface, knead gently 10 to 12 times. Divide dough in half; gently pat each half into an eight-inch circle1/2 inch thick. Cut each into eight wedges and place on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 18 minutes Yield: 16 scones

In-Depth Forecast

pounds total.) 1/4 cup water, plus two cups. 3 Tablespoons finely chopped red onion 3 Tablespoons fresh lime juice, or to taste 2 Tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves 1 1/2 teaspoon salt

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . .55/42 Baltimore . . . . . . .52/53 Chicago . . . . . . . .44/32 Denver . . . . . . . . . .27/9 Detroit . . . . . . . . .47/36 Houston . . . . . . . . . .55/39 Indianapolis . . . .45/32 Los Angeles . . . .66/49 Miami . . . . . . . . . .84/73 Minneapolis . . . . .33/21 New York . . . . . . .53/51 Orlando . . . . . . . .83/62 Philadelphia . . . .53/52 Reno . . . . . . . . . .46/26 Sacramento . . . . .59/39 Salem, OR . . . . . .48/31 Salt Lake City . . .41/17 San Francisco . . .61/45 Seattle . . . . . . . . .47/38 Syracuse . . . . . . .50/44 Tampa . . . . . . . . .78/65 Washington, DC .52/52

Around The World Today

Thursday

t . .55/35 pc ra .59/35 sh cl . .36/27 cl sn . .24/9 mc ra .37/29 sn mc .56/34 s ra .35/23 sn s . .68/49 s pc .80/66 t mc .26/19 cl ra .63/40 sh t . .75/57 sh sh .58/37 ra s . .45/27 s s . .60/40 s mc .48/31 s s . .36/19 s s . .61/47 s s . .48/40 s pc .47/30 sh t . .74/49 mc ra .59/35 sh

City

Thursday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .86/73 Athens . . . . . . . . .63/49 Baghdad . . . . . . .67/44 Beijing . . . . . . . . .45/22 Berlin . . . . . . . . . .38/31 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .78/57 Hong Kong . . . . .74/60 London . . . . . . . .53/49 Madrid . . . . . . . . .53/41 Mexico City . . . . .69/44 Moscow . . . . . . . .44/43 Nassau . . . . . . . .84/73 Paris . . . . . . . . . .51/48 Rio de Janeiro . . .89/74 Rome . . . . . . . . . .57/37 San Juan . . . . . . .86/77 Stockholm . . . . . .37/33 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .60/51 Toronto . . . . . . . .48/37

pc .87/73 pc ra .63/49 ra s . .67/44 s pc .42/23 s pc .42/32 pc s . .74/55 s s . .69/49 s ra .49/43 ra ra .52/39 ra pc .73/46 pc sh .44/33 sh pc .85/72 t sh .49/39 sh s . .87/75 t s . .59/39 mc sh .87/76 sh rs .36/34 pc s . .55/51 ra sh .42/29 sh

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

INGREDIENTS 2 cups slice yellow summer squash (1/4 inch thick) 1 cup sliced zucchini (1/4 inch thick) 1 medium onion, chopped 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 cup water 1 teaspoon salt, divided 2 cups crushed butter-flavored crackers 1/2 cup butter or margarine, melted 1 (10-ounce) can condensed cream of chicken soup, undiluted 1 (8-ounce) can sliced water chesnuts, drained 1 large carrot, shredded 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1 (2-ounce) jar diced pimientos, drained. 1 teaspoon rubbed sage 1/2 teaspoon white pepper 1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese DIRECTIONS In a sauce pan, combine the first five ingredients; add 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cover and cook until squash is tender, about six minutes. Drain well and set aside. Combine crumbs and butter. Spoon half into a greased shallow 1 1/2 quart baking dish. Combine soup, water, chestnuts, carrot, mayonnaise,

INGREDIENTS 1 (20-ounce) can Brunswick Stew 1 10 3/4 ounce can chicken gumbo soup 1 (12-ounce) can vegetable juice such as V-8 3 (five-ounce) cans chunk white chicken, drained and shredded 1/4 pound chopped pork barbecue (from refrigerated section) 1 (11-ounce) can shoe peg corn 1 10-ounce box frozen lima beans 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon sugar 1 cup thinly sliced onion Salt and pepper to taste 2 drops lemon juice 2 drops hot pepper sauce Worcestershire sauce to taste DIRECTIONS Combine all ingredients in a four quart or five quart slow cooker Cook on low for five to six hours. Remove bay leaf and serve. Stew can be made ahead and refrigerated for two to three days. For longer storage, divide into two to four cup portions and freeze for up to two months. Thaw in refrigerator and then reheat in microwave oven until hot. Serves 8 to 10. *** Got a community cookbook? Let us help you promote it. Bring a copy by the office and we will run some sample recipes with a picture of the book and a brief article about your cause. For more information, call Stan Hojnacki at 704-261-2220 or e-mail him at shojnacki@theej. com


S ports

Editor: Jerry Snow (261-2225) jsnow@theej.com

WORTH A LOOK Men’s college basketball Illinois at Clemson 7:30 p.m., ESPN Duke at Wisconsin 9:30 p.m., ESPN

WHO’S NEWS FSU’s legendary coach retiring

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida State coach Bobby Bowden will end his 44-year coaching career after the Seminoles play in a bowl game. Bowden will retire as the second winningest coach in majorcollege football behind Penn State’s Joe Paterno. The 80-year-old BOWDEN Bowden has won 388 games in his career at Samford, West Virginia and Florida State, where he spent the last 34 seasons. “We’ve got one more game and I look forward to enjoying these next few weeks as the head football coach,” Bowden said Tuesday in a statement released by the school. Bowden won two national titles with Florida State, in 1993 and 1999. Among his top achievements was a string of 14 straight seasons ending in 2000 when the Seminoles won at least 10 games and finished ranked in the top five of the AP poll. Florida State was 152-19-1, an .864 winning percentage, during that span. “He set records of achievement on the field that will probably never be equaled,” university president T.K. Wetherell said. “Bobby Bowden in many ways became the face of Florida State. It was his sterling personality and character that personified this university.” FSU officials announced after the 2007 season that offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher would succeed Bowden.

Jackets win opener on road

OAKBORO — The Forest Hills High boys basketball team opened the 200910 season with a 56-46 road win over West Stanly on Tuesday. Senior wing Markell Lotharp finished with a game-high 21 points for the Yellow Jackets (1-0, 1-0 RRC), who trailed the Colts HUNTLEY 25-21 at the half. Forest Hills also got 14 points, 10 assists and seven steals from senior guard Dre Huntley. Brandon Glenn chipped in with 13 points for the Jackets, who finished with 18 steals as a team. Elliott Drake paced West Stanly with 17 points while teammate Andrew Wilson poured in 14 points.

Mavs top Rebels in wrestling action

ROUGHEDGE — Marvin Ridge defeated Parkwood 54-30 Tuesday night while giving up a 3-1 advantage in forfeits. The Mavs won eight of the 10 contested matches and improve to 7-3 on the season. The Mavericks will next wrestle at the Jim Hayes Invitational Friday and Saturday at East Meck. Parkwood will be at the Weddington Duals tournament Saturday.

MR 54, Parkwood 30 103: Orion Despo (MR) forfeit 112: Stuart Todd (MR) pinned Tyler Willoughby 119: Nat Napoleone (MR) pinned Cody Bittner 125: Jeremy Thompson (MR) pinned Ryan Blackburn 130: Colin Crawford (MR) pinned James Carroll 135: Nathan Mullins (MR) pinned Nate Jauch 140: Chad Mullins (MR) pinned Colby Nance 145: Dusty Wallace (PW) pinned Alex Ruth 152: Zac Womack (PW) pinned Austin Rammer 160: Taylor Mlodzinski (MR) pinned Larry Parker 171: Adres Matajira (MR) pinned Justin Williams 189: Austin Craig (PW) forfeit 215: Chase Nance (PW) forfeit Hwt: Kevin Mullis (PW) forfeit

+

Streak ends at 4 Celtics blast Bobcats, end their win streak 3B Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Section B

CATA boys rip rival, improve to 2-1

By JERRY SNOW

E-J Sports Editor

MONROE Central Academy’s boys used its deep bench and pressure defense to run away with an easy 60-27 road win over archrival Union Academy on Tuesday. CATA’s boys, who were 4-19 last season, are off to a 2-1 start. “This is easily our best team,” said Central coach Mike Connelley. “It’s hard to teach kids how to put games away like we did tonight. They usually start thinking they’re better than they are and let up. “We haven’t had games

Prep Basketball where we have a good lead and hold it like that. I was pleased with how that first group was playing and I wanted to reward them a little bit and that’s why I left them out there longer in the third quarter.” CATA had a comfortable 2810 halftime lead, then put the contest out of reach by outscoring the Cardinals (0-3) 21-9 in the third. Junior point guard Jon Wright had six of his 10 assists in the third quarter for

the Cougars, and senior wing Charvis Barrino came off the bench to score six of his eight points in the period. “I thought Jon was outstanding in the third quarter,” Connelley said. “This was by far Jon’s best game. He played very relaxed and didn’t turn it WRIGHT over much. I thought we were very unselfish as a team and that we played hard.”

