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SUNDAY November 22, 2009

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State champions

Thanksgiving Day Edition!!

Marvin Ridge defeated Chapel Hill 2-1 in overtime to win the state 3A soccer championship Saturday.

Page 1B

Only

50¢

Celebrating the season

Rain

There’s an 80 percent chance of rain today, tapering off sometime tomorrow. High: 50 Low: 43 Full report: Page 12A

GOP keeps its primary open to the unaffiliated BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

Staff photos by Rick Crider

Flag girls with Piedmont High School’s marching band perform during Saturday’s Marshville Christmas parade. For more photos from the parade, see the slide show on our Web site, www.enquirerjournal.com.

Marshville Christmas parade kicks off holidays BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MARSHVILLE Mashad Hester and Tristan Jackson jostled for position so they could fill their pockets with candy. According to the brothers, there is no secret to getting the most candy; well, at least none that they would divulge. “You just gotta go get it,” Hester said. The boys stood with hundreds who lined the streets of downtown Marshville to take in the holiday parade. “We have more entries than we’ve ever had,” Kay Strawn, who helped organize the parade with the Marshville Chamber of Commerce, said before the start. “This will be one of the best.” The Baby Boll Weevil king and queen led the way, followed by Christ-

mas music serenades from the Forest Hills and Piedmont marching bands. Forest Hills’ cheerleaders riled up the crowd with their defining “We-say-Forestyou-say-Hills” cheer and aspiring tumblers from Victory Talent Dance and Gymnastics cartwheeled down the road. Organizers say the parade officially ushers in the holiday season. Downtown will be decorated until the new year. The Union County Christmas Parade begins today at 2 p.m. in downtown Monroe and will feature 10 high school marching bands and princesses from area schools.

What’s Inside Brides 8A Business 13A Classified 5B Comics Insert Coming Events 2A Dear Abby 8A

Horoscope Obituaries Opinion School News Weather

Editor’s note: This is part three in a weekly series about families impacted by United Way. BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer

cover. Cost is $34.95, plus $2.36 tax. A limited number of soft-cover editions of “A Pictorial History of Union County, North Carolina, Vol. I” are also available for $29.95, plus $2.02 tax. Both volumes may be purchased for $59.90 plus $4.04 tax. For information, call 704-289-1541.

Even if you did not order in advance, you can still get a copy of the E-J’s latest pictorial history book.

SETTING IT STRAIGHT 9A 2A 4A 9A 12A

See GOP / Page 6A

Crisis Assistance helps couple avoid living in car

Austin Starnes, Miss East Union 2009-2010, waves to the crowd.

for the books may also be picked up at this time. The book contains more than 250 photographs — depicting more than 100 years of local history — submitted by EnquirerJournal readers. Many have never been published before. The book is library quality, printed on archival paper and bound with a hard

MONROE Unaffiliated voters can still vote for Union County’s Board of Commissioners. At about 3 p.m. Saturday, however, that right was not so secure. N.C. Republican Party leaders got together in Raleigh Saturday to possibly restrict the Republican primary only to those voters registered as Republican. In North Carolina, an unaffiliated voter may vote in either party’s primary, but not both. Republicans have invited unaffiliated voters since 1988. Democrats have allowed unaffiliated voters since 1996. N.C. Sen. Eddie Goodall, R-Union, drove to Raleigh to keep the unaffiliated voters in. “We tried to point out that a lot of unaffiliated voters are more con-

servative than Republicans,” he said. “I would contend that there are a majority of unaffiliated voters who are conservative, especially on economic issues.” Goodall said the motion was defeated “about three or four to one.” Local officials resoundingly denounced the idea as a poor one. Every commissioner reached — Parker Mills has been out of town — said unaffiliateds should get a vote. “The mainstream, the majority of people, have bits of this party and bits of that party and bits of no party,” Commissioner Kim Rogers said. “They are not leaning toward a party, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be allowed to vote for individuals,” Commissioner Allan Baucom said.

Almost homeless

Pictorial history books now available for pickup, purchase MONROE “A Pictorial History of Union County, North Carolina, Vol. II” has arrived and a limited number are available for sale at The Enquirer-Journal office at 500 W. Jefferson St. Those that were pre-ordered may be picked up as well, and those for which shipping was paid have already been mailed. Photos submitted

Today’s temps

The Monroe Moose Lodge is starting a Boy Scout troop for economically disadvantaged boys. A headline on a What’s News item on Page 1A of Friday’s edition incorrectly said the group would be for Cub Scouts.

MONROE Joni and Don Craft thought they would have to live out of their car. That threat came this time last year when the grandparents struggled through a streak of financial problems, with no help from the slumping economy. Countrywide Financial had foreclosed on their home in Michigan earlier in the year, and Don Craft had quit his job at Penske, sure that the automotive industry would soon collapse. They faced eviction just a few months after moving to Monroe. “I was just ready to call

it quits, period, permanently,” Joni Craft said. “If I thought about it all the time, I’d go crazy.” United Way was there to break the fall. The Crafts moved to the area in June 2008, just after Don Craft’s mother died. The couple stayed with his father in Peachland until the first part of August that year, when they moved to Monroe. “We thought we’d be all right with the little bit of money we had saved,” Joni Craft said. People told them they would find jobs within a week, but the Crafts soon found that jobs were scarce. Joni Craft finally got a job at an assisted living facility — her 50th job application — but didn’t start until January.

See ALMOST / 3A

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially: Ron Glover, Craig Baucom, Elizabeth Hilton, Julie Williams, Hudson Little, Mary L. Blakely, Marjorie Plyler. Best wishes also are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday Monday, especially: Polly Bostic, Chuck Davis, Jan Parker, Amanda Buchholtz. Call (704) 261-2278 or e-mail birthdays@theej.com to add your names to the list.


2A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

DEATHS Charles Bethea

MINT HILL — Charles Gerald Bethea, 67, died Thursday (Nov. 19, 2009) at Presbyterian Hospice in Charlotte. Memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday at First Baptist Church of Indian Trail. Born June 12, 1942, in Dillon, S.C., he was a son of the late John and Belvin Bracy Bethea. He was an Army veteran and was retired from Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society. Survivors include his wife, Dottie Bethea; one daughter, Christy Sells of Indian Trail; two brothers, Homer Bethea of Fort Mill, S.C., Ches Bethea of Dallas; and two grandchildren. Visitation will follow the service. Memorials may be made to Hospice and Palliative Care, 1420 E. Seventh St., Charlotte, NC 28204. Good Shepherd Funeral Home of Indian Trail is in charge. Online condolences

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The Enquirer-Journal

Construction suspended for holiday may be left at www.goodshepherdfuneralhome.net.

Travelers reminded of lengthy detour for Interstate 40 near Tennessee state line

Linda Chambers

RALEIGH — The N.C. Department of Transportation will suspend most road construction activities over the Thanksgiving holiday to help ease traffic delays and improve driving conditions throughout the state. Most construction projects along interstates, N.C. and U.S. routes will be suspended from 4 p.m. Tuesday until 9 a.m. Nov. 30, with three exceptions: • One of three lanes will be closed on Interstate 85 North and I-85 South at the interchange with N.C. 62 at Exit 113 near High Point because of construction of the U.S. 311 Bypass. No work will occur during the holiday; however, the right lane in each direction will remain closed. • One lane of U.S. 220

MONROE Linda Diane Chambers, 52, died Friday (Nov. 20, 2009) at her daughter’s home. Funeral will be 2 p.m. Tuesday at Prosperous Revival Temple in Indian Trail, with burial in Hillcrest Cemetery. Born April 16, 1957, in Union County, she was a daughter of Mattie Chambers Huntley of Monroe and the late Ike Hall. Survivors, in addition to her mother, include two sons, Stanley Huntley, Brian Huntley, both of Monroe; two daughters, Valerie Wall, Renee Huntley, both of Monroe; three brothers, Henry Chambers, Van Chambers, Tracy Huntley, all of Monroe; two sisters, Darlene Bivens, Angela Huntley, both of Monroe; and 14 grandchildren. Public viewing will be from noon to 8 p.m. Monday at Harris Funeral Home.

Ray Simpson

500 W. Jefferson St., P.O. Box 5040 Monroe, NC 28111 (704) 289-1541, FAX (704) 289-2929 www.enquirerjournal.com Advertising (704) 261-2251 adcopy@theej.com Classified Advertising (704) 261-2214 sharon@theej.com Circulation (704) 261-2219 circulation@theej.com News (704) 261-2252 news@theej.com Sports (704) 261-2253 jsnow@theej.com Publisher (704) 261-2200 menderle@theej.com

HARRISBURG — Ray Wilson Simpson, 89, died Nov. 15, 2009, at Carolinas Medical Center-NorthEast in Concord. Funeral will be 2 p.m. today at McEwen Funeral Home of Monroe, with burial in Lakeland Memorial Park in Monroe. Born Feb. 13, 1920, in Monroe, he was a son of the late Z.K. and Arrie Simpson and was married to the late Elma Greene Simpson. He was a World War II veteran and a retired farmer. Survivors include three sons, Bill Simpson of Lewisville, Roger Simpson of Denver, N.C., Robert Simpson of Atlanta; one sister, Myrtle; one brother, Leroy Simpson; four grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. Visitation will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. today at the funeral home.

Janet West

MONROE Janet Lee Parker West, 54, died Thursday (Nov. 19, 2009) at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. Funeral will be 2 p.m. Monday at McEwen Funeral Home, with burial in Lakeland Memorial Park. Born March 18, 1955, in Union County, she was a daughter of the late Amos Lee and Shirley Yvonne Quick Parker. Survivors include her husband, Lloyd West of Pageland, S.C.; one daughter, Michelle West of Monroe; one brother, Kenny Parker of Monroe; and three grandchildren. Visitation will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.

SeniorS Do You Have Our BEST Rates On Plan F Medicare Supplement?

ALLAN PRESSON INS. 704-283-5950

South at the Randolph/ Montgomery county line will be closed because of the construction of rest areas. No work will occur during the holiday; however, the right lane in each direction will remain closed. • U.S. 17 in Windsor (Bertie County) is reduced to one lane on the Cashie River Bridge because of construction. Traffic is controlled by signals; however, no trucks are to use this route and detour signs are in place. Motorists are encouraged to use the U.S. 17 Bypass around Windsor. In addition, Interstate 40 is closed at mile marker 2.6, near the Tennessee state line, because of a rockslide on Oct. 25. A detour has been set up. Motorists traveling west to Tennessee should take

I-40 West to I-240 West in Asheville to I-26 West. Follow I-26 West from Asheville to I-81 South in Tennessee, back to I-40. Eastbound motorists will follow the reverse directions. This detour adds 53 miles. Currently, one lane of N.C. 12 for about .5 mile north of Rodanthe is open to traffic and the town is accessible following damage from ocean overwash last week because of a storm. By Monday, the road will be open to twolane, two-way traffic for the holiday week. On the following Monday, reconstruction of the highway will resume and lane closures to a single lane of traffic will be in place. NCDOT offers the following driving tips during the holidays: • Leave early to get a

head start on your drive and travel at non-peak times; • Stay alert. Even though workers may not be present in the majority of work zones, drivers may encounter narrowed lanes and traffic shifts; • Be patient and obey the posted speed limit. The penalty for speeding through a marked work zone is $250; • Use alternate routes, when possible, to avoid traffic congestion; and • Know before you go by calling 511, the department’s free travel information line, or get real-time travel information on line. NCDOT also offers travel information for motorists and ferry passengers on Twitter. For more information on how to get travel information, visit www.ncdot. gov/travel.

CLUB, 6:30 p.m., LaVerne Banquet Hall at Wingate University; call 704-233-5593.

200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • LAKE PARK CUB SCOUT PACK, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Faith United Methodist Church. For details call, 704-882-7533. •  OLD HICKORY OPTIMIST CLUB, 6:30 p.m., Operation ReachOut building, corner of Miller and Phifer streets. For details, call Daphney Henderson at 704-8216747. • MONROE JAYCEES, 6:30 p.m. social, 6:55 p.m. meeting, Oasis Restaurant, 116 S. Main St. New members welcome. Details, Mike McGinnis at 980-328-8702. •  OVERCOMERS OUTREACH, 7 p.m., Waxhaw Bible Church. For details, call 704-7643960. • PRENATAL CLASS, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., CMCUnion. Come during seventh month of pregnancy. For details, call 704-283-3254. • BOY SCOUT TROOP 1, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian, 302 E. Windsor St. For details, call Gale Brown at 704-764-7589. • THE ARC OF UNION COUNTY, board meeting, 7 p.m., first-floor conference room, United Way building, 102 E. Franklin St. Details, call 704-2265110. • BINGO, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., American Legion Post 208, Highway 75 East, Waxhaw. Jackpot, $500. Smoke free. • SWEET UNION REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, 7 p.m. meeting, Waxhaw Women’s Club, 200 E. South Main St., Waxhaw. All Republicans welcome. Details, Deborah Barton, 704-839-3768. • CANCER SUPPORT GROUP, 7:30 p.m., St. Ernest Catholic Church, Evans Mill Road, Pageland, S.C. For details, call Pat, 803-672-2037.

COMING EVENTS (Editor’s note: To list the event of your nonprofit civic, social or governmental organization, call 704261-2252.)

Today

• CBC BLOOD DRIVE, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Lakeview Baptist Church, 4602 Concord Highway. • CBC BLOOD DRIVE, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Union Square Cinema 8, 1911 Dickerson Blvd., Monroe.

Monday

•  EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704-2824657. • COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9:30 a.m., Indian Trail United Methodist Church. Call 704-292-1797 for reservations for lunch at the nutrition site at the church. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • INTERNET BASICS CLASS, 10 a.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704283-8184. • MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 2 p.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-283-8184. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-2837233. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • UNION COUNTY NAACP, 6 p.m., Bazemore Center, 1001 Winchester Ave., Monroe. Details, call 704-843-6971. • LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS, 6:30 p.m., Old Armory Community Center, Johnson Street, Monroe. Speaker, Mon-

When choosing a funeral home, people usually go with who they feel comfortable with.

Unfortunately, they don’t always know how comfortable they can be. Being the area’s preference is a hard thing to earn, only because people by nature are skittish to try something new. That’s why we invite you to stop by and meet our staff... you’ll be surprised by how comfortable our place is.

roe City Manager Wayne Herron on city’s new landlord ordinance. Details, Virginia Bjorlin, 704-283-5776. •  INDIAN TRAIL TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), private weighin, 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m; meeting 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Indian Trail United Methodist Church, 113 Indian Trail Road. First visit free. Details, 704843-9365. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. •  WINGATE LIONS CLUB, 6:30 p.m., Wingate University, LaVerne Banquet Hall. Visitors welcome. • TOPS (TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY), 6:30 p.m. weigh-in, 7 p.m. meeting, First Baptist Church, 109 Morrow Ave. For details, call 704-2261341. • WAXHAW TOPS No. 800, 6:30 p.m., Bonds Grove United Methodist Church. Details, 704-8432735. •  MONROE CIVITAN CLUB, 7 p.m., Wingate University LaVerne Banquet Hall. Details, Pat Laney, 704-283-5711. • UNION CHORALE, 7 p.m., Stallings United Methodist Church, 1115 Stallings Road. Details, Sandy McReynolds, 704238-1555. •  UNIONVILLE LIONS CLUB, 7 p.m., Unionville Community Building. Details, Betty Hinson 704-283-6364. • LANES CREEK VFD ANNUAL MEETING, 7 p.m., 7608 Landsford Road. Details, Shirleen Tucker, 704-226-8424. •  INDIAN TRAIL LIONS CLUB, 7:30 p.m., Indian Trail Civic Building. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704-8214256, 704-763-0784. • WINGATE LIONS

Tuesday

• COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9:30 a.m., Wingate Methodist Church. Bring covered dish. For details, call 704292-1797. • THE MOMS CLUB, Moms Offering Moms Support, Indian Trail and Monroe, 10 a.m., Hank’s Frozen Custard, 5250 Old Charlotte Highway. Details, Kim, 704-340-3281; or e-mail momsclubofindiantrail@yahoo.com. •  BASIC SPANISH, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St. Must be member. Details, 704-2824657. •  MARSHVILLE ROTARY CLUB, noon, Pier Restaurant, Marshville. For details, call Johnny Pigg, 704-624-2602. •  MONROE ROTARY CLUB, noon to 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. Details, 704-2834645. • LUNCH BUNCH, noon, Monroe Library. Topic, “The Help” by Katherine Stockett. Details, 704-283-8184, ext. 241. • MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 3 p.m., Union West Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-821-7475. • HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704283-8184, ext. 238. • MICROSOFT EXCEL II CLASS, 5 p.m., Union West Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-821-7475. • TOPS NO. 373 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting, 805 South Bragg Street, Monroe. For details, call 704-282-0073. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building,

The Benefits of Choosing a Family Owned • A focus on families, not profit • A knowledge of local customs and families • An interest in the community • Personal pride Call us or come in for a free brochure!

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The Enquirer-Journal

Almost Continued from Page 1A At the end of last November, the couple had no idea how December’s rent and utilities would be paid. With no insurance and a handful of medications for Don Craft’s back problems, bills continued to pile up. That’s when Joni Craft went to Crisis Assistance Ministry. The United Way agency didn’t just help with rent, but gave her an outlet to vent her frustration. If not for Crisis Assistance, Joni Craft said, she and her husband might have spent the month living in their car. The couple’s two daughters, 21 and 26, live in Michigan. Not wanting their daughters to worry or think their parents were irresponsible with money, the couple said they wouldn’t have told them if that happened. “We would’ve just said, ‘We’re down here with Dad and we’re fine,’” Joni Craft said. “We would not have told them. We would have made it through one way or another.” Even the car is unreliable; the day of their interview with The Enquirer-Journal, it broke down before they left the driveway. It was the second time in a week. It was Crisis Assistance that kept the couple in their home. “They’re all good people there,” Don Craft said, adding that he didn’t know how many United Way agencies there are until he and his wife needed help. Don Craft spent 15 years as a truck driver. He came to Monroe intending to work, but “there was no work anywhere.” His back problems occasionally require a cane, and medications come to about $150 per month. He is not yet approved for disability benefits, and because he quit his job, he can’t get unemployment checks, either. The state has helped

with some of his medical bills and he is still trying to get Medicaid. He attends vocational rehabilitation in hopes of earning an income again. Joni Craft received her certified nursing assistant license but makes just above minimum wage. To his wife, Don Craft said he feels bad about using “your money.” “Our money,” she corrected him. The Crafts met when they were 14 years old. Nearly 30 years into marriage, their $500 monthly house payment quadrupled and the couple moved to Monroe to find themselves sleeping on the floor. Their neighbors donated furniture for their home and a riding mower for their yard. Don Craft said he couldn’t ask for better neighbors and is forever grateful for United Way. The couple plans to donate regularly as soon as they are able. Agencies are “overburdened,” Joni Craft said, yet “people just won’t give. They’re just afraid, I guess ... of being squandered.” The $1.2 million compensation package of former United Way of Central Carolinas executive director Gloria Pace

King broke donors’ trust, she said, but that is behind the community now and people are in need. “If you’ve got 50 cents to give right now, it’s worth it,” she said. “As a community, if we could all hang in there together, it would be so cool just to help your neighbor. ... A dollar is not going to kill you.” Where the Crafts previously showered their daughters with Christmas gifts, they could afford to send only cards last year. Joni Craft gets her clothes from Goodwill and makeup from a dollar store. “You learn really quick how to save a dime,” she said. The couple has also turned to Operation Reach Out for help with a utility bill and Loaves and Fishes for food. Joni Craft said she was “embarrassed” to pick up the food, but “once I get a chance to repay these people, I am so going to do it because they made you feel like you were somebody.” As for other United Way agencies, she said they are all important. Joni Craft recently heard the story of a man who learned English through the Literacy Council. Without the agency, “How

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 3A

Staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Don Craft with Kramer, who has been the family pet for 11 years. would this guy be able to go up there and order a hamburger? It seems so trivial,” but speaking English or buying groceries are things people often take for granted. “If you think that you aren’t susceptible to possibly being in this situ-

ation, you better think again because you’re one illness and one layoff away from being in this same situation,” she said. “ ... We’re just one story.” A donated TV sits against the couple’s living room wall, next to a wooden sign that says

“Believe.” “Sometimes you just don’t believe you’ll make it through,” Joni Craft said, “ ... but you will.” To all the donors who have helped her and her husband, “Thank you, and you’ll get tenfold back one day.”

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4A Sunday, November 22, 2009

www.enquirerjournal.com

“It is possible to store the mind with a million facts and still be entirely uneducated.”

