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The

Enquirer-Journal

November 19, 2009 • 50 cents

THURSDAY Light rain

High: 68 Low: 49 Complete report: Page 9A

Deaths

Clay Lefler Sr. Shawn O’Malley Fay Wynn Ross Jimmy Williams

WHO’S NEWS Man charged in Rite-Aid break-in

STALLINGS

Stallings Police arrested a Charlotte man inside a drug store after responding to an alarm early Tuesday morning. Serge Alexander Matthey, 27, of 1007 Wishing Well Lane, Charlotte, was charged with breaking and entering, damage to property, possession of Schedule II (opium), possession of Schedule IV (Valium), trafficking opium and possession of counterfeit bills. Stallings Police responded to an alarm at Rite Aid at 15090 Idlewild Road at 1:29 a.m. Tuesday. When they arrived, officers found that someone had shattered the glass in the front door. Matthey was in a corner, consuming drugs from the pharmacy, police said. A Stallings officer found 11 counterfeit $20 bills. Matthey has a $25,000 secured bond. His initial court appearance is Dec. 2.

SETTING IT STRAIGHT The ordinance passed by the Monroe City Council Tuesday evening limits parking to one hour in the city-owned lot on Crowell Street in front of City Hall. A photo caption on Page 1A of Wednesday’s edition incorrectly said parking downtown would be limited to one hour.

BIRTHDAYS Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially Bobby Hannah, Helen Helms, John Sykes, Helen Todd Rape, Charles Greene, Lorenzo Amado, Rachel Belk, Rayne Hambrick, Alex Traywick, Andrew Traywick, Ashley Nicole Chambers, and Betty Carter. Call (704) 261-2278 or e-mail birthdays@theej.com to add your names to the list.

INSIDE Classified Comics Entertainment Obituaries Opinion Sports State

The Jackets face a tight match-up against Pisgah High in round two of the state playoffs 1B

4B 8A 6A 2A 4A 1B 5A

Your county• Your news•Your paper

Monroe, N.C.

Recount confirms results Victors: Ciaramella, Thomisser BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE The results from Election Day will stand, confirmed by a ballot recount on Wednesday. Weddington Town Councilman-elect Werner Thomisser and Marvin Mayor John Ciaramella were declared the winners in their respective races after their opponents, L.A. Smith and Joseph Barbara, requested a recount last week. Each race qualified for a recount because the losing candidates were within a 1 percent margin of total

ballots cast. “I’m glad it’s finally over,” said Thomisser, who beat incumbent Smith for the District 1 Weddington Town Council seat, 673 to 671. Ciaramella, Marvin’s incumbent mayor, beat Barbara 349 to 344. He said he hopes to work with the new members of the Village Council to “keep our sights focused on doing what’s best for the residents in Marvin,” including improving parks, greenways and recreation, he said. Barbara congratulated Ciaramella on the victory

and a good campaign. He said he plans to stay actively involved in Marvin government and continue to give his input. “I will be a very active citizen,” he said. “I live here, I pay taxes here, I am a part of the community here.” Each recount took about an hour to complete as Union County Board of Elections officials had to hand-feed each ballot through the counting maStaff photo by Ed Cottingham chine. Union County Board of Elections officials Mary RhoSmith picked up one extra vote from the des and Betty Couick record election results during a

See RECOUNT / 7A

recount for the Weddington Town Council race between L.A. Smith and Werner Thomisser.

Local Marine dies in barracks

Man saved from burning truck

Iraq veteran, 24, was headed home for convalescence BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer Staff photo by Rick Crider

Rescue workers from the Mineral Springs Volunteer Fire Department examined the scene of an accident near the intersection of New Town Road and Jed Circle. A 69-year-old man was pulled from his truck after he blacked out behind the wheel at 3 p.m. Wednesday. Firefighters extinguished the burning truck and cut the roof away to extract the driver. Investigators said the driver did not remember the wreck and was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

Commissioners shuffle legal team Former adviser hands over public works to county attorney BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE Commissioners have shifted authority from a longtime local attorney to the newly appointed official county attorney. Ligon Bundy is not the official county attorney, but has been working with the Public Works Department for years, in-

cluding during the county’s massive development boom. Monday, Commissioners asked county attorney Keith Merritt to oversee legal affairs for Public Works. “We wanted someone in there with a fresh perspective,” Commissioner Tracy Kuehler said Wednesday. “Get away from what had been go-

ing on for years.” Merritt is contracted as the official county attorney, so the board majority of Kuehler and Commissioners Lanny Openshaw and Kim Rogers said he was the obvious choice to have authority. They said they still wanted Bundy to stay and help when needed. Bundy attended a Public Works meeting

Wednesday, in keeping with weekly meetings he has been attending. Bundy was the interim county attorney, but was replaced when the board hired Merritt. Bundy and Merritt discussed areas each would take the lead on. Bundy’s office works with the Sheriff ’s Office

See COUNTY / 7A

MONROE Marine Lance Cpl. Shawn O’Malley, 24, died Friday in his barracks at Camp Lejeune. The direct cause of death has not been deter mined, but John O ’ M a l l e y Shawn said his son O’Malley, had post- 24, served in t r a u m a t i c the 8th stress dis- Marine order and Regiment, a brain 2nd Marine injury after serving Division. overseas in Iraq. John O’Malley and his wife, Brenda, traveled

See MARINE / 2A

Caught short, United Way scrambles Adding it up

A $5 donation every two weeks will give $130 to United Way in just one year — enough for a month’s supply of food for a homebound senior. United Way regional vice president Richard Heins said that’s like giving up two fast food meals or a few cups of coffee each month. More than 193,000 people live in Union County. If one-third of donate $5 every two weeks, United Way would raise more than $8.36 million in one year — eight times what the county raised last year.

Biweekly Annual payroll gift amount $1 $3 $5 $10 $15 $20 $30 $50

$26 $78 $130 $260 $390 $520 $780 $1,300

Donations halved; campaign extended BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer

MONROE United Way’s fall fundrasing campaign is coming up short. Since its campaign kickoff Aug. 29, the organization has received around $750,000, about half of what it had raised at this time last year. “We’re going to have to have some people step up

in a major way,” United Way Regional Vice President Richard Heins said. The campaign usually ends around mid-November, but Heins said that the United Way is extending that deadline “until we raise as much as we can.” Last year brought in $1.4 million. United Way served more than 50,000 people, or nearly one-fourth of

Union County’s population last year. United Way’s lients and agencies could be in danger if United Way’s campaign doesn’t pick up. With 18 agencies, the nonprofit organization has dozens of programs for domestic violence victims and addicts, as well as the unemployed,

See UNITED WAY / 2A

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2A / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

DEATHS

Jimmy Williams

MATTHEWS — Mr. Jimmy Wayne Williams, age 70, passed away Tuesday November 17, 2009, at his home. He was born April 8, 1939, in Union County, N.C., the son of the late Mr. Lloyd Union Williams and the late Mrs. Verona Emoline Hyatt Williams. Mr. Williams is survived by two sons, Ricky Wayne Williams and wife Debbie of Clarksville, Tenn., and Jimmy Dean Williams and wife Beth of Monroe, N.C.;

Fay Ross

MARSHVILLE Mrs. Fay Wynn Ross, age 80, went to be with her Lord and Saviour on Sunday, November 15, 2009, at her residence, with family at her side. She was born August 22, 1929, in South Norfolk, Va., the daughter of late Mr. Benjamin Josephus Wynn and the late Mrs Grace Burgess Middleton. In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Paul Edward Ross, on September 16, 2007. Mrs. Ross was a proud member of First Baptist of Indian Trail East Campus of Marshville, N.C. Her Sunday school class lighted up her darkest moments and encouraged her during her last days. Mrs. Ross is survived by six children: Timothy Ross and wife Lisa of Chester, Va., Susan Ross Lewis and husband Ramon of Mat-

one brother, Oren Lee Williams of Monroe, N.C.; one sister, Kathy W. Connell of Monroe, N.C.; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren. The family will receive friends and relatives for visitation Thursday November 19, 2009, from 7:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. at McEwen Funeral Home in Monroe. Funeral services for Mr. Williams will be 3:00 p.m. Friday November 20, 2009, in the McEwen Colonial Chapel, with burial to follow in the Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery. The family suggests memorials be made to Hospice and Palliative Care Charlotte Region, 1420 East Seventh Street, Charlotte, NC 28204. McEwen Funeral and Cremation Service of Monroe is serving the family of Mr. Williams. PAID OBITUARY

thews, N.C., Kathleen Ross and husband Dale Griffin of Marshville, N.C., Dr. David Ross and wife Stephani of Midlothian, Va., Sharon Ross Ruff and husband Jim of Jamestown, N.C. , and Carole Ross Schrader and husband Dale of Fredicksburg, Va.; 15 grandchildren: Micah Ross, Jennifer Fay Mayberry, Dusty Ross, Scott Ross, James Ruff, Brian Ruff, Victor Ruff, Rodney Ruff, Jon Ruff, Tina Smith, Hannah and Rachel Schrader, Nicholas Griffin, Galen and Eleanor Ross: four g reat-g randchildren Travis Veit, Michaela and Skyler Griffin and Egan Ross; two brothers: Roy Wynn of Corydon, Indiana and Donald Wynn of Soledad, Philippines. The Ross family will receive friends and relatives for a celebration and memorial of her life and visitation Thursday November 19, 2009, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at McEwen Funeral Home in Monroe. A graveside service will be held at Sunset Memory Gardens on Friday November 20, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. People may meet at McEwen Funeral home at 10:00 a.m. to travel to Sunset Memory Gardens. PAID OBITUARY

Obituary policy

Obituaries are published daily and include name, age, address, place of death, occupation, military service, spouse, parents, childre, immediate family survivors, number of grandchildre and great-grandchildren, funeral arrangements and memorials. Obituaries containing additional information may be purchased. Obituaries, whether free or paid, are accepted only from funeral homes.

IMAGES 4U

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704-893-0025

LLC

fundraising

Walk-Ins Welcome; Appointments Recommended; Closed Monday

$8.95 Holiday Portrait Special!

Shawn O’Malley

INDIAN TRAIL Lance Corporal Shawn Michael “Shamus� O’Malley, 24, of Indian Trail, died Friday, November 13, 2009, at his barracks at Camp Lejeune. Funeral services will be held 11:00 a.m. Friday at First Baptist Church Indian Trail. Interment will follow in Sharon Memorial Park with full military honors. The beloved son of John and Brenda O’Malley, Shawn had a love for music and was an avid weightlifter. He was an anti-tank assaultman assigned to the 8th Marine Regiment of the 2nd Marine

Clay Tony Lefler Sr.

MATTHEWS — Mr. Lefler, 83 of Matthews passed away Tuesday, November 17, 2009, at Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte. His family will receive friends Thursday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at Heritage Funeral Home in Indian Trail. Services from the graveside will be held Friday at 11 a.m. at Historic Matthews Cemetery with Reverend Ken Lyon officiating. Mr. Lefler was born June 8, 1926 in Matthews to the late Tony and Bertha Mae Lefler. He graduated from Matthews High School and attended Charlotte College (now UNCC) and proudly served his country in the US Army during WWII. Clay was a lifelong member of Matthews United Methodist Church and worked for the U.S. Postal Service where he was one of the youngest postmasters ever appointed. He retired from there in 1975 and in 1977 ran a successful campaign to be elected as Mayor of Matthews, where he served until 1987. To say that Mr. Lefler was an active person would be an understatement. Over the years his hands touched much of what was the

Division. His decorations included the Iraqi Campaign, National Defense Service and Global War on Terrorism Service Medals. In addition to his parents, Shawn is survived by his sister, Meghan O’Malley Doubraski of Asheville, N.C. Shawn never met a stranger, had a heart of pure gold and a smile that could light up the darkest room. He always found the humor in life and was forever teasing his dad. Our lives are better, having known him. Our lives are forever changed, having lost him. “But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave: for He shall receive me.� Psalms 49:15 Please share your condolences and memories at capt68@hotmail.com or www.goodshepherdfuneralhome. net. Good Shepherd Funeral Home, Indian Trail, is serving the family of Lance Corporal O’Malley. PAID OBITUARY

Town of Matthews. He served as chairman of the committee to organize the Matthews VFD, helped organize and was a charter member the Matthews Athletic Association, was a member of the Matthews Community Club, parade chairman for the former Stumptown Festival for 197677, served on the board of United Carolina Bank, served on the first Matthews Zoning Board, was a charter member of both the Matthews Optimist and Civitan clubs, and was a member of the VFW in Indian Trail. One of his most outstanding accomplishments was breaking ground for the Presbyterian Hospital at Matthews with Brian Bullard, former president of Presbyterian Hospital at Charlotte. His survivors include his wife of over 62 years, Myrtle Dulin Lefler; his children, Tony Lefler Jr. and his wife Ann of Matthews, Scarlet Helms and husband Tommy of Unionville; grandchildren, C.T. Lefler III, Katie Lefler, both of Matthews, Derek Helms and wife Laura of Greenville, N.C., Grant Helms of Matthews; brother, Mitchell Lefler and wife Geraldine of Charlotte. He was predeceased by 2 sisters and 5 brothers. The family asks that memorials may be sent to Matthews United Methodist Church, 801 S. Trade St., Matthews, NC 28105. Arrangements for the Lefler family are in the care of Heritage Funeral Home. An online guest registry is available at www.heritagefuneral.net. PAID OBITUARY