By Eric Rape

See Mavs / Page 2B

See CATA / Page 3B

Monroe now 2-0

Christian cruises past MR E-J Correspondent Marvin The Marvin Ridge girls were unable to make up for the size of Gigi Bailey in a 48-37 loss to Charlotte Chritsian Tuesday night. Bailey didn’t do much scoring from the field for the Knights (2-1), but she hit seven of 10 free throws and had several blocks threw the night in addition to 10 rebounds — finishing with a double-double (11 points). The Mavs (1-2) jumped out to a 10-4 lead through the first quarter and were able to hold off the Knights for an 18-16 halftime lead, but Morgan Kirk tied the game up with a 3-pointer after halftime and that sparked an 8-0 run that gave the Knights a five-point lead that they would not relinquish. The Knights iced the game with an 11-1 run midway through the fourth quarter that made the score 45-30. From there, Jordan Henry scored the last seven points for

Six Cougars scored in the third, and 13 found the scoring column for the game. “We’re definitely a deeper team,” Connelley said. “We still have a ways to go. The younger guys are still learning.” The Cougars started three seniors on the front line, and all were productive — forward Matthew Bradley had a gamehigh 10 points, center Darnell Hill had nine points and five rebounds and forward Kacey Robinson led all rebounders with nine in addition to scoring eight points.

Crowder leads MHS to 40-point victory BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Monroe’s Jamison Crowder, a 5-9 junior point guard, scored 18 points, dished three assists and had his first dunk in a game.

UNIONVILLE After trailing at the end of the first quarter, the switch seemed to flip for the Monroe High boys basketball team in Tuesday’s Rocky River Conference opener at Piedmont. Facing a 12-11 deficit, the Redhawks outscored the Panthers 47-16 over the next two quarters on their way to a dominating 77-37 road victory. Monroe (2-0, 1-0 RRC) had eight steals in the second quarter, including three apiece by senior Quontez Threatt and junior Jamison Crowder. “A lot of that started with Crowder because he set the tempo,” said MHS coach Johnny Sowell of his defense. “We were in a zone and we told him to go up and put some pressure on them, and once we got the right combination out there with our veteran guys, we said we were going full man-to-man. We didn’t miss a beat from where we were last year defensively.” Crowder also stood out offensively, scoring a game-high 18 points to go along with four rebounds, four steals and three assists. The 5-foot-9 point guard made several outside jumpers and recorded his firstever high school dunk in a game during the Redhawks’ second-quarter run.

See MONROE / Page 3B

Brown, Hood combine for 36; Rebels now 3-0 By David Sentendrey

E-J Correspondent

CHARLOTTE The Parkwood High girls basketball team improved to 3-0 after defeating Charlotte Country Day (2-2) 58-51 on Tuesday evening. The Rebels completed the sweep of Country Day, having won the first meeting 51-43 at home, but Parkwood coach Jamal McGee knew it would be a tougher task on the Bucca-

neers’ home court. “They attacked us more offensively, and that’s one thing we thought we were going to have to get ready for,” McGee said. Country Day jumped out to a 14-10 lead by the end of the first quarter, but Parkwood erupted in the second quarter, outscoring CCD 17-4 and entering the half with a nine-point lead. “We were kind of sluggish (in the first quarter),” McGee said.

“What we did, we tried to increase the intensity a little. We showed a three-quarter court trap and then we got them in a half court trap – we got some turnovers, some easy opportunities and I think we held them to four points in the second (quarter).” The Rebels would never trail through the rest of the game. Michelle Brown led the way for Parkwood with 19 points, while Cadeja Hood racked up 17 points.

By Bill Marx

See CAVS / Page 3B

See REBELS / Page 2B

Trio lead Panthers past MHS

Berry whips Cavs E-J Correspondent CHARLOTTE Berry Academy’s pressure defense was too much for the Cuthbertson girls to handle Tuesday night in Berry’s 55-17 victory. Berry began to press late in the first quarter and led 7-6 going into the second quarter. Cuthbertson (0-3) would get no closer the rest of the night. Berry outscored the Cavaliers 24-5 in the second quarter and 18-0 in the third. “My kids, being young, they don’t handle pressure all that well, especially tight man-to-man like they play,” Cuthbertson coach David Daniels said. Essense Baucom led Berry (4-1) with 14 points, and Candice Brown scored 11.

Morgan Brown added nine points and Kate Howie had five. The Rebels shot 15-of-26 from the free-throw line, compared to the Bucs’ 4-of-11 shooting. In a game that was decided by eight points, getting to the freethrow line 15 more times than CCD proved to be an advantage for Parkwood. McGee is hoping his team will continue to maintain a defensive mentality.

BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Piedmont junior guard Jade Montgomery led all scorers with 18 points in a 58-43 home win.

UNIONVILLE Junior guard Jade Montgomery scored a game-high 18 points to lead the Piedmont High girls basketball team to a 58-43 home win over Monroe on Tuesday. The Panthers improved to 1-1 overall and 1-0 in the Rocky River Conference. The Redhawks fell to 0-2 overall and 0-1 in the league. Piedmont led by seven at the end of the first quarter and increased the advantage to 16 by halftime. Monroe never got closer than 12 the rest of the way. Senior post Courtney Barrineau was also productive for the Panthers, BARRINEAU finishing with 17 points and six rebounds. Junior wing Amber Weaver posted 15 points and a game-high 13 rebounds for Piedmont, which out-rebounded the Redhawks 35-24 on the night.

See TRIO / Page 3B


2B / Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Mavs Continued from Page 1B the Mavericks, giving her nine for the night. “They made some adjustments against our offense; they switched from man to zone on us, and we didn’t make adjustments,” said Mavs coach Dwight Miller. “We weren’t able to execute well against the zone, wasn’t able to knock down (shots) and we had opportunities to get the game

Rebels

down to about five or so and we missed lay-ups and we missed free throws.” Christian’s Crystal Barnett and Kirk matched the Mavericks’ Eryn Curry with game-high scoring honors with 12 points apiece. Henry finished with a team-high eight rebounds for the Mavs.

Christian handles MR boys

Christian’s boys had little trouble in the nightcap, whipping MR 76-53. The Knights (3-0) have two Division I

PHS boys now 2-1

The Parkwood boys (2-1) rebounded from a loss to Monroe on Monday with a 63-55 win over Country Day (1-3). The Rebels defeated the Bucs 64-59 earlier in the season. Senior Maurice Leak scored a game-high 20 points while adding four assists. Deonte Hiatt scored 17 points and had four rebounds and

Continued from Page 1B “We want to rebound, clean up after missed shots,” he said. “I figure we can get out and run, Morgan (Brown) pushes the ball very well, we got Michelle (Brown) back … so we’re just trying to stay strong defensively.”

The Enquirer-Journal commitments in Akil Mitchell (Virginia) and Anthony Gill (South Carolina). Mitchell put on the best show from the field with 19 points and nine rebounds and Gill added 13 points and eight rebounds — both players had goal-shaking dunks. Marvin Ridge (0-3) had a couple players of their own do some damage from behind the arc as Jon Bassett dropped in five threes while TJ Tolbert hit four. Bassett finished with 19 points on the night and Tolbert 17. Size was a factor in the game as the Knights took home a 41-16 rebound advantage.

Justin Crowder added 15 points while connecting on four 3-point attempts. The Bucs led early in the first quarter, largely attributed to Wake Hamilton’s five assists in the quarter. Maurice Leak answered, though, knocking down a transition jump shot from the foul line that beat the first quarter buzzer to tie the game at 16 – the Rebels never

trailed following the shot. Junior Marcus Leak dominated the glass, pulling down a game-high 16 rebounds. Marcus Leak outrebounded the entire Country Day team in the first half, 11-9. Marcus Leak, (6-foot-2 wing, has 33 rebounds in three games this season. The Rebels will travel to face Central Academy on Friday.

Local Events Today High School Basketball Weddington at Cuthbertson, 6:30 p.m. Sun Valley at Providence, 6:30 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today BOXING 8 p.m. VERSUS — Light heavyweights, Bernard Hopkins (49-5-0) vs. Enrique Ornelas (29-5-0), at Philadelphia; champion Danny Green (24-3-0) vs. Roy Jones Jr. (54-5-0), for IBO cruiserweight title, at Sydney, Australia MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7:15 p.m. ESPN — Illinois at Clemson 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Boston College at Michigan 9:15 p.m. ESPN — Duke at Wisconsin 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Florida St. at Ohio St.