Alec Bourne

Editor: Stan Hojnacki / shojnacki@theej.com

The Enquirer-Journal

Since 1873, a heritage of commitment and involvement

Publisher: Marvin Enderle Managing Editor: Stan Hojnacki News Editor: Jim Muldrow City Editor: Betsy O’Donovan

A CAROLINA VIEW

Grades for cash not the right message P

ssst! Hey, kid, wanna get a better grade on your next test without taxing your brain? Get your parents to donate $20 to the school and we’ll spot you a few points. That was the message, however unintentional, that was sent via a Goldsboro area school’s ill-conceived fundraising idea. Last year’s candy sale was a bust, so the school’s parent advisory group decided it was time to think way outside the box. Instead of goodies, the school would sell students the chance to improve their grades by fattening the school treasury. Fortunately, Wayne County school administrators stopped the campaign before it got too much momentum. A parent complained that not only does it send an awful message to students — that grades can be bought rather than earned — but it also discriminated against families that could not afford to give money. The embarrassment made national news, and TV host Jay Leno managed to get a joke out of it. Credit the parent group for being interested enough to raise money for things the school needs, even if the effort was terribly misguided. The state budget crisis has made things even worse than usual, but for too long schools have looked to parent-teacher groups to provide what should be considered budgetary necessities: teacher supplies, equipment for classrooms and field trip expenses for students who otherwise would be left at school while their peers enjoyed an educationally enriching experience. In New Hanover County, a few PTAs even are paying for late buses for children who stay after school for tutoring or other activities, according to Stephanie Kraybill, who heads the local Council of PTAs. The school system stopped paying for after-school buses and made other transportation changes to absorb state budget cuts. The ability to provide such “necessary extras,” of course, is based on a school’s demographics. The inequality also extends beyond money. New Hanover has affluent schools whose very active PTAs raise many thousands of dollars to stretch tight state and county budgets. It also has schools with high enrollments of poor children whose parents don’t have the means to contribute or the time to volunteer. Truth be told, time often is more important to a child’s education than supplies or “SMART” boards or even the occasional new experience a field trip can bring. Kraybill, the PTA council president, believes that parent and teacher groups, as well as the business community, could make a big difference in students’ education by making a push for more volunteers in all schools, including those with low parent involvement. Many local businesses already encourage their employees to tutor or otherwise be involved in our public schools, and many people who don’t even have school-age children are volunteering their time and their experience to help make a small difference — one student at a time. Yes, the schools need more money to buy what got cut from the budget, and teachers should have the supplies they need. But time is an even more valuable commodity. And you don’t even have to dig into your pocket for change. — The Star-News, Wilmington

Judge apologizes for cameras By Douglas E. Lee

Special to First Amendment Center Online CHICAGO — If news is something you don’t see every day, the recent apology of U.S. District Judge Joe Billy McDade is certainly news. On Sept. 21, McDade, a judge in the Central District of Illinois, apologized in writing to Frank Easterbrook, the chief judge of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, for allowing video and still cameras into a hearing in a school-desegregation case. As McDade admitted in his letter, his decision to permit camera coverage of the hearing violated a Judicial Conference of the United States policy and a local rule of the Central District. When he allowed the cameras into the courtroom, McDade wrote, “I erroneously thought that I had the authority to waive the Rule because of the great public interest.” “I was wrong,” McDade continued. “[M]y violation of the policy was not intentional, but negligent … . My action in no way reflect[s] any disagreement on my part with the policy of the Judicial Conference or our Local Rule 83.7.” The Judicial Conference policy and Local Rule 83.7 prohibit all photography, audio and video recording and broadcasting in federal trial courtrooms, except recording done by court reporters to assist them in making written reports of proceedings. A district judge can waive this prohibition only for ceremonial occasions. Although legally irrelevant, McDade’s motives for allowing camera coverage were pure. The school-desegregation case had been pending for nine years, and the Champaign, Ill., school district at issue had been under a consent decree for the last seven. McDade conducted the Sept. 15 hearing to determine whether a proposed settlement of the case was fair. (The pro-

posal is still under advisement.) “In connection with the hearing,” McDade explained to Easterbrook, “the local television station asked if it could video record the hearing. Because of the considerable interest in the case by the Champaign community … I wanted the widest possible dissemination of the hearing … . Therefore, I allowed the television station and all other media to record the court hearing.” Easterbrook learned of the violation through a newspaper report. Shortly thereafter, he learned that a video of the hearing was available online and that at least one newspaper had published photos taken during the hearing. Then, Easterbrook wrote in a Sept. 28 memorandum, the 7th Circuit received inquiries “about whether this action shows that the Judicial Branch’s policy concerning cameras in court has been altered.” After identifying McDade’s action as a possible violation of the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act of 1980, Easterbrook launched a “limited inquiry” under the act. McDade’s response to the inquiry was his Sept. 21 letter, in which he said he deeply regretted his violations of the policy and local rule and promised to abide by them in the future. McDade’s apology was sufficient for Easterbrook. “The 1980 Act’s goal is to ensure performance of each judge’s duties,” Easterbrook wrote. “I am satisfied that Judge McDade’s apology and promise to comply in the future accomplish this objective.” In his memorandum, Easterbrook acknowledged “the ongoing debate” about the role of cameras in the courtroom “in the legislative and judicial branches, and among members of the public.” “People of good will advocate photography and broadcasts; other people of good will think that cameras would have ill effects,”

Easterbrook wrote. However: “No matter what one makes of these contentions, once the Judicial Conference of the United States and the Judicial Council of the Seventh Circuit have adopted a policy, a judge must implement it without regard to his own views.” A significant factor in Easterbrook’s decision to accept McDade’s apology as the “corrective action” necessary under the act was the fact that the violation caused no harm. “As far as I can see,” Easterbrook wrote, “none of the litigants suffered any injury from the broadcasting … and none of the litigants has complained.” While Easterbrook’s public admonishment of McDade undoubtedly will remind all federal trial judges of their obligation to keep cameras out of their courtrooms, McDade’s misstep might also become Exhibit A in the effort to open federal courtrooms to electronic coverage. As Easterbrook noted, no harm came from the coverage of the hearing. To the contrary, when McDade allowed cameras into the courtroom he assisted the news media — and himself — in explaining and disseminating news of the settlement as widely as possible. Through this coverage, a legitimate public interest in a case of significant importance was recognized and satisfied. This, as even the harshest critics of cameras in the courtroom would have to acknowledge, is how electronic coverage of the courts should work. No one expects the federal courts to throw open their doors to cameras anytime soon. The experience in the Central District of Illinois, however, might help persuade policymakers to trust trial judges to know when electronic coverage can be beneficial. If that occurs, McDade might no longer be remembered for his mistake. Instead, he might be remembered for being ahead of his time.

Honest, Abe, I’m here to help the busy presidents MARION — In March of 1861, 8-year-old George Patten was having a rough go of it in school. The little scamp told classmates he had met the newly elected president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Being the son of a journalist, George was immediately accused of making it up. “I’m bestest pals with ol’ Honest Abe,” George would say. (Note: The dialogue here is an historical recreation of what I believe children in 1861 would say based on absolutely no research on my part.) “Ah, you’re full of beans, George.” “I’ll get my pal Abe to whomp you with a knotted plow line.” “Georgie Porgie, puddin’ and pie/Met Abe Lincoln, what a lie.” “Hey, you come back here with my Gameboy! Man, that is whack!” Finally, George’s teacher grew tired of the shenanigans, the high jinks and even the

Scott Hollifield

Columnist

tomfoolery and wrote to Lincoln to discredit George’s story. Lincoln wrote back. (Cue solemn fiddle music that plays in all Ken Burns-style documentaries when someone reads a dead person’s letter. Also, visualize a picture of Lincoln.). “Whom it may concern, I did see and talk with master George Evans Patten, last May, at Springfield, Illinois. Respectfully, A. Lincoln.” {End fiddle music and stop visualizing. I said stop visualizing.) Today, many years after it was written (I don’t get

paid enough to do the actual math), that letter survives in Philadelphia as part of The Raab Collection, which is now offering to sell it for $60,000, according to a Nov. 17 story by The Associated Press. On its Web site, The Raab Collection, buyers and sellers of historical documents, said Lincoln “would not allow an injustice to exist if he could do anything about it, anything at all.” I’m sure our presidents today, former and current, would follow Lincoln’s fine example and come to the aid of a little boy if they had time, but former presidents are too busy raking in exorbitant fees for public speaking engagements and the current president has his hands full either saving or ruining health care, depending on which cable news channel is on. That’s why I give Jimmy Carter, George Bush (I and II), Bill Clinton and Barack Obama permission to use the following generic help-a-boywho-is-being-mocked letter. All

they have to do is take a few seconds to fill in the blanks. “To whom it may concern: I did see and talk with (child’s name here) on (date here) in the beautiful city of (name of city here), which coincidentally, I carried with 58 percent of the vote in my last election. From my understanding, my little friend, who I often turn to for counsel in trying times, is being picked on because he said that he met me. Intelligence sources tell me he’s being called ‘liar” and ‘poopypants’ and ‘liar, liar poopypants on fire’ which I find especially egregious and perhaps even actionable. For the record, not only did he meet me, I arranged for him to score some sweet backstage passes to a Miley Cyrus show. Her agent knows some people who know some defense contractors... let’s just say I’ve got connections. “And why did I arrange this for (child’s name here)? It’s top secret and you need clearance at the highest level to know, but

I’m going to tell you anyway. He uncovered a terror cell and single-handedly neutralized the threat. Oh, his name will be redacted from any documents you acquire through the Freedom of Information Act, but it was him all right. So the next time you think about calling someone ‘liar’ or ‘poopypants’ or some other tomfoolery you might instead want to reach out and fist bump this young patriot and say, ‘Thank you, (child’s name here), thank you for helping protect our way of life.’ Signed, The (former/current) President.” Presidents who use the generic help-a-boy-who-isbeing-mocked letter can make the $60,000 check payable to Scott’s Generic Presidential Letter Company, Inc. — Scott Hollifield is editor/general manager of The McDowell News in Marion and a columnist for The Media General News Service. Contact him at P.O. Box 610, Marion, NC 28752 or e-mail rhollifield@mcdowellnews.com.


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 5A

LOCAL BRIEFS

Trooper fired in dispute over lost hat

School improvement meeting Monday

RALEIGH (AP) — A North Carolina state trooper who said he was fired because his bosses thought he lied about the fate of his $45 hat is fighting his dismissal. Thomas C. Wetherington, 22, told The News & Observer of Raleigh that losing his job in a misunderstanding about his hat is especially galling considering the kind of mis-

MONROE A meeting to discuss the revision of the Local Education Agency District Improvement Plan for Union County Public Schools will be 3 p.m. Monday in Room 203 of the Professional Development Center, 710 Brewer Drive. Anyone interested in discussing the revision of the plan is welcome to attend.

Entrepreneur program offered

MONROE The Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College will offer the FastTrac NewVenture program to emerging entrepreneurs Nov. 30 through Dec. 17, Mondays thorugh Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Monroe campus, 4209 Old Charlotte Highway. The FastTrac NewVenture program is a handson business development program designed to help budding entrepreneurs develop a business idea and then plan the critical steps to a successful business launch, including how to identify and reach target markets, plan and man operations, set financial goals and fund the startup. To enhance classroom instruction, participants will hear from successful entrepreneurs, receive coaching from business startup specialists and work in small-group planning sessions with fellow entrepreneurs. At close, participants will present their business plans for review by peers and coaches. Through funding provided by Gov. Beverly Perdue’s Charlotte Regional Economic and Workforce Recovery Initiative, this program is offered at no cost to displaced workers wanting to pursue business ownership as a career. This program is part of FastTrac LaunchPad, a joint initiative of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and the Deluxe Corporation Foundation. To apply for admittance, go to www.fasttrac. org and complete the online application. Click on “Program Locator — Get Started” and enter your ZIP code. Select the Charlotte Region Programs for Displaced Workers, then follow the link for the SPCC location. The application deadline is Friday. For more information, contact Vince Holloman, director of the SPCC Small Business Center at 704-290-5222 or vholloman@spcc.edu.

Dismissed cop says others having sex in patrol cars received lesser punishment conduct other troopers have committed without getting fired. “Look, we’ve got guys having sex in patrol cars just about every day,” said Wetherington, a trooper since 2007. “Why did I get dismissed when other guys get slaps on the wrist?” A review committee ruled in September that Wetherington should

CATA wins two theater awards MONROE Central Academy of Technology and Arts brought home two awards from the state high school theatre competition. “The kids did a superb job,” said Larry Robinson, who teaches the student actors. “We had a tremendous number of comments saying it was a strong show.” The group won honorable mention in the ensemble acting category and Brandon Rogers took an individual acting award. CATA performed “The Good War,” a bookturned-musical that was written by Studs Terkel, who interviewed survivors from World War II.

While still pleased with the honors, Robinson said the crew needed to turn its attention to its next performances. CATA will put on “To Kill a Mockingbird” in December. — Staff Writer Jason deBruyn

be reinstated and the conduct of the supervisor who pushed for his removal be reviewed. But the Highway Patrol hasn’t put Wetherington back on the highway and he is awaiting a hearing before a judge who can make the patrol put him back on the force. Patrol spokesman Capt. Everett Clendenin wouldn’t talk to the newspaper about the case, citing the pending legal action. Wetherington’s saga began an a blustery night in March when he pulled over a vehicle towing a boat on U.S. 70 in Craven County. While seizing guns and alcohol, he set his hat on his patrol car, then heard it tumble down the asphalt in the dark. He returned later

and looked for it for two hours without success. Wetherington had to file a form to get a new hat, and he wrote that it blew away and was likely run over. But another trooper pulled over the same driver two weeks later, and the man had Wetherington’s hat, which he said he picked up after the trooper left. Wetherington’s name and phone number were in the hatband, but the driver never called. The Highway Patrol ruled Wetherington violated its code of conduct, which requires troopers to always tell the truth. The agency has had plenty of trouble with troopers following the conduct code. Since 1998, the patrol has dealt with at least 27 cases of sexual

misconduct by troopers either on or off duty. In several cases, those involved were not fired, including a trooper who received a five-day suspension in 2002 after he was caught repeatedly having sex on duty in and on his parked patrol car. On one occasion, the trooper inadvertently left his handgun behind, where children later found it, the newspaper reported. Those stories frustrate Wetherington, who said he just wants to get back out on the road, serving the people. “I bleed black and silver,” said Wetherington, noting the colors on his hat and the patrol’s uniform. “This was my life, and they took it away from me. All I want is to get it back.”

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6A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

GOP Continued from Page 1A “Just let people vote, is my thing,” Commissioner Tracy Kuehler said. Union County would be greatly affected by a rule that excludes primary voters because of how Republican the local government is. In the 2008 commissioner election, no Democrats ran for a seat. That meant that when then-candidates Kueher and Rogers were elected out of the primary, they were the de facto commissioners because there was nobody left to run against. The last time Democrats had candidates run for commissioner was 2004, when both Max Melton and Frank Deese ran. N.C. Rep. Curtis Blackwood, R-Union, also opposed the suggestion. If the system is not broke, don’t fix it, he contended. “Unless we actually have a reason to address

something, I don’t think you should change it just for the sake of saying you changed something.” Some Republicans argued that allowing unaffiliated voters in could swing the primary result toward a more moderate candidate, or even open the door for Democrats to register as unaffiliated and try to swing an election. “Those things, to me, sound like paranoia,” Goodall said. “I mean, Republicans could do the same thing to Democrats. I just don’t see that happening.” A party has until Dec. 1 to tell the State Board of Elections it wants to prevent registered voters without a party from participating in the next year’s primary. Nineteen of the 41 states with presidential primaries last year had closed primaries, according to a report from electionline.org. The number of unaffiliated voters in North Carolina has soared

from 608,000 in 1998 to 1.4 million last year. They now constitute almost 23 percent of the state’s registered voters. About 46,200 unaffiliated voters participated in the May 2008 Republican primary, or more than 9 percent of the ballots cast for GOP nomination for governor, according to State Board of Elections data. But that could underestimate their potential to swing an election, since more than 211,500 unaffiliated voters chose to vote in the Democratic primary, where the presidential nomination between Obama and Hillary Clinton had not been decided. McCain had already sewn up the GOP bid. With Republicans making up 32 percent of the state’s 6.1 million registered voters, the GOP must attract more independents and conservative Democrats to win statewide elections than the Democrats. — The Associated Press contributed to this story

The Enquirer-Journal

Historic health care bill clears Senate hurdle WASHINGTON (AP) — Invoking the memory of Edward M. Kennedy, Democrats united Saturday night to push historic health care legislation past a key Senate hurdle over the opposition of Republicans eager to inflict a punishing defeat on President Barack Obama. There was not a vote to spare. The 60-39 vote cleared the way for a bruising, full-scale debate beginning after Thanksgiving on the legislation, which is designed to extend coverage to roughly 31 million who lack it, crack down on insurance company practices that deny or dilute benefits and curtail the growth of spending on medical care nationally. The spectator galleries were full for the unusual Saturday night showdown, and applause broke out briefly when the vote was announced. In a measure of the significance of the moment, senators sat quietly in their seats, standing only when they were called upon to vote. In the final minutes of a daylong session, Major-

ity Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., accused Republicans of trying to stifle a historic debate the nation needed. “Imagine if, instead of debating whether to abolish slavery, instead of debating whether giving women and minorities the right to vote, those who disagreed had muted discussion and killed any vote,” he said. The Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, said the vote was anything but procedural — casting it as a referendum on the bill itself, which he said would raise taxes, cut Medicare and create a “massive and unsustainable debt.” For all the drama, the result of the Saturday night showdown had been sealed a few hours earlier, when two final Democratic holdouts, Sens. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas, announced they would join in clearing the way for a full debate. “It is clear to me that doing nothing is not an option,” said Landrieu,

who won $100 million in the legislation to help her state pay the costs of health care for the poor. Lincoln, who faces a tough re-election next year, said the evening vote will “mark the beginning of consideration of this bill by the U.S. Senate, not the end.” Both stressed they were not committing in advance to vote for the bill that ultimately emerges from next month’s debate. Of particular contentiousness to moderates is a provision for the government to sell insurance in competition with private companies, subject to state approval — a part of Reid’s bill expected to come under significant pressure as the debate unfolds. Even so, their announcements marked a major victory for Reid and the White House in a year-end drive to enact the most sweeping changes to the nation’s health care system in a half-century or more. At the White House, press secretary Robert Gibbs issued a statement saying the president was gratified by the vote, which he says “brings us one step closer to ending insurance company abuses, reining in spiraling health care costs, providing stability and security to those with health insurance, and extending quality health coverage to those who lack it.” The legislation would require most Americans to carry insurance and provide subsidies to those who couldn’t afford it. Large companies could incur costs if they did not provide coverage to their workforce. The insurance industry would come under significant new regulation under the bill, which would first ease and then ban the practice of denying coverage on the basis of pre-existing medical conditions.

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The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 7A

Losing Oprah would be big blow for Chicago CHICAGO (AP) — Step outside Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Studios and into the near west side neighborhood that’s been home to her television talk show for two decades, and it’s easy to get a sense of what she’s meant to Chicago. “I used to live across the street from Harpo and when I moved there it was me and crossdressing crack addicts and Harpo. And now it’s strollers and little white dogs all over,” said Paul O’Connor, whose job has been to sell the city to businesses looking to relocate and those wondering why they should stay. Along with the upscale condominiums and pricey restaurants that replaced the rundown apartments, abandoned warehouses and vacant storefronts, it’s a sentiment that helps explain just how nervous people in Chicago are about

Winfrey’s announcement that next season, the 25th, will be the last for “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” “Chicago’s going to find out that she’s a real engine to hotel rooms, flowers, limo drivers, you name it,” said Joel Nickson, who owns Wishbone restaurant just down the street. “Even when she’s not doing the show, we see people all the time taking cabs out here, taking pictures in front of the place.” Media analysts will discuss the millions of viewers worldwide who have eagerly watched Winfrey’s show, tuned in others she told them to watch and read books she told them to read. The story in Chicago will be what she’s meant to Chicago. It’s a story that starts in the neighborhood that people visited just to see her show — then

they’d go off to explore the rest of the city. It’s from the neighborhood that Winfrey bragged about Chicago, reminding all those who knew she could take her show just about anywhere that she wanted to be right here. “Isn’t this the most fabulous city in the world?” Winfrey yelled to more than 20,000 fans who crowded Chicago’s Magnificent Mile in September for the taping of this season’s premiere. Without Winfrey, some wonder. “What’s this town going to come to?” asked Ann Coddington, 41, of Richmond, Ind., who was at Harpo Studios to see the show Friday morning. “You think of Chicago, you think of Oprah.” Winfrey hasn’t said she’s leaving Chicago, but there are indications it’s possible. She is widely expected to start up a

new talk show on OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network, which is set to debut in January 2011. OWN hired “Oprah” coexecutive producer Lisa Erspamer this month as its chief creative officer. She is expected to move from Chicago to Los Angeles in January. Nobody suggests Harpo Studios’ neighborhood will revert to the pre-Winfrey years, when it was all but impossible to catch a cab and there was no place to order a latte much less a nice meal. But the studio stands as a reminder of what has been, and what could be lost. It was here that celebrities came from all over the world when they had something to say — from Tom Cruise’s declaration of love for Katie Holmes, memorably accompanied by a jump on her couch, to Sarah Palin’s appearance on the show to kick off her

book tour. “It’s our little piece of Hollywood, our big piece of it,” said Bob O’Neill, the president of the Grant Park Conservancy. Winfrey did more than set up shop in Chicago: She gave other companies reason to do so. “She is part of the cultural infrastructure which provides a rich intellectual and cultural life to the city and that is absolutely critical for corporate decision making,” said O’Connor, who now works for the Chicago Metropolis 2020 civic group after leaving World Business Chicago, a not-for-profit economic development corporation that worked to attract and keep businesses in Chicago. Once the businesses are here, Winfrey has even been part of the effort to persuade employees who might be reluctant to pack up and

move their families. “Oprah and the sports and the 5,000 boats on the lake and the museums are all part of the rich mix to help (companies) bring talent here and make that transition.” O’Connor said. “You cannot underestimate that.” Now, though Winfrey will tape in Chicago for at least another 18 months, the studio will stand as a reminder of all that is plaguing the city, from the staggering economy to the lost bid to host the 2016 Olympic games to losing two major trade shows in recent weeks. “A lot of bad things are happening,” said O’Neill, who was troubled enough even before Winfrey’s announcement about the spate of bad news that he helped organize a “Chicago in a funk?” symposium. “Her leaving brings a lot of negative publicity.”