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ALLAN PRESSON INS. 704-283-5950

United Way Continued from 1A elderly, disabled, ill and illiterate. It reaches children, the homeless and fire victims. All of that aid is funded through a fall fundraising campaign. Despite tight budgets, he said, most people still have “a financial means to contribute something. We all waste money in some form or fashion.� Money spent at vending machines or on dollar menus could go to a neighbor in need, he added. He said this is the most challenging year since he started work at United Way in 1988. Heins attributes the shortfall to local business cutbacks and said businesses not yet unaffiliated with United Way could offer a big boost. For businesses that regularly give to United Way, he said, reductions in staff can mean more job responsibilities for those left, leaving less time for campaigning. Reduced hours can mean less income and less money to donate. United Way relationship manager Rachelle Souk said it is usually only one industry or one part of the country impacted by dips in the economy, but this year, “it’s across the board.� Heins encourages companies that do not yet hold United Way campaigns to do so. Employees should at least have an opportunity not just to give, he said, but to learn about the organization’s services if they are ever in need. Some businesses have raised more this year with fewer staff members, he added, and some have agreed to match employees’ donations dollar for dollar. Heins also reminds residents that Leon and Sandra Levine made a $1 million matching pledge to United Way of Central Carolinas. Leon Levine, who founded the Family Dollar chain of stores, said in September that the foundation would match every dollar, up to $1 million, raised above last year’s campaign total of $21.7 million. United Way wants to make sure that offer isn’t “left on the table,� Heins said. Campaign money goes to the Community Care Fund to be dispersed

Marine Continued from 1A to the base near Jacksonville Friday planning to pick up their son for a 32-day convalescent leave. John O’Malley found his son’s body. “Theoretically, it was going to be his last night at Camp Lejeune ever,� John O’Malley said. “The doctor felt that he would be better off at home.� A convalescent leave is an authorized break from duty granted for rest or recuperation following an injury, illness or childbirth. Although the loss is painful, John O’Malley said, family members want to focus on the joy his son brought to them. Shawn O’Malley attended Sun Valley High School and Central Piedmont Community College. He had served in the Marine Corps since May 13, 2005, and has an older stepsister. John O’Malley said his son was excited to come home and let all his friends know of his planned return. Shawn O’Malley came back from Iraq a couple of years ago and was originally scheduled to be discharged on June 13. He came home to visit about once a month. “He had the kindest heart of any person I’ve ever known,� John O’Malley said, and “the warmest smile you’d ever want to see. ... He was always giving of himself � for others. “We’re just hoping that time will heal the void that’s been created.�

What can donations really do? $5

provides one week of afterschool snacks for a homeless child

$25

provides a backpack and backto-school supplies for one poor student

$45

provides a one-month supply of prescription medication for an unemployed person

$50

sends a homeless child to the dentist

$104

provides meals for a homebound senior for a month

$185

provides a home repair for an elderly or disabled person

$191

pays a utility bill for an unemployed person facing disconnected utilities

$275

provides an unemployed person with 30 hours of job training

$380

allows a poor girl to participate in Girl Scouts for one year

$520

provides one month’s rent for a family whose home was destroyed in a fire

$600

provides a week of shelter and counseling for a victim of domestic violence

$750

provides one year of medications, medical equipment and supplies for a Hospice patient

$1,000

matches a child with a mentor for one year Source: United Way of Central Carolinas

among 97 agencies in the region. Union County is allotted slightly more funds than it raises, because a large portion of Union County residents contribute through their Charlotte employers. The campaign extension will not extend member agencies’ fundraising blackout.

The Enquirer-Journal copyright 2008

500 W. Jefferson St., P.O. Box 5040 Monroe, NC 28111 (704) 289-1541, FAX (704) 289-2929 www.enquirerjournal.com Advertising (704) 261-2251 adcopy@theej.com Classified Advertising (704) 261-2214 sharon@theej.com Circulation (704) 261-2219 circulation@theej.com News (704) 261-2252 news@theej.com Sports (704) 261-2253 jsnow@theej.com Publisher (704) 261-2200 menderle@theej.com

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The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 3A

COMING EVENTS (Editor’s note: To list the event of your nonprofit civic, social or governmental organization, call 704-2612252.)

Today

•  UNION WEST ROTARY, 7:30 a.m., civic building behind Indian Trail Town Hall. For details, call Sean Helms, 704849-9332. • WAXHAW-WEDDINGTON SUNRISE ROTARY CLUB, 7:30 a.m., Rippington’s Restaurant, 109 W. South Main Street, Waxhaw. For information, call Jerry Simpson, 704-363-2173. •  CRIME STOPPERS, 7:30 a.m., Hilltop Restaurant, new members welcomed. • GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Hospice Services of Western Union County, Waxhaw. Details, Kim Davis, 704-243-4424; Elizabeth Stapleton, Russell Morrison, 704-292-2100. • MICROSOFT PUBLISHER I CLASS, 10 a.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-283-8184. • BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS/MICROSOFT WORD II/INTERNET BASICS CLASS, 10 a.m., Waxhaw Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-843-3131. • BABY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Union West Library. Details, 704-821-7475. •  MONROE LIONS CLUB meeting, noon, Quincy’s Family Steakhouse. Call Wanda Deese, 704-577-7669, for details. •  KIWANIS CLUB OF MONROE, noon to 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. For details, call Fran Dandridge at 704289-9429. •  SENIOR CITIZENS CANASTA, 12:30 p.m., El-

REUNION

len Fitzgerald Center. For information, call Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center at 704-282-4657. • HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704-283-8184, ext. 238. • THURSDAY TALES, 5 p.m., Monroe Library. For ages 5 and up and their caregivers. Details, 704-283-8184. • MOTHER/DAUGHTER KNITTING CLASS, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Monroe Library. For ages 8 to 12. To register, call 704-2838184, ext. 231. • READING CLUBHOUSE, 5;30 p.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. For ages 8 to 12. Details, 704-624-2828. • CARTOONING CLUB, 5:30 p.m., Union West Library. Ages 8 and up; new members welcome. Details, 704-8217475. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. •  TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:20 meeting, Love Baptist Church, 707 Deese Road, Monroe. Details, 704-225-1720. •  WAXHAW TOPS #613 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Waxhaw Bible Church, 6810 Pleasant Grove Road. For details, call 704-8435518 or 704-254-3880. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • UNION COUNTY CRUISERS, 6:30 p.m., Monroe Mall, next to

Pizza Hut. Custom and classic cars. Details, 704238-1600. • SENIOR DANCE, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Center, Line dancing and ballroom dancing. Details, 704-282-4657. •  BINGO, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Indian Trail VFW, 100 VFW Lane, Indian Trail; $500 jackpot. For details, call 704-821-9753. • BOY SCOUT TROOP 98, 7 p.m., Hemby Bridge Church, 6010 Mill Grove Road. For details, call 704882-3482. •  WAXHAW LIONS CLUB, 7 p.m., site TBA. For details, call 704-8435537. • UNION COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS, 7 p.m., Union County Agricultural Services Center. Details, Union County Master Gardener Growline, 704-283-3822. • UNION COUNTY VETERANS COUNCIL, 7:30 p.m., Call Ken Rogers, 704-283-3744, for location. • COCAINE ANONYMOUS meeting, 7:30 p.m., at the Friendship Home, 2111 Stafford St. Ext., Monroe. •  UNION COUNTY AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE, 7:30 p.m., Red Cross Building, Franklin Street. Call 704-238-9216. • CIVIL AIR PATROL, South Piedmont Squadron, 7:30 p.m., Indian Trail Town Hall. For details, contact Jerry Langley at 704-847-8304. • AL-ANON, 8 p.m., First Step Recovery Center, 1623 Sunset Drive, Monroe. Details, 704-2830944, 704-764-7651.

Friday

• RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE, 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Weddington High School. Details, 704-283-7402.

•  EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704-2824657. • COUNCIL ON AGING INDOOR ATTIC SALE, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 1401 Skyway Drive, Monroe. Details, 704-292-1797. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • BABY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. Details, 704624-2828. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-283-7233. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Nicey Grove Baptist Church, 318 Camden Road, Wingate. Details, 704-221-7352. • OVERCOMERS OUTREACH ANONYMOUS, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., 1700 Secrest Shortcut Road. For details call 704-8469223. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704-8214256, 704-763-0784. • CAROLINA SINGLES & MARRIED COUPLES CLUB DANCE, 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m, Shrine Club, Phifer Street. Band,

Crooked Creek. Admission, $10. Must be 21. Details, Ellen Benton, 704283-1304.

Saturday

•  DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS CHAPTER 95, 9 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. meeting, Golden Corral, 2507 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Monroe. Details, 704-635-7908, unionncdav@earthlink.net. • TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 9 a.m. weigh-in, 9:20 meeting, Love Baptist Church, 707 Deese Road, Monroe. Details, 704-226-1520. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704-377-0244. • OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS, 10 a.m., Central United Methodist Church, room 106. • BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS, 1:30 p.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-283-8184. • PAW-SITIVE READING, 2 p.m., Edwards Library, Marshville. Details, 704-624-2828. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 5:30 p.m. to 6: 30 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704821-4256, 704-763-0784. •  BINGO, 7:30 p.m., Vietnam Veterans Association Post No. 14, 620 Roosevelt Blvd., $2,500 program. Doors open at 5 p.m. For details, call 704283-6165. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 8 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245.

Traffic shift scheduled for Monday on U.S. 601 South MONROE Blythe Construction has scheduled a traffic shift of northbound traffic on U.S. 601 South for Monday. The shift will begin at McRorie

Road and end at the northern project limits near White Store Road. This shift will be canceled if there is a threat of rain. Once the shift is done,

both northbound lanes will be open and in their final configuration. Southbound lanes will be narrowed to one lane from the northern project limits

Community Jubilee Saturday, November 21• 8:00 am – 2:00 pm Come and join us for food, fun, fellowship, & shopping! Attic Sale • Silent Auction • Pecans • Breads • Pies Fried Pies • Cakes • Cookies • Candies Jellies • Jams • Pickles Soaps • Candles •Aprons • Knitted Items • Antiques Collectibles • China • Pottery • Ceramics Christmas Ornaments and Decorations Jewelry • Cosmetics • Handbags • Toys • Books Church Cookbooks • African Artifacts Refreshments – Ham Biscuits, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs 30+ Vendors • Over 700 Frozen Entrees Bring your cooler and stock up!

First Presbyterian Church 302 East Windsor Street Monroe, NC (next to the library)

RESTAURANT

Come Join us for Thanksgiving Day!!

We Will Be Offering our Famous Thanksgiving Buffet $11.95 (Buffet includes salad bar, assorted cakes & pies and fresh fruit)

Some

of

Country Style Steak Roasted Turkey & Dressing Honey Glazed Pit Ham Fried Chicken Roast Top Sirloin Leg of Lamb Rosemary Roast Pork Loin Baked Salmon

our Home-Style mealS Cream Style Corn Green Beans Mac & Cheese Buttered Broccoli Sweet Potato Soufflé/Candied Yams

will include:

Fresh Fried Squash Rice and Gravy Red Roasted Mashed Potatoes Baby Limas Fresh Collard Greens

don’t feel like cooking????

Let us take care of it for you. You can order any of our delicious homemade meats and vegetables to take home for however many people you are feeding. Call us ahead of time and we will have it ready for PICK UP! 704-289-3733

Bulk mealS

to go

One Meat with Two Sides $9.50

(4

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Reunions are published each Thursday in The Enquirer-Journal. To list your reunion, call 704-261-2252, fax 704-2892929 or e-mail news@ theej.com.

Harding High Class of 1969

CHARLOTTE — The Harding High School Class of 1969 will celebrate its 40-year reunion at 6 p.m. Nov. 27 at the Thoroughbred Lounge, Charlotte Shag Club, 4925 Rozzelles Ferry Road. For information, call John Windell at 704-8468810.

In Memory of

Fredonia Massey Simpson “Big Mama” February 3, 1926 November 16, 2002

It has been seven years since that dreary rainy Saturday morning, the eleventh hour of the am; the Angel of Silence who keeps the time schedule in Eternity made sure God’s record was in order by calling our “Big Mama”and sealing the last chapter of her life. So to Almighty God we had to humbly submit to His will and thank Him for having given us the opportunity of being her family for 76 years. The infinite wisdom of God is never to be questioned. We love you and miss you dearly. George, Royle, Ryan, Cynthia, Debbie, Bobbie & Grandchildren


V

iewpoint

4A Thursday, November 19, 2009

www.enquirerjournal.com

“Never hate your enemies. It clouds your judgment.”