Davis, UNC hold off Spartans, 89-82 CHAPEL HILL (AP) — New season, different lineups, same result. Ed Davis scored a career-high 22 points Tuesday night to help No. 10 North Carolina beat No. 9 Michigan State 89-82 in a rematch of last season’s national championship game won by the Tar Heels. Larry Drew II had a careerbest with 18 points for the Tar Heels (7-1), who led most of the game before having to hold off a rally in the final minutes. North Carolina shot 58 percent and led by as many as 19 points early in the second half, beating Michigan State (5-2) for the second straight year in the ACC/ Big Ten Challenge. Raymar Morgan scored 18

points to lead the Spartans, who shot 43 percent but were 2 of 20 from 3-point range. Kalin Lucas added 15 points and helped the Spartans get as close as six points late before the Tar Heels hit enough free throws to hold on. The teams met twice last season at Detroit’s Ford Field, with North Carolina beating Michigan State by 35 points in the early season Challenge. Then came the 89-72 win in April for the program’s fifth NCAA championship, a game in which North Carolina led by 24 points in the first half. It was a performance

that put a damper on the Spartans’ thrilling tournament run that had galvanized the economically battered state of Michigan. Coach Tom Izzo had said he didn’t plan to use last season as motivation, though some of his players admitted they were eager for another shot at the Tar Heels. And as if the Spartans needed any reminders of what happened in April, the blue-clad students near the home bench greeted them for pregame warmups with chants of “Banner! Banner!” while pointing to the one hanging in the

Smith Center rafters to commemorate last season’s title. Virginia Tech 70, Iowa 64 IOWA CITY, Iowa — Malcolm Delaney scored 18 points, Terrell Bell added 13 and Virginia Tech held on to beat host Iowa 70-64 Tuesday night in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge The Hokies (5-1) committed just five turnovers and finished a four-game road swing with three wins. Iowa cut Virginia Tech’s lead to 63-59 with just under two minutes left. But former Forest Hills High standout Dorenzo Hudson nailed a long 3 with 1:33 left and the shot clock set to expire, and Bell sealed the victory with a dunk following a

fight for a loose ball with 17 seconds remaining. Victor Davila and Jeff Allen each had 10 points for the Hokies, who are now 2-3 in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge — with both wins coming against Iowa. Anthony Tucker had a seasonhigh 24 points for the Hawkeyes (2-5), who lost despite shooting 44 percent from 3-point range. Virginia Tech opened the second half with two baskets in the first minute, punctuated by Davila’s transition slam off of an Iowa turnover, to push their lead back to 38-28. It looked as though the Hokies were set to blow past the inexperienced Hawkeyes, but Iowa rallied to make a game of it.

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East

New England Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo

W 7 5 5 4

L 4 6 6 7

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .636 .455 .455 .364

W x-Indianapolis 11 Jacksonville 6 Tennessee 5 Houston 5

L 0 5 6 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .545 .455 .455

Cincinnati Baltimore Pittsburgh Cleveland

W 8 6 6 1

L 3 5 5 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .727 .545 .545 .091

San Diego Denver Kansas City Oakland

W 8 7 3 3

L 3 4 8 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .727 .636 .273 .273

PF 307 256 230 186

PA 202 275 195 242

AFC 5-3-0 3-4-0 4-5-0 2-6-0

NFC 2-1-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 2-1-0

Div 3-1-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 2-2-0

PA 184 255 289 243

AFC 7-0-0 5-2-0 3-6-0 4-5-0

NFC 4-0-0 1-3-0 2-0-0 1-1-0

Div 4-0-0 2-2-0 2-3-0 1-4-0

PF 231 257 248 122

PA 174 188 204 279

AFC 6-3-0 6-4-0 4-4-0 1-6-0

NFC 2-0-0 0-1-0 2-1-0 0-4-0

Div 6-0-0 3-2-0 1-3-0 0-5-0

PF 312 196 183 115

PA 219 189 282 258

AFC 6-3-0 5-3-0 2-5-0 2-6-0

NFC 2-0-0 2-1-0 1-3-0 1-2-0

Div 5-1-0 2-1-0 1-3-0 1-4-0

PA 182 228 261 205

NFC 6-2-0 6-2-0 4-3-0 2-7-0

AFC 2-1-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-1-0

Div 2-1-0 3-1-0 2-1-0 0-4-0

PA 221 245 256 314

NFC 7-0-0 5-4-0 4-4-0 1-7-0

AFC 4-0-0 1-1-0 0-3-0 0-3-0

Div 3-0-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 0-3-0

PF 342 296 216 193

PA 203 215 261 335

NFC 8-0-0 6-3-0 2-6-0 1-8-0

AFC 2-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-1-0

Div 5-0-0 3-2-0 1-2-0 0-5-0

PF 267 228 223 130

PA 217 213 250 297

NFC 5-2-0 4-3-0 3-6-0 1-8-0

AFC 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

Div 3-1-0 3-0-0 2-3-0 0-4-0

South

PF 304 202 229 259

North

West

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East

Dallas Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Washington

W 8 7 6 3

L 3 4 5 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .727 .636 .545 .273

New Orleans Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay

W 11 6 4 1

L 0 5 7 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .545 .364 .091

Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 10 7 4 2

L 1 4 7 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .909 .636 .364 .182

PF 255 293 272 170

South

PF 407 272 199 181

North

West

W Arizona 7 San Francisco 5 Seattle 4 St. Louis 1

L 4 6 7 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .636 .455 .364 .091

x-clinched division Thursday’s Games Green Bay 34, Detroit 12 Dallas 24, Oakland 7 Denver 26, N.Y. Giants 6 Sunday’s Games Buffalo 31, Miami 14 N.Y. Jets 17, Carolina 6 Seattle 27, St. Louis 17 Atlanta 20, Tampa Bay 17 Indianapolis 35, Houston 27 Cincinnati 16, Cleveland 7 Philadelphia 27, Washington 24 San Diego 43, Kansas City 14 San Francisco 20, Jacksonville 3 Tennessee 20, Arizona 17 Minnesota 36, Chicago 10 Baltimore 20, Pittsburgh 17, OT Monday’s Game New Orleans 38, New England 17 Thursday, Dec. 3 N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6 St. Louis at Chicago, 1 p.m. Oakland at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Detroit at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. New England at Miami, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Washington, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Houston at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 p.m. San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 7 Baltimore at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.

College football

(10-2) vs. Clemson (8-4) at Tampa, Fla., 8 p.m. MIDWEST Fresno St. (7-4) at Illinois (3-8), 12:30 p.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (9-2) at Butler (10-1), Noon SOUTHWEST Southern U. (6-4) at Texas Southern (5-4), 2 p.m. Big 12 championship, Texas (12-0) vs. Nebraska (9-3) at Arlington, Texas, 8 p.m. FAR WEST New Mexico St. (3-9) at Boise St. (12-0), 3 p.m. Arizona (7-4) at Southern Cal (8-3), 3:30 p.m. California (8-3) at Washington (4-7), 6:30 p.m. Wisconsin (8-3) at Hawaii (6-6), 11:30 p.m. FCS PLAYOFFS Quarterfinals William & Mary (10-2) at Southern Illinois (11-1), Noon Stephen F. Austin (10-2) at Montana (12-0), 2:05 p.m. New Hampshire (10-2) at Villanova (11-1), 3:30 p.m. Appalachian State (10-2) at Richmond (11-1), 7 p.m.

Prep basketball Tuesday’s area boxscores MHS boys 77, Piedmont 37 Monroe (2-0) Jamison Crowder 8 1-2 18, Qwadarius Duboise 5 0-0 11, Issac Blakeney 2 1-4 5, Quay Chambers 1 0-0 2, Quon Threatt 3 2-3 9, Shamiir Hailey 4 0-0 10, Bryant Cureton 4 0-0 9, Chris Butler 1 0-0 3, Eric Horne 2 0-0 4, Daniel Kress 0 0-0 0, Chris Thomas 0 0-0 0, Jamarous Bratney 1 0-0 2, Coleman Kress 1 0-0 2, Team 1 0-0 2. Totals 32 4-9 77.

Piedmont (0-2) Cameron Leviner 3 0-2 8, Ross Rushing 4 0-0 8, TJ Doster 4 0-1 8, Wes Marsh 1 1-2 3, Wilson Broadway 0 0-0 0, Pat King 0 3-4 3, Justin Crump 0 1-2 1, Justin Redfern 1 0-0 2, Christian Dermid 1 1-2 3, Tumani Washington 0 1-2 1, Mason Montgomery 0 0-0 0, Trenton Linville 0 0-0 0, Kyle Austin 0 0-0 0. Totals 14 7-15 37. Monroe Piedmont

11 25 22 19 - 77 12 8 8 9 - 37

3-pointers: Monroe 7 (Hailey 2, Crowder 1, Duboise 1, Threatt 1, Cureton 1, Butler 1); Piedmont 2 (Leviner 2). Rebounds: Monroe 29 (Blakeney 7, Chambers 7, Crowder 4); Piedmont 36 (Rushing 9, Doster 7, Marsh 6, Leviner 4). Assists: Monroe 14 (Crowder 3, Duboise 3); Piedmont 5 (Leviner 2). Steals: Monroe 13 (Crowder 4, Threatt 4); Piedmont 6 (Rushing 2). Blocks: Monroe 5 (Blakeney 3); Piedmont 2 (Marsh 2).