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8A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

Horton — Norris

Marshville United Methodist Church was the setting for the 4 p.m., Aug. 29, 2009, wedding of Jessica Dawn Horton and William Coy Norris. The Rev. Sherri Barnes officiated. The bride is the daughter of David and Sheila Cornwell of Maiden. She is the granddaughter of Marie White of Clover, S.C., and Martha Camp of Lincolnton. She graduated from Maiden High School in 2005 and is employed by Wachovia Bank in Charlotte. The groom is the son of Tim and Sandy Norris of Monroe. His grandparents are Ken and Sue Norris of Monroe and Arlie and Elsie Baucom of Wingate. He is a 2007 graduate of Forest Hills High School and is employed by Select Stainless in Matthews. The bride, given in marriage by her parents, wore a long gown of white satin. It was fashioned with a strapless neckline and swirl-around waist. The bodice and skirt were trimmed with crystal beading and lace. The skirt extended into a semichapel-length train enhanced with white lace and crystal beading. She carried a nosegay bouquet of red gerbera daisies and yellow lilies. Serving as maid of honor was Brandy Beard, cousin of the bride, of Clover. Serving as matron of honor was Valerie Sipe, sister of the bride, of Maiden. Bridesmaids were: Erica Harper of Maiden, Amber Hartsoe of Maiden, Katelyn Baucom of Monroe and Felicia Clark of Charlotte. The groom’s father and friend Darren

ENGAGED

ANNIVERSARY Dear Abby Columnist

Wife feels betrayed by Internet infidelity Mr. and Mrs. William Coy Norris (Jessica Dawn Horton) Guffey of Monroe served as best men. Groomsmen were: Tanner Norris of Monroe, Dustin Norris of Monroe, Travis Naito of Monroe, Jerry Turner of Shelby and Daniel Guffey of Monroe. Also in the wedding party were flower girl Kirsten Ward and ring bearer David Martinez. The wedding reception, held at the East Campus of First Baptist of Indian Trail in Marshville, followed the ceremony. The rehearsal dinner was held on Aug. 28 at the East Campus of First Baptist of Indian Trail. After a wedding trip to Savannah, Ga., the Norrises reside in Matthews.

IN SERVICE Spittle finishes infantry training

Mandy Crainer Adam Mills

Crainer-Mills

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Crainer of Wesley Chapel announce the engagement of their daughter, Mandy Crainer, to Adam Mills. Mandy graduated from Sun Valley High School in 2004 and from Appalachian State University in 2008. She is employed by Union County Public Schools. Her fiance is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie T. Mills of Asheboro. He is a 2004 graduate of Southwestern Randolph High School and graduated from Appalachian State University in 2008. He is employed by Buckeye International Inc. in Charlotte. An Oct. 1, 2010, wedding is planned at Our Lady Of Lourdes Catholic Church in Monroe.

The Enquirer-Journal

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Army Pfc. Kevin D. Spittle has graduated from the Infantryman One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning. The training consists of basic infantry training and advanced individual training. During the nine weeks of basic combat training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid skills, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experienced use of various weapons and weapons defenses available to the infantry crewman. The Advanced Individual Training course is designed to train infantry soldiers to perform reconnaissance operations; employ, fire and recover anti-personnel and antitank mines; locate and neutralize land mines and operate target and sight equipment; operate and maintain communications equipment and radio networks; construct field firing aids for infantry weapons; and perform infantry

combat exercises and dismounted battle drills, which includes survival procedures in a nuclear, biological or chemical contaminated area. Spittle is the son of Keith Spittle of O.S. Drive, Waxhaw, and Becky Stover of Lonnie Little Road, Marshville. He is a 2009 graduate of Anson High School in Wadesboro.

Horne completes Navy basic

GREAT LAKES, Ill. — Navy Seaman Recruit Nicholas J. Horne, grandson of Diana Curzon of Marshville, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command. During the eight-week program, Horne completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations, which gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. Horne is a 2007 graduate of Gateway Charter High School of Fort Myers, Fla.

REUNION

Rushings celebrate 60 years Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Rushing of Indian Trail celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Nov. 15, 2009, with a reception at Ron and Kay Rushing’s home. They were married Nov. 12, 1949, in Lancaster, S.C. Mrs. Rushing is the former Frances Richardson, daughter of the late Letford and Bright Richardson. She is retired from Delmar Printing Co., where she worked as a book release supervisor. His parents were the late Theodore and Annie

BIRTHDAYS Tiffany Lynn Firms T i f f a ny Lynn Firms was 11 years old on Oct. 21, 2009. She is the daughter of Roscoe and Janice Melton Firms of Marshville.

Zeeondrea Daiysha Chambers

Zeeondrea Daiysha Chambers will be 10 years old on Nov. 28, 2009. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Metro Brooks ( K i s h a Chambers) of Monroe. Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James C. Chambers of Marshville. Zee’s great-greatgrandmother is Mittie Huntley of Marshville.

Landon Alexander Withers

Lindsey Anne Withers

Tyler Scott

Mat-

don Timmons, Lynda Bigham Herring, Zeta Perrell Isgett, Patsy Rogers Pfister, Patsy Gamble McGee; second row, David Knight, Margaret Howie Ezzell, Donnie Moore, Joyce Hudson Davis Johnson Blythe, Tommy Norwood, Robbie Faye, Carter Presley; third row, Gary Brady (former teacher), J. Arthur Taylor (former principal), Buddy Ezzell, Rob Tyson, John Mc- Little Hudson Davis Little will Gee, Mack Haywood, Betty Jo Chapman Tyson and John Godfrey. be 4 years

Birthday announcements for those 80 and older will include the name, date and place of birth, date, place and host of birthday celebration, in addition to parents’ and spouse’s names, occupation, children’s names and numbers of grandchildren and great-children. These are accepted within a month of the birthday. Those turned in past the one-month deadline will be published in an abbreviated form on a space available basis and will include only the person’s name, birth date, age and parents’, spouses and children’s names. Pictures of the individual will be published with birthday announcements. The newspaper is not responsible for lost or damaged photos.

Autumn Paige Allen was 4 years old on Nov. 16, 2009. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Payton Allen (Jennifer Tarlton) of Stanfield. Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Danny Tarlton, Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Allen, all of Stanfield, and Mr. and Mrs. Rick Cashwell of Monroe. Autumn’s great-grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Tarlton of Monroe.

Landon Alexander Withers was 5 years old on June 29, 2009. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Withers (Jessica Long) of Pageland, S.C.

Morgan Lee McLain

T y l e r Scott will be 13 on Dec. 14, 2009. He is the son of Brian and Joni McLain of Marshville. His grandparents are Waxhaw High Class of 1959 Mike and The Waxhaw High School Class of 1959 recently had its 50-year reunion at Waxhaw Debbie Smith of United Methodist Church. Those who attended were, from left, front row, Margie Gor- thews.

and Mary Linker of Indian Trail and Danny And Gail Little of Monroe. His great-grandmothers are Vera Mae Linker, Letha Greene and Annie Little, all of Monroe.

Autumn Paige Allen

Morgan Lee McLain was 9 years old on Aug. 16, 2009. She is the daughter of Brian and Joni McLain of Marshville.

Birthday announcements for those 80 and older

Rushing of Indian Trail. He is retired as owner/operator of Rushing’s Alignment Company. Their children and spouses are Ron and Kay Rushing of Monroe and Tonya Rushing Carter and her husband Billy Carter of Livingston, Mont.

old Nov. 22, 2009. He is the son of Aaron and Amanda Linker Little of Indian Trail. Hudson’s grandparents are Carrell

Lindsey Anne Withers was 3 years old Sept. 18, 2009. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Withers (Jessica Long) of Pageland, S.C.

Mallory Elizabeth Love Mallory Elizabeth Love was 4 years old July 11, 2009. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Avery Love (Ashley Long) of Monroe.

Dear Abby: My husband and I have been married for many years. We have three happy, successful children and a good life together. I love him dearly. I recently discovered that he had been spending a lot of time in erotic online chat rooms. He had hundreds of contacts he was speaking with regularly for pleasure. It had escalated to the point that he would have “conversations” with them on the phone or watch them on a webcam. After I caught him, he promised to stop. I caught him again and threatened to leave him. He swore that he had never met any of these people and that he had used a fictitious name. He’s now getting counseling and expects me to get beyond it. I am trying, but I feel betrayed. I feel as though he was unfaithful. I am sure you have other readers out there who have experienced Internet infidelity. Do you consider it cheating if they never actually physically meet the people they talk to? I have no one to discuss this with and would appreciate some input. — Just Plain Sad in Maine Dear Just Plain Sad: Yes, I do consider it a form of cheating. And it would be in your interest to get to the bottom of why this happened before you “get beyond it.” You’re feeling sad because you were betrayed. And the fact that you have no one to discuss it with makes me sad. That’s why I’m advising you that you could also benefit from counseling, and I recommend that you seek a referral right away. Dear Abby: I have two great-nephews. I would like to invite one of them to help me on a big shopping trip, but I don’t want to include his brother. The 10-year-old is a sweet boy who always shows respect for his elders. His 12-year-old brother is a smart-mouth, arrogant know-it-all. How can I invite one without having to put up with the other? — Great-Aunt Susie Dear Great-Aunt Susie: Just pick up the phone and ask his mother if you can bring the younger boy along to help you on the trip. Don’t mention the older boy. And if his mother brings him up, tell her what you have told me. However, if you plan to shower the younger one with gifts on that trip and “forget” the older one, I’d advise against it because it will create resentment and the target will be the younger boy. Dear Abby: How do you handle someone who needs to constantly flaunt his money? That person is my boss. He makes a lot of money, and he enjoys rubbing it in my face. He never fails to tell me how much he pays for purchases — from cars to clothing, even to how much he paid for his mother’s funeral. He literally approaches my desk with his checkbook open and points out the amount. This man spends more on clothes in a month than I earn in a year. He takes his cash out of his pocket and counts it in front of me. I feel like he’s waiting for some kind of reaction from me, but I don’t give in. Can you think of a way for me to stop him in his tracks when he starts regaling me with his next shopping spree? — Frugal Office Worker in the Midwest Dear Office Worker: I sure can. Tell him you need a raise. — Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. © 2009 Universal Press Syndicate


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 9A

HONOR ROLLS Marvin Ridge High

Following are the honor rolls for the first grading period at Marvin Ridge High School: Ninth grade A — John R Agres, Alexandria Amodeo, Tyler E Amos, Tucker N Axhoj, Brooklynn M Bailey, Grayson R Baldy, Laura E Baucom, Lane M Bretschneider, Paul A Bueche, SaraAnn Burroughs, Josephine R Butler, Jason T Cardinali, Matthew R Carter, Kendon L Corbett, Shanna M Cronley, Madeleine R Cutrone, Madison G Davis, Orion C Despo, Caroline E Earnheart, Mariel V Emery, Sarah E Fisenne, David C Florian, Michael T Fourre, Christina M Frizen, Meghan E Gillogly, Cager J Gilmore, Sarah E Glave, Ariel F Griffin, Lukas R Hamilton, Amanda K Hampton, Brianna N Hamrick, Madeline M Hardy, Robert J Hatala, Jordan B Hodges, Carson A Hsiao, La’Chanda K Jackson, Evan M Johnson, Julia L Johnson, Sreeraahul Kancherla, Jordan T Kearney, Hannah E Kessenich, John S Koehler, Cameron J Komsa, Kayla G Kopczynski, Alexander Lam, Lauren A Lee, Maria N Liapis, Abigail E Liles, Megan N Loren, Jordan L Lugibihl, Jacqueline C Male, Taylor C Malseed, Gabrielle E Marino, Madison G Martin, Samantha A McCloskey, Jacob R Milden, Luke R Miller, Devon E Moeller, Matthew P Moore, Morgan A Moss-Walliser, Paige N

Nestor, Andrew M Page, Katherine A Page, Nicole C Perite, Michael H Polzin, John L Pope, Grant W Price, Emiy T Reardon, Victoria L Reynolds, Jacob E Richardson, Jessica L Richburg, Jordan E Roseborough, Ashley R Ruday, Meghan A Rutowski, Austin J Sather, Shannon R Sodergren, Douglas J Soffel, Kasey M Stewart, Morgan A Sulser, Corinne E Sweeney, Shannon N Taflinger, Mackenzie T Trapp, George S Wallace, Matthew J Warner, Natalie M Weber, Evan A Westrud, Zachary C Yates, Katherine M Zimmerman A/B — Madison R Adcock, Marcie N Amos, Madison R Arroyo, Lauren J Aten, Morgan G Bailey, Jacob W Ballard, Brittany N Barnas, Jennifer A Bauer, Savannah L Billingham-Hemminger, Nils K Blankley, Robert T Blood, Lawrence C Boyce, Kaitlyn N Bryant, Robyn L Buchanan, Alexa R Bummel, Elise S Bunzey, Brandon T Camp, Anthony J Cannizzo, Nicholas A CarletonSmith, Jonathan S Chang, Christian C Clark, Shannon P Conroy, Ross F Corday, Kyle W Corgan, Benjamin H Cotter, Ashleigh N Cross, Abigail F Cummings, Adrian Cvetkovski, Stewart A Day, Hallie G Dean, Matthew W Deas, Peyton M Detwiler, Rhiannon E Dewey, Chandler J Dey, Emma E Estes, Hannah M Ewers, Hannah M Falcon, Hannah L Frederick, Jillian M Frein, David M Froneberger, Zachary A Frye, Brooke

A Ganser, Michael C Gates, Brett D Gibson, Justus T Gilfillan, Rodney Gillis, Sloan R Glenn, Gabrielle J Grandstaff, Maxwell I Guzinski, Megan L Hagstedt, Brianna C Harrington, Samuel G Hartman, Carter J Hill, Harry G Hockham, William S Hodes, Alyssa C Horan, Adam B Hothersall, Logan S Jackson, Peyton E Jordan, Katherine M Judge, Samson J Kaplin, Jackson K Karow, David J Kelcy, Lauren S Kelley, Richard T Kelly, Eliot I Kemper, Carter J Killian, Adrienne M Kronovet, Thomas L Laatsch, Jordan G Laird, Emily A Lane, Megan N Lavalle, Gage R Leavitt, Amos J Lee, Alexandra P Leppert, Tyler J Lewis, Meredith F Liccione, Courtney M Macker, Jonathon J Macker, Kristen E Martin, Isabella Martinez, Miranda K McGaha, Mason C McKinster, Morgan S Menaker, Emily E Millard, Madison M Miller, Shelby E Miller, Giorgios M Minaidis, Grant C Mitro, Melody P Morgan, Jacob L Mrozowski, Taylor E Neal, Mia K Nikodemski, Ruth C Nwauche, Elyssa N O’brien, Joshua J Park, Jaclyn M Partridge, Nolan J Patterson, Benjamin A Peterson, Michael L Picarell, Emily G Pickhardt, Charles A Plummer, Gianna Polito, Patrick J Povinelli, Alexander E Powell, Joseph M Proite, Jason S Rand, Emily A Reynolds, Kelsie M Rich, Shannon A Roche, Avery N Rodriguez, Erin N Roediger, Taylor N Roth,

Matthew I Rubin, Andasia E Russell, Jacob T Sagmoe, Anthony M Santelle, Kara N Scharn, Haley A Seitz, Lindsay K Shields, Kyle T Slavinski, Olivia M Smiarowski, Adam P Smits, Hyun J Song, Claudia M Spinelli, Kerri E Stewart, Christian A Styles, Caylie A Sullivan, Imani H Sweatt, Delaney M Swift, Kayla M Thompson, Brianna M Thomson, Joseph J Tietjen, Andrew J Vasquez, Corey B Venable, Amanda B Vergnetti, Stephen A Villa, Benjamin P Vogt, Thomas K Wells, Sara J Whitman, Nathan C Wood, Courtney A Woodward, Annie E Young, Conner J Young 10th grade A — Daniella Arboleda, Jessica L Arnold, Jon R Attridge, Diana Berdugo, Stefanie A Cage, Austin C Chaney, Stefania Crovesi, Danielle A David, Jaclyn N Doody, Taylor M Dove, Keenan Dunkley, Kayla M Ebner, Kelechukwu I Emezie, Hannah R Farley, Matthew K Font, Brittany K Fritz, Jonathan D Garrick, Jamie L Gleason, Alexander R Hall, George W Harper, Jasmyn M Hitchcock, Nicholas B Hsiao, Cameron J Hunt, Hannah B Johnson, Lauren R King, Henry J Klein, Veronica A Krieg, Cole R Laird, Emily K Latham, ReeRee J Li, Laura S Love, Alexis C Marko, Bryan P Mawhinney, John P McClendon, Megan E Mitchell, Breanna M Moe, Shane M Nelson, Vivek C Patel, Brandon D Patton, Jacqueline

HOROSCOPES Nov. 22, 2009

In the year ahead, you might finally engage in a number of long-desired activities. The times ahead could be laced with many pleasurable adventures that will be quite memorable, leaving a big impression on you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You’re such a shrewd shopper that finding bargains could be far easier than usual. If you’re stuck in the house, get on the computer and check out what’s for sale on the Internet. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Because you have such a healthy curiosity, your inquiring mind could be exceptionally responsive. You’ll accurately evaluate any new information and file it away for future use. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- A healthy curiosity could have you checking out all kinds of information that happen along. The good thing is that you may stumble across a new way to make or save money. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- A good friend will be vastly impressed, as well as greatly flattered, when you credit him or her with something said in the past that applies to current events. How nice you remembered. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -A huge goal will command your attention, and a quietly effective manner will help you achieve it with little fanfare. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It’ll be mentally stimulating to associate with persons whose intellect you respect, because their thinking gets your mental juices flowing. Who knows what concepts you’ll conceive? TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- You’re good at utilizing the ideas or suggestions of others to a greater advantage than you

Gordon E Holzberg, Katie R Honeycutt, Bradley P Hood, Laura K Howard, Taylynn Hunt, Christian A Hyman, Khadejah Jackson, Paige E Jackson, Charlotte F Johnston, Taylor L Josey, Cullen T Kelleher, Erich J Kessel, Michael G Kitson, Allison R Kmec, Abbey M Lancaster, Connor J Lax, Margot D Lebaron, Kristen Lewis, Zachary M Loren, James P Markus, Juliana C Martinez, Emily C Mazeline, Brittany J McClure, Josie H McElveen, Erin E McInerny, Caraline E McKirdy, Andrew M Miles, Nicholaus C Mills, Christy N Misenheimer, Jenna M Misenheimer, Stephanie E Moe, Megan L Moore, Trent E Morris, Alyssa K Mossotti, Layne C Murphy, Brandon Napoleone, Bryan Napoleone, Tania V Nuno, Lindsay M Okowita, Mallory A Pack, Elvis J Perez, Sarah E Pickhardt, Valerie A Quadrini, Erin M Rabinowitz, Andrew P Randolph, Olivia C Reardon, Brandon J Reed, Nina A Rickles, Jeffery N Robinson, Nicholas D Rodriguez, Katherine M Rowland, Richard B Runde, Michael D Ruocco, Carly M Rutledge, Mackenzie L Salati, Allison M Schmidt, Kimberly Schoenborn, Maranda K Sesler, Sariah M Shaw, Lauren T Shipley, Joseph W Skavroneck, Bria J Soto, Nathan H Spitler, Hayley Stout, Ashlyn A Sunseri,

Continued on Page 10A

LUNCH MENUS

would without their input. What they contribute may be small, but it’ll be dynamic to you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t discount the thinking of others. It’s true that they may be looking at matters differently, but a variation in thinking broadens your evaluation and understanding of the subject. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Any project that requires brainpower should be your cup of tea. You can be exceptionally productive if you’re fortunate to work on something that takes a bit of cleverness. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -You’ll yield the greatest satisfaction dealing with endeavors that take a bit of concentration. It doesn’t matter whether you’re engaged in a sport or a serious project. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It won’t take much to get a response to a new idea if you think it will improve your living conditions and habitat. You won’t hesitate to try anything that’s a bit different. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Unless your mind is intricately involved in whatever you’re doing, you could be a bit restless. It’s not enough to be engaged in something physically; you need mental stimulation as well.