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The Enquirer-Journal

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A CAROLINA VIEW

Yadkin bridge could use some creative funds A

sk Charlotte residents what their top concern is, and traffic will be mentioned frequently. Davidson County residents who commute to Charlotte for work or visit for dining, entertainment or sporting events can attest to the fact the roads are often clogged with vehicles. Driving south on Interstate 85 motorists often encounter tie-ups beginning at Concord Mills and continuing toward the Interstate 77 interchange and beyond. So the announcement on Nov. 9 by Gov. Bev Perdue that construction on the last five-mile section of Interstate 485 will be accelerated came as welcome news. That section will link I-85 near Concord Mills with I-77 north of the city. Originally, construction was set to begin in 2015. Now, the segment is scheduled to be finished about that time. This will probably make traffic near Concord Mills worse in the short term when work begins there, but in the end the loop should reduce some of the bottlenecks and make the trip along I-85 much easier. What’s good news for Charlotte may not be welcome in other places of the state. Urban loops are paid for from a dedicated fund, meaning other roads, such as Interstate 295 in Fayetteville, may now be delayed. Perdue and other state transportation leaders probably figured that it’s better to appease Charlotte leaders and motorists at the risk of alienating others, since the Queen City is the largest municipality in the state. Plus, few could argue that traffic isn’t a major problem in Charlotte. One of the most interesting aspects of the I-485 project is how it will be funded. The total cost is estimated at $340 million, but contractors will finance $50 million of that cost with the state paying it back over 10 years. This will allow the DOT to move forward even though the money is not yet available. Contractors eager for state business will comply with the condition, even though it will take a decade to recoup their investment. When news came that Perdue planned a major transportation announcement on Nov. 9, hope in Davidson County was that it would involve the I-85 bridge over the Yadkin River. State officials continue to seek $300 million in discretionary federal stimulus money to pay for a much-needed replacement bridge. DOT has undertaken several steps to make the project “shovel ready,” a key requirement to gain a slice of the federal pie. They have unanimous support from city, county, state and federal representatives in lobbying for the money. That’s one key difference between the I-485 announcement and the bridge project. The state DOT was able to fund the loop project itself while hoping to receive federal money for the bridge. Still, the creative financing being used for I-485 could possibly be applied to the bridge as well. DOT needs to explore all options to replace the bridge (although a toll is probably not the best route to take). The federal money may yet come through, but the more time that passes with no announcement, optimism begins to fade a little bit. — The Dispatch, Lexington

Going hungry in America WASHINGTON — The number of American households who couldn’t adequately sustain food for their family rose from 13 million in 2007 to 17 million households in 2008, according to a new report by the Food and Drug Administration. The jump represents the highest number since the FDA started keeping track in 1995. The government refers to this condition as “food insecure” rather than hungry, which they define as not having enough resources throughout the year to provide food for all of their members. The new label was adopted during the Bush administration. Outside of the Washington beltway we call that hungry. A third of those who were deemed food insecure were unable to feed everyone for at least a few days of the month for eight out of the 12 months of the year. The FDA labeled them as very insecure. The new lingo makes me wonder who we’re paying inside the beltway to come up with ways to tie self esteem to a state of being. Their salary could probably buy a few more meals for everyone instead. Let’s go old school and try it like this. If someone doesn’t eat they become hungry. If they miss an entire day of food they become very hungry. We’ll take it for granted they feel badly about the situation but we’ll keep our focus on the need for food. Perhaps someone at one of the food pantries will give them the needed pat on the back. The surveys also show that adults in the household went without more often and did their best to shield any children

Martha R. Carr Guest Columnist

from missing a meal. However, there were still 506,000 children, up from 323,000 in 2007, who didn’t always have enough to eat despite government programs. Local food banks, which are often the very last safety net for families, have been reporting a decrease in donations since the beginning of the recession and have less to feed an increased number of families seeking help. Many of the newly hungry are doing their best to hide the reduced status from their neighbors or friends. We haven’t come far enough from our old way of thinking that how we measure up as human beings depends more on how we look than on how we treat each other. It is difficult for those who in the past have been able to not only feed their families but make regular mortgage payments to suddenly find themselves struggling for the most basic of needs. All across America, though there are now families who are making decisions about where to put the last dollars. The list is long and includes things like prescription medicine, fuel for the car, keeping a roof over everyone’s head and food. The answer some families

come up with is to get just enough of each category to stay afloat, which means that your neighbor may be hungry but pride is keeping him from saying anything. Americans by nature want to be of service to someone who is in need. When there is a disaster we turn out in droves to help put things back to a semblance of normal. We understand that especially during the Great Recession there are going to be even more valleys than hills. It’s not a mark of failure to ask for help. Sometimes it’s a good mark of character to be able to accept as well as to be able to give. An ability to be independent when taken too far becomes a character defect and can cause us to isolate from one another when what we really need is to reach out and take a chance that help will be provided and without judgment. Look for solutions as a neighborhood and speak up about your limitations or your needs. See if even just one block can’t come together and operate as a co-op during these unusual times to make sure that no one goes without a decent meal. It’s time we dropped the notion that came out of the 1970’s when air conditioning became commonplace that the goal is to know as little as possible about our neighbors. Let’s try adopting the idea that all of life is about progress and never perfection. Then we can admit that sometimes we don’t know what we’re doing, it isn’t going as planned and we could use a little help. Imagine the example we’ll be setting for the generations to come. © 2009 Martha Randolph Carr.

Listen to what else money has to say when it talks By Damon Circosta

N.C. Center for Voter Education RALEIGH — We’ve all heard the old adage that money talks. For a small business, money can tell you how popular your product is. For a nonprofit organization, money can tell you how supportive people are of your mission. For politicians, money is often used as shorthand for how viable your campaign is. Money certainly talks in politics, but what exactly is it saying? Even though we are still a year away from the general election, candidates are hard at work raising funds to run for office. They are doing this not just because campaigning in this day and age is tremendously expensive. Just as important, candidates want to make a good showing in what has become the “money primary.” In order to prove viability, anyone seeking public office tries to secure funding from political donors and party regulars who act as gatekeep-

ers for the general public. If you are successful with this moneyed crowd, the conventional wisdom is that you will have demonstrated the necessary fund-raising prowess to be a competitive candidate. As the saying goes, money talks. The money primary often gets reported in the media, but what is reported doesn’t tell the whole story. We tend to focus on the total amount of money raised and pay very little attention to the other numbers that come out of a campaign. Several Democratic competitors are shaking the money tree as they jockey for support to take on Republican Sen. Richard Burr in 2010. The fate of these campaigns rests largely on a small cadre of donors who underwrite the money primary. A cursory glance of campaign filings will tell you that the people who write checks early in a primary tend to give in large amounts. The most recent campaign report from lawyer Kenneth Lewis, one of the Democrats

hoping to take on Burr, illustrates the concept of the money primary. Lewis has raised $259,167 and did so from 241 individuals. Forty-nine of those were for $2,400 — the maximum amount allowed by law. The average contribution was more than $1,000. Of the nearly 10 million North Carolinians Lewis could go on to represent, few can afford to give such a contribution. Lewis isn’t the only candidate in search of big checks early in the campaign season. Across both political parties and throughout the country the money primary is almost exclusively the domain of the well heeled. Despite solid support and enthusiasm from voters, many would-be public servants are nixed because they are unable to land large donors early in the year. Over time, the money primary distorts our democracy. It gives those who can write big checks an outsized seat at the table and it shuts others out. Politicians will forever be indebted to donors will-

“Despite solid support and enthusiasm from voters, many would-be public servants are nixed because they are unable to land large donors early in the year.”

ing to invest heavily in them early on. These folks will have access — and possibly get favors — that your typical Tar Heel can only dream of. Money talks and raising money early says that you are a contender. But instead of focusing so heavily on what the total amount raised says about a campaign, what else could money say if we

were willing to listen? If, for instance, we were to focus on the number of donors, not just how much they gave, wouldn’t that give us a better picture of how much support a candidate has? Why don’t we examine where the money comes from? If future constituents from a wide variety of backgrounds and occupations are willing to invest in your campaign, isn’t that better than a few wealthy folks who might not even live in your state? The current campaign finance system is skewed in favor of the few. In order for us to hear the other things money could say, we are going to have to alter the system so that more people can meaningfully participate in this early phase of the campaign. Money talks. What would it say about that? — Damon Circosta is the executive director of the N.C. Center for Voter Education, a Raleigh-based nonprofit and nonpartisan organization, dedicated to helping citizens more fully participate in democracy.


The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 5A

States pour money into erosion fight Storm damage threatens East Coast beaches, islands OCEAN CITY, N.J. (AP) — It was a desperate, ultimately futile battle — machine against nature — and Ocean City kept it up long after the outcome had been decided. As wave after wave pummeled the beachfront during last week’s powerful nor’easter, more and more of the sand disappeared until the ocean came roaring through. A bulldozer manned by a city employee rushed to push sand back into the breach, which would hold for a few moments before yet another wave would knock it down and send the sea rushing through again. “They were literally fighting each wave,” said Bob Ashenbrenner, who watched from his home across the street. “They did that for days.” It was one of the more extreme examples of

beach erosion that occurred along the east Coast from North Carolina to New Jersey last week from the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida, which killed at least six people and caused tens of millions of dollars worth of damage. Officials in more than half a dozen states began totaling the cost of the destruction this week, hoping to build a strong case for President Obama to declare their areas federal disaster areas, and qualify them for rebuilding funds. In Maryland, the storm pelted Assateague Island with nearly 2,000 tires from a man-made underwater tire reef. Volunteers on Wednesday will start clearing the tires that most likely came from a man-made reef off Ocean City, Md. The island is one of two

places that are home to a famous colony of wild ponies that swim between it and the mainland of Chincoteague, Va. The 150 ponies on Assateague Island survived the storm by seeking higher ground. Virginia Beach claimed $10 million in damages to its 17-mile coast. But the beach did not sustain as much erosion as it might have a decade ago because the city added 4 million cubic yards of sand in 2001. Delaware’s beaches lost 4 million to 5 million cubic yards of sand worth about $15 million. In North Carolina, rough surf chewed up about a quarter-mile of State Highway 12, the main road running north and south on Hatteras Island. “We set aside a portion of the room occupancy tax collections specifi-

cally for beach renourishment projects,” said Lee Nettles, the managing director of the Outer Banks Visitors Bureau, which includes Dare County and Cape Hatteras. “It’s kind of understood that it’s part of the price for enjoying nature as we do. It’s just a dynamic environment and it’s part of what is so appealing about it, but there’s a downside to it as well, which is that you have an occasional storm and you’ll probably have to deal with erosion at some point.” Nettles said that the Outer Banks draw about 170,000 visitors each week during the tourist season, pumping nearly $800 million into the state’s economy. “There are a lot of folks Photo courtesy N.C. Tourism/Bill Russ coming here, so obviously we have a vested interest A fisherman shows off his catch in front of the Cape in preserving the coast- Hatteras lighthouse. Erosion has threatened the Outer line,” he said. Banks, one of the state’s top tourist attractions.

threw out that law in May because of an unrelated energy amendment. Lawmakers restored the tax break as a one-time event in the budget this year.

North Carolina this year. More than a dozen were attributed to laboratoryconfirmed H1N1 virus.

STATE BRIEFS FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

N.C. budget $95M off pace, but has $620M cushion

RALEIGH — North Carolina state government has at least $620 million at its disposal to close any budget hole this fiscal year. State budget director Charlie Perusse’s office estimates it will have $469 million from unused funds and holdbacks of up to 5 percent from state agencies ordered by Gov. Beverly Perdue to ensure there’s money to pay bills. There’s another $150 million in the rainy-day fund. So far, revenues are $95 million less than what lawmakers projected when they passed the $19 billion budget. That shortfall is nowhere near the $3.2 billion shortfall Perdue faced last year.