Piedmont girls 58, MHS 43 College Football Schedule All Times EST (Subject to change)

Thursday, Dec. 3

SOUTH Arkansas St. (3-8) at W. Kentucky (0-11), 7 p.m. FAR WEST Oregon St. (8-3) at Oregon (9-2), 9 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 4

MAC championship, Central Michigan (10-2) vs. Ohio (9-3) at Detroit, 8 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 5

EAST Cincinnati (11-0) at Pittsburgh (9-2), Noon West Virginia (8-3) at Rutgers (8-3), Noon South Florida (7-4) at Connecticut (6-5), 8 p.m. SOUTH C-USA championship, Houston (10-2) at East Carolina (8-4), Noon San Jose St. (2-9) at Louisiana Tech (3-8), 2 p.m. SEC championship, Florida (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-0) at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic (4-7) at Fla. International (3-8), 7 p.m. ACC championship, Georgia Tech

Monroe (0-2) Dequishea McCain 6 1-2 17, Shakira Jordan 3 4-5 10, Rae Moore 3 0-0 6, Katie Bention 0 1-3 1, Lydia Griffin 3 2-3 8, Shanequa Chambers 0 1-4 1, Alexis Collins 0 0-0 0, Daya Jordan 0 0-0 0. Totals 15 9-17 43. Piedmont (1-1) Courtney Barrineau 6 5-7 17, Nicole Hyatt 2 0-0 4, Amber Weaver 5 4-4 15, Hayley Whitley 0 0-0 0, Jade Montgomery 5 6-6 18, Alison Florence 1 0-2 2, Callie Rape 0 2-2 2, Sarah Wylie 0 0-0 0, Kristina McAlister 0 0-2 0, Ashley Widener 0 0-0 0. Totals 19 17-23. Monroe Piedmont

10 8 14 11 - 43 17 17 16 8 - 58

3-pointers: Monroe 5 (McCain 4, Jordan 1); Piedmont 3 (Montgomery 2, Weaver 1). Rebounds: Monroe 24 (Moore 7, Bention 6, Griffin 6); Piedmont 35 (Weaver 13, Barrineau 7, Florence 4, Hyatt 4). Assists: Monroe 5 (Jordan 2, Moore 2); Piedmont 12 (McAlister 4, Montgomery 4, Barrineau 3). Steals: Monroe 12 (Bention 4, Jordan 4, Moore 2); Piedmont 11 (Weaver 4, Montgomery 4). Blocks: Monroe 3 (Griffin 2); Piedmont 2 (Hyatt 2).

Berry girls 55, Cuth. 17

Cuthbertson Sydney Sebastian 4 5-8 13, Theresa Walter 0 1-2 1, Rachel Miller 0 0-0 0, Alexis Duty 0 0-0 0, Kathleen Cashman 0 1-4 1, Emily Barfield 1 0-0 2, Jessica Feranda 0 0-2 0, Brogan O’Brien 0 0-0 0, Tristen Taylor 0 0-0 0. Totals 5 7-16 17. Berry Essense Baucom 7 0-0 14, Andreka Williams 1 2-2 4, Naisha Calhoun 1 0-0 2, Imani Parr 2 0-0 4, Candice Brown 4 3-5 11, Melissa Jeter 1 0-0 2, Milan Quinn 4 0-4 8, Alicia Quinn 3 0-0 6, Jessica Marcus 1 2-4 4. Totals 24 7-15 55. Cuthbertson 6 B. Academy 7

5 0 6 - 17 24 18 6 - 55

3-pointers: None. Rebounds: C—36 (Sebastian 6, Cashman 6, Feranda 5, Walther 4); B—51 (Parr 10, Brown 9, A. Quinn 7, M. Quinn 6, Jeter 4, Marcus 4). Fouls: C—14, Berry 20. Fouled out: Parr. Technical fouls: Berry team.

Berry boys 66, Cuth. 38

Cuthbertson Jorden Hardrick-Givens 2 0-0 4, Emmitt Afam 3 2-6 8, Cody Esser 2 4-4 6, Mike Cuthbertson 2 1-1 5, Lucius McMillon 0 0-0 0, Cornelius Stradford 1 1-5 4, Chris Bristow 2 1-2 5, Ralph Wright 3 0-1 6. Totals 15 9-19 38. Berry Academy Quiny Ekechukwu 2 2-2 6, Dajuan Graf 4 3-3 11, Jaquantis Pinder 5 7-9 18, Bill Ngha 2 0-0 4, Kenny Patterson 3 1-5 7, Jerron Jamerson 1 2-2 4, Keegan Stroud 0 0-0 0, Braxton Hicks 1 1-2 3, Chris Walls 2 0-0 4, Raheem Reeves 1 0-0 2, Marquis Buckman 3 0-0 7. Totals 24 16-23 66. Cuthbertson 6 B. Academy 9

11 12 9 - 38 15 16 26 - 66

3-pointers: Stradford, Buckman, Pinder. Rebounds: C—29 (Cuthbertson 7); B—41 (Patterson 9, Walls 6, Graf 5, Pinder 4). Fouls: C—17, B—18. Fouled out: None. Technical fouls: Stroud.

CATA boys 60, UA 27

Central Academy (2-1) Jon Wright 3 0-0 6, John Quintero 3 0-0 8, Darnell Hill 4 0-0 9, Kacey Robinson 4 0-4 8, Matthew Bartley 4 0-2 10, Charvis Barrino 4 0-0 8, Ronnie Burch 0 0-0 0, Isiah Wallace 0 1-2 1, Andrew London 0 1-2 1, Mitchell Blackburn 1 1-2 3, Chris Hailey 1 0-0 2, Ladarius Linen 1 0-0 2, Jeremy Ferguson 1 0-0 2, S. Washington 0 0-0 0. Totals 26 3-12 60. Union Academy (0-3) Brad Helms 3 0-0 8, Austin Snipes 1 0-0 3, Tommy Yandle 0 0-0 0, James Mauney 0 0-0 0, Chris Austin 0 2-4 2, Justin Gibson 2 0-0 5, Marlon Young 1 0-1 2, Zack Anderson 1 0-0 2, Griffin Walters 2 0-0 4, Jackson Hargett 0 1-2 1, Darren Clark 0 0-0 , Jared Hill 0 0-0 0, Maurice Young 0 0-0 0, Austin Gallowich 0 0-0 0. Totals 10 3-9 27. C. Academy 11 17 21 11 — 60 U. Academy 3 7 9 8 — 27 3-pointers: CATA 5 (Quintero 2, Bartley 2, Hill 1); UA 4 (Helms 2, Snipes 1, Gibson 1). Rebounds: CATA 42 (Robinson 9, Barrino 7, Hill 5, Burch 5); UA 27 (Anderson 6, Austin 4, Walters 3, Helms 3). Assists: CATA 14 (Wright 10); UA 6 (Snipes 2, Helms 2).

UA girls 32, CATA 28

Christian boys 76, MR 53

Charlotte Christian (3-0) Corbin Harris 2 0-0 5, Trent Walker 4 2-4 11, Akil Mitchell 8 2-4 19, Anthony Gill 5 2-7 13, Ryan Potocnik 3 0-0 6, Mitchell Hargett 2 2-4 6, Luke Robinson 0 0-0 0, Judson Hall 3 1-1 7, Kyler Brown 2 1-1 5, Ryan Watkins 2 0-0 4, Uyi U-Edmondson 0 0-0 0. Totals 31 10-21 76 Marvin Ridge (0-3) Ryan Collins 0 0-0 0, Colby Rhodes 1 1-2 4, Jon Bassett 7 0-0 19, TJ Tolbert 5 3-3 17, Josh Garrick 0 0-0 0, Pat Bellucci 2 0-0 4, Joey Mysante 0 0-1 0, Channing Bass 1 2-4 4, Joe Jacobs 0 1-2 1, Taylor Neal 0 0-0 0, David Powell 0 0-0 0, Tim Neal 2 0-0 4, Andy Lipocky 0 0-0 0, Dalton Stout 0 0-0 0. Totals 18 7-12 53 C. Christian 18 24 16 18 - 76 M. Ridge 7 15 18 13 - 53 3-pointers: Charlotte Christian 4 (Harris 1, Walker 1, Mitchell 1, Gill 1); Marvin Ridge 10 (Bassett 5, Tolbert 4, Rhodes 1); Rebounds: Charlotte Christian 41 (Mitchell 9, Gill 8, Potocnik 6, Walker 5); Marvin Ridge 16 (Bellucci 7, Tolbert 5); Assists: Charlotte Christian 18 (Walker 5, Harris 4); Marvin Ridge 14 (Tolbert 4).