Nov. 23, 2009

In the year ahead, you will get plenty of help from associates working hard to improve your lot in life. It’s important to do all you can to help further the collective effort. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you’re not careful, your strong interest in members of the opposite gender could turn your head and place you in a forbidden relationship fraught with complications.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Listen to the advice of wellintentioned friends, but verify all that you hear before acting on anything, especially if money is involved. Something told to you could prove detrimental. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you take things for granted, you may not fully capitalize on new opportunities that cross your path. Unless you check out what is being offered, you could be looking a gift horse in the mouth. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Don’t expect Lady Luck to help if you are leaving all the heavy lifting to her. She wants to work with you, but you need to share the burden. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You’re able to work well with peers as long as there is no outside interference. The moment an outsider gets into the act, cooperation will go downhill. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Be careful about accepting the word of someone who has previously betrayed you. Anyone with a history of breaking important promises is likely to do it again without batting an eyelash. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Both your attention span and stick-to-itiveness are at low levels. Thus, the moment you lose interest in something is the mo-

ment your work ethic will go out the window. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- A lot of patience might be required with regard to something another has promised you. If you ride this person, he or she will scratch the project altogether. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You have a wonderful, generous nature, but this may hold true only up to a point. If you begin to feel someone is taking advantage, you’ll instantly put a lock on your holdings. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Putting on airs or affectations is totally unnecessary when in the presence of your friends. If you feel the need to use pretense or to try to be someone you’re not, chances are you’re with phonies. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Financial conditions could be tricky, so don’t trust your luck and risk your hard-earned holdings. To be on the safe side, put your money only on that which is a sure thing. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your beliefs are usually based on that which you know for certain or on what experience has taught you. However, you could kid yourself into believing that certain people aren’t as bad as they seem.

Elementary

Monday: Chicken nuggets with barbecue sauce, cheese enchilada, pinto beans, Mexicali corn, blueberry cup, fresh fruit choice, muffin Tuesday: Cheese stix dippers, chili-stuffed spud, baked french fries, California blend, Caesar salad, spiced apples, fresh fruit choice, sesame seed roll

Middle

Monday: Chicken nuggets with barbecue sauce, cheese enchilada, pinto beans, Mexicali corn, pasta salad, blueberry cup, fresh fruit choice, muffin Tuesday: Cheese stix dippers, chili-stuffed spud, chunky chicken soup, baked french fries, California blend, Caesar salad, spiced apples, fresh fruit choice,

sesame seed roll

High

Monday: Chicken strips with honey mustard, pork chopper on whole wheat bun, baked beans, glazed carrots, spinach salad, pineapple and applesauce, fresh fruit choice, muffin Tuesday: Pepperoni pizza, yogurt cup, turkey on whole wheat bread, whole kernel corn, steamed broccoli, veggie dipper, fresh apple wedges, fresh fruit choice

After school

Monday: Cheddar sun chip, assorted juices Tuesday: Fresh apple, milk Wednesday: Assorted breakfast cereals, milk, Scooby Doo, assorted juices

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A Pennington, Brittany M Philippe, John Z Rachuba, Michaela A Rankins, Amanda M Risher, Erin N Robertson, Jessica G Robinson, Rheanna L Schmitt, Morgan N Smith, Shannon L Speer, Sierra J Tillman, Katelyn P Tolbert, Brett V Ward, Christopher L Warner, Evan M White A/B — Sydney M Altonji, Aaron D Arthur, Hayden T Asbury, Sara Ashrafi, Nikita Bangalore, Kelly A Bassett, Rachael E Bechtel, Taylor B Berry, Richard W Bettison, Roshan Bhave, Meredith N Boatner, Matthew J Bogert, Kaitlyn Boigner, Jonathan T Bond, Joseph J Boulos, Kelsi A Bryant, Andrew J Buckley, Julia L Bullock, Nicolas A Cevallos, Tyler Chadwick, Trey M Cherry, Mckee T Christiansen, Zachary J Cochran, Seth Condon, Daniel P Cooper, William A Cottrell, Grey A Curtis, Abbie C Davis, Kierstan A Davis, Alison M Demarco, Michael N Demasi, Lauren E Deville, Gregory D Dotson, Alyssandra M Dove, Alyssa R Dubin, Morgan E Durand, Brenna Dwyer, Samantha L Eastburn, Sarah E Every, Dara A Fazelnia, Roya N Fazelnia, Katherine A Filloramo, Ronald L Franklin, Kyle A Gallagher, Katelyn R Garbarino, Erica L Garrison, Erika D Gass, Aleesia Gillis, Allison N Giordano, Jayne M Glanton, John L Green, Carter W Harris, Marissa A Hartert, Hallie A Hartley, Joseph J Hatala, Caitlyn N Heine, Kelcey Holcomb,

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10A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

HONOR ROLLS Continued from Page 9A Devin M Sweeney, Mikayla M Sweeney, Carly E Thaw, Jordan H Thomas, Stuart L Todd, Matthew D Townsend, Suzanna D Treske, Addison A Tyndall, Jeremy M Urso, Sean W Van Gurp, Lindsey A Wainscott, Rachel F Walker, Emily R Weber, Abigail K Williams, Alexandria L Wilson, Jillian P Winchester, Zechariah E Woodie, Joshua L Wright, Kaylin M Zimmerman 11th grade A — Alexis Almonte, Ellen E Black, Rachael V Broom, Lacy C Buseick, Ashley S Clayton, Elizabeth E Clyde, Kristina R Cody, Chelsea L Contafio, Kailey R Filter, Jordan M Grice, Dominique Ibekwe, Manasvi Koul, Dylan J Kwaiser, Katherine Lombard, Brandon R Loren, Kaitlyn Mawhinney, Ashley A McGee, Hannah R Nadel, Minali Nigam, Sarah M Plascyk, Carli D Reynolds, Colby R Rhodes, Mary Rouse, Christian Smith, Nicole E Steagall, Vincent S Sunseri, Trent Tolbert, Kaitlin Wood, Ji A Yu A/B — Arik E Adrian, Kathryn Agres, Kelsey Ahern, Reid A Anderson,

Nathan Bailey, Trenton E Baker, Alyssa D Basen, Patrick A Bellucci, Amir A Biglari, Garrett R Blatnik, Nolan M Bowker, Sarah L Brady, Erin Brock, Kirbie L Burnett, Joseph T Bursch, Helen Butler, Megan M Cappiello, Megan E Carleton-Smith, Jaime A Cevallos, Matthew D Chilton, Ashley L Christy, Brittany Clark, Christopher M Colo, Collin R Crawford, Eryn E Curry, Michael A Deas, Connor J Deason, Ronald L Detwiler, Allison Dunbar, Edmond P Duvall, Mara L Edmondson, Joshua T Ferguson, Hannah K Florian, Erin C Foley, Rachel Footitt, Alex R Gac, Justin B Ganey, Christina Giusto, Alyssa D Gribble, Rachel Hampton, Lars A Haugsted, Alexander Helmke, Karla R Hernandez, Jessica R Hockham, Jeffrey S Hoefler, Jamal Hyrams, Meagan M Johnson, Alyx Kahn, Stephanie Karam, Erin Kayton, Colin A Keyes, Katheryn A Kiffmeyer, Denise Y King, Emily R Kravis, Caitlin Kurtz, Megan A Martin, Andres Matajira, Kelsey Matheny, Tracey McAuley, Kelly J McNeal, Cameron P Mitro, Jacquelin R Morgan, Charles W

Morris, Matthew Mullaly, Chad Mullins, Nathan Mullins, Christopher Murphy, Timothy W Neal, Blaine K Nichols, Nkem Obi-Melekwe, Nsor K Ogar, Cynthia L Partridge, Akshar Patel, Michael J Patetta, Kole S Patterson, Maximilian Paul, Brian M Peart, Tanner S Pedersen, Starr K Peterson, Patrick Phelan, Zachary R Pierce, Jesse Poe, Kelly A Pope, Hannah Powell, Shelby Raines, Catherine M Rardin, Christine A Rardin, Sebastian Rodriguez, Tyler T Roediger, Savannah Schoenborn, Yana Senchuk, Paul G Sheehan, Angela M Shenouda, Aleksey V Silchenko, Stephanie Sparacio, Cory W Spiers, Perry R Spinelli, Raquel Stover, Casey M Tarwater, Brett E Thompson, Justin K Thompson, Torri J Tillman, Lauren S Toppin, Aimee L Trowbridge, Brittany N Turner, Jacob C Tyndall, Christopher P Van Gurp, Tynaya N Walker, Jessica N Walters, Lauren Weeks, Erica F White, Breanne Wilhite, Christopher T Woodlief 12th grade A — Godwin Abiola, Joseph M Baily, Kendra Barker, Jon Bassett, Jordan M Batson, Morgan E

Beaty, Alexandria Brewer, Brent Buckley, Brianna L Bursch, Haley N Camp, Tyler P Canington, Kathryn Cannon, Courtney E Clement, Matthew M Corgan, Brigette M Flieger, Nathan H Forbes, Lindsay A France, Vincent M Franco, Nicole Frelier, Michael J Goss, Sarah G Graves, Christopher Gray, Chelsea N Hathaway, Jamie Helmke, William M Jiang, Katie A Johnson, Andrea R Jones, Daniel Kim, Marina P Krizhevskaya, Shahil Lalloo, Danielle E Latoni, Robert P Markus, Breanna E McRae, Cara Miles, Desnee L Miles, Zachary L Miller, Nathan R Mitchell, Robert G Nelson, Tatiana C Nossent, Christian Quinn, Matthew D Risher, Megan E Robertson, Alexa R Rodriguez, Taylor M Sennett, Eric D Sensenbrenner, Nicholas Short, Eric B Stach, Colby C Thompson, Sydney Tomer, Zachary Vincent, Tyler Weber, John Z Young A/B — Allison Allcock, Maggie Amos, Ashley M Aragona, Kara R Armstrong, Monicka Arora, Christopher Asbury, James A Attenhofer, Channing B Bass, William J Beaton, Lauren Bernat,

Hilary M Bibeau, Landon J Biehl, Justin Blum, Joseph R Brennan, Emily L Brock, Kaylin P Buckley, Thomas G Cardinali, Ryan Chamberlain, Kristen L Chaussard, Alyssa R Clark, Amanda P Clark, Brianna Conroy, Christopher A Cooler, Hallie Corday, Flavia C Crovesi, Karla D Cruz, Caroline Cutrone, Bridgette L Davidson, Leslie Dorton, Stephanie M Dunton, Leeanna Early, Nicole Echeandia, Adrian Edwards, Timothy M Edwards, Stephanie E Estep, Matthew C Frein, Hunter A Fritz, Steven T Gamble, Rakeya Gardner, Victoria Gass, Jessica Goncalves, Chelsea Gribble, Shelby L Haigler, Sara Hambright, Matthew T Hamilton, Evan D Harris, Kirsten A Haugsted, Tara N Heilingoetter, Joseph S Henry, Chelsea L Hilton, Mallory E Himsl, Chelsey Horan, Vivian E Howard, Anna E Jackson, Isaac Johnston, Katherine E Johnston, Joseph Kahn, McKinley E Kelcy, Hayden Kelley, Toni M Lashley, Jacquilyn C Lavalle, Amanda T Lawton, Georgia B Leavitt, Chandler C Ledoyen, Andrew Lipocky, Jenna C Lutz, Jessica C Mantekas,

Alexandrea B Mays, John M Miller, Jacob A Mlakar, Taylor Mlodzinski, Haley E Moore, Jennifer A Nadel, Brendan Nally, Melanie O’Rourke, Ashley Pack, Kara Pate, Courtney M Perrone, Paige A Pileggi, Heather J Piraneo, Olivia A Poole, Jennifer Powell, Garet Praska, Connor D Price, Michael J Pritchard, Chelsea C Proimos, Elizabeth A Rabinowitz, Evan P Ramsey, Gina M Randazzo, Adam M Remme, Macon Richardson, Abby Rigney, Chelsea R Ruggiero, Kristen Runde, Nicholas Ruocco, Chelsea R Rutledge, Sydney Salati, Nickolas Sayresmith, Lauren E Seitz, Soraya N Sheikh, Jacob W Slaughter, Taylor M Smiarowski, Jake Spinella, Sarah E Spitler, Chad Stegall, Dalton Stout, Kaitlyn Sulser, Cory M Teat, Katarina Thompson, Joseph Thomson, Samantha Tibbetts, Austin C Todd, Alexandria T Tran, Andrew Treske, Max Vlasov, Matthew J Walser, Justin Weeks, Kelsey T Wells, Jacob R White, Erin Whitman, Dylan R Williams, Janelle Williams, Morgan Woods, Hannah L Wright, Jermaine W Wyatt, Jillian S Zimmerman

ANTIQUES • COLLECTIBLES

J E W

A Hidden Treasure

E

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The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 11A

Soccer hair-pulling fuels debate over sports sexism NEW YORK (AP) — The vicious hair-pulling of an opponent was inexcusable. But prominent advocates of women’s sports say that so, too, has been much of the commentary generated by the popular video of college soccer player Elizabeth Lambert’s combative tactics in a recent game. “Catfight” has been a term commonly used in cyberspace reactions to the video clip now seen by millions of people around the world. One Web site ran a poll: “Do you find violent women sexy?” Some bloggers — lapsing into old stereotypes — suggested Lambert’s menstrual cycle was a factor. “It’s clearly sexist,” said Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, as she assessed the overall reaction to Lambert’s rough play in a Nov. 5 game between her New Mexico team and Brigham Young. “It’s obvious there are still some people in this country who just can’t accept that women want to play sports, and sometime sports get rough.”

Astronauts take 2nd spacewalk CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A spacewalking astronaut put aside the impending birth of his daughter and blazed through his first-ever venture outside the International Space Station on Saturday. Expectant father Randolph Bresnik and Michael Foreman were so far ahead despite their late start and interrupted sleep the night before — false fire and decompression alarms jolted them awake — that their commander handed them extra work. “Way to kick butt,” said commander Charles Hobaugh, a Marine. The spacewalkers installed new antennas, relocated a monitor for electrical hazards, set up an attachment for a spectrometer due to arrive next year, and hooked up a wireless video system for spacewalkers’ helmet cameras. Then they released another payload platform. Bresnik was mightily impressed as he started on the work outside. “Other than seeing my wife for the first time, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a more beautiful face,” Bresnik said, gazing down at Earth 220 miles below. “This is amazing.” Bresnik’s wife, Rebecca, was back home in Houston, due to give birth to their second child at any moment. They also have a 3-year-old son, adopted from Ukraine. The delivery had been planned for Friday, but the baby had yet to arrive when the second spacewalk of the weeklong mission started Saturday morning. The astronauts agreed with Mission Control to hold off on any news if the birth occurred during the spacewalk. Everyone wanted Bresnik, a 42-year-old Marine, focused on the spacewalk because of the extra risk posed by working outside. As they soared over Houston, the spacewalkers took time for a little sightseeing. They joked that they could see their homes and hear their commander urging, “Get back to work.” Throughout the spacewalk, Foreman, a veteran spacewalker, had trouble hearing inside his helmet. Bresnik’s voice was especially faint. “I can’t understand you,” Foreman called out. Bresnik spoke louder. “Still can’t,” Foreman said. An astronaut inside had to intercede. Foreman also missed some of the praise coming his way after accomplishing all the major chores.

Lambert, a junior defender who was suspended indefinitely, issued an apology through the university, saying, “I let my emotions get the best of me in a heated situation.” She was involved in several incidents of hard-nosed play during the Mountain West Conference tournament semifinal, mostly notably when she grabbed BYU’s Kassidy Shumway by her ponytail and yanked her backward to the ground. Laura Pappano, coauthor of a book about gender in sports and a writer-in-residence at Wellesley College, has written a couple of blogs assessing reactions to the Lambert video. “The image of female athletes as more than skilled players — as good, wholesome people — is a centerpiece of women’s sports and a staple of marketing, promotion, and ticket-selling,” Pappano wrote. “This has been both a benefit and a limitation that has helped shape women’s sports as ’gentler’ fare.” This feeds into a situation in which male

athletes often get a pass for bad behavior, while women draw criticism, she argued. “We forgive Michael Vick, and gasp when Serena Williams screams at a line judge’s late call at the U.S. Open,” Pappano wrote. “No one likes dirty play. But if Elizabeth Lambert just made people see that women’s sports are highly intense, competitive, and exciting, well, good for her.” Lambert herself, according to the New Mexico athletic department, is not giving further interviews at this stage beyond one she gave Tuesday to The New York Times in which she did suggest there is a double standard for women’s sports. “I definitely feel because I am a female it did bring about a lot more attention than if a male were to do it,” Lambert told the Times. “It’s more expected for men to go out there and be rough. The female, we’re still looked at as, ‘Oh, we kick the ball around and score a goal.”’ Blogger and author Michael Tunison, in a

blog for sportingnews. com, was among the male commentators who didn’t fully buy that argument, saying Lambert brought the attention on herself because her conduct “was so brazenly outlandish.” “Most of us have long accepted the fact that women’s sports aren’t dainty, aimless affairs,” Tunison wrote. “To suggest the reaction to her dirty play is merely the result of condescension is a weak attempt to deflect criticism.” Other men pointed out that plenty of male athletes had incurred disciplinary action and public criticism for acts of unsportsmanlike violence — such as Oregon running back LeGarrette Blount for punching a Boise State player, and Florida linebacker Brandon Spikes for seemingly trying to gouge the eyes of a Georgia opponent. However, Carl Cannon, deputy editor of Politics-

Daily.com, suggested the intense public reaction to the Lambert incident was different from cases involving male athletes. “It’s as though we expect women to play fiercely competitive sports — like men — and yet retain some of the traditional notions of femininity,” he wrote. Alexis McCombs, Los Angeles-based host of talk show “Instant ShePlay” on AOL Sports, said there was no doubt that Lambert and other female athletes are held to an unfair double standard. She recalled the vehement reaction to Serena Williams after her outburst of profanity at the U.S. Open. “Think of Andre Agassi — people would relish his bad behavior, while Serena got blasted,” McCombs said. “For some of the men, it almost benefits them — they’re able to cash in on their bad behavior.”

McCombs also suggested that sexual factors were part of the reason the Lambert video became such an Internet sensation. “The bottom line is it’s the female being sexualized,” she said. “Some people like the fact that two women are fighting.” NOW’s O’Neill said she was dismayed by some of the misogynistic sentiments directed at Lambert, who told the New York Times of one message suggesting she deserved to be imprisoned and raped. “The only thing we can do is stand in solidarity with women athletes,” O’Neill said in a telephone interview. “Obviously what Elizabeth Lambert did was wrong. But you have a right to try to be winners — being tough, being aggressive, wanting to win. That’s what women athletes everywhere should be striving to do.”

Griffin Motor Company Welcomes Back

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12A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Report finds wide disparity in gifted education ATLANTA (AP) — the States in Gifted Edu- and Obama administraWhen Liz Fitzgerald real- cation,” hits at a basic tions have tried to elimiized her son and daughter element of the federal nate that money entirely, were forced to read books government’s focus on but Congress put it back in math class while the education: Most of its into the budget each year. Gifted programs are other children caught up, money and effort goes she had them moved into into helping low-perform- typically paid for by logifted classes at their sub- ing, poor and minority cal districts or states urban Atlanta elementa- kids achieve basic profi- and vary dramatically. ciency. It largely ignores In some states, it’s as ry school. Just 100 miles down the the idea of helping gifted stark as one county with road in Taliaferro County, kids reach their highest multiple gifted programs that wouldn’t have been potential, leaving those — magnet schools, honan option. All the gifted tasks to states and local ors courses and separate classrooms for advanced classes were canceled be- school districts. “In the age of Sputnik, learners — next to a cause of budget cuts. “If they didn’t have it, we put money into math county with nothing. “The quality of gifted they would get bored and and science, and we enddistracted easily,” said ed up on the moon,” said services is dependent Fitzgerald, whose chil- Del Siegle, a University on geography, and it dren are 14 and 12. “It of Connecticut research- shouldn’t be,” said Laura just wouldn’t be challeng- er who wrote the report. Carriere, president of the “We really need to con- Maryland Coalition for ing.” Such disparities exist sider that again. We can- Gifted and Talented Eduin every state, accord- not afford as a country to cation and the mother of two gifted children. ing to a new report by ignore talent.” Just six states pick up The federal government the National Association for Gifted Children that spent just $7.5 million the whole tab for gifted blames low federal fund- last year on research and programs, and 13 don’t ing and a focus on low- grants for the estimated put a single dollar toward Value Bonanza - US Version such curriculum, accord3 million gifted children performing students. 0% for 72 months - 3 column: 5.875” x 10”, b/w Bonanza - US in the U.S. Both theVersion Bush ing to the study. That The report, “State ofValue Bonanza - US Version 0% for 72 Value months - 3 column: 5.875” x 10”, b/w 0% for 72 months - 3 column: 5.875” x 10”, b/w

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Some oppose having separate classes for gifted kids. Mara Sapon-Shevin of Syracuse University argues that gifted programs create “haves and the have nots.” She prefers grouping students together and then tailoring the curriculum to each child. Sapon-Shevin kept her own daughter out of a second-grade gifted program in the 1980s. “In the unit on birds, the gifted children would learn myths about birds, go bird watching, build bird houses, learn bird calls, do bird identification,” she said. “The problem came when I raised my hand and asked what the other second-graders were doing. They said ‘work sheets.”’ But for educators like Sally Walker, gifted programs help bright children reach their highest potential, putting future doctors, scientists and

means poor urban and rural school systems are often have no money left for their highest achievers, according to the Nov. 12 report. “There is a markedly insufficient national commitment to gifted and talented children, which, if left unchecked, will ultimately leave our nation ill-prepared to field the next generation of innovators and to compete in the global economy.” The federal No Child Left Behind Law, which was passed in 2003, forced states to focus on bringing struggling children up to grade level — inadvertently exaggerating the problem even more, Siegle said. A Fordham Institute study released last month showed gifted students are still improving their standardized test scores, but not as quickly as low-performing children.

engineers in classrooms where they don’t feel embarrassed for being smart. Walker recalls the day she was testing a particularly bright 5-year-old boy in her gifted program in a Rockford, Ill., elementary school in the 1980s. She asked him what color coal is and gave him three options: black, purple and gray. The boy marked all three answers and told Walker that coal was black indoors, purple in the sunshine and gray if it burns. “These are students who are ignored because of the myth that they will make it on their own or succeed without help,” said Walker, now executive director of the Illinois Association for Gifted Children. “They get frustrated because they feel they are not being understood.”