S.C. gives guns a tax holiday

COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina shoppers will get a second chance to buy tax-free guns. The state Revenue Department sent out a reminder Wednesday of the upcoming “Second Amendment Weekend.” The 48-hour tax break begins just after midnight the Friday after Thanksgiving. Shoppers will pay no state or local sales taxes on handguns, rifles and shotguns, which can tally 9 percent. Taxes still apply to ammunition and accessories. South Carolina had the nation’s first tax holiday on guns last year, after legislators tacked it on to a tax break on energyefficient appliances. But the state Supreme Court

Officials confirm teen died of H1N1

BURGAW — Health officials say a North Carolina high school student’s death earlier this month was the result of the swine flu. The Star-News of Wilmington reported Wednesday that the Topsail High School student suffered fatal complications from the H1N1 virus. The newspaper said the victim was a 16-year-old girl who died Nov. 6. The state Health and Human Service Department said flu has been blamed for 58 deaths in

Charges on hold in 5-year-old’s death

FAYETTEVILLE — Investigators handling the death of a 5-year-old North Carolina girl say they can’t file more charges until they decide where crimes occurred. Fayetteville police had said they planned to file more charges in the death of Shaniya (shuh-NY-uh) Davis, the girl whose body was found Monday beside a rural highway in Lee County. But Police Chief Tom Bergamine said Wednesday they won’t file more charges until jurisdiction is determined. Authorities are trying to decide where the

girl was killed and if the case will be prosecuted in Lee County or neighboring Cumberland County, where she lived. Her mother, Antoinette Davis, is charged with human trafficking and child

abuse involving prostitution. Mario McNeill is accused of kidnapping after surveillance footage from a Lee County hotel showed him carrying the girl.

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6A / Thursday, November 19, 2009 Comedy

The Enquirer-Journal

What’s

Jon Reep, Nov. 27-28 at 8 p.m. at Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets start at $25 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www.CarolinaTix.org. Jeff Dunham, Dec. 31 at 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets are $49.50 and are available at the Arena box office, at www.TimeWarnerCableArena.com or through Ticketmaster. Jerry Seinfeld, Jan. 22 at 7 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Tickets range from $47 to $77 and go on sale Friday at 10 a.m. at the Bojangles’ Coliseum box office and through Ticketmaster. Louis Ramey, April 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. Bill Cosby, April 25 at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $24 and go on sale Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org.

Happening

Theater

Dance

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Feb. 9-11 at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 12 at 8 p.m., Feb. 13 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Feb. 14 at 3 p.m. at the Knight Theater, 430 S. Tryon St. Tickets start at $34 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. The Parsons Dance Company, March 25 at 7:30 p.m., March 2627 at 8 p.m., March 28 at 3 p.m. at the Knight Theater. Tickets start at $24 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org.

Exhibits/galleries

Faces & Flowers: Painting on Lenox China, through Jan. 30, at the Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Craft + Design on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www. mintmuseum.org. American Quilt Classics, 1800-1980: The Bresler Collection, through Feb. 6 at the Mint Museum of Craft + Design, 220 N. Tryon St., Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Art on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www.mintmuseum.org. Loîs Mailou Jones: A Life in Vibrant Color, through Feb. 27, at the Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Craft + Design on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www. mintmuseum.org. The Art of Affluence: Haute Couture and Luxury Fashions 1947-2007, through spring 2010, at the Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Craft + Design on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www. mintmuseum.org. The Height of Fashion: Platform Shoes Then and Now, through spring 2011 at the Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Craft + Design on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www. mintmuseum.org. Identity Theft: How a Cropsey Became a Gifford, Saturday through March 27, at the Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte. Hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays. Admission, which includes entry to the Mint Museum of Craft +

at the Greensboro Coliseum. Tickets range from $37 to $66 and go on sale Friday at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster. The Irish Tenors with the Charlotte Symphony, March 19 at 8 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Tickets range from $25 to $65 and are available at the Bojangles’ Coliseum box office and through Ticketmaster. Celtic Crossroads, March 20 at 8 p.m. at Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets start at $33.50 and go on sale Jan. 15 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www.CarolinaTix.org. Bon Jovi, April 22 at 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $39.50 to $125 and are available at the Arena box office and through Ticketmaster.

Miley Cyrus will perform Tuesday at Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte. Design on the same day, is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for members and children 4 and younger. For information, call 704-337-2000 or go online to www. mintmuseum.org.

Film

“Under the Sea,” at the Imax Dome Theatre at Discovery Place, 301 N. Tryon St., Charlotte. Admission to the theater is $8 for ages 14 to 59, $7 for those 60 or older or 2 to 13, free for those under 2. Combo passes including Discovery Place are $14 and $10.50. For information or show times, call 704-372-6261, ext. 300, or (800) 935-0553, or go online to www.discoveryplace.org. “Adventures in Wild California,” at the Imax Dome Theatre at Discovery Place, 301 N. Tryon St., Charlotte. Admission to the theater is $8 for ages 14 to 59, $7 for those 60 or older or 2 to 13, free for those under 2. Combo passes including Discovery Place are $14 and $10.50. For information or show times, call 704-372-6261, ext. 300, or (800) 935-0553, or go online to www.discoveryplace.org.

Music

A Deeper Shade of Blue, Friday at 7:30 p.m. at the Mineral Springs Music Barn, 5920 Eubanks St., Mineral Springs. Tickets are $8 for adults, $4 for children 12 and younger, and are available online at www. MineralSpringsMusicBarn.com. For information, call 704-668-1689. The Charlotte Symphony: Beethoven’s Eroica, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets range from $15 to $77 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. Doc Watson, Saturday at 8 p.m. at The Neighborhood Theatre, 511 E. 36th St., Charlotte. Tickets are $32 and are available at www.CarolinaTix.org. R. Kelly, Saturday at 8 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Tickets range from $45 to $95 and are available at the Bojangles’ Coliseum box office and through Ticketmaster. Michelle Shocked, Saturday at 8 p.m. at Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets range from $17.50 to $21.50 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. Billy Currington, Saturday at 11 p.m. at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte. Tickets are $20 and are available at www.coyotejoes.com. John McCutcheon, Sunday at 7 p.m. at Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets start at $17.50 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. Miley Cyrus, Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $39.50 to $79.50 and are available at the Arena box office and through Ticketmaster. Flat Out Bluegrass, Nov. 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Mineral Springs Music Barn, 5920 Eubanks St., Mineral Springs. Tickets are $8 for adults, $4 for children 12 and younger, and are available online at www.MineralSpringsMusicBarn.com. For information, call 704-668-1689. Charlotte Symphony Pops: Simply Sinatra, Nov. 27-28 at 8

p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets range from $25 to $67 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Nov. 28 at 8 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $25 to $60 and are available at the Arena box office and through Ticketmaster. Edwin McCain, Nov. 28 at 8 p.m. at the Neighborhood Theatre, 511 E. 36th St. Tickets are $22 and are avaialble at www.CarolinaTix.org. Luke Bryan, Nov. 28 at 11 p.m. at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte. Tickets are $15 and are available at www.coyote-joes. com. University Wind Ensemble, Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Free admission. “With Instrument and Voice,” university choral concert, Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Free admission. Carolina Homestead, Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the Mineral Springs Music Barn, 5920 Eubanks St., Mineral Springs. Tickets are $8 for adults, $4 for children 12 and younger, and are available online at www.MineralSpringsMusicBarn.com. For information, call 704-668-1689. Jimmy Wayne, Dec. 5 at 11 p.m. at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte. Tickets are $15 and are available at www.coyote-joes. com. Martina McBride, Dec. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the Greensboro Coliseum. Tickets range from $29.75 to $59.75 and are available through Ticketmaster. The Singing Christmas Tree, presented by Carolina Voices, Dec. 12 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Dec. 13 at 3 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Adult tickets range from $16 to $26 and are available through www.CarolinaTix.org., Ticketmaster and by calling Carolina Voices at 704-374-1564. Tickets half price for children 14 and younger. A Rockapella Holiday, Dec. 15-16 at 7:30 p.m. in Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets start at $34 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. Jingle Bell Jam, featuring Danny Gokey, Phil Vassar, David Nail, Mallory Hope, Dec. 16 at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte. Cover charge, $4. Doors open at 7 p.m. Details, www. coyote-joes.com. Band of the Irish Guards/ Royal Regiment of Scotland, Jan. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $19 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. Boston Brass, Jan. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. George Strait, Reba McEntire, Jan. 23 at 7 p.m. at the Greensboro Coliseum. Tickets are $79.50 and $89.50 and go on sale Saturday at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster. Jake Owen, Blaine Larson, Jan. 29 at 11 p.m. at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte.

Tickets are $15 and are available at www.coyote-joes.com. Turtle Island String Quartet, Feb. 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. Kathy Mattea and the Charlotte Symphony, Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Tickets range from $20 to $50 and are available at the Bojangles’ Coliseum box office and through Ticketmaster. David Nail, Feb. 6 at 11 p.m. at Coyote Joe’s, 4621 Wilkinson Blvd., Charlotte. Tickets are $10 and are available at www.coyote-joes.com. Wingate University Choral 2010 Tour home concert, Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Free admission. The 5 Browns, Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Knight Theater, 430 S. Tryon St., Charlotte. Tickets start at $39 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. Get the Led Out, Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $19.50 and go on sale Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. University Wind Ensemble, Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Free admission. University Men’s and Women’s Choirs, Feb. 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Free admission. Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour, Feb. 26 at 8 p.m at the Knight Theater. Tickets start at $39 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. African Children’s Choir, March 15-16 at 7 p.m. at the Knight Theater. Tickets start at $24 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. John Mayer, Michael Franti, Spearhead, March 15 at 7:30 p.m.

It’s A Wonderful Life, today at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. “Plaza Suite,” presented by CPCC Theatre, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. at CPCC’s Pease Auditorium, 1201 Elizabeth Ave., Charlotte. Tickets are $16 and are available at www.CarolinaTix.org. “Grease,” featuring Taylor Hicks as Teen Angel, Dec. 1-3 at 7:30 p.m., Dec. 4 at 8 p.m., Dec. 5 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Dec. 6 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Ovens Auditorium. Tickets range from $25 to $80 and are available at the Bojangles’ Coliseum box office, at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www.CarolinaTix.org. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism,” Dec. 1-3 at 7:30 p.m., Dec. 4-5 at 8 p.m., Dec. 6 at 3 p.m., Dec. 8-10 at 7:30 p.m., Dec. 11-12 at 8 p.m., Dec. 13 at 3 p.m., Dec. 15-17 at 7:30 p.m., Dec. 18-19 at 8 p.m., Dec. 20 at 3 p.m., in the Booth Playhouse of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $24.50 and are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. “A Christmas Carol,” presented by Theatre Charlotte, Dec. 3-5 at 7 p.m., Dec. 6 at 2:30 p.m., Dec. 9-12 at 7 p.m., Dec. 13 at 2:30 p.m. at the theater, 501 Queens Road, Charlotte. Tickets range from $7 to $20 and are available at www.CarolinaTix.org. “Biloxi Blues,” presented by Theatre Charlotte, Jan. 28 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 29-30 at 8 p.m., Jan. 31 at 2:30 p.m., Feb. 3-4 at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 5-6 at 8 p.m., Feb. 7 at 2:30 p.m. at the theater, 501 Queens Road, Charlotte. Tickets range from $7 to $24 and are available at www.CarolinaTix.org. “Spring Awakening,” Feb. 2-4 at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 5 at 8 p.m., Feb. 6 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Feb. 7 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets go on sale Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www.CarolinaTix.org. Charlotte Squawks: Six Degrees of Desecration, Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 12-13 at 8 p.m., Feb. 18 at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 19-20 at 8 p.m. in Spirit Square’s McGlohon Theatre. Tickets start at $29.50 and go on sale Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. “The Frog Prince,” Feb. 19 at 7 p.m., Feb. 20 at 3 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Each child’s ticket (12 and younger) free with a $5 adult ticket. For tickets, call 704-233-8316 or go online to www.wingate.edu/culture. “tick, tick ... BOOM!,” March 11-13 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. “My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish & I’m in Therapy,” March 16-18 at 7:30 p.m., March 1920 at 8 p.m., March 21 at 3 p.m. in the Booth Playhouse of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $24.50 and go on sale Jan. 15 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. “A Streetcar Names Desire,”

Doc Watson will perform Saturday at The Neighborhood Theatre in downtown Charlotte.

presented by Theatre Charlotte, March 18 at 7:30 p.m., March 1920 at 8 p.m., March 21 at 2:30 p.m., March 24-25 at 7:30 p.m., March 2627 at 8 p.m., March 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the theater, 501 Queens Road, Charlotte. Tickets range from $7 to $24 and are available at www.CarolinaTix.org. “Snow White,” March 26 at 7 p.m., March 27 at 3 p.m. in the McGee Theatre of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Each child’s ticket (12 and younger) free with a $5 adult ticket. For tickets, call 704-233-8316 or go online to www.wingate.edu/ culture. “Jersey Boys,” March 31 at 7:30 p.m., April 1 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., April 2 at 8 p.m., April 3 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., April 4 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., April 6-8 at 7:30 p.m., April 9 at 8 p.m., April 10 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., April 11 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., April 13-15 at 7:30 p.m., Arpil 16 at 8 p.m., April 17 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., April 18 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Ticket sale date TBA. “Smoke on the Mountain,” presented by Theatre Charlotte, May 6 at 7:30 p.m., May 7-8 at 8 p.m., May 9 at 2:30 p.m., May 12-13 at 7:30 p.m., May 14-15 at 8 p.m., May 16 at 2:30 p.m., May 19-20 at 7:30 p.m., May 21-22 at 8 p.m., May 23 at 2:30 p.m. at the theater, 501 Queens Road, Charlotte. Tickets range from $7 to $24 and are available at www. CarolinaTix.org.