Christian girls 48, MR 37

Charlotte Christian (2-1) Morgan Kirk 3 4-7 12, Megan Denehy 0 1-2 1, Maryah Mazyek 4 1-3 9, Gigi Bailey 2 7-10 11, Crystal Barnett 5 2-4 12, Saundra Smith 1 1-2 3, Katie Falzarano 0 0-0 0, Michelle Brotherton 0 0-0 0. Totals 15 16-28 48 Marvin Ridge (1-2) Eryn Curry 4 3-4 12, Toni Lashley 2 2-2 6, Chelsea Horan 3 0-0 7, Jordan Henry 4 1-1 9, Katie Lombard 0 0-0 0, Anna Lipocky 1 0-0 2, Kathryn Cannon 0 0-0 0, Erica White 0 1-4 1, Rachel Walker 0 0-0 0, Josie Butler 0 0-0 0. Totals 14 7-11 37 C. Christian 4 12 15 17 - 48 M. Ridge 10 8 7 12 - 37 3-pointers: Charlotte Christian 22 (Kirk 2); Marvin Ridge 2 (Curry 1, Horan 1); Rebounds: Charlotte Christian 24 (Bailey 10, Mazyek 6); Marvin Ridge 25 (Henry 8, Horan 6, White 4); Assists: Charlotte Christian 8; Marvin Ridge 8.

Parkwood boys 63, CCD 55 Parkwood Maurice Leak 6 6-6 20, Deonte Hiatt 6 3-6 17, Justin Crowder 5 1-2 15, Marcus Leak 3 1-2 7, Joseph Gordon 2 0-0 4, Totals: 22 11-16 63.

Country Day Mac Schweppe 5 0-0 10, Ben Simons 3 2-2 9, Wake Hamilton 4 0-1 8, Zach Simons 2 3-6 8, Morgan Roberts 2 3-5 7, Mac Cramer 2 1-2 5, Brandon Santiago 1 1-2 3, Bryan Erb 1 0-0 2, Totals: 20 10-18 55. Parkwood 16 20 14 13 - 63 Country Day 16 6 18 15 - 55 3-pointers: Parkwood 8 (Crowder 4, Hiatt 2, Maurice Leak 2); CCD 2 (Ben Simons 1, Zach Simons 1); Rebounds: Parkwood 32 (Marcus Leak 14, Maurice Leak 4, Gordon 4); CCD: 26 (Hamilton 7, Roberts 6); Assists: Parkwood 9 (Maurice Leak 4); CCD 13 (Hamilton 8, Cramer 3).

FH boys 56, W. Stanly 46

CATA (2-1) Larie Bailey 2 2-4 7, Casey Nichols 2 0-2 4, Asmber Isley 1 1-2 3, Jasmine Huntley 3 0-0 6, Xan Starnes 1 1-2 3, Logan Horne 1 0-0 2. Brittany Barrino 1 1-2 3. Totals 11 5-12 28.

Forest Hills (1-0) Dre Huntley 5 1-2 14, Brandon Glenn 5 3-4 13, John Goodrum 1 0-0 2, Tyrone Roland 2 2-2 6, Markell Lotharp 9 0-1 21, Canious Sturdivant 0 0-0 0, Jarvis Wilson 0 0-0 0, Demontrez Allen 0 0-0 0, Treston Heard 0 0-0 0.

Union Academy (2-1) Erin Walters 5 3-7 13, Chloe McKnight 2 0-0 5, Kendall Cox 2 0-4 4, Meredith 2 0-2 4, Shana Grigston 1 0-0 2, Megan Young 1 0-0 2, Lexi Beaver 0 0-0 0. Totals 13 3-10 32.

West Stanly (1-2, 0-1) Taylor Frayley 1 0-0 2, Keke Smith 1 0-0 3, Jace Whitley 0 0-1 0, Tad Morton 0 2-3, Eason Sides 1 0-0 2, Zach Caldwell 3 0-0 6, Andrew Wilson 6 1-5 14, Elliott Drake 7 3-3 17.

C. Academy 5 U. Academy 11

Forest Hills 6 15 22 13 - 56 West Stanly 12 13 16 5 - 46

7 4

5 11 — 28 10 7 — 32

3-pointers: CATA 1 (Bailey 1); UA 1 (McKnight 1).

3-pointers: FH 6 (Huntley 3, Lotharp 3).

Transactions Tuesday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Traded C Kelly Shoppach to Tampa Bay for a player to be named. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with LHP John Halama on a minor league contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Agreed to terms with C Brian Schneider on a two-year contract. Named Rick Strouse vice president and general counsel. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Terry Kennedy manager of Portland (PCL), Doug Dascenzo manager of San Antonio (Texas) and Jose Flores manager of Fort Wayne (MWL). American Association GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS—Traded RHP Steve Andrade and RHP James Morrison to Southern Maryland (Atlantic) for two players to be named. ST. PAUL SAINTS—Signed 1B/OF Jason Cooper. Northern League GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS— Announced the retirement of OF Rob Marconi. KANSAS CITY T-BONEs—Agreed to terms with INF Jimmy Mojica. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW JERSEY NETS—Named general manager Kiki Vandeweghe coach for the remainder of the season. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Released PK Jason Elam. Signed PK Matt Bryant. Signed QB D.J. Shockley to the practice squad. Waived DT Jeremy Clark from the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DT Rashaad Duncan to the practice squad. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed LB Quinton Culberson. Waived-injured LB Kelvin Smith. CHICAGO BEARS—Signed LB Cato June to a one-year contract. Waived DE Joe Clermond from the pactice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Placed NT Shaun Rogers on injured reserve. Released WR James Robinson from the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS—Placed TE Brandon Pettigrew on the reserve/ injured list. Signed TE Dan Gronkowski from the practice squad. Signed G Kurt Quarterman and TE Jake Nordin to the practice squad. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed TE Tom Crabtree to the practice squad. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Waived DE Josh Thomas and DB Anthony Madison. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Signed TE Brent Celek to a six-year contract extension and WR Jordan Norwood from the practice squad. Released CB Ramzee Robinson. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed P Sam Paulescu. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed DL Antoine Holmes to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOARD OF GOVERNORS—Approved the sale of the Montreal Canadiens to a group headed by the Molson brothers. NHL—Suspended Washington F Alex Ovechkin two games for extended his knee while delivering a hit to Carolina D Tim Gleason during Monday’s game. BOSTON BRUINS—Signed F Marc Savard to a seven-year contract extension. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Placed D Joe Corvo on injured reserve. Assigned F Patrick Dwyer to Albany (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Added D Mathieu Roy to the roster on emergency recall from Syracuse (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS— Reassigned D Alexander Sulzer to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Assigned D Bobby Sanguinetti to Hartford (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned D Jonas Junland to Peoria (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Claimed D Jay Leach off waivers from the Montreal Canadiens.


The Enquirer-Journal

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 3B

Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 27 help Boston blast Bobcats, 108-90 CHARLOTTE (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ray Allen found his shooting touch, his teammates scored at will inside and the Celtics made it look so easy it was hard for Bobcats coach Larry Brown to watch. Allen broke out of his shooting slump with 27 points, Kendrick Perkins added 21 points and 12 rebounds and the Boston cruised past Charlotte 108-90 on Tuesday night for their fifth straight victory. For a night, the Celtics looked like the dominant team that started the season 6-0. And the Bobcats looked nothing like the club that had won four straight, including a victory over Cleveland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was like the varsity

against the JV,â&#x20AC;? Brown said as he attacked his teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort and defense. Entering shooting 30 percent from 3-point range, Allen took only nine shots, but hit 5 of 6 3s, including one from behind the plane of the backboard with 1 second left to give the Celtics a 62-39 halftime lead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ray made shots early. When your shooter makes shots, the floor opens a little bit more for you,â&#x20AC;? Celtics coach Doc Rivers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It opened up our low-post game.â&#x20AC;? Perkins took advantage, hitting 9 of 10 shots. Kevin Garnett shot 5 for 8 and added 16 points and seven rebounds. About the only negative was Rasheed Wal-

laceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s league-leading eighth technical foul as the Celtics quickly ended any hopes Charlotte had of erasing memories of its embarrassing 59-point performance in Boston on opening night. For Brown, who called a timeout less than 2 minutes in, this game was worse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy ALLEN for our fans. They got to go home and watch (North) Carolina and Michigan State,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If any of them were smart, they would

have left early and watched that game.â&#x20AC;? Gerald Wallace scored just five points for the Bobcats after getting into early foul trouble. Nazr Mohammed had 16 points for Charlotte, which entered giving up a league-low 87.9 points a game. Rivers entered the game worried about new Charlotte addition Stephen Jackson, joking before the game that they were going to â&#x20AC;&#x153;do some tic-tac-toeâ&#x20AC;? to figure out if the 6-foot-5 Allen guarded the 6-8 Jackson or 6-7 Wallace. Allen started on Jackson, who immediately posted him and scored in the lane on the first possession. But Wallace

picked up two fouls in 5 minutes and sat out the rest of the half, giving the Celtics matchup advantages. Nobody could get a body on Perkins, who was only five points shy of matching a career high. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hard for me sitting in the first half, just watching basically layup after layup after layup,â&#x20AC;? said Wallace, who entered as the reigning Eastern Conference player of the week after twice topping 30 points in victories last week. The Bobcats shot 31 percent in the first half without him, and trailed by as many as 26 points before he got his first points with 8:15 left in the third quarter.