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The

Renn’s Nest

M-F 10-6 Sat 10-5

208 N. Main St. Downtown Monroe

(704) 291-3080

The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Rain Likely

Rain Likely

Isolated Rain

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

50º

43º

61º 44º

68º 45º

66º 43º

60º 36º

North Carolina State Forecast

In-Depth Forecast Today we will see cloudy skies with an 80% chance of rain, high temperature of 50º, humidity of 89% and an overnight low of 43º. The record high temperature for today is 79º set in 1942. The record low temperature is 15º set in 1937.

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00"

Tarboro 55/50 Washington Asheville 58/51 Greensboro Raleigh 49/41 48/45 52/47 Charlotte Cape 50/43 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 60/52 63/60 Shown is today’s weather. 50/43 55/51 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 65/56 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:03 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:13 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . .11:41 a.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . .10:23 p.m.

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

Moon Phases

First 11/24

Full 12/2

New 12/16

Last 12/8

Local UV Index

H

L

This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+ Cold Front

UV Index

Around Our State City

Albemarle . . . . . .49/45 Brevard . . . . . . . .49/40 Burlington . . . . . .48/45 Cape Fear . . . . . .53/48 Emerald Isle . . . .62/56 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .54/50 Gastonia . . . . . . .49/42 Grandfather Mtn. .43/38 Greenville . . . . . .57/50 Hendersonville . .48/40 Hickory . . . . . . . .47/42 Jacksonville . . . .60/50 Kinston . . . . . . . .58/50 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .60/57 Mount Mitchell . .49/44 Roanoke Rapids .53/47 Southern Pines . .53/47 Swanquarter . . . .62/57 Wilkesboro . . . . .47/41 Williamston . . . . .57/51 Yanceyville . . . . .47/43 Zebulon . . . . . . . .53/48

ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra

.62/41 ra .57/38 ra .60/41 ra .63/43 ra .66/52 ra .54/50 ra .59/42 ra .53/38 ra .62/47 ra .56/39 ra .60/41 ra .65/47 ra .63/47 ra .61/55 ra .59/42 ra .63/43 ra .63/42 ra .64/51 ra .59/39 mc .62/47 ra .60/42 ra .63/42 ra

Warm Front

L

H

Low Pressure High Pressure

High: 86° in Indio, Calif. Low: -7° in Laramie, Wyo.

Across The Nation Today

Monday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Stationary Front

L

National Extremes

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

Today

Durham 51/46

Winston-Salem 47/44

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . .56/44 Baltimore . . . . . . .54/46 Chicago . . . . . . . .54/44 Denver . . . . . . . . .49/25 Detroit . . . . . . . . .52/40 Houston . . . . . . . . . .72/53 Indianapolis . . . .56/41 Los Angeles . . . .72/52 Miami . . . . . . . . . .85/71 Minneapolis . . . . .50/38 New York . . . . . . .54/44 Orlando . . . . . . . .82/64 Philadelphia . . . .58/43 Reno . . . . . . . . . .48/29 Sacramento . . . . .59/44 Salem, OR . . . . . .50/41 Salt Lake City . . .44/31 San Francisco . . .63/50 Seattle . . . . . . . . .48/42 Syracuse . . . . . . .53/36 Tampa . . . . . . . . .80/62 Washington, DC .54/47

Around The World Today

Monday

sh .65/45 pc mc .55/47 ra pc .51/49 pc pc .47/25 mc pc .52/42 mc s . .75/57 pc mc .54/42 pc s . .76/53 s sh .83/70 pc ra .47/35 ra s . .53/46 ra t . .77/60 s mc .57/48 ra pc .48/31 s pc .63/45 s ra .54/42 ra sn .41/32 mc pc .66/49 s sh .51/44 ra s . .49/39 sh t . .78/62 s ra .56/47 ra

City

Monday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .88/74 Athens . . . . . . . . .70/52 Baghdad . . . . . . .67/45 Beijing . . . . . . . . .47/27 Berlin . . . . . . . . . .54/47 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .77/59 Hong Kong . . . . .69/60 London . . . . . . . .53/50 Madrid . . . . . . . . .55/37 Mexico City . . . . .75/48 Moscow . . . . . . . .39/33 Nassau . . . . . . . .84/74 Paris . . . . . . . . . .54/47 Rio de Janeiro . . .90/74 Rome . . . . . . . . . .66/51 San Juan . . . . . . .88/78 Stockholm . . . . . .44/38 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .52/51 Toronto . . . . . . . .50/39

s . .87/74 pc s . .69/51 s s . .65/45 s s . .48/26 pc cl . .49/45 sh s . .77/59 s s . .75/48 s ra .53/50 pc sh .59/36 s s . .73/49 pc sh .35/32 mc sh .83/73 sh ra .55/47 sh t . .82/74 t s . .64/47 pc t . .88/77 sh sh .43/39 sh sh .61/50 sh mc .49/41 sh

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

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The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 13A

KidzArt franchise now serving Waxhaw area Jay Jacob Columnist

Navigating today’s economy While changes in the economy occur regularly, what we have experienced recently is anything but a “normal” change. The challenges of the current economy haven’t been seen or experienced in our country in decades. Like most investors, you may wish you could figure out some way to know when economic conditions were about to change, or what adjustments you should make in your portfolio based on current conditions. It’s a tricky topic, and even economists disagree about the nature and causes of economic cycles. But we can at least take a look at some of the issues you need to be aware of, and help familiarize you with how the economy works. Some people tend to refer to changes in overall economic conditions as “economic cycles” or “business cycles.” However, it could be a misnomer to label these changes this way. Because they are not, in fact, predictably cyclical, some economists prefer to call them “economic fluctuations.” Regardless of the terminology you choose to identify them with, changes in economic activity generally follow four phases: Advance or expansion. When times are good and the economy is growing, we typically see indications such as falling unemployment rates and factories taking advantage of excess capacity, to name a couple. While the news during this phase is typically positive, you may soon start to see signs of problems ahead. If inflationary pressures begin to creep in, this is typically when the Fed raises interest rates in an attempt to help keep the economy from overheating. Peak. By the time we get to this point, the economy tends to be operating at full employment, factories have generally used up their excess capacity, and inflationary pressures are usually building. When rising labor and materials costs squeeze companies’ profit margins, the Fed will usually move more aggressively in an attempt to slow growth by raising rates to help ease inflationary pressure. Decline, slowdown or recession. Ideally, action by the Fed to tame inflation should allow the economy to gradually adjust to a sustainable long-term growth rate without the threat of inflation. In reality, however, the combination of the Fed’s tightening and the need to correct accumulated imbalances in labor and materials supplies typically slows growth to a level that’s actually below the economy’s long-term potential. Unemployment rises, factories slow down, and inflationary pressures ease. Trough. At this point in the cycle, inventories are depleted. The Fed lowers interest rates in an attempt to help stimulate the economy, and businesses and homeowners may consider refinancing mortgages to take advantage of lower rates. Companies will eventually purchase new equipment and expand operations, helping inventories to grow and marking the beginning of a new expansion. As you can see, there are some telltale signs that can at least give some idea of where the economy is in its cycle. However, to make matters more complicated for you as an investor, the stock market tends to move in advance of the economy, usually in response to investors’ anticipation of what they see down the road. The biggest challenge is knowing when the shift to the next phase will occur, because predicting the market and the economy is a bit like forecasting the weather. As an investor, your level of concern for economic fluctuations will depend on several factors. You may pay less attention to them if you have a long term approach and your portfolio is positioned to weather the ups and downs. Alternatively, you may see this as a time of opportunity to reposition holdings or even add attractively priced securities to your portfolio. Working with a Financial Advisor could prove valuable if you decide to employ such a strategy.

WAXHAW Jill Long of Matthews has recently purchased a KidzArt franchise and will provide art enrichment programs to children in the south Charlotte and Waxhaw areas. KidzArt is an international children’s art education company that has 60-plus franchisees throughout the United States and a growing international presence. KidzArt, a curriculum that provides drawing instruction for kids of all ages, offers a creative outlet that encourages selfexpression in a safe and relaxing environment. No prior arts training or experience are necessary to participate. Classes are small, up to 15 enrollees, to maximize the amount of attention paid to each student. “My goal is to continue to build on the existing KidzArt reputation as a fun, creative, high quality art program in the south Charlotte area,” Long said in a press release. “Specifically, I would like to expand KidzArt’s presence in area elementary schools and bring KidzArt to preschools and middle schools. Our programs will benefit the home school and the “mom and tot” communities as well.

I would love for all kids to experience what KidzArt classes have to offer.” Long, a mother of three who lives in Matthews, attributes her own son’s growth into a creative, confident problem solver to his experiences as a KidzArt student. “I learned about KidzArt when my son began taking classes three years ago,” Long said. “I was excited when I saw his confidence and creativity grow and the enjoyment and sense of accomplishment that he brought home every week. His experience with KidzArt is one of the reasons why I decided to purchase a KidzArt franchise and offer programs.” Long holds a B.A. in economics from Northwestern University and worked in accounting and finance in Chicago and New York prior moving to the area. She bases her plans for success on her business experience, enjoyment of art and drawing, and strong family values. “After my third child started preschool, I felt I needed to use my life experiences to affect those outside my immediate family, but would only do so if it was fun and I could work from home,” she said.

Long said giving back to the community is important. “We provide scholarships to students for class sessions and donate classes and birthday parties to fundraisers at schools

where our classes are held,” she said. “We also plan to do our own fundraisers to help schools in the community.” Long is currently holding classes at Kensington,

New Town, Rea View and Waxhaw elementaries. For more information about KidzArt, contact Long at 704-941-0074 or visit www.kidzartsouthcharlotte.com.

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14A / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

BUSINESS BRIEFS Union Power sending free CFLs

MONROE To promote energy efficiency and help save energy dollars for its members, Union Power Cooperative will be send-

ing out a mailer containing two complimentary compact fluorescent bulbs (CFL) to each of the cooperative’s members during December. “We will be mailing 116,000 compact

fluorescent bulbs to 65,000 members throughout the five county area we serve,” Hal Setser, vice president of marketing and energy services, said in a press release. “We expect our members to start receiving these packages the first part of December. The package will be easy to identify as it sports the theme “Do the Twist, Switch to CFL’s and Save.” As a North Carolina electric cooperative, Union Power Cooperative is promoting this project in part to comply with the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards legislation passed by the N.C. General Assembly in 2007. “Distributing these energy-saving CFL bulbs is one way we are meeting the requirements of our state law,” Setser said. Also included in each mailer will be brochure detailing information about the CFLs and how using these bulbs can save members an average of $30 per bulb in energy costs. CFLs use 75 percent less energy than their standard

incandescent counterparts, and they last 10 times longer. Information is also included on the proper disposal of CFLs and recycling locations. Union Power Cooperative is a member-owned electric cooperative, which provides electric service to approximately 65,000 members in Union, Stanly, Mecklenburg, Cabarrus and Rowan counties.

TOPS leader given ‘Time to Shine’

MONROE TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) selected area captain Patricia McMullen of Monroe to participate in “Time to Shine,” an international recognition event, for the second McMullen time. TOPS’ field staff membes were invited to the international headquarters in

Milwaukee for the “Time to Shine” opportunity Nov. 11-15. According to TOPS’ president, Barbara Cady, McMullen and only 100 others were selected from among 400-plus field staff to participate. They received specialized training designed to capitalize on their leadership skills. “I was pleasantly surprised by this honor,” McMullen said in a press release. “TOPS thought they were recognizing me for a job well done — but they were really honoring me with additional tools so I may provide better support and guidance to the chapters and members in my area. I am energized and eager to share what I have learned. I am looking forward to starting more local TOPS chapters in this area.” McMullen has served the chapters and members of the greater Piedmont area for seven years. She oversees 23 local TOPS chapters in Anson, Cabarrus, Mecklenburg, Rowan, Stanly and Union counties. TOPS Club, Inc. is a weight-loss support and wellness education organization with thousands of associate chapters in the United States and Canada. Members (about 180,000 worldwide), learn about nutrition, portion control, food planning,

exercise, and more, in weekly meetings. Weighins, group feedback, and support help members achieve their goals. It was founded in 1948. Visitors may attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. To find a local chapter, visit www.tops.org or call TOPS headquarters at 800-932-8677.

Metro’s Brock reaches top status

MONROE Robbie Brock has earned master technician status at Metro Honda of Union County, the highest achievement in Honda’s technical training program. He is the only one on staff so far to receive this award. He Brock has been with the company for 11 years. His boss, service manager Eric Tippett, said in a press release that it takes “an extensive amount of instructor-led training off site, over 210 self study training modules and 8 ASE certificates” to accomplish.

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Duke Catches Fire The No. 9-ranked Blue Devils matched a school record with 18 3-pointers in Saturday’s 104-67 victory over Radford. Freshman Andrew Dawkins made a team-high six triples. Page 4B November 22, 2009

Sports

SUNDAY

Division Champs Clemson beat Virginia for its eighth straight win on Saturday. The victory also clinched the ACC Atlantic Division title for the Tigers, who will play in the ACC title game for the first time. Page 4B

The Enquirer-Journal

Sports Editor Jerry Snow

Mavericks win it all

MVP Risher delivers on his prediction of a state title with winning goal By PAUL LONG

E-J Correspondent

CARY Three months ago, Matt Risher predicted the Marvin Ridge High boys soccer team would end the 2009 season by winning a state championship. On Saturday afternoon, Risher made sure that prediction came true. The senior forward scored a golden goal off a free kick from Garrett Condon in sudden death overtime to give the Mavericks a dramatic 2-1 victory over Chapel Hill in the 3A state title game at Koka Booth Stadium. “I believed we could be here from the beginning of preseason,” said Risher, “all the way through the playoffs, going against ( Charlotte ) Catholic. I knew this team could win. We have a great group of guys. All 18 of them are wonderful players, great men, and it was just a very fun season.” Marvin Ridge ( 22-2-1 ) also gave head coach Ray Fumo his first state title in his fifth trip to the finals. Fumo’s coaching career began in 1977 and included stops at Parkwood and Weddington before he took over the Marvin Ridge program when the school opened its doors in 2007. “It feels great,” Fumo said. “It’s been a lot of years coming, and this team worked very, very hard. This past week, week and a half, we’ve played four games in eight days, and into that sudden death overtime, they were still playing hard. (That) shows the heart and determination of these kids.” On the final play, Condon launched the ball in from the left side and got it to Risher in front of the net. Risher, The Enquirer-Journal’s 2008 Union County Player of the Year, beat Chapel Hill goaltender Juan Arristizabal in the 101st minute, just 57 seconds into the first sudden death session. He immediately raced to the sideline in front of the Marvin Ridge fan section, where he was mobbed by his teammates. “I was just trying to lose my

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Marvin Ridge senior Matt Risher (bottom) celebrates with teammates following his game-winning goal in OT of Saturday’s 3A state title match. defender,” said Risher, “and he turned back for a second, and I was gone, wide open, and just put it home.” During post-game ceremonies, Risher was honored as the Most Valuable Player of the match. The Mavericks dominated the first half, outshooting the Tigers 18-7, but they were unable to solve Arristizabal. Then, in the 43rd minute, Kyle Parker played the ball into Risher just outside the 18-yard box. Risher passed to junior defender Kole Patterson, who fired a laser past Arristizabal for a 1-0 Marvin Ridge lead.

That advantage held up until, in the 63rd minute, Chapel Hill netted the equalizer on an own-goal, with the ball deflecting off the head of a Marvin Ridge player who was trying to clear the ball out of the defensive zone. Midfielder Jamie Dell was credited with the goal for the Tigers. Both teams had several scoring chances throughout the final 17 minutes of regulation and two 10-minute overtime periods, but neither was able to capitalize. Condon just missed on three opportunities down the stretch, firing the ball just wide in the 61st minute, hitting

the crossbar in the 77th and missing the net by inches on a breakaway in the 93rd. “Garrett didn’t put his head down,” said Fumo. “He came in (and said) ‘I’m ready to do what it takes.’ And on that play, he did exactly what we practiced. He swerved the ball in and he gave us a chance to attack it going to goal.” Condon, one of five seniors on the Mavs’ roster, said he was glad Risher scored the game-winner. “I was beating myself up there a couple times,” Condon said.

See STATE CHAMPS / Page 8B

Official suspended for call in Monroe game By JERRY SNOW

E-J Sports Editor

MONROE An official has been suspended for the rest of the high school football playoffs for what has been determined to be a missed call on a touchdown during West Montgomery’s 17-14 road win over Monroe in the second round of the playoffs on Friday. With the score tied at 14 late in the third quarter, Monroe had a third down and 10 at the Warriors’ 16-yard line. Monroe quarterback Jalen Sowell completed a pass to receiver Issac Blakeney in the back of the end zone, but back judge Keith Watkins ruled Blakeney was out of bounds. Game film shows Blakeney was inbounds, according to Bill Freeman, who supervises and books officials for the Metrolina Athletic Officials’ Association.

Freeman informed Monroe athletic director Doug Jones Saturday morning that Watkins has been suspended for the remainder of the playoffs, including a game he was scheduled to work on Saturday. The official sent a letter of apology to Jones on Saturday. “It’s disappointing for a 12-0 team to have to go out on a blown call,” Jones said. “You would rather get beat than to lose it on a missed call.” Jones felt the apology was appropriate, but said it does not take away from the lost opportunity. Monroe’s 12-0 mark was the best record in the program’s 48-year history. “It’s disheartening,” said Jones, who graduated from Monroe High 30 years ago. “We felt we had a good shot at a state championship. But it was still a good year.”

Marvin Ridge fans show support during Saturday’s 3A state championship victory.

FH quarterback finishes out stellar career BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer

Photo from Monroe High video

The feet of Monroe receiver Issac Blakeney (in red) touched down in the back of the end zone on this play, but he was ruled out.

MARSHVILLE Juanne Blount wrapped up his remarkable varsity football career on Friday, and in typical fashion. Blount, a senior quarterback at Forest Hills High, rushed for 189 yards and three touchdowns on 19 carries in the Yellow Jackets’ 24-21 home loss to Pisgah in the second round of the 2AA state playoffs. The three scores were significant because it gave Blount 102 over his four-year career. That total includes rushing (84), passing (12), kick returns (3), interception returns (2) and receiving (1). Blount accumulated 5,392 rushing yards and 1,425 passing yards for his career. Blount ended the 2009 season with 2,034 rushing yards and a careerhigh 35 rushing touchdowns.

See FH / Page 3B

Porter Ridge dominates at Parkwood dual tournament By Eric Rape

E-J Correspondent

Roughedge Porter Ridge High took home first place in the Parkwood Dual Team Tournament Saturday, finishing 5-0 for the day. The Pirates won their first two matches by the best score possible, 84-0. The Pirates then took care Monroe, 60-18, and essentially won the championship by defeating Parkwood, 54-30.