Miscellaneous

Aw Shucks Corn Maze, Thursdays through Sundays through Sunday. Hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursdays, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturdays, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. Open to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays on haunted trail nights. Cost, $9 general admission. Southern Christmas Show, today through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at The Park (formerly the Merchandise Mart) in Charlotte. Adult tickets are $7.50 with a VIC card at participating Harris Teeter stores, $8 online by phone or mail in advance, $9 at the door. Youth (ages 6 to 12) tickets are $3; under 6 free with paying adult. For information, call 704-376-6594 or go online to www.SouthernChristmasShow.com. Carolina Renaissance Festival and Artisan Marketplace, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the festival grounds on Poplar Tent Road off N.C. Highway 73 between Concord and Huntersville. Tickets are $18 for adults, $7 for children 5 to 12 if purchased at Harris Teeter or online at RenFestInfo.com; tickets at the gate are $1 more. Senior discount tickets for 60 and older are $17 at the gate. For information, go to the Web site or call 704-896-5544 or 877-896-5544. Garrison Keillor, Sunday at 7 p.m. in the Belk Theater of the Blumenthal Performing Arts Center. Tickets start at $24.50 and go on sale Oct. 9 at 10 a.m. at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-372-1000 or online at www. CarolinaTix.org. Christmas at Reed Gold Mine, Dec. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 11-12 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Reed Gold Mine, 9621 Reed Mine Road, Midland. Dec. 11-12 events require reservations; call 704-7214653 or e-mail johnreed1799@ gmail.com for information. Lipizzaner Stallions, Dec. 6 at 3 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $24.50 to $34.50 and are available at the Arena box office and through Ticketmaster. The Aluminum Show, Jan. 1214 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 15 at 8 p.m., Jan. 16 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Jan. 17 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Jan. 19-21 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 22 at 8 p.m., Jan. 23 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Jan. 24 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 26-28 at 7:30 p.m., Jan. 29 at 8 p.m., Jan. 30 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., Jan. 31 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Knight Theater, 430 S. Tryon St., Charlotte. Tickets are available at the PAC box office in Founders Hall, by calling 704-3721000 or online at www.CarolinaTix. org. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, Jan. 27-28 at 7 p.m., Jan. 29 at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., Jan. 30-31 at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $15 to $100 and are available at the arena box office and www.timewarnercablearena. com. Spencer’s Theatre of Illusion, Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in the McGee Theater of Wingate University’s Batte Center. Tickets are $20 and are available by calling 704-233-8316 or online at www.wingate.edu/culture. Southern Spring Home and Garden Show, March 3-4 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., March 5-6 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., March 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at The Park (formerly the Charlotte Merchandise Mart). Tickets are $10 at the door, $8 in advance, $7.50 with a VIC card at participating Harris Teeter stores, free for youths 15 and younger (excluding groups). Group rate, $7.50 per person. For information or tickets call 800-849-0248 or go online to www.SouthernSpringHomeandGardenShow.com. Harlem Globetrotters, March 20 at 7 p.m. at Time Warner Cable Arena. Tickets range from $22 to $125 and are available at the Arena box office, at www.TimeWarnerCableArena.com and through Ticketmaster.


The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 7A

‘Holy hip-hop’ breaks for mainstream NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Terverius Black believes in hip-hop gospel so much he sold his first home to get the money needed to start his Christian-themed entertainment company. It was a risky move, but the 34-year-old entrepreneur believes the company’s diversity, which is producing music, a film, a reality television show and a gospel cruise, will help boost a struggling genre of Christian music. Secular hip-hop used radio as a launching pad, but holy hip-hop gets little play on regular hip-hop stations and nearly none on gospel or Christian radio. “It’s tough, but we’ve got to get a little more creative,” said Black, who started Huntsville, Ala.based Xist (pronounced “exist”) Worldwide Record Label three years ago with partner Sean Simmonds. Both men point to hiphop moguls like Sean “Diddy” Combs, Jay-Z and Russell Simmons, who succeeded branching outside the music industry. Even though their message is faith-based, Black and Simmonds believe they can find the same success.

Photo courtesy Xist Worldwide

From left, musicians Mario Maitland, Badge Rman, Sean Simmonds, Tim Luft and Matt Donald tape a Revelation Television show, part of Xist Worldwide Record Label’s efforts to expand the reach of Christian hip-hop and modern gospel music. “We’re trying to create our own blueprint for gospel, but at the same time, make it so that it’s respected across the board, and can be followed,” said Simmonds, 32. Hip-hop gospel has been around nearly two decades, but many followers say it didn’t start getting recognized until a few years ago. So far this year, there have been more than 500,000 CD and

digital sales of hip-hop gospel, according to the Christian Music Trade Association, which operates Christian SoundScan. “I think holy hip-hop music is starting to make a move,” said Danny Wilson, a former road manager for rapper-actor LL Cool J and the main organizer of the Holy Hip Hop Awards in Atlanta. “Look how long it took regular

hip hop to take. You’re talking about 25 to 30 years for it to really make an impact to the point that it’s a driving culture that’s known all over the world.” Wilson said better air play of hip-hop gospel would make it a more effective tool in reaching the unchurched. He cites a syndicated radio show sponsored by Holy Hip Hop Awards that airs once

It eats kudzu (and a lot more) ATLANTA (AP) — Researchers recently found an insect in north Georgia that has never before been reported in the Western Hemisphere — and its arrival could be both a blessing and a curse. Some might celebrate the arrival of the kudzumunching bug, which could help control the invasive vine that drapes much of the South. However, the bug also feasts on valuable crops like soybeans and other legumes. As of Nov. 12, the insect was reported in nine

north Georgia counties, mostly on homes and other buildings with nearby kudzu patches. Experts aren’t sure yet how fast or wide the bug will spread or how damaging it might be to crops. “I think in time it’s going to spread significantly,” said Dan Suiter, an associate professor of entomology at the University of Georgia’s Griffin campus. “But only time will tell.” Suiter and Lisa Ames, director of UGA’s Homeowner Insect and Weed

Recount Continued from 1A

the scanner. Smith won that precinct 267 to 255. Smith won three out of four precincts, but none by a large enough margin to make up for the 92 to 55 defeat in the Siler Presbyterian Church precinct. “I was actually surprised that I picked up (a vote),” Smith said, adding that she will be active in the town.

Weddington Elementary precinct. Board of Elections Director John Whitley said the machine recognized the ballot on Election Day, but that the bubble next to Smith’s name must not have been dark enough to be read by

JB’S SEAFOOD

Diagnostics Lab, first received specimens of the bug from pest control companies and county agricultural officials in midOctober. Neither had ever seen it before and both initially misidentified it. Just before Halloween, Dow AgroScience field researcher Joe Eger visited the UGA campus, and Suiter showed him a specimen. That turned out to be a lucky break. “There are literally five people in the U.S. who could’ve identified this insect,” Suiter said.

An insect enthusiast who has devoted a lot of time to studying stink bug varieties, Eger quickly recognized the bug as a bean plataspid, a native of India and China that is commonly called lablab bug and globular stink bug. It was not good news. The brownish bugs have a narrow head and a wide, rounded back end and are a little bigger than the eraser on a pencil, Eger said. They waddle a bit when they walk but fly quickly.

a week in 100 cities. “We get letters from prison all the time,” Wilson said. “One man wrote, ’I wish I had this music when I was out on the street, it might have saved my life.”’ Joey Elwood, president of Gotee Records, a small independent label, agrees hip-hop gospel would benefit from more air play on both gospel and secular outlets, but he believes “a lot of the outlets are afraid of offending people.” “If there’s any genre where I think that would not be an issue, it would be in hip-hop,” Elwood said. “I think hip-hop listeners are less likely to complain about a gospel message in their song. The radio stations have got to get a little bit braver.” Xist could create more awareness and demand for its music with its other ventures, said Kymberlee Norsworthy, director of publicity for Verity Gospel Music Group, a subsidiary of Sony. “I think only time will tell, but I have faith and confidence that it will be successful,” she said of the company. Xist’s film, “Stand,” and its reality TV show focus on three young hip-hop gospel artists struggling

County Continued from 1A and the Department of Social Services, but each wanted to take the lead on Public Works. The county has paid almost $1 million in attorney fees over the past three years for legal battles relating to Public Works. Commissioner Allan Baucom was the lone dissenting vote. He said Bundy had more experience and would have to train Merritt, an arrangement Baucom warned would amount to paying two attorneys. “I clearly don’t under-

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in the industry who refuse to trade their beliefs for fame. Black said the gospel cruise, which allows fans to mingle with their favorite artists, is also an opportunity for people to enjoy themselves “and not ... worry about compromising what they believe in.” “We Christians, but we party, too,” he said. The key will be staying true to a Christian message, said Vassal Benford, a top California-based record and movie producer who is working on his first gospel album. Xist needs to clearly distinguish the music from secular hip hop, whose reputation and lyrics are often “centered around a lot of darkness,” such as robbing and killing. “Gospel music has a certain wholesomeness to it,” he said. “And whether it’s a hip-hop beat or whatever it is under it, the underlying cause of it should always be about God and ... creating a positive influence.” Trey Williams, also known as Andale, is a Nashville gospel rapper starring in Xist Worldwide’s film. He said his lyrics focus on humility and encouragement.

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8A / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Guilt mars comfort couple finds in each other’s arms Dear Abby: Is there anything wrong with having a lover solely for the purpose of sex? He is grieving for his late wife (my best friend), and I am separated from my husband. We’re both lonely and have supported each other through our pain. A few weeks ago we decided to become lovers. We both have our eyes open, and we don’t expect anything out of this except a friendship with benefits. I am satisfying his needs, and he is making me remember the woman I used to be before I was emotionally beaten down by my husband. I see myself as enjoying the best of both worlds: I’m finding myself again, and I don’t have to answer to anyone but me. So, Abby, what do you think? I guess I’m looking for some validation for our selfishness. — Friend With Benefits Dear Friend: Selfish-

Dear Abby Columnist ness? You are both consenting adults. You can do what you want. Many successful relationships have begun with two people supporting each other through a painful period — and I don’t consider that “selfish” at all. What I AM having trouble understanding is why you haven’t begun divorce proceedings from your emotionally abusive husband. Once that’s started, you should have no reason to have any second thoughts at all. Dear Abby: My husband of 25 years died last year. How

long do I need to maintain ties with his family? Must I still give gifts at Christmas and birthdays to all his siblings, nieces and nephews? What I need to know is how to ease out of this without offending them. His parents are still alive, and the most I want to do is send a card at Christmas. — Ready to Move On in Canada Dear Ready to Move On: No law says that you “have to” maintain a gift-giving relationship with your late husband’s relatives. It would be nice, however, to send something to the nieces and nephews — if only a few dollars and some kind words included in a card. The message that speaks loudest to me in your letter is the one you did not directly put into words — that after 25 years of marriage to your husband, you had no meaningful connection with his family. An acceptable way to begin step-

Horoscopes Nov. 19, 2009 In the year ahead, friends and associates might have a greater influence on you than ever before, which is OK if it is productive and beneficial to your welfare. If you can reject what isn’t good for you, you’ll do fine. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Take command of your destiny, and don’t become depressed over things that may never happen. Maintain a positive, hopeful attitude at all times. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) -- It’s unlike you to be stingy or tightfisted with your funds, yet when it comes to dividing up the tab, you might try to shave off some of your share. Get back in character. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Although you might be exceptionally ambitious, if you don’t have your head on straight, you could waste time pursuing a meaningless objective. Be discerning about your targets. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)

Blondie

-- Suffering in silence won’t help solve a thing. If a family member or a friend does something disturbing, it’s OK to speak up -- in a diplomatic manner. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It’s generally unwise to immerse yourself in the problems of another, especially at this time. Instead of being helpful, you could stir things up and muddy the waters even further. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Being prepared to fend for yourself doesn’t bother you one bit, which is good, because that’s what you’ll have to do. There won’t be anyone backing you up; you’ll be on your own. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- You will collect more guilt than you can handle from not getting certain duties or jobs done. So do them right away because chances are you won’t get to them later. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Unless you know with whom you are doing business, you would be smart to hold back until you learn more about this person. He or she may be withholding vital facts that’ll cost

Frank and Ernest

Hagar the Horrible

Dilbert

Dennis the Menace you big bucks. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Be cooperative with those who appear to be treating you well. If you suspect someone is trying to take advantage, however, you don’t have to be rude, but it might be wise to be a bit standoffish. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -You might have trouble distinguishing between constructive criticism and simple nitpicking. Keep your opinions to yourself, or someone could accuse you of being harsh or rude. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -If you don’t have money in the bank to pay charges on your credit card, be wise for once and don’t make matters worse with a lot of foolish spending. Be smart and frugal. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- As a member of one of the more congenial signs of the zodiac, you rarely treat others ungraciously. If you are out of sorts, however, you might do just that. Be careful not to make others feel ill at ease.

by Jim Davis

by Bob Thaves

by Chris Browne

Dear Birth Mother: You are under no obligation to give chapter and verse about your personal history to anyone who is only an acquaintance. If you are asked if you have children, just say no because you are not raising any. — Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone — teens to seniors — is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds only) to: Dear Abby -- Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included in the price.) © 2009 Universal UClick

Family Circus

Encourage your children to read the newspaper.