Knicks end their losing streak at five

Monroe Continued from Page 1B

NEW YORK (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danilo Gallinari had 27 points and 10 rebounds, and the New York Knicks beat the Phoenix Suns 126-99 on Tuesday night, snapping a five-game losing streak and giving their coach a resounding victory over his old team. David Lee added 24 points and Al Harrington had 22 for the Knicks, who rang up a season-best 71 first-half points, then blew it open when Gallinari scored seven points in a span of barely a minute midway through the third quarter. Steve Nash had 20 points and eight assists for the Suns (14-4), who came in with the NBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best record. They had won four straight by an average of 21.3 points. It was a sweet victory for Mike Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Antoni, who rode his high-scoring offensive system to an average of 58 wins in his four full seasons in Phoenix before he and the Suns parted ways after a first-round loss to San Antonio in 2008. He hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been nearly as successful with an inferior roster in New York, where he coached his 100th game Tuesday and recorded just his 36th victory.

Wizards 106, Raptors 102

TORONTO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Antawn Jamison had 30 points and 12 rebounds, Gilbert Arenas had 22 points and nine assists for Washington. Caron Butler scored 19 points, and Brendan Haywood had 15 points and nine rebounds for the Wizards, who have won three of four. Chris Bosh had 22 points and 14 rebounds, Andrea Bargnani had 20 points and 11 rebounds and Jose Calderon added 20 points for the Raptors, who have lost four straight and eight of 10. Jarrett Jack had 18 and Hedo Turkoglu scored 13 for the Raptors.

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Piedmont junior Wesley Marsh, right, rejects the shot of Monroeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quontez Threatt during Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contest while Cameron Leviner (11) tries to draw a charge.

Junior guard Qwadarius Duboise added 11 points, senior guard Shamiir Hailey finished with 10, and Threatt and freshman guard Bryant Cureton scored nine each for Monroe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest thing is Jamison is in rare form,â&#x20AC;? said Sowell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Qwadarius is not quite there yet and then Shamiir was playing for the first time, period. He came in and knocked down some shots, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pleased with where CROWDER heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at right now. We played four guards and one post a lot last year, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do that again if we need to.â&#x20AC;? Junior g u a r d DUBOISE Cameron L e v i n e r, sophomore guard Ross Rushing and senior forward TJ Doster each scored eight points to lead the Panthers (0-2, 0-1). The Panthers play at Sun Valley on Thursday while Monroe is back in action on Friday at home against Cuthbertson.

Steelers star QB expected to return from this week PITTSBURGH (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger has worked out without problems since missing Sunday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game in Baltimore with a concussion and is expected to play Sunday against Oakland. Roethlisberger was held out of the 20-17 overtime loss to the Ravens after having postpractice headaches Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. A team doctor recommended Saturday that the quarterback not play, and coach Mike Tom-

lin agreed. While the Steelers did not practice on Monday, Roethlisberger worked out on his own and did not have any problems, Tomlin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All indications are heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a full participant tomorrow (Wednesday) in practice and ultimately play in the game on Sunday,â&#x20AC;? Tomlin said Tuesday. If the headaches should unexpectedly return, Tomlin said the Steelers will â&#x20AC;&#x153;act quickly.â&#x20AC;? The two-time Super Bowlwinning quarterback sus-

tained his fourth concussion since 2006 and his second in less than a year during an overtime loss in Kansas City on Nov. 22. Neither Roethlisberger nor the team revealed during the week he was having headaches, one Roethlisberger reason there was considerable surprise when it was an-

nounced he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are codes that come with playing tough games like football that kind of conflict at times, with things that are of utmost importance like head injuries,â&#x20AC;? Tomlin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand the gravity of the decision that we had to make on Saturday, the potential of that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand that if we allowed Ben to play that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be open to questions in regards to that. I thought that if we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow Ben to play, that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be open to questions in regards to

Cavs

that. Really, it was irrelevant in terms of my decision making. I was more concerned about doing what was right. Medical experts suggested he not play, so we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play him.â&#x20AC;? Roethlisberger played the week after sustaining a concussion against Atlanta in 2006, but had one of the worst games of his career. He threw four interceptions â&#x20AC;&#x201D; two for touchdowns â&#x20AC;&#x201D; during a 20-13 loss to Oakland, which won only one other game all season.

CATA

Continued from Page 1B

Continued from Page 1B

Freshman Sydney Sebastian led the Cavaliers with 13 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my consistent scorer every night,â&#x20AC;? Daniels said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I need to work on now is the rest of the team picking up some of the scoring also. I think sometimes they look to her to score, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pass up an open shot to get her the ball, which is fine, but I need them all ready to shoot. I need them all to be confident they can score.â&#x20AC;?

Barrino added seven rebounds and sophomore guard John Quintero s c o r d e i g h t on the strength of two 3-pointers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; giving CATA five players with e i g h t BARRINO points or more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really care whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scoring as long as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s us,â&#x20AC;? Connelley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to see that kind of balance. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s harder to defend.â&#x20AC;? Brad Helms scored all of his team-high eight

Berryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boys cruise

Berry Academy outscored Cuthbertson 26-9 in the fourth quarter to break open a close game Tuesday night and defeat the Cavaliers 66-38. Berry (4-1) used its athleticism to frustrate Cavaliers standout Mike Cuthbertson, who finished with five points, and harass freshman point guard Emmitt Afam, who led the Cavaliers (1-2) with eight points. Berry coach Michael Willis rotated four players on Afam, forcing him to work overtime to run the Cavaliersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had trouble getting into the offense and running the offense,â&#x20AC;? Cuthbertson coach Mike Helms said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were flashes of brilliance from the freshman point guard. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showing flashes of what he can be. I thought he grew up a lot tonight.â&#x20AC;?

points in the second half, including two 3-pointers in the third, for the Cards. Zack Anderson led UA in rebounding with six.

Walters leads UA

Erin Walters scored five of her game-high 13 points in the fourth quarter to help Union Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls hold off CATA 32-28. It was Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first loss â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both teams are now 2-1. Union Academy jumped out to an 11-3 lead and never trailed. CATA made a run and cut the advantage to 1512 at halftime, but the Cardinals won the third quarter 10-5. Chloe McKnight had five points for the Cardinals, including her teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only 3-pointer. Larie Bailey led Central with seven points.

Grand Opening NEW /WNERSHIPsNEW -ANAGEMENTsNEW Attitude! E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Piedmontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amber Weaver, left, had 15 points and 13 rebounds.

Trio Continued from Page 1B

Junior guard Dequishea McCain scored 17 points on the strength of four 3-pointers for the Redhawks,

who also got 10 points from sophomore guard Shakira Jordan. Senior post Lydia Griffin added eight points and six rebounds for Monroe, which plays at home against Cuthbertson on Friday. Piedmont plays at Sun Valley on Thursday.

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4B / Wednesday, December 2, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

CELEBRITY CIPHER

SUDOKU PUZZLE

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Administrator of the Estate of Marsha C. Maciejewski, deceased, late of 9005 Carindale Road, Waxhaw, Union County, North Carolina, the undersigned does hereby notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the Estate of said decedent to present them to the undersigned in care of Davies Law, PLLC at 15720 John J. Delaney Drive, Suite 203, Charlotte, NC 28277 on or before the 10th day of February, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to the said Estate will please make immediate payment to the undersigned. This 11, day of November, 2009. Edward Maciejewski Administrator Estate of Marsha C. Maciejewski November 11,18,25, 2009 December 2, 2009

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK FILE # 9E0680 ADMINISTRATOR EXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J. R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of Donald Edward Mitchell Sr., deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 8th day of March 2010, or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 30th day of November 2009. Donald E. Mitchell Jr. 4803 Legacy Dr. Colfax, NC 27235 Co-Executor Linder Jaeckels 839 Eagle Crest Dr. Versailles, KY 40383 Co-Executrix Dec. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009 09 SP 721 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by MICHAEL LILJESTRAND AND KARINA E. LILJESTRAND, HUSBAND AND WIFE to Harold Russell, Trustee(s), which was dated March 15, 2007 and recorded on March 16, 2007 in Book 04491 at Page 0007, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on December 15, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING ALL OF LOT 32 OF THE ESTATES AT WESLEY OAKS SUBDIVISION, MAP 2, AS SAME IS SHOWN ON MAP THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT CABINET I AT FILE 702, UNION COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC REGISTRY. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 1012 Patricians Lane, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance "AS IS WHERE IS." There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Michael Liljestrand, and wife, Karina E. Liljestrand. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-08011-FC01 December 2, 9, 2009

in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the Judicial Center in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina at 1:00 PM on December 10, 2009 and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following real estate situated in the County of Union, North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: BEING all of Lot 7 of Block F of VANN V. SECREST DEVELOPMENT, as shown on plat recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 63, Union County Registry, to which reference is hereby made for a more particular description. Together with improvements located thereon; said property being located at 204 Jones Street, Monroe, North Carolina. Parcel ID Number: 09-150-116 Trustee may, in the Trustee's sole discretion, delay the sale for up to one hour as provided in NCGS §4521.23. Should the property be purchased by a third party, that person must pay the tax of Forty-Five Cents ($0.45) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) required by NCGS §7A-308(a)(1). The property to be offered pursuant to this notice of sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS, WHERE IS.” Neither the Trustee nor the holder of the note secured by the deed of trust/security agreement, or both, being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representative of either the Trustee or the holder of the note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such condition expressly are disclaimed. Also, this property is being sold subject to all taxes, special assessments, and prior liens or encumbrances of record and any recorded releases. Said property is also being sold subject to applicable Federal and State laws. A cash deposit or cashier’s check (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT

TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. This 19th day of November, 2009. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE Attorney at Law The Law Firm of Hutchens, Senter & Britton, P.A. Attorneys for Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 1028 4317 Ramsey Street Fayetteville, North Carolina 28311 http://sales.hsbfirm.com Case No: 1017789 November 25, 2009 December 2, 2009

October 1, 2007, may after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. This 19th day of November, 2009. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE Attorney at Law The Law Firm of Hutchens, Senter & Britton, P.A. Attorneys for Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 1028 4317 Ramsey Street Fayetteville, North Carolina 28311 http://sales.hsbfirm.com Case No: 1012615 November 25, 2009 December 2, 2009

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 09 SP 1732 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust made by Sara E. McMahan by Dottie Nash, her Attorney-in-Fact (PRESENT RECORD OWNER(S): First Connor Corporation) to Andrew Valentine, Esq., Trustee(s), dated the 8th day of August, 2006, and recorded in Book 04259, Page 0864, in Union County Registry, North Carolina, default having been made

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 09 SP 1818 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust made by Kenneth L. Hall by Lucille K. Hall, his Attorney-in-Fact, and Lucille K. Hall to Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC, Trustee(s), dated the 15th day of July, 2004, and recorded in Book 3501, Page 252, in Union County Registry, North Carolina, default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the Judicial Center in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina at 1:00 PM on December 10, 2009 and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following real estate situated in the County of Union, North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: Being all of Lot 129 of Sandalwood II Subdivision, as same is shown on map thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet C, File 475 in the Union County Public Registry. Together with improvements located thereon; said property being located at 2804 Faircroft Way, Monroe, North Carolina. Parcel ID Number: 07072069 Trustee may, in the Trustee's sole discretion, delay the sale for up to one hour as provided in NCGS §4521.23. Should the property be purchased by a third party, that person must pay the tax of Forty-Five Cents ($0.45) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) required by NCGS §7A-308(a)(1). The property to be offered pursuant to this notice of sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS, WHERE IS.” Neither the Trustee nor the holder of the note secured by the deed of trust/security agreement, or both, being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representative of either the Trustee or the holder of the note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such condition expressly are disclaimed. Also, this property is being sold subject to all taxes, special assessments, and prior liens or encumbrances of record and any recorded releases. Said property is also being sold subject to applicable Federal and State laws. A cash deposit or cashier’s check (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 09 SP 1819 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust made by Tiffanie M. Stevenson and Dorothy S. Craig to George A. Resta and Allan B. Bernstein, Trustee(s), dated the 18th day of May, 1999, and recorded in Book 1248, Page 0733, in Union County Registry, North Carolina, default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the Judicial Center in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina at 1:00 PM on December 10, 2009 and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following real estate situated in the County of Union, North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron set in the west margin of Richardson Street, which point is North 14-58-06 East 100.00 ft. from a set nail in the northwest intersection of Ashcraft Street and Richardson Street, the southeast corner of Lot No. 52 on plat recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 95 and runs thence from said beginning point South 74-56-23 West 155.00 ft. to an iron, a corner on the East line of Lot No. 44 of the Van V. Secrest, Jr. Subdivision (Plat Book 3, Page 95); thence running with a portion of the east line of Lot 44 and a portion of the East line of Lot 48 North 14-58-06 West 100.00 ft. to a set iron; thence North 74-5623 East 155.00 ft. to an iron in the West margin of Richardson Street South 14-58-06 East 100.00 ft. to the point and place of beginning and being 15,500 sq.ft. and designated as Lot No. 1 on an unrecorded map of survey by Derick L. Miles, RLS dated June 15, 1998, and being a portion of Lots 51 and 50 of the Van V. Secrest, Jr. Subdivision as shown in Plat Book 3, Page 95, Union County Registry. Together with improvements located thereon; said property being located at 207 Richardson Street, Monroe, North Car-


The Enquirer-Journal

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 / 5B

004 Legals

004 Legals

olina. Trustee may, in the Trustee's sole discretion, delay the sale for up to one hour as provided in NCGS §4521.23. Should the property be purchased by a third party, that person must pay the tax of Forty-Five Cents ($0.45) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) required by NCGS §7A-308(a)(1). The property to be offered pursuant to this notice of sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS, WHERE IS.” Neither the Trustee nor the holder of the note secured by the deed of trust/security agreement, or both, being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representative of either the Trustee or the holder of the note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such condition expressly are disclaimed. Also, this property is being sold subject to all taxes, special assessments, and prior liens or encumbrances of record and any recorded releases. Said property is also being sold subject to applicable Federal and State laws. A cash deposit or cashier’s check (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. This 19th day of November, 2009. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE Attorney at Law The Law Firm of Hutchens, Senter & Britton, P.A. Attorneys for Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 1028 4317 Ramsey Street Fayetteville, North Carolina 28311 http://sales.hsbfirm.com Case No: 1014601 November 25, 2009 December 2, 2009

Should the property be purchased by a third party, that person must pay the tax of Forty-Five Cents ($0.45) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) required by NCGS §7A-308(a)(1). The property to be offered pursuant to this notice of sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS, WHERE IS.” Neither the Trustee nor the holder of the note secured by the deed of trust/security agreement, or both, being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representative of either the Trustee or the holder of the note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such condition expressly are disclaimed. Also, this property is being sold subject to all taxes, special assessments, and prior liens or encumbrances of record and any recorded releases. Said property is also being sold subject to applicable Federal and State laws. A cash deposit or cashier’s check (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. Upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. This 19th day of November, 2009. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE Attorney at Law The Law Firm of Hutchens, Senter & Britton, P.A. Attorneys for Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 1028 4317 Ramsey Street Fayetteville, North Carolina 28311 http://sales.hsbfirm.com Case No: 1017790 November 25, 2009 December 2, 2009

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 09 SP 1730 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust made by Sara E. McMahan by Dottie Nash, Attorney-in-Fact (PRESENT RECORD OWNER(S): First Connor Corporation) to Andrew Valentine, Esq., Trustee(s), dated the 8th day of August, 2006, and recorded in Book 4259, Page 887, in Union County Registry, North Carolina, default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Substitute Trustee Services, Inc. having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the Judicial Center in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina at 1:00 PM on December 10, 2009 and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following real estate situated in the County of Union, North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: BEING all of Lot 11, Block A of the VANN V. SECREST DEVELOPMENT, as shown on plat recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 63, Union County Registry, to which reference is hereby made for a more particular description. Together with improvements located thereon; said property being located at 403 Jones Street, Monroe, North Carolina. Parcel ID Number: 09-150129 Trustee may, in the Trustee's sole discretion, delay the sale for up to one hour as provided in NCGS §4521.23.

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm

005 Special Notices ★★★★★★★★★★★★

GENERAL INFORMATION

DEADLINES

014 Lost & Found

FREE FOUND ADS If you find an item, call us and place your FREE ad.

3 LINES, 5 DAYS, FREE There is a charge for Lost Ads The Enquirer-Journal CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

704-261-2214

4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES

EMPLOYMENT

★★★★★★★★★★★★

014 Lost & Found Found large brown dog, no name collar & broken leash 11/5, Stack Rd. (704)283-4112 Lost large male brown dog close to Wolf Pond community. $300 Reward call 704-764-7871

AUCTION- SATURDAY,

DECEMBER 5, 9:00am, Red Oak, VA. 4.3 Acres, Home with 40'x60' Shop, Commercial Woodworking Equipment & Tools, Personal Property, Vehicles, Backhoe, etc. Carwile Auctions, www. carwileauctions.com. (434) 547-9100. (VAAR392) *NC Statewide*

069 Appliances Refrigerator & Stoves $99.99 Washers & Dryers $79.99 704-649-3821

078 Feed/Seed/Plants POINSETTIAS

040 Help Wanted Avon- Do you need an extra $200-500? Act now! Ft/Pt. Free gift. Medical Ins. avail. 704/821-7398

CIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGER Full-time, entry-level management position. Responsibilities include working with adult newspaper carriers, maintain and improve customer service and work on circulation sales. Flexible shifts including early mornings and weekends. Must have dependable vehicle to be used on the job, clean driving record, valid drivers license and insurance. To complete application apply at: The Enquirer-Journal 500 W. Jefferson Street PO Box 5040 Monroe, NC 28111 The Enquirer Journal is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability.