Porter Ridge also finished with the most wrestlers with 5-0 records for the day, with Kyle Whiting (103 pounds), Frankie Best (112), Andrew Baatz (119), Chris Lingle (125), Brandon Griffin (135), Josh Green (145) and freshman Jacob Bryant (171) accomplishing the feat. Best has returned after a back injury that forced him to contemplate an early retirement from the sport. The Pirates returned just four

starters from their state playoff team from a year ago. Parkwood came away with a strong showing on the day, going 4-1 team-wise, including wins over Monroe (42-31) and Queens Grant (54-24). The Rebels had three wrestlers finish 5-0: seniors James Carroll (130), Tyler Couick (140), and Kevin Mullis (heavyweight). Saturday’s success should provide a confidence boost for

Parkwood, which finished last in the South Piedmont Conference last season. Monroe placed third, going 3-2 on the day. Senior Miles Cook was in the Redhawks’ lineup less than 12 hours after his football season ended, and was one of four wrestlers for Monroe to go 5-0 on the day. Cook had one of the best matches of the day with Parkwood’s Austin Craig. Cook took

home the victory over Craig by a score of 14-8. Stephen Dysard (152), James Swann (135/140), and Kevin Phinney (160) also finished 5-0 for Monroe. Porter Ridge will be back on the mat with most of these teams next weekend when Monroe hosts its annual Thanksgiving tournament. Parkwood and Monroe face off again Monday at 7 p.m. in Roughedge.


2B / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

McMurray pleased to reunite with Ganassi HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — ride because Roush must drop Jamie McMurray feels right one team to meet NASCAR’s at home at Earnhardt Ganassi four-car limit that begins next season. Racing. “You just always think that He should. He’s been there it is going to be better if you do before. McMurray’s ride for Roush something different and it isn’t Fenway Racing on Sunday will always,” McMurray said. McMurray and Matt Kenseth be his last after four years with are the only Roush the team. He signed Fenway drivers to win this week with EGR, a race this year. Greg where he was reunitBiffle, Carl Edwards ed with Chip Ganassi, and David Ragan are the owner who gave looking for their first the driver his first victories of 2009, and Cup ride in 2002. none of the five drivers McMurray exqualified for the Chase pressed no regret for the championship. about signing with “When things are owner Jack Roush McMURRAY going well, things are after the 2005 season. really good. You have But he sometimes felt lost in the shuffle as part of the a lot of data, a lot of drivers to organization’s five-car lineup, learn from,” McMurray said. something he won’t have to “The down side to that is when worry about next season at things aren’t going well, it’s a big ship and it takes a long EGR. “I remember telling him time to get it turned around.” McMurray has three career that day he was making the right decision, when he left Cup wins, including his vicus,” Ganassi said. “Those were tory at Talladega earlier this the days when it looked like he month. He set a NASCAR reneeded a big, four-car teams. I cord by winning in his second hope our team has shown this Cup race while driving for Gayear maybe you don’t need to nassi in 2002. He enjoyed his best success have all that to do well.” McMurray was hired to with Ganassi, finishing 13th drive the No. 1 Chevrolet, a spot (2003), 11th (2004) and 12th left open when Martin Truex (2005) in his final three seaJr. defected to Michael Waltrip sons with the team. McMurRacing. The hiring has long ray would have qualified for been in the works, and gives the Chase for the championone of the last remaining open ship in 2004 and 2005 under the current format. He never seats for 2010 to McMurray. McMurray drove 114 races finished better than 16th with for Ganassi, but left after the RFR — he’s 22nd this year en2005 season to join Roush Fen- tering the finale at Homesteadway Racing. He is losing that Miami Speedway.

fans have made him the most popular driver this week. It might be too much attention. Montoya, sixth in the points standings, has been crushed by ticket requests for the finale at HomesteadMiami Speedway. “It’s actually a nightmare. It is,” he said. “It’s so many people. Everybody wants tickets. Everybody wants this, everybody needs this. EveryHAMLIN SURGERY: body is your best friend.” Montoya had plenty of Denny Hamlin will have arthroscopic surgery on his friends Thursday night when right knee Wednesday. He will more than 700 people attended his fundraising need about two weeks gala in south Florida. of recovery. He’s proud of the in“When I get out of creased awareness the car, it really is stiff he’s helped bring to and the joints really NASCAR, but emphahurt a bunch,” Hamlin sized that’s secondsaid. “It’s something ary compared to his that needs to be done racing. for the long run.” “I’m not racing Hamlin has three NASCAR to create wins, qualified for the HAMLIN Hispanic awareness Chase and is in eighth about it, you know,” he said. place this season. “I race NASCAR because MAN OF THE MOMENT: I want to kick everybody’s Juan Pablo Montoya’s best butt.” The former Formula One season in NASCAR has made him a bigger hit with the His- standout — he also has an Indianapolis 500 win and CART panic community. “I think it’s great to see the championship on his resume Latin community paying at- — has done more of that this tention to what we’re doing,” year than his first two full seasons in Cup racing. he said. “I want to win races and evNASCAR’s only Colombian star has expanded the erything, but the way we ran sport’s popularity outside over the past few years against of the United States. He an- this year, it’s been incredible,” swers questions from the he said. “We got to be able to Hispanic media in Spanish, match the performance. I fans wave Colombian flags in think that’s the key thing for the stands, and south Florida the team for the future.” His only teammate in 2010 will be Chase driver Juan Pablo Montoya. Their friendship hit an icy patch earlier this year when Montoya wrecked McMurray in Bristol. McMurray said he’s moved on from the incident now that they’re both driving under the EGR banner. Kevin Manion will be McMurray’s crew chief.

Local Events Monday High School Basketball Metrolina Christian at Central Academy, 6:30 p.m. Sun Valley at Cuthbertson, 6:30 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today AUTO RACING 3:15 p.m. ABC — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford 400, at Homestead, Fla. GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — LPGA Tour Championship, final round, at Houston MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Carolina Classic, championship game, teams TBA, at Charleston, S.C. 8 p.m. ESPN2 — O’Reilly Auto Parts Puerto Rico Tip-off, championship game, teams TBA, at San Juan, Puerto Rico NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader FOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:15 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game 8:15 p.m. NBC — Philadelphia at Chicago RODEO 9 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, Challenger Tour Championship, final round, at Atlanta (same-day tape) SOCCER 3 p.m. ESPN2 — FIFA, Beach World Cup, championship match, teams TBA, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates (same-day tape) 8:30 p.m. ESPN — MLS Cup, Los Angeles vs. Real Salt Lake at Seattle WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. FSN — Baylor at California

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

AFC

NFC

Div

New England

6

3

0

.667

259

150

4-3-0

2-0-0

2-1-0

Miami

5

5

0

.500

242

244

3-3-0

2-2-0

3-1-0

N.Y. Jets

4

5

0

.444

199

158

4-4-0

0-1-0

1-3-0

Buffalo

3

6

0

.333

140

210

1-5-0

2-1-0

1-2-0

South

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

AFC

NFC

Div

Indianapolis

9

0

0

1.000

252

142

5-0-0

4-0-0

3-0-0

Jacksonville

5

4

0

.556

181

220

4-2-0

1-2-0

2-2-0

Houston

5

4

0

.556

215

188

4-3-0

1-1-0

1-2-0

Tennessee

3

6

0

.333

189

255

2-6-0

1-0-0

1-3-0

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

AFC

NFC

Div

Cincinnati

7

2

0

.778

198

147

5-2-0

2-0-0

5-0-0

Pittsburgh

6

3

0

.667

207

157

4-2-0

2-1-0

1-2-0

Baltimore

5

4

0

.556

222

154

5-3-0

0-1-0

2-2-0

Cleveland

1

8

0

.111

78

225

1-5-0

0-3-0

0-4-0

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

AFC

NFC

Div

Denver

6

3

0

.667

167

151

5-2-0

1-1-0

2-0-0

San Diego

6

3

0

.667

237

202

4-3-0

2-0-0

3-1-0

Kansas City

2

7

0

.222

142

215

1-4-0

1-3-0

1-2-0

Oakland

2

7

0

.222

88

217

1-6-0

1-1-0

1-4-0

North

West

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

NFC

AFC

Div

Dallas

6

3

0

.667

224

169

5-2-0

1-1-0

1-1-0

Philadelphia

5

4

0

.556

242

184

4-2-0

1-2-0

2-1-0

N.Y. Giants

5

4

0

.556

232

204

3-3-0

2-1-0

2-1-0

Washington

3

6

0

.333

140

171

2-5-0

1-1-0

0-2-0

South

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

NFC

AFC

Div

New Orleans

9

0

0

1.000

331

197

6-0-0

3-0-0

2-0-0

Atlanta

5

4

0

.556

221

194

4-3-0

1-1-0

1-2-0

Carolina

4

6

0

.400

193

239

4-4-0

0-2-0

2-2-0

Tampa Bay

1

8

0

.111

157

256

1-5-0

0-3-0

0-1-0

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

NFC

AFC

Div

Minnesota

8

1

0

.889

271

184

6-0-0

2-1-0

4-0-0

Green Bay

5

4

0

.556

232

179

4-3-0

1-1-0

2-2-0

Chicago

4

5

0

.444

186

2010

2-4-0

2-1-0

1-1-0

Detroit

1

8

0

.111

143

264

1-7-0

0-1-0

0-4-0

North

West

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

NFC

AFC

Div

Arizona

6

3

0

.667

229

184

4-2-0

2-1-0

2-1-0

San Francisco

4

5

0

.444

184

180

4-2-0

0-3-0

3-0-0

Seattle

3

6

0

.333

187

198

2-5-0

1-1-0

1-3-0

St. Louis

1

8

0

.111

100

249

1-6-0

0-2-0

0-2-0

Thursday’s Game Miami 24, Carolina 17 Today’s Games Cleveland at Detroit, 1 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Oakland, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Tennessee at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 26 Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Denver, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 29 Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at Tennessee, 4:15 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30 New England at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m

College football Saturday’s boxscores #1 Florida 62, FIU 3 Fla. Inter. Florida

0 3 0 0— 3 14 21 14 13— 62

First Quarter Fla—Spikes 41 interception return (Sturgis kick), 13:10. Fla—Tebow 55 run (Sturgis kick), 9:18. Second Quarter Fla—Rainey 27 pass from Tebow (Sturgis kick), 13:39. Fla—Rainey 22 run (Sturgis kick), 9:41. Fla—Demps 3 run (Sturgis kick), 1:38. FlIn—FG Rivest 37, :29. Third Quarter Fla—Cooper 18 pass from Tebow (Sturgis kick), 13:38. Fla—Hines 20 pass from Brantley (Sturgis kick), 4:06. Fourth Quarter Fla—Williams 16 pass from Brantley (Sturgis kick), 11:10. Fla—Hammond 31 pass from Brantley (kick blocked), 2:28. A—90,473.

First downs

FlIn 11

Fla 30

Rushes-yards 30-53 Passing 136 Comp-Att-Int 10-26-1 Return Yards 0 Punts-Avg. 5-40.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-49 Time of Possession 27:00

36-223 361 26-38-0 66 0-0.0 0-0 8-81 33:00

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Fla. International, Berry 13-26, W.Younger 2-16, Owens 8-15, Turner 3-12, McCall 3-(minus 5), Rivest 1-(minus 11). Florida, Tebow 7-102, Demps 9-46, Rainey 4-30, Scott 9-26, Brantley 3-23, V.Brown 1-(minus 1), Blaylock 3-(minus 3). PASSING—Fla. International, McCall 9-21-1-134, W.Younger 1-5-0-2. Florida, Tebow 17-25-0-215, Brantley 9-13-0-146. RECEIVING—Fla. International, Hilton 4-75, J.Younger 2-13, Anderson 1-18, Owens 1-18, Times 1-10, Turner 1-2. Florida, Thompson 5-66, Hines 4-50, James 4-15, Rainey 3-61, Cooper 3-48, Nelson 3-45, Hammond 2-38, Holliday 1-22, Williams 1-16.

#9 Ohio St. 21, Michigan 10 Ohio St. Michigan

7 0

7 3

7 0— 21 7 0— 10

First Quarter OSU—Heyward recovered fumble in end zone (Barclay kick), 10:44. Second Quarter Mich—FG Olesnavage 46, 7:59. OSU—Saine 29 run (Barclay kick), 5:22. Third Quarter Mich—V.Smith 18 pass from Forcier (Olesnavage kick), 10:05. OSU—Herron 12 pass from Pryor (Barclay kick), 4:46. A—110,922.

OSU First downs 18 Rushes-yards 53-251 Passing 67 Comp-Att-Int 9-17-1 Return Yards 33 Punts-Avg. 9-38.6 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-40 Time of Possession 32:56

Mich 16 31-80 229 25-42-4 12 6-43.0 3-1 3-25 27:04

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Ohio St., Herron 19-96, Saine 12-84, Pryor 19-74, Team 3-(minus 3). Michigan, V.Smith 8-32, D.Robinson 10-31, Forcier 6-10, Shaw 7-7. PASSING—Ohio St., Pryor 9-17-1-67. Michigan, Forcier 23-38-4-226, D. Robinson 2-4-0-3. RECEIVING—Ohio St., Posey 5-38, Herron 2-17, Sanzenbacher 1-11, Saine 1-1. Michigan, Roundtree 9-116, Mathews 6-67, V.Smith 3-28, Kev. Grady 2-7, Stonum 1-10, Webb 1-6, Hemingway 1-5, C.Brown 1-(minus 4), Shaw 1-(minus 6).

#21 Miami 34, Duke 16 Duke Miami

3 3

10 7

3 0— 16 3 21— 34

First Quarter Duke—FG Snyderwine 30, 5:50. Mia—FG Bosher 33, 1:25. Second Quarter Duke—FG Snyderwine 49, 14:50. Mia—T.Johnson 5 pass from J.Harris (Bosher kick), 4:50. Duke—Varner 24 pass from Lewis (Snyderwine kick), 2:17. Third Quarter Duke—FG Snyderwine 26, 11:05. Mia—FG Bosher 20, 6:15. Fourth Quarter Mia—Berry 2 run (Bosher kick), 13:41. Mia—Hankerson 44 pass from J. Harris (Bosher kick), 7:37. Mia—Sharpton 73 interception return (Bosher kick), 6:06. A—38,200.

Duke First downs 18 Rushes-yards 22-55 Passing 303 Comp-Att-Int 20-37-1 Return Yards 10 Punts-Avg. 4-42.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 Penalties-Yards 1-0 Time of Possession 21:34

Mia 25 44-148 348 25-43-1 80 3-40.7 1-1 5-49 38:26

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Duke, Hollingsworth 10-32, D.Scott 10-27, Lewis 2-(minus 4). Miami, Berry 16-76, Cooper 14-42, J.James 9-33, Benjamin 1-9, Team 1-(minus 1), J.Harris 3-(minus 11). PASSING—Duke, Lewis 20-37-1-303. Miami, J.Harris 25-43-1-348. RECEIVING—Duke, Varner 8-165, Kelly 4-31, Vernon 3-52, Hollingsworth 2-24, B.King 1-16, Parker 1-9, D.Scott 1-6. Miami,

Hankerson 8-143, Graham 5-73, Benjamin 3-43, J.James 2-19, Epps 2-17, T.Johnson 2-14, A.Johnson 1-20, Byrd 1-17, Cooper 1-2.

FSU 29, Maryland 26 Maryland Florida St.

0 7

13 7

0 13— 26 0 15— 29

First Quarter FSU—Thomas 3 run (Hopkins kick), 4:39. Second Quarter Md—FG Ferrara 44, 9:26. FSU—Pryor 50 run (Hopkins kick), 8:35. Md—FG Ferrara 39, 4:28. Md—Meggett 1 run (Ferrara kick), :06. Fourth Quarter Md—Cannon 20 pass from Robinson (pass failed), 12:40. FSU—Reed 42 run (Easterling pass from Manuel), 10:30. Md—Meggett 9 run (Ferrara kick), 4:29. FSU—Pryor 3 run (Hopkins kick), :32. A—66,042.

Md First downs 20 Rushes-yards 46-196 Passing 214 Comp-Att-Int 20-27-0 Return Yards 119 Punts-Avg. 4-43.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-30 Time of Possession 37:05

FSU 18 24-198 206 17-27-3 88 3-47.7 2-0 0-0 22:55

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Maryland, Scott 19-83, Meggett 13-59, Robinson 12-58, Smith 2-(minus 4). Florida St., Pryor 2-57, Manuel 6-49, Thomas 11-44, Reed 3-42, Pressley 1-4, T.Jones 1-2. PASSING—Maryland, Robinson 20-27-0-214. Florida St., Manuel 17-27-3-206. RECEIVING—Maryland, Smith 7-74, Cannon 4-72, Williams 2-29, Scott 2-21, Tyler 2-8, D.Campbell 2-(minus 4), L.Watson 1-14. Florida St., Fortson 5-71, Owens 5-52, Easterling 2-36, Reed 2-18, Pryor 1-12, Thomas 1-12, Reliford 1-5.

UNC 31, B. College 13 N. Carolina 21 0 B. College 3 10

0 10— 31 0 0— 13

First Quarter NC—Houston 1 run (Barth kick), 7:33. NC—Thomas 20 fumble return (Barth kick), 6:00. NC—Burney 30 interception return (Barth kick), 5:14. BC—FG Aponavicius 28, :29. Second Quarter BC—FG Aponavicius 20, 12:28. BC—Gunnell 2 pass from Shinskie (Aponavicius kick), 1:13. Fourth Quarter NC—Houston 1 run (Barth kick), 4:39. NC—FG Barth 29, 1:35. A—0.

NC First downs 18 Rushes-yards 38-96 Passing 182 Comp-Att-Int 23-34-3 Return Yards 181 Punts-Avg. 7-33.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 Penalties-Yards 4-37 Time of Possession 33:52

BC 12 30-97 101 12-30-5 22 7-46.3 2-1 3-20 26:08

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—North Carolina, Houston 18-45, Elzy 8-25, Little 4-15, J.White 6-8, Yates 1-3, Boyd 1-0. Boston College, Harris 23-132, Smith 2-9, Shinskie 5-(minus 44). PASSING—North Carolina, Yates 23-34-3-182. Boston College, Shinskie 12-28-4-101, Marscovetra 0-2-1-0. RECEIVING—North Carolina, Little 7-69, Highsmith 6-38, Pianalto 5-35, J.White 2-2, Rome 1-22, Elzy 1-14, Boyd 1-2. Boston College, Gunnell 6-60, Pantale 3-24, Harris 2-9, Jarvis 1-8.

Tex. Tech 41, Oklahoma 13 Oklahoma Texas Tech

3 3

3 0 7— 13 14 10 14— 41

First Quarter TT—FG Mat.Williams 33, 10:57. Okl—FG O’Hara 47, 1:24. Second Quarter Okl—FG O’Hara 22, 10:42. TT—Batch 1 run (Mat.Williams kick), 8:48. TT—Zouzalik 21 pass from Potts (Mat. Williams kick), 4:58. Third Quarter TT—Torres 24 pass from Potts (Mat. Williams kick), 10:38. TT—FG Mat.Williams 37, 8:01.

Fourth Quarter TT—Batch 21 run (Mat.Williams kick), 13:43. Okl—Broyles 51 pass from L.Jones (O’Hara kick), 7:30. TT—Stephens 4 run (Mat.Williams kick), :47. A—50,479.

Okl First downs 16 Rushes-yards 26-48 Passing 262 Comp-Att-Int 18-36-2 Return Yards 9 Punts-Avg. 6-42.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-66 Time of Possession 22:59

TT 32 35-161 388 35-53-1 17 4-46.0 1-0 11-98 37:01

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Oklahoma, C.Brown 11-37, Calhoun 2-21, Murray 7-14, Broyles 1-5, Team 1-(minus 1), L. Jones 4-(minus 28). Texas Tech, Batch 25-136, Stephens 8-46, Potts 2-(minus 21). PASSING—Oklahoma, L.Jones 18-35-1-262, Broyles 0-1-1-0. Texas Tech, Potts 35-53-1-388. RECEIVING—Oklahoma, Broyles 7-117, Murray 4-14, D.Miller 3-58, Tennell 2-14, J.Reynolds 1-57, C. Brown 1-2. Texas Tech, Torres 11-163, Batch 7-68, Swindall 5-40, Zouzalik 4-40, Leong 2-25, Brinker 2-24, Lewis 2-19, Britton 2-9.

Auto racing NASCAR-Sprint Cup-Ford 400 Lineup

After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Homestead-Miami Speedway Homestead, Fla. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 173.919. 2. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 172.695. 3. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 172.678. 4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 172.353. 5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 172.243. 6. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 172.144. 7. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 172.035. 8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 172.024. 9. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 171.86. 10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 171.838. 11. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 171.838. 12. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 171.794. 13. (44) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 171.75. 14. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 171.647. 15. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 171.63. 16. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 171.576. 17. (02) David Gilliland, Toyota, 171.461. 18. (36) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 171.434. 19. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 171.396. 20. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 171.336. 21. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 171.331. 22. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 171.276. 23. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 171.162. 24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 170.994. 25. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 170.967. 26. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 170.967. 27. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 170.816. 28. (37) Travis Kvapil, Chevrolet, 170.805. 29. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 170.794. 30. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 170.648. 31. (96) Erik Darnell, Ford, 170.53. 32. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 170.455. 33. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 170.412. 34. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 170.379. 35. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 170.272. 36. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 170.266. 37. (7) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 169.881. 38. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 169.715. 39. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 169.353. 40. (34) John Andretti, Chevrolet, 169.274. 41. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 169.072. 42. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, Owner Points. 43. (08) Terry Labonte, Toyota, Past Champion.