© 2009, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

by Dean Young & Mike Gersher

Garfield

ping back would be to explain to them that, because of your reduced circumstances, you are no longer able to send the usual gifts and will be sending cards during these holidays. Dear Abby: Thank you for all the great advice you have given over the years. I have enjoyed reading your column since I can remember. When I was in high school nine years ago, I gave birth to a beautiful baby whom I placed in an open adoption with a great family. I am now in my 20s. I find that if I mention the adoption, the conversation sometimes becomes awkward. I don’t like to mention it with acquaintances because it’s something very personal and I am somewhat sensitive about it. When people ask me if I have children, what would be the appropriate response? — Birth Mother in Minnesota

B.C.

by Johnny Hart

The Born Loser

Andy Capp

The Wizard of Id

by Scott Adams Peanuts

by Art Sansom

by Reggie Smythe

by Bryant Parker & Johnny Hart

by Charles M. Schultz


The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 9A

Study: CT scans offer fast diagnosis Scans quicker, cheaper than other tests for heart attacks

Photo courtesy The University of Hawai’i

Doctors used this CT scan to diagnose a 15-year-old who visited the emergency room complaining of chest pain. The scan revealed that his pain came from a collection of air around the lungs, (see arrow).

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A CT scan — a kind of super X-ray — provides a faster, cheaper way to diagnose a heart attack when someone goes to the emergency room with chest pains, a new study suggests. About 6 million people each year go to hospitals with chest pain, but only a small fraction are truly having a heart attack. CT scans are increasingly used to diagnose problems because they give a deep, detailed view inside the body. But they put out a lot of radiation, which may raise a person’s chances of developing cancer. Whether these scans are worth that risk is un-

known. The new study suggests that for ruling out heart attacks in the emergency room, they just might be. The research involved 749 chest pain sufferers at 16 big medical centers around the country. These were people who did not have clear signs of a heart attack from blood tests or EKGs, but doctors are afraid to send them home without more tests. Between 4 percent and 13 percent of such patients will have a missed diagnosis of a heart attack, and up to one quarter of that group will die, said the new study’s leader, Dr. Kavitha Chinnaiyan, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospi-

HEALTH BRIEFS FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Judge closes case on forced chemo

NEW ULM, Minn. — A Minnesota judge has closed the case of a teenager forced by the court to undergo chemotherapy against his family’s wishes. Brown County Judge John Rodenberg says in his order that there’s no further need for court involvement after tests have shown 13-year-old Daniel Hauser of Sleepy Eye is now cancer-free. The order, reported Tuesday by The Journal of New Ulm, was dated Thursday. In April, county officials filed a child protection order after a doctor reported Daniel’s family was refusing to treat his Hodgkin’s lymphoma with chemotherapy. Rodenberg ordered the treatment, prompting Daniel’s mother to flee

with the boy to California for a week before returning to Minnesota. Daniel completed his final radiation treatment earlier this month.

D.A.: Cops will bust pot dispenseries

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles County’s district attorney says he intends to prosecute owners of marijuana dispensaries that take cash for pot. District Attorney Steve Cooley said Tuesday he believes state law only permits the possession, use and cultivation of medical pot — not sales. Most dispensaries currently sell pot to those with doctor referrals and identification cards. Some patients grow pot and distribute it through the shops. Cooley’s statement came after a pair of committees rejected City

Attorney Carmen Trutanich’s proposal to ban sales of marijuana at dispensaries as part of an ordinance that could be voted on by the City Council on Wednesday. In 1996, California voters approved a measure that allows medical use of pot.

Ex-KISS drummer has breast cancer

SPRING LAKE, N.J. — Lying in bed one night in 2007, Peter Criss felt something strange: a lump on his left breast. “I thought, ‘It’s a nodule, I’m a guy, I don’t think it’s anything more than that,”’ he said. “The more I messed with it, the bigger it got and the more it hurt, and that started really scaring me.” The former Kiss drummer went to the doctor, underwent some tests and a surgical procedure

to remove the lump. A week later, the doctor called. It was cancer. “My heart hit my stomach and my knees buckled,” Criss recalled. The good news was that Criss had caught the disease at its earliest stage. After a second surgery to remove it in March 2008, he would not need chemotherapy, radiation or medication. Now, the once-costumed rocker who performed in his Catman makeup is speaking out about his illness to encourage other men to get tested for breast cancer the moment they suspect something is amiss. “You need to immediately tell your wife, your girlfriend, your boyfriend, whatever,” he said. “The more you sit around and say, ‘Well, it’s going to go away,’ that time could be the time that you save your life.”

tal in suburban Detroit. “One of the most common reasons for an emergency room physician to be sued is that they send a patient out and then they come back with a heart attack,” said Dr. Sidney Smith, a former American Heart Association president from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “It is a big problem.” In the study, half of the patients were given CT scans and the rest, standard imaging tests with a radioactive dye. Of the CT patients, 82 percent were found to have clear arteries and were discharged immediately. In the other group, 89 percent were determined to have normal

arteries and sent home. The portion of patients who needed a definitive but invasive test — angiography — to see whether they should have an artery-opening balloon angioplasty procedure or bypass operation was the same — 6 to 7 percent of each group. The big difference was in cost and time. CT scan patients were diagnosed in about three hours versus more than six for the others. Their testing also cost less — $2,137 on average versus $3,458 for standard screening. “It’s equally safe, it’s faster and it’s cheaper,” said Chinnaiyan, who has no financial ties to imaging companies.

With reservations, FDA backs vaccine BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Federal health experts said Wednesday an updated version of Pfizer’s bestselling anti-infection vaccine is safe and effective for infants and toddlers, despite company studies that failed to meet certain goals. The Food and Drug Administration’s panel of vaccine experts voted 10-1 in favor of Pfizer’s Prevnar 13 to protect against pneumococcal disease. FDA reviewers noted that company studies failed to meet preselected goals for three types of pneumococcal disease. But Pfizer scientists argued that the missed statistical targets were a result of comparisons between the new vaccine and the original Prevnar. Since Prevnar is recommended for all children in the U.S., the company could not

compare patients taking Prevnar 13 against an untreated group — the standard method for studying drugs and vaccines. The FDA panel recommended long-term safety tracking for the new vaccine, and Pfizer has agreed to a 43,000-patient follow-up study. “The data I’ve heard suggest it’s safe, but these were fairly small studies and we’re inferring safety with Prevnar 13 from our experience with Prevnar,” said panel member Patricia Ferrieri, a professor at the University of Minnesota Medical Center. While the FDA is not required to follow the group’s advice, its recommendation moves the company closer to expanding the use of a treatment that racked up more than $2.7 billion in sales last year.

The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Few Showers

Clear

Mostly Sunny

Partly Cloudy

Few Showers

Mostly Sunny

68º

49º

67º 46º

62º 43º

55º 41º

63º 41º

North Carolina State Forecast

In-Depth Forecast

Coming Thanksgiving Day Save More on Black Friday With the Money-Saving Ads From the Following Advertisers* A.C. Moore Monroe Crossing Office Max Bass Pro Shop Belk Rack Room Shoes Best Buy Rite Aid Sears CVS Dick’s Sporting Goods Shoe Carnival General Nutrition Target Home Depot Toys R Us J.C. Penney Tuesday Morning Verizon Kmart Kohl’s Walgreen Lazy Boy Wal-Mart Lowe’s Home Improvement Waxhaw Ace Hardware ...and more! Enjoy money-saving ads from local advertisers along with Union County’s most complete community news coverage. Delivered Tuesday thru Sunday mornings. Start your convenient home delivery subscription today.

Phone 704-261-2219

*Due to the quantity of advertising inserts provided by advertisers, not all copies of the newspaper will contain every advertising insert.

Today we will see mostly cloudy skies with a 50% chance of showers, high temperature of 68º. The record high temperature for today is 81º set in 1942. Skies will be clear tonight with an overnight low of 49º. The record low is 18º set in 1951.

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.02"

Tarboro 68/56 Washington Asheville 71/55 Greensboro Raleigh 62/37 64/49 68/54 Charlotte Cape 68/46 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 71/56 72/61 Shown is today’s weather. 68/49 72/56 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 71/57 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:00 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:15 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .9:44 a.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:31 p.m.

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

Moon Phases

First 11/24

Full 12/2

New 12/16

Last 12/8

Local UV Index

H

L H This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+ Cold Front

UV Index

Around Our State City

Albemarle . . . . . .68/51 Brevard . . . . . . . .64/37 Burlington . . . . . .64/50 Cape Fear . . . . . .70/55 Emerald Isle . . . .72/59 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .71/55 Gastonia . . . . . . .68/46 Grandfather Mtn. .54/38 Greenville . . . . . .71/54 Hendersonville . .63/37 Hickory . . . . . . . .64/43 Jacksonville . . . .72/56 Kinston . . . . . . . .71/55 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .69/58 Mount Mitchell . .67/47 Roanoke Rapids .66/55 Southern Pines . .71/54 Swanquarter . . . .72/57 Wilkesboro . . . . .61/44 Williamston . . . . .70/54 Yanceyville . . . . .64/49 Zebulon . . . . . . . .68/55

t . .67/45 s s . .64/39 s sh .65/44 s t . .68/48 s sh .70/54 pc t . .71/55 t sh .68/43 s sh .52/38 s sh .69/48 s s . .62/39 s sh .64/42 s sh .71/50 pc sh .69/49 s t . .66/55 pc sh .66/44 s t . .66/47 s t . .69/47 s t . .70/52 pc ra .63/41 s sh .68/48 s ra .66/43 s t . .67/47 s

Warm Front

L

H

Low Pressure High Pressure

High: 86° in Riverside, Calif. Low: -13° in Lake George, Colo.

Across The Nation Today

Friday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Stationary Front

National Extremes

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

Today

Durham 67/53

Winston-Salem 62/48

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . .64/40 Baltimore . . . . . . .60/49 Chicago . . . . . . . .47/42 Denver . . . . . . . . .49/29 Detroit . . . . . . . . .50/41 Houston . . . . . . . . . .73/60 Indianapolis . . . .49/39 Los Angeles . . . .78/52 Miami . . . . . . . . . .82/71 Minneapolis . . . . .47/36 New York . . . . . . .59/50 Orlando . . . . . . . .83/62 Philadelphia . . . .60/51 Reno . . . . . . . . . .55/33 Sacramento . . . . .59/44 Salem, OR . . . . . .53/45 Salt Lake City . . .47/33 San Francisco . . .62/51 Seattle . . . . . . . . .53/45 Syracuse . . . . . . .58/46 Tampa . . . . . . . . .80/61 Washington, DC .60/49

Around The World Today

Friday

s . .67/45 s t . .61/41 sh sh .51/39 s s . .55/30 s sh .49/41 mc s . .66/52 t sh .54/37 s s . .70/49 s pc .82/70 s cl . .50/34 s mc .59/43 sh s . .80/64 s ra .60/44 sh s . .56/27 ra s . .54/45 ra ra .49/40 ra s . .58/36 s s . .61/47 ra ra .50/42 ra sh .53/40 sh s . .80/64 s t . .63/41 pc

City

Friday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .87/75 Athens . . . . . . . . .70/53 Baghdad . . . . . . .64/50 Beijing . . . . . . . . .38/23 Berlin . . . . . . . . . .52/40 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .76/59 Hong Kong . . . . .66/58 London . . . . . . . .57/55 Madrid . . . . . . . . .66/42 Mexico City . . . . .73/47 Moscow . . . . . . . .35/33 Nassau . . . . . . . .83/73 Paris . . . . . . . . . .59/48 Rio de Janeiro . . .89/74 Rome . . . . . . . . . .70/50 San Juan . . . . . . .87/77 Stockholm . . . . . .43/42 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .54/47 Toronto . . . . . . . .51/41

pc .87/76 pc s . .70/53 s s . .68/47 s s . .41/23 s sh .57/41 s s . .76/59 s pc .69/44 s pc .58/52 ra s . .65/43 pc pc .75/51 pc rs .35/31 rs pc .82/74 pc s . .61/49 sh pc .90/75 pc pc .69/51 pc sh .87/77 sh ra .47/44 ra sh .58/48 s ra .47/41 sh

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy


Day

10A / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

WHS to present ‘The Diviners’ WEDDINGTON Weddington High’s Theater Arts Department, led by teacher Maria Moore, will present “The Diviners,” a drama written by Jim Leonard. Set during The Great Depression, “The Diviners” centers on a 12-year-old boy (who has lost his mother in a drowning accident) and a disillusioned preacher who drifts into town. Parental guidance is

suggested because some language might be inappropriate for young audiences. The opening performance in the high school auditorium will be Dec. 3, at 4:30 p.m. for $4 at the door, with half of the receipts going to the charity Operation Christmas Child. Evening performances will be Dec. 4-5 at 7 p.m. Reserved seating is available

Weddington High School theater arts students rehearse an emotional scene from ‘The Diviners.’ From left are senior Rachel Veazey as Jennie Mae; senior Jason Puckett as CC Showers; senior Jared Shank as Buddy and freshman Kevin Reid as Ferris. Performances are scheduled for Dec. 3-5, including a dinner theater Dec. 4.