READER NOTICE! While many work-athome opportunities listed provide real income, many seek only to sell booklets or catalogs on how to get such work.

free delivery to area churches. (704)624-6179 Haigler Greenhouses

090 Miscellaneous

or visit our Web site at www.ftc.gov/bizop. N.C. law requires sellers of certain business opportunities to register with NC Attorney General before selling. Call to verify lawful registration before you buy.

108 Money To Loan Advance Fee Loans or Credit Offers Companies that do business by phone can’t ask you to pay for credit before you get it. For more information, call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP. A public service message from The Enquirer-Journal and The Federal Trade Commission.

109 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE - RENT

112 Apartments ★★★★★★★★★★★ 1/2 off 1st mo. rent !! Ask about other specials Completely Remodeled 2br, 1.5ba Townhouse Small pets allowed Shown by appt only 704-283-1912 ★★★★★★★★★★★

113 Duplexes

092 Firewood Seasoned Firewood Oak & mixture of Hickory call for details (704)363-4420

FINANCIAL 104 Bus. Opportunities

INVESTIGATE BEFORE YOU INVEST! Always a good policy, especially for business opportunities and franchises. Call NC Attorney General at (919)-716-6000 or the Federal Trade Commission at (877)-FTCHELP for free information;

Deck, this beautiful LR & DR for a cozy Christmas 3br 3ba jacuzzi $900mo +dep (704)254-2723

Beautiful 2br 1.5ba Cedar Indian Trail area nice 3br 2.5ba w/garage & bonus Bend Townhome in room Traewyck S/D only Monroe $650mo. $1075mo call (704)292(704)296-2428 1329

★ Monroe Apt. ★

MOBILE HOMES

Land Owners Wanted Zero Down call for details (704)225-8850

138 Mobile Homes - Rent

TRANSPORTATION

REAL ESTATE - SALE

114 Houses For Rent

dock door. 2400 sf. Old Charlotte Hwy. $600/Mo. 3br home 1 mile west of (704)283-4697 Monroe on Waxhaw Rd. No pets. AC. Ref’s & dep. 112 Apartments $650mo. (512)771-9113 1 bed 1 bath Apartment $450 Cotton St. Monroe 3BR, big loft, 2.5BA, 2800sf, good location-Monroe, Unionville Realty new house. $1100/mo. 704-753-1000 (704)458-4022

3 Bd 2 ba only $200/mo! 5% dn,15yrs@8%! For Listings 800-749-8106 x B002

$500.00 DN moves you in. Call and ask me how. 704-225-8850

$200/mo! 4 bed 2 ba! 5% dn, 15 yrs @ 8%! For Listings 800-749-8106 x H611

2br 1ba country farm home, $550mo. +dep. 5/8 inch x 4ft x 8ft OSB, Warehouse/office with 4’ & ref’s (704)225-9339

Metal Roofing 3ft wide $1.40 LF 1-803-789-5500

Waxhaw 3br 2.5ba kit, dining, den w/fp, all appliances/yard maint. included reduced! $900mo. Sherin Realty 704-882-1634

140 Mobile Homes - Sale

1br 1ba duplex spacious, cent H/A, $437mo. 903 A 2br 2ba MH River Rocky Rd. area. $300 dep. & 158 Trucks For Sale Guild, ref’s & dep req’d $300 every other Monday (704)400-4560 704-221-4233 03 Chevrolet Truck 1500 Ext Cab real good truck, 2br 1ba 900sf $595mo. Wingate: 2 mo free rent $8900 (704)283-5748 3br 1.5ba 1050 sf $695mo. 3BR 2BA $600 both, great location in Cent H/A. No pets. Wingate cul de sac dep & 704-451-8408 ref’s req’d (704)283-6490

111 Commercial - Rent

$7.00 each. Owens Corning Oakridge 30 yr black onyx shingles 18 sq, $1080. (704)233-0464

114 Houses For Rent

1988 PETERBUILT (379) C at. M otor, 15 S peed W ith O verdrive, 411 R ear E nd, N ew P arts, 63” Flat Top S leeper, R ebuilt E ngine and Transm ission.

$12,000 704-651-9644

2003 Cadillac Seville STS Loaded, like new, new M ichelin tires. 41,000 M iles.

$14,500 704-608-4748 9A-9P

Nearly new 3 & 4BR in

Monroe, $800-$950mo. Special 2br 2ba (704)289-5410 Move in by DEC. 1st. Get Jan & Feb FREE Owner financing 3br 2.5ba Beautiful & quiet town home. $149,900.00 paid water owner financing available. 704-289-5949 4005 F Christine Lane Newly Remodeled Townhouse 2bd/1.5 ba $600mo. 704-283-3097

Waxhaw NC (Alma Village) Call 704-609-5463

Please use caution when responding to all such ads. 042 Office/Clerical Indian Trail Co. needs Receptionist. Must be Bilingual (Spanish) Fax Resume to: 704-821-4327

043 Truck Drivers DRIVER- CDL-A. Attention Flatbed Drivers! Steady Freight & Miles. Limited Tarping. Paycheck deposited to ComData Card, $25 Bonus for every clean DOT inspection. Must have TWIC Card or apply within 30 days of hire. Western Express. Class A CDL, 22 years old, 1 year experience. 866-863-4117. *NC Statewide*

044 Sales Local Modular Home Center has immediate opening for a Sales Associate. Benefits are 401K plan, health/dental ins, commission base w/draw. No experience necessary. 1st Choice Home Center, 2008 E. Roosevelt Blvd, Monroe. 704-225-8850. Fax 704-225-8480 tommy@ 1stchoicemonroe.com

046 Medical/Dental PT Med Tech 2nd shift Hillcrest Bap. Ch Rest Home call for appt. (704)292-1145

Patented Happy Jack Flea Beacon: Control Fleas in the home without toxic chemicals. Results overnight! RODDENS DOG SUPPLIES 764-3905 www.happyjackinc.com

The Enquirer-Journal reserves the right to edit or reject and correctly classify an ad at any time. The Enquirer-Journal will assume no liability for omission of adver062 Homes for Pets tising material in whole or in part. Free 2 dogs both females ERRORS Aust Shep 1-1/2 gold brn/wht. blk Lab 6 yrs Please check your ad the moving, (704)363-9848 first day it runs. If you find an error, call the first day so Free 2 Persian cats with payour ad can be corrected. pers male & female, 2yrs The Enquirer-Journal will old (704)289-3283 give credit for only the first incorrect publication. Free dog part Rott/Doberman 6yrs, good home PAYMENT needed (704)957-4063 Pre-payment is required for all individual ads and all Free puppies Aust. Shep & business ads. Business acLab mixed, good home counts may apply for pre-apneeded (704)385-8547 proved credit. For your convenience, we accept Visa, MERCHANDISE Master Card, cash, or checks

FAX: 704-289-2929

104 Bus. Opportunities

BUSINESS SERVICES

In Column Call before 1:30pm the day PETS & LIVESTOCK prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on Thursday and for Sunday 060 Pets & Supplies call before 1:30 pm on Friday. German Shepherd pups M Display & F black/tan, born 9/25, shots & wormed raised Sunday 12 Noon Thurs w/other animals & chilTuesday 4PM Friday dren $200ea. (704)753Wed. 4PM Monday 5580 Thursday Friday Saturday

068 Auctions

068 Auctions AUCTION Antiques & Collectibles Sat. Dec 5 @ 7:00 PM 7813 Idlewild Rd. Indian Trail, NC Antique glassware & accessories, 100s of antique tools, advertising items, sports collectibles, furniture 10% BP, cash/check BELK AUCTION CO. NCAL 6936 704-339-4266 www.belkauctionco.com

Looking for me? Or maybe you’re searching for... a car? an interesting auction? a new job? furniture? a new home? a yard sale?

Find us all in The Enquirer-Journal. To subscribe call 704-261-2219. To advertise call 704-261-2213 or email sharon@theej.com.

www.enquirerjournal.com


6B / Wednesday, December 2, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community

LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.)

Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

REDUCED

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

$169,000

REDU

New 2007, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, rec room, s/s appliances, ceramic tile, 1 ac lot, lots of extras. Must see! $167,400 CALL 704-243-4656

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

CED!

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Lot $30,000

SKYECROFT

5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

.87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Enjoy entertaining in this wonderful Marshville home: over 3500 sq. ft. on 2 acres. Holiday dinners a breeze to prepare in the spacious kitchen. Grand living and dining rooms. 5 bedrooms; 5 fireplaces; den; screeened porch. Call Elsie: 704-363-8815 PRUDENTIAL CAROLINAS REALTY

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To advertise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

We accept cash, checks or Mastercard, VISA and American Express. Cancellable but non-refundable.

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December 2, 2009

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