Pro basketball NBA Standings All Times EST

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 9 4 .692 — Toronto 6 7 .462 3 Philadelphia 5 7 .417 3 1/2 New York 2 9 .182 6 New Jersey 0 12 .000 8 1/2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 11 2 .846 — Orlando 10 3 .769 1 Miami 7 5 .583 3 1/2 Washington 3 8 .273 7 Charlotte 3 9 .250 7 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 7 3 .700 1/2 Cleveland 9 4 .692 — Chicago 6 5 .545 2 Indiana 5 5 .500 2 1/2 Detroit 5 7 .417 3 1/2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Dallas 10 3 .769 — Houston 7 6 .538 3 San Antonio 4 6 .400 4 1/2 New Orleans 5 8 .385 5 Memphis 4 8 .333 5 1/2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Denver 8 4 .667 — Portland 9 5 .643 — Oklahoma City 7 6 .538 1 1/2 Utah 6 6 .500 2 Minnesota 1 11 .083 7 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Phoenix 10 3 .769 — L.A. Lakers 9 3 .750 1/2 Sacramento 5 6 .455 4 L.A. Clippers 5 9 .357 5 1/2 Golden State 4 8 .333 5 1/2 Friday’s Games Toronto 120, Miami 113 Cleveland 105, Indiana 95 Memphis 102, Philadelphia 97 Atlanta 105, Houston 103 Orlando 83, Boston 78 Milwaukee 95, Charlotte 88 Dallas 104, Sacramento 102 L.A. Clippers 106, Denver 99 Golden State 108, Portland 94 Saturday’s Games New York at New Jersey, late Philadelphia at Cleveland, late Milwaukee at Memphis, late Atlanta at New Orleans, late Sacramento at Houston, late Washington at San Antonio, late Chicago at Denver, late Detroit at Utah, late Minnesota at Portland, late Today’s Games Orlando at Toronto, 12:30 p.m. Boston at New York, 1 p.m. Indiana at Charlotte, 5 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 6 p.m. Detroit at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Prep wrestling Parkwood Duals

(Team results)

Parkwood 72, Union Academy 0 Porter Ridge 84, Challengers 0 Porter Ridge 84, Union Academy 0 Monroe 48, Queen’s Grant 24 Parkwood 42, Monroe 31 Challengers 36, Union Academy 24 Porter Ridge 60, Monroe 18 Porter Ridge 54, Parkwood 30 Parkwood 72, Challengers 12 Porter Ridge 78, Queen’s Grant 6 Monroe 60, Union Academy 9 Parkwood 54, Queen’s Grant 24 Queen’s Grant 45, Union Academy 18

Transactions Saturday’s Sports Transactions HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS— Announced C Andrew Ebbett has been claimed from waivers by Minnesota. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled D Mike Lundin and D Matt Smaby from Norfolk (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Assigned F Matt Pettinger to Manitoba (AHL).


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 3B

Defense leads Tar Heels to 31-13 victory BOSTON (AP) — Deunta Williams grabbed his third interception of the game and headed for the end zone, weaving 39 yards through the Boston College offense to the 6 inch-line. North Carolina already had two defensive touchdowns in the game, and Williams wanted to celebrate his 21st birthday with a third. “It was crazy at first. It was like a dream out there,� Williams said after the Tar Heels forced six turnovers to beat Boston College 31-13. “When we were up 21-0, everybody on defense was trying to get greedy; everybody was trying to get a turnover. We were just all out there trying to get turnovers and make plays.� Boston College had an outside shot at winning the ACC Atlan-

tic Division title, but that disappeared with a flurry of first-quarter turnovers by quarterback Dave Shinskie that helped spot the Tar Heels (8-3, 4-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) to a 21-0 lead. E.J. Wilson hit Shinskie to force a fumble, and lineman Cam Thomas picked it up and ran 20 yards for a touchdown. Two plays later, Shinskie threw an interception that Burney returned for 30 yards as Carolina scored three times in a span of 2 minutes, 19 seconds to open a 21-point lead. The Tar Heels (7-4, 4-3) held on to win their fourth consecutive game after opening the conference season 0-3.

“We’re peaking right now,� Wilson said. “And it’s the right time to peak.� Shinskie had four interceptions in all; he also fumbled twice more when BC recovered, and another interception was negated by a pass interference call. Mike Marscovetra relieved him late in the fourth quarter and his first pass was picked off by Melvin Williams. T.J. Yates threw three interceptions of his own, including one in the end zone when Roderick Rollins, who had been called for a late hit that moved the Tar Heels in position to score, outjumped the receiver and kept BC in the game.

Three plays later, Deunta Williams grabbed his third interception of the game and was stopped just short of the goal line. Ryan Houston ran it in from there for his second touchdown of the game to make it 28-13. Montel Harris ran 23 times for 132 yards for BC, becoming the 16th back in school history to reach the 2,000 yard plateau. Rich Gunnell caught six passes for 60 yards and the Eagles’ only touchdown and left-footed walk-on Steve Aponavicius, playing his last home game in the stadium where he was discovered, made two field goals to remain perfect for the season. The Eagles would have needed to win their last two games and hope Clemson lost to Virginia, which is in last place in the ACC

Coastal. But with bowl scouts in the press box and Boston College looking for just its second perfect home season since 1985, the Eagles couldn’t hold onto the ball. “It would be a shame if Virginia beats Clemson today. But it’s something that’s out of our hands now,� BC linebacker Mike McLaughlin said. “But if we could get eight wins, that’s a heck of a season. We could go to a nice bowl game.� Houston ran for 1 yard to make it 7-0, and the Eagles ran just two plays before Shinskie fumbled when was hit from behind by E.J. Wilson. Thomas, a defensive tackle, picked the bouncing ball up and rumbled the last 20 yards, fighting off Harris near the goal line and scoring his first career touchdown to make it 14-0.

Miami rallies past Duke

FH Continued from Page 1B He went over 200 yards three times in 2009 and scored a career-best six touchdowns in a win over Central Academy on Oct. 23. Blount also had his best season statistically in the passing game, throwing for 833 yards with seven touchdowns and just three interceptions.

Sigmon shines

Forest Hills junior linebacker Aaron Sigmon matched a season-high with 16 tackles in Friday’s loss, giving him a teambest 152 for the season. Sigmon also had a tackle for loss against Pisgah. Sigmon was a first-team all-Union County selection as a sophomore in 2008, when he led Union County in tackles with 130.

Odds and ends ...

... Sophomore defensive end Marcus Thomas had three tackles for loss and a sack on Friday while Blount, junior defensive end Darius Ellison and sophomore linebacker Darian Tobin all had two stops for loss. Junior linebacker Sherman Faulkner added one tackle for loss. ... Senior tailback Cortland Crowder caught his first pass of the season for a 37-yard gain in the third quarter of Friday’s loss. ... FH’s defense held Pisgah tailback Travis Smalling to a season-low 76 yards on 26 carries. For the season, Smalling has E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham 1,866 yards and 32 touchForest Hills quarterback Juanne Blount was a part of 102 touchdowns during his four-year varsity career. downs.

MIAMI (AP) — Jacory Harris threw for 348 yards and two touchdowns, Darryl Sharpton capped his final home game with a 73-yard interception return for a score, and No. 21 Miami staved off a Duke challenge for the fourth straight year in a 34-16 win Saturday. Damien Berry’s 2-yard touchdown run early in the fourth quarter opened the floodgates for Miami (8-3, 5-3 Atlantic Coast Conference). Leonard Hankerson had career bests of eight catches and 143 yards — including a 44-yard score — for the Hurricanes, who scored the final 24 points to keep hope alive for their first 10-win season since 2003. Thaddeus Lewis finished 20 of 37 for 303 yards for Duke (5-6, 3-4), taking over the school’s all-time lead in passing yardage with 9,678. Donovan Varner caught eight passes for a career-high 165 yards and a touchdown for the Blue Devils, who have now lost 55 straight away from home against ranked opponents, dating to October 1971. Duke took a 16-10 lead on Will Snyderwine’s third field goal of the game, a 26-yarder early in the third quarter. After that, it was all Miami. Duke was eliminated from bowl contention. The Blue Devils were seeking their first postseason appearance since 1994.

Forcier’s 5 turnovers help OSU beat Michigan ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Terrelle Pryor is thankful he chose to play at Ohio State, instead of for Rich Rodriguez and the Michigan Wolverines. Pryor threw a touchdown for the final score in the third quarter and avoided making many mistakes to help the ninthranked Buckeyes beat Michigan 21-10 Saturday for its sixth straight win in the series and an outright Big Ten title. “I’m glad I’m on this side,� Pryor said. Ohio State (10-2, 7-1) has won five straight conference championships and will play in the Rose Bowl with a fivegame winning streak. “When you’re undefeated in November, good things are going to happen over the holidays,� coach Jim Tressel said. Michigan wouldn’t know.

The Wolverines lost their last five games and beat only Delaware State after September to finish 5-7. College football’s winningest program has endured consecutive losing years for the first time since the 1962-63 seasons. Freshman Tate Forcier threw four interceptions and fumbled in his end zone, spoiling Michigan’s chances of an upset it needed to become bowl-eligible. “I lost that game,� Forcier wrote in a text message to The Associated Press about an hour after the game. “This offseason, I’m gonna make sure myself and every single person on this team works the hardest we have ever worked. “We’re gonna come back a a new team. I’m not going to let this happen again.� Michigan’s flop followed a school-re-

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cord nine-loss year in Rodriguez’s debut in Ann Arbor. “I’m tired of being humbled,� Rodriguez said. He said earlier in the week the Wolverines would not be “doomed� if they were shut out of the bowl picture. But he desperately needed the feel-good victory to take some heat off him — especially with an NCAA investigation looming over his program. Does Rodriguez fear losing his job? “No,� he said. Tressel, meanwhile, can probably coach the Buckeyes as long as he wants with the success he’s had overall and especially against their rival. He improved to 8-1 against Michigan and extended Ohio State’s longest winning streak that

matches the best run in the rivalry since Michigan also won six in a row in the 1920s. Forcier fumbled on his first drive and Cameron Heyward recovered to give Ohio State a 7-0 lead. He threw three interceptions in the fourth quarter. “Turnovers and rushing game are always going to be the key to this game,� Tressel said. Ohio State turned the ball over only once, on Pryor’s deflected pass, and outrushed Michigan 251-80. Dan Herron had 96 yards rushing, Brandon Saine ran for 84 yards and scored on a 29-yard run on a play in which his team was misaligned, and Pryor finished with 74 yards on the ground. “They couldn’t stop the run,� Pryor said.

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4B / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

No. 18 Tigers wrap up ACC division title CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) — C.J. Spiller scored a touchdown Saturday in his final game at Death Valley and No. 18 Clemson beat Virginia 34-21 on the day the Tigers wrapped up their first trip to the Atlantic Coast Conference title game. The Tigers (8-3, 6-2 ACC) won their sixth straight game, but had the Atlantic Division wrapped up as they kicked off thanks to North Carolina’s 31-13 victory against Boston College. Clemson will face Coastal division winner Georgia Tech in two weeks at Tampa, Fla. Spiller had a 4-yard touchdown run and set the ACC’s single-season all-purpose yard-

age mark, surpassing the 2,059 of Virginia’s Thomas Jones in 1999. Virginia (3-8, 2-5) kept things close in the first half, its 21 points more than it had put up in any of its previous five games. However, the Cavaliers were shut out the final 30 minutes and lost their fifth straight. It’s Clemson first visit to the title game after years of near misses. In 2006, Clemson lost four of its last five after starting 7-1 to fall from contention. A year after that, the Tigers were beaten by Boston College 20-17 in a division showdown.

This time, Spiller got to hold his hand up in triumph as he jogged off the field to the adoring calls of 77,000 at Death Valley. Fans spilled onto the field as the game ended and the crowd sang “Happy Birthday” to coach Dabo Swinney, who turned 40 on Friday. Swinney had banned the Boston College game from the team’s locker room area and told managers to keep news of the contest away from the players. It turned out to be quite a profitable day for Swinney. Reach-

ing the ACC title game kicked in a contractual bonus that will raise Swinney’s salary from the league bottom at $800,000 to the median of all ACC coaches — around $1.8 million annually. Spiller had been on a Heisman-type tear in Clemson’s win streak, posting record-setting performances of 310 and 312 allpurpose yards in victories over Miami and Florida State. But Virginia had Spiller’s number — again. After allowing him just 18 yards rushing a season ago, the Cavaliers never let Spiller break free for one of his highlight reel romps. He finished with 58 yards rushing and 114 all-purpose.

Still, it was a day of memories for a player who’ll one day will likely have his name enshrined in Death Valley’s Ring of Honor. Spiller was the last of Clemson’s seniors to take the solo run down the Death Valley’s famed hill in their last home games. Spiller kissed Howard’s Rock and skipped down holding a U.S. flag in honor of Military Appreciation Day as the large, orange-clad crowd roared in celebration. The game that followed was supposed to be just as raucous for the Tigers, whose secondranked ACC defense was expected to easily put away the league’s worst offense.

Cavs at home Monday Va. Tech Late TD run dominates lifts FSU, 29-26 TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Freshman Lonnie Pryor ran for a pair of touchdowns, including a 3-yard run with 32 seconds left, and Florida State beat Maryland 29-26 on Saturday to become bowl eligible for the 28th straight year. Pryor’s winning score was set up by a 48-yard punt return by freshman Greg Reid that gave the Seminoles the ball at the Maryland 44 with 1:35 left. Pryor also scored on a 50-yard run in the second quarter to give Florida State a 14-3 lead. The Seminoles (6-5, 4-4 ACC) handed Maryland (2-9, 1-6) its sixth straight loss. Maryland’s Davin Meggett scored his second touchdown on a 9-yard run with 4:29 remaining that gave the Terrapins a 26-22 lead. Maryland’s defense intercepted Florida State freshman EJ Manuel three times, the last one by Cameron Chism with 2:57 left that seemed to shut the door on the Seminoles. But the Terrapins were unable to run out the clock and Reid, the ACC’s leading punt returner, gave the Seminoles some momentum with his return to set up the winning drive. Reid returned three punts for 88 yards and now has 350 yards on 19 returns going into next week’s game at top-ranked Florida. Manuel, who was making his first start at home, completed 17-of-27 passes for 206 yards. He ran for 49, including gains of 15 and 20 yards on the final drive. Maryland took its first lead at 19-14 on a 20-yard touchdown pass from Jamarr Robinson to Adrian Cannon early in the fourth quarter, but Florida State regained the lead when Bert Reed scored on a 42-yard end around.

N.C. State

Photo by Jamie Belk

Logan Rase, right, and Cuthbertson High won their first-ever boys basketball game on Friday, defeating Union Academy 70-32. The Cavaliers face a tougher test on Monday when they host Sun Valley.

Tebow, Gators rout Florida International GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Top-ranked Florida moved another step closer to perfection with a 62-3 rout of Florida International. Tim Tebow accounted for three touchdowns and Brandon Spikes returned an interception for a score to extend the nation’s longest winning streak to 21 games Saturday. Florida improved to 11-0 for just the second time in school history and needs two more wins — against Florida State

and Alabama — to earn a shot at repeating as national champion. After surviving some struggles during Southeastern Conference play, the Gators probably needed an easy week. The Golden Panthers (3-8) played the part to perfection. Florida scored touchdowns on eight of 10 offensive possessions. The only scoreless drives came when Caleb Sturgis missed a 52-yard field goal attempt in the first quarter

and when Florida ran out the clock in the final seconds. Spikes started the onslaught when he intercepted Paul McCall’s pass and returned it 41 yards for a touchdown, his fourth INT return for a score in the last two years. It came one play after Florida was called for a roughing-thekicker penalty against Carlos Munera, who injured his left ankle. The defense didn’t let up, sacking McCall twice and

holding the Golden Panthers to 189 yards and 11 first downs. Tebow, hoping to solidify a spot as a Heisman Trophy finalist, had one of his best games of the season. It came against a defense that had allowed nearly 500 yards a game. Tebow completed 17 of 25 passes for 215 yards and two touchdowns and ran seven times for 102 yards and a score.

No. 9 Duke hits 18 triples in big win DURHAM (AP) — Freshman Andre Dawkins scored a season-high 20 points and No. 9 Duke matched a school record with 18 3-pointers in a 104-67 romp against Radford on Saturday. Nolan Smith added 20 points and Jon Scheyer had 18 for the Blue Devils (4-0). They overwhelmed Radford during a first half in which they shot 50 percent, matched the school record with 13 3s in a half and put this one away with a huge run. After that, the only question was whether they’d launch enough 3s to reach the school record set in 2000 and matched against Monmouth in the first round of the 2001 NCAA tournament. They finished 18 for 32 from long range and shot 48.6 percent overall. Artsiom Parakhouski had 23 points and 14 rebounds in his third straight 20-point game for the Highlanders (2-1). The schedule will get tougher in a hurry for Duke, which heads to Madison Square Garden to face Arizona State — and Herb Sendek, who spent a decade coaching at rival North Carolina State — in the semifinals of the NIT Season Tip-Off. In having its nine-game road winning streak snapped in emphatic fashion, Radford was held to one field goal during a 6 1/2-minute stretch of the first half. At the other end of the floor, it allowed Duke to shoot over

its zone defense. The Blue Devils, who won their first three games by an average of nearly 34 points, cruised to their NCAA-record 72nd straight nonconference win at Cameron Indoor Stadium and earned their 32nd straight home win against an unranked team. But this game probably wasn’t supposed to be quite this easy. Radford returned four starters from last season’s NCAA tournament team — including the 6-foot-11 Parakhouski, the Big South’s preseason player of the year, and 6-8 Joey Lynch-Flohr. Both players scored at least 20 points in both of the Highlanders’ previous games, and they were expected to test Duke’s bulked-up interior that coach Mike Krzyzewski has called his biggest team in three decades at the school. His lineup returns only two guards — Scheyer and Smith — who played significant minutes last season. Instead, with the Highlanders throwing a zone defense at the Blue Devils, they simply went back to their long-range ways. Duke hit seven 3s during its gamebreaking run midway through the first half, with Smith and Scheyer hitting three apiece. Scheyer capped the burst and pushed the lead into the 20s with a 3 from the left wing

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — Ryan Williams ran for 120 yards and four touchdowns and helped make sure No. 16 Virginia Tech would send its 21 seniors out of Lane Stadium with a win one last time as the Hokies beat North Carolina State 38-10 Saturday. The Hokies (8-3, 5-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) also got a careerbest day from wide receiver Jarrett Boykin, who caught six passes for 164 yards and a touchdown, and from linebacker Cody Grimm, who forced two fumbles in his final home game. N.C. State (4-7, 1-6) lost its second straight and for the sixth time in seven games. The Wolfpack allowed at least 30 points for the eighth game in a row, and struggled on offense, turning the ball over four times and allowing five sacks of Russell Wilson. The victory was Virginia Tech’s third in a row, keeping them on pace for a sixth consecutive 10-win season provided they also win at Virginia next Saturday and then in a bowl game. Williams, who carried 32 times, came up with the play of the day in the third quarter. On a secondand-6 from the NC State 19, he went around the left side and was grabbed from behind by safety Earl Wolff at about the 12. Wolff seemed to maintain a hold on Williams’ jersey the rest of the way, but the tailback dragged him all the way into the end zone. On their next possession, the Hokies drove 97 yards in just six plays, with Tyrod Taylor hitting Boykin for 26 yards early in the drive, and then again for 38 yards and the touchdowns. Before the day was over, the Wolfpack replaced Wilson with Mike Glennon, the younger brother of former Hokies quarterback Sean Glennon. On his first snap, Glennon dropped back and was promptly drilled by reserve linebacker Mark Muncey for an 8-yard sack. The Hokies started fast, even winning the coin flip for the first time in 11 games. They elected to kick, and on the first play, Grimm sacked Wilson, forced him to fumble and recovered it at the Wolfpack 34. Seven plays later, Matt Waldron kicked a 26-yard field goal.

D-I signee

that made it 43-22 with about 6 1/2 minutes left. By the time Dawkins made his fourth 3 of the half, stretching the lead to 24 with 1:20 before the break, the Cameron Crazies bowed toward him and chanted his name. Kyle Singler scored 13 points and Miles Plumlee added 12 points and 11 rebounds for Duke, which made 16 of 17 free throws. Phillip Martin scored 12 points and freshman Blake Smith added 11, but Lynch-Flohr had just eight on 3-of-13 shooting for Radford, which fell to 0-17 against ACC teams. #4 Kentucky 92, Rider 63 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Freshman John Wall had 21 points and 11 assists as No. 4 Kentucky dominated Rider 92-63 on Saturday in the Cancun Challenge. Patrick Patterson added 19 points and a career-high 18 rebounds for the Wildcats (4-0). The team hardly looked like the one coach John Calipari called the “worst” defensive team he’s seen in 20 years after wins over Miami (Ohio) and Sam Houston State earlier in the week. Kentucky held Rider (2-2) to 31 percent shooting, blocked 10 shots and forced the Broncs into 20 turnovers. Ryan Thompson led Rider with 16 points, but the Broncs couldn’t find the shooting stroke that helped them win at Mississippi State last week. Rider made just 4-of-17 3-pointers and was never really in it after Wall took over midway through the first half.