(presale only) for $7. Admission at the door is $5. The Dec. 4 dinner theater will be served from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tickets must be purchased in advance and will cost $20 for the dinner and the show. Contact a cast member or call Maria Moore at 704708-5530 by Dec. 1 for presale reserved seating tickets and/or dinner theater tickets.

Contributed photo

HONOR ROLLS Cuthbertson High

Following are the honor rolls for the first grading period at Cuthbertson High School: Ninth grade A — Samantha Baker, Emily Barker, Aaron Bowman, Stephanie Bronchick, Kathleen Cashman, Colin Codentino, Melissa Damiano, Connor Dodd, Leanne Donton, Jason Drain, Phenix Durham, Amanda Gage, Thomas Gilliam, Christina Glair, Mallory Goan, Rebecca Gonzalez, Omar Halawani, Dylan Harper, Alys-

5pm

sa Hart, Kylie Hawk, Caroline Hensley, Madeline Hosking, Jeffrey Johnson, Katherine Kamin, Kalli Karas, Brianne Kasminoff, Tatum Katz, Andrea Kopaskie, Naish Lalloo, Blair Meyer, Alexandra Monkiewicz, Emily Morton, Hannah Mulready, Alexander Norton, Elizabeth Pattison, Angela Perez, Bijan Razavi, Claire Seef, Connor Sorensen, Maria Sroczynski, Taylor Wade, Danielle Wallace, Jessica Weber, Rachel Wells, Devin Wensevic, Terry Woo A/B — Zoheny Anaza-

Shine this Christmas

Fits all bead bracelets.

The

Renn’s Nest

M-F 10-6 Sat 10-5

208 N. Main St. Downtown Monroe

(704) 291-3080

gasty-Grajale, Halle Babel, Emily Barfield, Robert Barnes, Hailey Barwick, Michael Bernat, J e n a l yse Bickmore, Arrianna Brenes, Gina Brinson, Leah Burns, Jurnee Case, Zachary Chitwood, Tyler Collins, Bridget Coomber, Austin Corriher, Hazsaud Courtlandt, Lagan Crow, Isiah Cureton, Paul D’Aeth, Elizabeth Davidson, McKinley Davis, Chaney Dedmon, Roland Deslauriers, Austin Duty, Kayla Edmonds, Layla Estrada, Nancy Falb, Conner Fanning, Megan Feranda, Kaitlyn Flint, Kasey Franz, Taylor Frazier, Lucas Fussy, Alana Garland, Brittany Glover, Nicholas Goncalves, Derrick Gordon, Jessica Greenleaf, Lauren Gruber, Cassandra Hart, Joshua Hattaway, Andrew Hendel, Cody Herbert, Marisa Hofmeister, Chloe Hughes, Devin Johnson, Audra Ketchum, Megan Kiss, Emma Lang, Brittany Leibowitz, Madison Levan, Benton Lunning, Conner Malloy, Dillon Malloy, Eric Maritato, Madison McCalla, Najee McCray, Kelli McDonnell, Matthew McGinnis, Lucius McMillon, Erika Miller, Alyssa Mitarotondo, Alexa Molinelli, Brady Mullis, Emily Newman, Mayra Ortiz, David Page, Leah Painter, Kimberly Parnell, Kylene Pavelich, Raquel Petrizzo, Luise Pieper, Remy Pignataro, Michael Proctor,

Seth Regan, Staci Renda, Rebecca Risalvato, Lucia Rodriguez, Nicole Rotunno, Kara Salvo, Sydney Sebastian, Amanda Shuttleworth, Andrew Sileo, Elizabeth Simmons, Sydney Simmons, Jacob Skrutowski, Riley Sloop, Aria Smith, Tyler Spelane, Rozalind Standing, Lauren Sullivan, Jeffrey Swan, Christian Sykes, Kayla Taylor, Sarah Tkachuk, Leah Upchurch, Francois Van Herren, Rachel Velasco, Thomas Vigdor, Alexa White, Brandon Whiting, Erika Wiley, Natalie Wilkinson, Gabrielle Williams, Austin Wilson, Sloane Young 10th grade A — Marcia Afful, Grishma Alakkat, Amy Bareham, Claire Corbitt, Alexandra Correa, Joseph Costa, Paulina Fratilallies, Andrew Gebhardt, Ryan Haddock, Michelle Knoud, Jilliam Kreimer, Kendall McGee, Rachel Miller, Nicholas Mlakar, Caroline Monkiewicz, Patrick Nebel, Amber Owen, Mary Scheppegrell, Emily Springer, Karina Tyulyu, Elena Wandzilak, Joshua Wilson A/B — Steven Agati, Austin Bailey, Macy Barnhill, Kelly Belue, Nicholas Bertrand, Tyler Bishop, Brittany Bodine, Crystal Boland, Haley Branam, Andrew Braswell, Sarah Buckner, Katherine Campbell, Alexis Carson, Justin Chandler, David Cheney,

Emily Cochran, Marisa DeLay, Christopher Dethlefsen, Brian Donovan, Ethan Ewing, Sarah Flieger, Vincent Frasca, Shannon Gallitz, Ariana Gavin, Emily Glesias, Julia Grainger, Milton Harris, Rachael Harvey, Juan Henao, Alexander Herring, Connor Hickey, Darion Horner, Maddox Humphries, Akilah Hyrams, Alexander Kopakie, Jennifer Lepke, Amanda Lopez, Brittany Lowe, Sarah Mayer, Kyle McGuire, Patrick Narmi, Brogan O’Brien, Victoria Pacheco, Brianna Peters, Hannah Peterson, Raquelle Pollock, David Reed, Oscar Reyes, Bryan Ricarte-Diaz, Bradley Ricketts, Morgan Ries, Aidan Riney, Melody Rogers, Matthew Roman, Richard Rowe, Amanda Salvo, Anthony Scaduto, Hanna Sjoberg, Sarah Stephens, Jennifer Stephenson, Jacob Summerour, Tyesha Thomas, Iryna Tsikhotska, Ashley Turner, Layton Turner, Joshua Walker, Jessica Wallace, Andrew Wells, Brandon Yancey 11th grade A — Valerie Afam, Christopher Bristow, Melissa Fellmeth, Jessica Feranda, Drew Furr, Brian Grainger, Kelsey Hathaway, Jordan Hattaway, Caitlin Huff, Trent Johnson, McKenna Karas, Kelsey Killion, Ariel Knauer, Sarah Lowder, Chase Lunning, Meagan

Padro, Nicholle Romero, Adam Schneeberger, Bryan Seef A/B — Michaela Atwell, Arielle Bagood, Thomas Bennett, Kaitlyn Bochicchio, Kristen Bochicchio, Christen Brunsetter, Kayla Chapman, Kayla Condrey, Elizabeth Corteville, Rodric Covington, Salvatore D’Angelo, Daniel DeFelice, Kirstin Dellinger, Angelo Dematteo, Christopher Doceti, Joshua Epifanio, Cody Esser, Dannon Fields, Connor Glair, Hilary Grant, Deborah Guthmann, Matthew Hagan, Ashlee Hall, Shannon Hendel, Austin Hill, Cara Jackson, Briannan JasekSnow, HyunJu Kim, Jung Ha Kim, Shawn Linnen, Corey Lockwood, Adam Lutz, Kassi Mangum, Ava Maritato, Daniel Marko, Michael Martin, Meghan McAleer, Jessica McCranie, Raymond McDade, David McKee, Joseph Molinelli, Joseph Morrison, Carter Murphy, Meaghan Nasta, Amber Nebel, Justine Neville, Julia Papuga, Douglas Perez, Dunte Perkins, Stefan Raia, Stephanie Renda, Joanne Sabenicio, David Schaaf, Mischka Scott, Laura Serran, Amanda Sica, Jane Sosinski, Courtney Spencer, Kimberly Stansfield, Taylor Stuart, Vitaliy Svarishchuk, Dayanna Villalva, Geoffrey Vincent, Theresa Walther, Rachel Wild, Sarah Wilson, Brittanie Wudkwych


S ports

Cats lose 6th straight Williams’ late layup gives Sixers two-point victory 3B

Editor: Jerry Snow (261-2225) jsnow@theej.com

WORTH A LOOK Men’s college basketball North Carolina vs. Ohio State 9 p.m., ESPN2

WHO’S NEWS Panthers’ top two RBs questionable

CHARLOTTE (AP) — Carolina Panthers running backs DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart are questionable for Thursday’s game against Miami with lingering injuries. Williams skipped practice Wednesday with a sore left knee, but coach John STEWART Fox said they were “resting” him. Stewart practiced in full after sitting out Tuesday with a sore Achilles’ tendon. Defensive tackle Damione Lewis questionable with a sore shoulder, but practiced Wednesday. The biggest concern for Carolina is defensive end Charles Johnson, who is doubtful after missing his second straight practice with a strained pectoral muscle. Johnson plays mostly on passing downs. Fullback Brad Hoover and safety Charles Godfrey are also doubtful, but aren’t expected to play because of ankle injuries.

Northwest Cabarrus nips WHS wrestlers

WEDDINGTON —Northwest Cabarrus High’s wrestling team edged Weddington 35-30 in the Warriors’ season-opener on Wednesday. Weddington emerged victorious in four matches: freshman Josh Drye (103) won by pin, freshman Kyle Deacon (152) won by pin, junior Christian Lowder (171) won 9-4 and Joe Centrella (189) won 2-1. Weddington is at South Meck Duals on Saturday starting at 9 a.m.

NFL fines Browns QB for illegal hit

BEREA, Ohio (AP) — Cleveland Browns quarterback Brady Quinn has been fined by the NFL for his chop block on Baltimore’s Terrell Suggs. After throwing an interception in Monday night’s 16-0 loss to the Ravens, Quinn dived at Suggs’ knees while QUINN trying to bring down cornerback Chris Carr, who had picked him off. Suggs had to leave the game and could miss significant playing time. Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis accused Quinn of a cheap shot. Quinn said he received a letter from the league on Wednesday but would not disclose the size of his fine, saying only that it was “a good amount.” Quinn insists he was not trying to hurt Suggs and has apologized to him and the Ravens.

Today’s game: Miami (4-5) Carolina (4-5) 8:20 p.m., 212 DirecTV (Ch. 10 TWC) Noteworthy: Both teams are built around the run but both are banged up in the backfield. Dolphins RB Ronnie Brown is out with an ankle injury and Carolina’s one-two punch of DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart are both listed as questionable.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Panthers seeking third straight win CHARLOTTE (AP) — Miami coach Tony Sparano and assistant David Lee get plenty of credit for making the wildcat a much-copied NFL sensation. Offensive coordinator Dan Henning had little trouble making it work — perhaps because he first used direct snaps to running backs when directing Carolina’s offense in 2006. It’s a story that’s often forgotten when the formation’s rise to prominence is discussed. “Dan added his two cents

Basketball

Robinson gets by Mavs in overtime

+

into the mix when we started talking about it a little bit and drawing up for our preseason stuff,” Sparano said. “He did mention at that time that it was something (the Panthers) did.” It’s with that backdrop that the Dolphins (4-5) and Panthers (4-5) meet tonight in a critical game for their renewed playoff hopes. The main component of Miami’s wildcat, running back Ronnie Brown, won’t play because of a foot injury. But that

only makes the Panthers more nervous in a short week. What will Henning, fired by Carolina in 2006 amid criticism he was too conservative, cook up to make up for Brown’s absence? Will Ricky Williams line up in that formation? What about rookie Pat White? Will they not use it all? “I have all the trust in the world of Dan on game day to let him do his thing,” Sparano said. “One of the things I

See PANTHERS / Page 3B

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By David Sentendrey

E-J Correspondent

CONCORD J.M. Robinson High swept a doubleheader on Wednesday, defeating Marvin Ridge’s boys and girls basketball teams in the season-opener for both. Robinson’s boys needed overtime to pull out a 69-64 win. The Mavs missed two free throws with no time on the clock and the score tied at 56 at the end of regulation. The Mavericks shot 9 of 17 from the free-throw line, while the Bulldogs took advantage by shooting 19 of 30 at the line. T.J. Tolbert led the Mavericks in scoring with 22 points and added three rebounds while Jon Basset added 10 points. Tolbert, a junior wing, gave MR a chance in the fourth quarter with a strong take to the basket for two points and the foul. Tolbert converted the three-point play, giving MR a 55-54 lead. But the Mavericks had no answer for Robinson’s Jacob Allen, a 6-7 power forward who had 15 points and four rebounds – with most of his damage being done in overtime. David Powell led MR with seven rebounds and Pat Belluci and Basset each added five rebounds. Powell added a highlight-worthy dunk off a fast break, posterizing his defender and bringing MR fans to their feet. Colby Rhodes led the Mavericks with five assists, while adding seven points and three rebounds.