Photo courtesy of Metrolina Christian Academy

T.J. Hallice, a 6-foot-8 senior forward at Metrolina Christian Academy, signed a full athletic scholarship for basketball with Gardner-Webb University on Wednesday. Hallice and Metrolina play at Central Academy on Monday. Hallice is the first Division I basketball signee in Metrolina history.


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 5B

CELEBRITY CIPHER

SUDOKU PUZZLE

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION Having qualified as Executor of the Estate of George Joseph Siragusa, SS #XXX-XX-3347, deceased, late of Union County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against said estate to present them, duly verified, to the undersigned care of Giordano, Gordon & Burns, P.L.L.C., 319 S. Sharon Amity Road, Suite 230, Charlotte, N.C. 28211, on or before the 30th day of January, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate settlement with the undersigned. This the 1st day of November, 2009. Joseph S. Siragusa, Executor November 1,8,15,22, 2009

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS CFP NC 65-50108 & CFRG NC19S06550109 MONROE HOUSING AUTHORITY MONROE NORTH CAROLINA Sealed proposals will be received by the MONROE HOUSING AUTHORITY for CAPITAL FUND PROJECT NC 65-50108 AND CAPITAL FUND RECOVERY GRANT PROGRAM NC19S06550109 until 2:00PM, December 15, 2009, and immediately thereafter publicly opened and read for the furnishing of labor, material and equipment entering into these modernization projects. Scope of work will consist of a Single Prime Contract for landscaping, site improvements and miscellaneous apartment renovations. SPECIAL NOTE: WORK AT BRAGG STREET IS HIGH PRIORITY AND NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED FIRST. A PreBid Conference has been scheduled for December 3, 2009 at 1:30PM. Meeting will be held at the Housing Authority Administrative Office 504 Hough Street, Monroe, NC 28112. In accordance with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Public and Indian Housing Notice: PIH 2009-12 (HA), Contractors shall follow the Buy American requirements of Section 1605 of the Recovery Act and use manufactured goods produced in the United States. Complete Plans and Project Manual will be open for inspection in the office of Stogner Architecture, PA 615 East Broad Avenue, Rockingham, North Carolina (Designer); at the Housing Authority Office; or OnLine viewing of the complete Plans and Project Manual will be available from the offices of Associated General Contractors, Carolina Branch www.carolinasagc.org, McGraw HillF. W. Dodge www.mcgrawhill.com, Reed Construction Electronic Data www.reedbusiness.com; Plans Online www.plansonline.com. Complete Plans and Project Manual may be obtained by download from Stogner Architecture, PA by qualified bidders. For instructions on downloading these documents email info@stognerarchitecture.co m Documents may be obtained in printed form from Duncan-Parnell, 900 S. McDowell Street, Charlotte, NC 28204, Phone: 704372-7766, Email: cad1@duncan-parcell.com with production costs being paid by the contractor. Anna McRae Executive Director MONROE HOUSING AUTHORITY Designer: Stogner Architecture PA 615 E. Broad Avenue Rockingham, NC 28379 Phone: 910-895-6874 November 22, 29, 2009 09 SP 504 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by OKSANA V MATSEBURKA aka OKSANA MATSEBURKA AND PETR M MATSE-

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

BURKA, WIFE AND HUSBAND to WILLIAM R. ECHOLS, Trustee(s), which was dated March 7, 2008 and recorded on March 7, 2008 in Book 04830 at Page 0893, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Lisa S. Campbell, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on December 3, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING all of Lot 220 of Hamilton Place, Phase 5 as same is shown on a map thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet I at Files 889893 in the Union County Public Registry. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 3109 Chippendale Road, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Peter M. Matseburka and wife, Oksana V. Matseburka. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COL-

LECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Lisa S. Campbell Substitute Trustee PO Box 4006 Wilmington, NC 28406 PHONE: 910-392-4971 FAX: 910-392-8051 File No.: 09-06748-FC01 November 22, 29, 2009

said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on December 3, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEGINNING at an existing rebar on the eastern margin of Greenbrook Parkway, (a 60 foot right of way), a common corner of Lots 21 and 22 of Providence Woods South subdivision as shown on a plat thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet B, File 199A Union County Registry; thence with the easterly margin of Greenbrook Parkway a curve to the left having a radius of 230.00 feet, an arc distance of 90.13 feet, having a chord bearing N. 30-20-31 W. a distance of 89.56 feet, a corner of the Patricia Ann & Jerry E. Troxell property (now or formerly, 432/699 UCR) and running with the said Troxell line two calls as follows: (1) N. 56-12-52 E 183.71 feet to an existing rebar and (2) N. 69-49-39 E. 224.22 feet to an existing rebar on the line of the R.S. Morris Family Limited Partnership property (828/200 UCR); thence with said Morris line S. 0757-29 W. 155.53 feet to an existing rebar, another corner of Lot 22; thence with the line of Lot 22 S. 70-5251 W. 313.68 feet to the point and place of the BEGINNING and containing 1.02 acre more or less, and being the major portion of Lot 21 and a small portion of Lot 20 of the aforementioned subdivision all according to a survey by C. Robert Moore PLS dated September 26, 2002 Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 2616 Greenbrook Parkway, Weddington, NC 28104. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Sean Surace and wife, Leslie Surace. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to

convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-00166-FC01 November 22, 29, 2009

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION NOTICE OF CO-EXECUTORS Having qualified as Co-executors of the ESTATE OF MYRTLE GREENE MARKS of Union County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against the ESTATE OF MYRTLE GREENE MARKS to present them to the undersigned on or before the 25th day of February, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 19th day of November, 2009. Sylvia A. Marks, Co-executor, 2002 Brookhollow Ct., Indian Trail, NC 28079 Frederick Gerald Marks, Co-executor, 1002 Tarheel Dr., Monroe, NC 28112 James Allen Lee, CALDWELL HELDER HELMS & ROBISON, P.A. P. O. Drawer 99 (314 N. Hayne St., 28112), Monroe, NC 28111-0099 November 22, 29, 2009 December 6, 13, 2009 STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION NOTICE OF EXECUTOR Having qualified as Executor of the ESTATE OF EARLE PIGG of Union County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against the ESTATE OF EARLE PIGG to present them to the undersigned on or before the 8th day of February, 2010, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 2nd day of November, 2009. Teena P. Austin & L. Glenn Austin Co-Executors 367 Foxcroft Drive, Blue Ridge, VA 24064 Carol Pinsak, Process Agent, 431 Three Knotts Rd., Monroe, NC 28112 James Allen Lee, CALDWELL HELDER HELMS & ROBISON, P.A. P. O. Drawer 99 (314 N. Hayne St., 28112), Monroe, NC 28111-0099 Nov. 8, 15, 22, 29, 2009 09 SP 67 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by SEAN SURACE AND LESLIE SURACE, HUSBAND AND WIFE to WALTER GARY PALMER, Trustee(s), which was dated October 18, 2002 and recorded on October 28, 2002 in Book 1956 at Page 255, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK FILE # 9E0622 ADMINISTRATOR EXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J. R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of Jeff Powell Dixon, deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 1st day of February 2010, or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 29th day of October, 2009. Executor: Douglas B. Dixon 15733 Idlewild Rd. Indian Trail, NC 28079 November 1,8,15,22, 2009

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008 Happy Grams

040 Help Wanted

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR Needed Newspaper Delivery Routes Available

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014 Lost & Found Found male dog black Lab/Rott mixed Mineral Springs area, call to identify (704)843-1020 Found male dog Baucom Deese Rd area, collar no tag call to identify (704)225-9291

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046 Medical/Dental Atlantic Coast Home Care Agency, Inc. Need’s CNA’s & IN HOME AIDES in Stanly & Union counties. Up to $12.50 per hour, no exp. necessary & can set own hours. Opportunity for advancement is available. For more information call 1-866-575-5888 Certified Med-Techs needed for second and third shifts. Apply in person 918 Fitzgerald St. Monroe NC 28112

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060 Pets & Supplies Bloodhound puppies for sale, 8wks, $150ea. (704)233-1993

040 Help Wanted 062 Homes for Pets Avon- Do you need an extra $200-500? Act now! Ft/Pt. Free gift. Medical Free dog part Rott/Doberman 6yrs, good home Ins. avail. 704/821-7398 needed (704)957-4063 CIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGER Full-time, entry-level management position. Responsibilities include working with adult newspaper carriers, maintain and improve customer service and work on circulation sales. Flexible shifts including early mornings and weekends. Must have dependable vehicle to be used on the job, clean driving record, valid drivers license and insurance. To complete application apply at: The Enquirer-Journal 500 W. Jefferson Street PO Box 5040 Monroe, NC 28111 The Enquirer Journal is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, or disability. Housekeepers needed with hotel exp pref’d Country Inn & Suites 2001 Mt. Harmony Church Rd, Matthews 704-846-8000

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AUCTION SALE Farm and Construction Machinery

Friday Nov. 27, 2009 @ 9:00 A.M. Approx. 75-100 Tractors 400-600 Implements 60-80 Construction items

Godley Auction Company 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd Charlotte, NC 28216 704-399-9756 NCAL#305 www.godleyauction.com

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111 Commercial - Rent

REAL ESTATE - SALE

CHRISTMAS AUCTION Warehouse/office with 4’ 126 Houses For Sale THANKSGIVING DAY dock door. 2400 sf. Old NOV 26TH 6:00pm Charlotte Hwy. $600/Mo. $8,000 Tax Credit to buy HEMBY BRIDGE AUCTION (704)283-4697 your first home Call to 7304 SUTTON DR. see if you may qualify HEMBY BRIDGE NC, New Homes Available 112 Apartments 28079 from $129,900 Leon 7043 DEALERS WITH LARGE 607-2602 1 bed 1 bath Apartment ASSORTMENT OF MER$450 Cotton St. Monroe CHANDISE. ELECTRIC Unionville Realty REDUCED! 3 bd 2bt den w/ RIDING TOYS, 4 SPEED 704-753-1000 fp, dlbl carport, det. shop GAS POWERED MOnear Wingate $129,900 TORCYCLE, BARBIE Heritage Realty JEEP, CHOPPER BIKES, (704)289-5596 17" LAPTOP COMPUT- 2br 1.5ba Condo no dep. 1st month rent moves in ER, DESK TOP COM(704)507-0722 MOBILE HOMES PUTER, HUGE SELECTION HANNA MONTANA, JOHN DEERE, & 138 Mobile Homes - Rent ★ Monroe Apt. ★ NASCAR ITEMS. BUXSpecial 2br 2ba TON PURSES, NAME Very nice 5 mls out New Move in by DEC. 1st. BRAND WATCHES, Town Rd. 2br 1ba JEWELRY, TOYS, Get Jan & Feb FREE $525mo.+dep new paint DOLLS & TOOLS, NAME 980-721-6214 Beautiful & quiet BRAND MEN, WOMENS, paid water CHILDRENS CLOTHES, Wingate: 2 mo free rent 704-289-5949 SHOES, LOADS OF X3BR 2BA $600 MAS DECORATIONS Cent H/A. No pets. COL. CHARLIE THERRELL ★★★★★★★★★★★ 704-451-8408 NCAL 6807 1/2 off 1st mo. rent !! 704-504-5358 Ask about other specials 140 Mobile Homes - Sale Completely Remodeled $500.00 DN moves 2br, 1.5ba Townhouse 069 Appliances Small pets allowed you in. Call and ask Shown by appt only me how. 704-225-8850 Refrigerator & Stoves 704-283-1912 $99.99 ★★★★★★★★★★★ Washers & Dryers $79.99 Land Owners Wanted 704-649-3821 Zero Down Newly Remodeled call for details 078 Feed/Seed/Plants Townhouse 2bd/1.5 ba (704)225-8850 $600mo. POINSETTIAS 704-283-3097 free delivery to area TRANSPORTATION churches. (704)624-6179 113 Duplexes Haigler Greenhouses 148 Autos For Sale 1br 1ba duplex spacious, 082 Yard/Garage Sales cent H/A, $437mo. 903 A 03 Mitsubishi Eclipse Guild, ref’s & dep req’d Spyder red convert, auto Giant Yard Sale (704)225-1543 A/C exc. condition $4800 Every Fri, Sat & Sun 8-5 (843)672-3348 New & Used Items 2204 Stafford St. Ext. Monroe 2br 1ba 900sf $595mo. 158 Trucks For Sale 3br 1.5ba 1050 sf $695mo. 090 Miscellaneous both, great location in 99 Red Dodge 2500 V10 Wingate cul de sac dep & 107,000 mls, over $2500 Metal Roofing ref’s req’d (704)283-6490 access. camo back top 3ft wide $1.40 LF $6000 obo 704-706-0253 1-803-789-5500 Lovely 2br 1ba private set163 ATVs ting storage Indian Tail, 092 Firewood $750mo.dep. 980-721- 09 Honda 500 4 whler 4x4 Seasoned Firewood 6214 or (704)289-4017 less than 10 hrs, must sell $65 a load delivered exc. cond. $6800 114 Houses For Rent (704)821-8395 (704)764-9294 aft 7pm cell 704-291-0762 LM 3br 2ba + bonus, Matthews, FINANCIAL min from 485, fenc’d yard all appli, $900mo.+dep 104 Bus. Opportunities req’d, 980-721-6056 Read...

INVESTIGATE BEFORE YOU INVEST!

3br 2ba brick 4ac pasture great for horse, Piedmont/New Salem, garage, $1000mo +dep no pets, (704)221-7419

Always a good policy, especially for business opportunities and franchises. Call NC Attorney General at (919)-716-6000 or Indian Trail area nice 3br w/garage & bonus room the Federal Trade ComTraewyck S/D only mission at (877)-FTC$1075mo call (704)292HELP for free information; 1329 or visit our Web site at www.ftc.gov/bizop. N.C. law requires sellers Need to rebuild your credof certain business opporit? Let us build your new tunities to register with home while you build your NC Attorney General becredit Call to see if you fore selling. Call to verify qualify? 704-233-0236 lawful registration before you buy. Owner financing 3br 2.5ba town home. $149,900.00 owner financing available. 108 Money To Loan 4005 F Christine Lane Waxhaw NC (Alma VilAdvance Fee Loans lage) Call 704-609-5463 or Credit Offers Companies that do business by phone can’t Stallings brick house 2br ask you to pay for credit 1ba new paint lg fenced before you get it. yard, wired shop, $750mo For more information, +dep 980-721-6214 call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP. Waxhaw 3br 2.5ba kit, dinA public service ing, den w/fp, all applianmessage from ces/yard maint. included The Enquirer-Journal and reduced! $900mo. Sherin The Federal Trade Realty 704-882-1634 Commission.

109 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE - RENT

WAXHAW small brick ranch hdwd flrs, storage bldg near Cane Creek Park $700mo +dep 704-843-1676

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111 Commercial - Rent Estates, Antiques Farm Equipment Belk Auction Co. (704)339-4266 www.belkauctionco.com

Light industrial 20002500sf bldgs/or both, SV, $1000 & $1200mo. 704283-8982 / 704-442-0071

1988 PETERBUILT (379) C at. M otor, 15 S peed W ith O verdrive, 411 R ear E nd, N ew P arts, 63��� Flat Top S leeper, R ebuilt E ngine and Transm ission.

$12,000 704-651-9644

READER NOTICE! While many work-athome opportunities listed provide real income, many seek only to sell booklets or catalogs on how to get such work.

Please use caution when responding to all such ads.

2003 Cadillac Seville STS Loaded, like new, new M ichelin tires. 41,000 M iles.

$14,500 704-608-4748 9A-9P

Wanted Exp’d Baritone Singer for all male southern gospel quartet call 704-699-8506

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The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, November 22, 2009 / 7B

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven.

SKYECROFT

5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

.87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Enjoy entertaining in this wonderful Marshville home: over 3500 sq. ft. on 2 acres. Holiday dinners a breeze to prepare in the spacious kitchen. Grand living and dining rooms. 5 bedrooms; 5 fireplaces; den; screeened porch. Call Elsie: 704-363-8815 PRUDENTIAL CAROLINAS REALTY

REDUCED New 2007, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, rec room, s/s appliances, ceramic tile, 1 ac lot, lots of extras. Must see! $167,400 CALL 704-243-4656

Lot $30,000

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

$169,000

REDU LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.) 2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

CED!

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To advertise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

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8B / Sunday, November 22, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Johnson, Martin take title race into finale HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — Mark Martin has lost to Dale Earnhardt, Jeff Gordon and Tony Stewart — some of NASCAR’s greatest drivers — in his frustrating bid for an elusive championship. Standing in his way now? Jimmie Johnson, who takes a 108-point lead over Martin into Sunday’s season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Barring a total collapse, Johnson will be the one to send Martin to a fifth runner-up finish in the standings. In doing so, Johnson will become the first driver in NASCAR history to win four consecutive championships. When Martin gets beat, it’s by the

the winner and the loser of this year’s very best. “I don’t know how this guy here Chase for the Sprint Cup championship will stack up in NASCAR history. hasn’t won a championship,� In one corner is Johnson, who wondered Rick Hendrick, ownhas dominated the Cup Series er of both Johnson and Marthe past four years. He’s won 29 tin’s teams. “He has raced and races over the past four seasons, finished second to some of the including four since the 10-race all-time greats when they were Chase began in September. in their prime, from Jeff GorIn the other is Martin, the don to Dale Earnhardt. Has 50-year-old role model to most anyone (else) ever raced against NASCAR drivers who came back that many champions in their to full-time racing this season prime and finished second? JOHNSON when Hendrick offered him one “He would have to be considof the best rides in the business. ered one of the all-time greats.� With five wins in this rejuvenating seaAnd so begins the debate over where

son, Martin has proved to still be at the top of the game. But as the praise poured in for the sentimental favorite, he downplayed his role in the sport’s history. “My record does not stand up against the greats in this business,� he said of 40 victories in 757 starts. “I just want to be a winner. Just a winner, you know? I worked really hard and I try pretty hard to be that.� Understated, as always, and open for debate. He wasn’t even finished underselling his accomplishments when Hendrick urged Johnson to speak up and make everyone understand just what Martin means to NASACAR.

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Mavs sophomore midfielder Kyle Parker makes a move during Saturday’s 3A state title game.

State champs Continued from Page 1B “But in the end it worked out. I’m glad Risher had it. (That’s) the best assist of my life. ‌ I’m always looking for Risher up top. It worked out in the end. It never works in practice, but it worked in the game.â€? Marvin Ridge, which finished the season on a 20-match winning streak, finished with a 47-24 advantage in shots. Arris-

tizabal recorded 16 saves while sophomore netminder Danny Cooper stopped 12 shots for the Mavs. “I’m just so proud of our team,� Cooper said. “We held strong defensively, and the few times they broke through, I think we handled it pretty well.� Chapel Hill ( 19-8-1 ) was back in the title game for the first time since capturing the state crown in 1983. The Tigers knocked off top-ranked and unbeaten Jacksonville 2-1 in a semifinal match which took

two days to complete. The two teams battled to a 1-1 draw on Wednesday before officials suspended the match at the conclusion of regulation due to poor field conditions. The contest resumed Friday night in Jacksonville , and Chapel Hill scored quickly to eliminate the Cardinals and secure a berth in Saturday’s title match. “They play in a tremendously tough conference,� Fumo said of the Tigers. “They battle every game. ... They play a very tough schedule, and it showed here.�

Dear <First Name, Last Name> It is my pleasure to invite you to a very unique opportunity. Your <Vehicle Year, Make, Model> has made you eligible to participate in our Annual Buy Back Event. During this time our Manager has the authority to BUY-BACK YOU <Vehicle Year, Make, Model> with incredible incentives to you. Here is how you can benefit from the Buy-Back Program: KEFFER HYUNDAI WILL BUY BACK YOUR <VEHICLE YEAR, MAKE MODEL> FOR THE SAME PRICE THAT YOU PAID. *PLUS 0% Financing** is available on New Hyundais. ALL FACTORY REBATES AND SAVINGS WILL BE PASSED ON DIRECTLY TO YOU! Upgrade to a newer, lower maintenance vehicle that fits your budget! In addition, our dealership has agreed to discount the entire New & Used inventory of quality late model pre-Owned vehicles from Hyundai and other makes. This inventory includes Certified Hyundai vehicles, hard-to-find program cars, bank repossessions, rental and lease returns, dealership demo, and auto dealer auction cars, trucks, vans and SUVs with prices below the national average. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made special arrangements for this even and ABSOLUTELY NO CREDIT APPLICATION WILL BE REFUSED! This will be your only notice. It is truly my pleasure to offer this opportunity to you! Sincerely, Dwayne General Manager

BUY BACK LOCATION:

%)NDEPENDENCE"LVDs-ATTHEWS .# For More Details, Please Call: 704-714-4700

www.kefferhyundai.com

LOWER YOUR MONTHLY PAYMENT! ALL CREDIT APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED!

+

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Marvin Ridge senior forward Garrett Condon was credited with the game-winning assist in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship match.


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