Robinson’s girls win by 11

Robinson won the girls game 59-48. Jordan Henry led the Mavericks with 10 points and seven rebounds and Chelsea Horan scored eight points. The MR girls shot 6 of 11 from the free-throw line, compared to Robinson’s 24-of-33. The Mavericks led the game for a short period of time with 5:08 remaining in the third quarter (34-32), but the Bulldogs used a 13-2 run to close out the quarter and swing momentum in their favor for the fourth quarter. Marvin Ridge is back in action on Tuesday, hosting Charlotte Latin.

Photo Jamie Belk

Jackets QB Juanne Blount, middle, has 1,845 yards rushing and 32 TDs in 12 games this year.

Pisgah, Forest Hills have accomplished run games BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer MARSHVILLE Travis Smalling isn’t a mirror image of Forest Hills senior quarterback Juanne Blount, but their statistics are almost identical. The Pisgah High junior tailback enters Friday’s 2AA second round playoff matchup against the Yellow Jackets (9-3) with 272 carries for 1,786 yards and 32 touchdowns on the season. Blount (5-foot-8, 185 pounds) has 203 rushing attempts for 1,845 yards and 32 TDs. Smalling (5-9, 185) has rushed for four scores in six different games this season and has eclipsed 200 yards twice. Blount (5-8, 185) has gone over 200 yards and scored at least four TDs on

leb Leatherwood, who has three different occasions. “(Smalling’s) carried the 48 catches for 780 yards and ball 272 times, so they obvi- seven touchdowns. “They like to run the ball a ously think a lot of him,” said FH coach John Lowery. lot, but they do throw it some, “He’s not a scat back, but so we’ve got to be ready for that,” said Lowery. he’s a real tough “When they throw it, runner, so we’ve got it’s usually to (Leathto make sure we’ve erwood). Offensively, got enough people we’ve got to hope our up in the box to put speed will offset their the breaks on him. size because they are They’re a power runa little bigger than ning football team, so we are.” we’ve got to pile up The Jackets’ air and stop that.” attack flourished in While the Bears last Friday’s first(8-4) are primarily SMALLING round win over Wila run team, like the Jackets, their passing game kes Central. Blount was 7 of 11 for 142 yards with two has been effective, too. Pisgah quarterback Brian touchdown passes to sophoCurry is 82 of 154 for 1,282 more Jamal Little, who finyards with 12 touchdowns ished with four receptions and five interceptions. His for a career-high 119 yards. favorite target is junior CaSee JACKETS / Page 2B

Hendersonville knocks Monroe out in semifinals By Eric Rape

E-J Correspondent

Wake tops Panthers, improves to 3-0 WINSTON-SALEM (AP) — AlFarouq Aminu had 22 points and 10 rebounds to help Wake Forest pull away early in the second half and beat High Point 83-60 on Wednesday night. Ishmael Smith added 13 points for the Demon Deacons (3-0), who trailed almost the entire first half before finally pushing ahead by three at the break. But Wake Forest scored the first seven points after halftime to finally get some separation from the Panthers (1-1), then steadily increased the margin down the stretch. Wake Forest shot 52 percent and led by as many as 27 points. That’s not to say it was all easy for Wake Forest, which was facing a team picked to finish sixth in the Big South Conference. In fact, High Point led by nine points midway through the first half while Wake Forest didn’t take its first lead until there were just 2 minutes left before halftime.

Section B

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Fernando Estevez (9) helped Monroe put together one of its best soccer seasons ever, reaching the state semifinal round for the first time.

Monroe Monroe High’s outstanding boys soccer season came to a sudden halt on Wednesday. Hendersonville (19-4-1) eliminated the Redhawks with a 3-0 win in the 1A state semifinals — ending the deepest run by a Monroe soccer team in school history. Monroe (18-5) played strong on defense for mmost of the first half, limiting the highpowered Hendersonville offense to just five shots on goal in the first 38 minutes — highlighted by a couple of impressive saves by Redhawks goalie Rafael Martinez. But they couldn’t hold off the Bearcats the entire half, as Hendersonville got on the board with just over a minute left in the half when Jake Cosgrove headed in a throwin. The Redhawks got some good looks at the goal during the first half, but missed wide or high. Martinez spent the second half under a lo more pressure, and fought off numerous good shots. Martinez saved eight shots

Mavs will play 3A semifinal today Marvin Ridge High was scheduled to host Asheville in the state semifinal round of the 3A boys soccer playoffs on Wednesday, but the match was postponed until today at 7 p.m. because of rain. Read details in Friday’s issue of The Enquirer-Journal. in the first 30 minutes of the second half before Brayan Aguirre put the Bearcats up 2-0 with 9:07 left in the match by heading in a corner kick. Aguirre, a junior, now has 101 goals in his career. Monroe did put the ball in the back of the net, but the score was waived off because of a high-kicking penalty. As time ran down, the Redhawks tried to get more offensive, and that helped Ahmad Jarrar break free for a one-onone with Martinez. Jarrar won the battle, giving his team a cushion with his goal that miade it 3-0 with just under three minutes left in the game.

See SOCCER / Page 2B


2B / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Jamison leads Wiz to 17-point win over Cavs Local Events quarter while shooting 3 for 7. No one else scored more than 10 points for Cleveland, which was without the injured Shaquille O’Neal and Anderson Varejao, and had its five-game winning streak snapped.

WASHINGTON (AP) — LeBron James was stymied down the stretch by DeShawn Stevenson, Antawn Jamison delivered 31 points and 10 rebounds in his season debut, and the Washington Wizards beat the Cleveland Cavaliers 108-91 Wednesday night to end a six-game losing streak. Wearing a white protective sleeve over the right shoulder that sidelined him since October, Jamison looked in midseason form from the start, scoring 13 points in the first quarter. James finished with 34 points and nine assists, but he scored only six points in the fourth

Hawks 105, Heat 90 ATLANTA — Joe Johnson made it two straight 30-point games, Josh Smith dominated during a decisive first-half run and Atlanta won its sixth in a row, beating Miami to reclaim a share of the NBA’s best record. Johnson scored 30 points on the heels of a 35-point effort against Portland on Monday.

Soccer Continued from Page 1B “They got a couple of athletic headers that we couldn’t stop,” said Redhawks coach Rick Kukor. “My boys played from the first whistle ... we tried things

Jackets Continued from Page 1B Little (6-1, 230) leads the team with 32 catches for 441 yards and six TDs on the season. “That’s just a real plus for us because if (Pisgah) tries to load up the box, we know we can throw it and get some yards down field,” said Lowery. “When Jamal

Bucks 99, Nets 85 MILWAUKEE — Andrew Bogut and Carlos Delfino each scored 21 points, Bogut also grabbed 11 rebounds, and Milwaukee beat winless New Jersey. The short-handed Nets have lost 12 straight for their longest single-season losing streak in more than 19 years. This one was painful because Chris Douglas-Roberts scored a career-high 31 points and had 10 rebounds, but the Nets blew a 48-41 halftime lead by shooting 9 of 38 in the second half. That made it easy for Bogut, Delfino and rookie

and they did everything we asked them to do. It was an awesome game.” Kukor said the Redhawks’ playoff run brought a lot of attention to the program. “They’ve always felt isolated,” Kukor said of his players, “but we the community, the teachers, the school got behind us. The teachers have been mak-

get his hands on the ball, he runs it really well for a guy his size. Plus, that makes the other team have to prepare for some different things.” Forest Hills has had plenty of recent success in the postseason. The Jackets have reached the 2AA state semifinals three out of the last four seasons, including last year. Pisgah has also had some post-

Brandon Jennings, who had 19 points and eight assists in his second game since a 55-point night on Saturday. Knicks 110, Pacers 103 INDIANAPOLIS — Al Harrington scored 13 of his 26 points in the fourth quarter against his former team, and New York beat Indiana to snap a six-game losing streak. Larry Hughes had 22 points and 10 rebounds, Wilson Chandler scored 18 points and David Lee added 17 for the Knicks (2-9), who overcame a double-digit deficit in the final period.

ing them brownies, the community’s behind them and I hope they recognize it and the young guys take it forward. I want them to say, ‘Hey we’re playing for Monroe,’ and understand they’re not out here on an island.” The Redhawks finished the 2009 season ranked No. 3 in the 1A state poll by eurosportscoreboard.com.

season success, advancing past the first round in each of the last four seasons. “Obviously, the playoff experience has got to be a plus for a lot of our guys, but every year is a new year, so we’ve just got to line up and play,” said Lowery. “Any time you get in a game like this, you can’t have turnovers. (Pisgah) isn’t the type of team that will beat themselves, so we’ve got to come ready to play.”

LITTLE

Today

High School Boys Soccer Playoffs, State Semifinals Asheville at Marvin Ridge, 7 p.m. High School Basketball Ardrey Kell at Porter Ridge, 6:30 p.m. Gray Stone Day at Union Academy, 6:30 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today AUTO RACING 6:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, final practice for Ford 200, at Homestead, Fla. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Colorado at Oklahoma St. GOLF 4 p.m. TGC — LPGA Tour Championship, first round, at Houston 3 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Dubai World Championship, second round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — O’Reilly Auto Parts Puerto Rico Tip-Off, first round, Indiana vs. Mississippi, at San Juan, Puerto Rico 7 p.m. ESPN2 — 2K Sports Coaches vs. Cancer Classic, first round, Syracuse vs. California, at New York 9 p.m. ESPN2 — 2K Sports Coaches vs. Cancer Classic, first round, North Carolina vs. Ohio St., at New York NBA BASKETBALL 8:15 p.m. TNT — Phoenix at New Orleans 10:30 p.m. TNT — Chicago at L.A. Lakers NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. WAXN — Miami at Carolina UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE 9 p.m. VERSUS — Florida at California

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East

New England Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo

W 6 4 4 3

L 3 5 5 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .444 .444 .333

Indianapolis Jacksonville Houston Tennessee

W 9 5 5 3

L 0 4 4 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .556 .556 .333

Cincinnati Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland

W 7 6 5 1

L 2 3 4 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .778 .667 .556 .111

Denver San Diego Kansas City Oakland

W 6 6 2 2

L 3 3 7 7

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .667 .222 .222

PF 259 218 199 140

PA 150 227 158 210

AFC 4-3-0 3-3-0 4-4-0 1-5-0

NFC 2-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-0 2-1-0

Div 2-1-0 3-1-0 1-3-0 1-2-0

PA 142 220 188 255

AFC 5-0-0 4-2-0 4-3-0 2-6-0

NFC 4-0-0 1-2-0 1-1-0 1-0-0

Div 3-0-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 1-3-0

PF 198 207 222 78

PA 147 157 154 225

AFC 5-2-0 4-2-0 5-3-0 1-5-0

NFC 2-0-0 2-1-0 0-1-0 0-3-0

Div 5-0-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 0-4-0

PF 167 237 142 88

PA 151 202 215 217

AFC 5-2-0 4-3-0 1-4-0 1-6-0

NFC 1-1-0 2-0-0 1-3-0 1-1-0

Div 2-0-0 3-1-0 1-2-0 1-4-0

PA 169 184 204 171

NFC 5-2-0 4-2-0 3-3-0 2-5-0

AFC 1-1-0 1-2-0 2-1-0 1-1-0

Div 1-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0

PA 197 194 215 256

NFC 6-0-0 4-3-0 4-4-0 1-5-0

AFC 3-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-3-0

Div 2-0-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 0-1-0

PF 271 232 186 143

PA 184 179 201 264

NFC 6-0-0 4-3-0 2-4-0 1-7-0

AFC 2-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-1-0

Div 4-0-0 2-2-0 1-1-0 0-4-0

PF 229 184 187 100

PA 184 180 198 249

NFC 4-2-0 4-2-0 2-5-0 1-6-0

AFC 2-1-0 0-3-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

Div 2-1-0 3-0-0 1-3-0 0-2-0

South

PF 252 181 215 189

North

West

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East

Dallas Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Washington

W 6 5 5 3

L 3 4 4 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .556 .556 .333

New Orleans Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay

W 9 5 4 1

L 0 4 5 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .556 .444 .111

PF 224 242 232 140

South

PF 331 221 176 157

North

Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 8 5 4 1

L 1 4 5 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .889 .556 .444 .111

W Arizona 6 San Francisco 4 Seattle 3 St. Louis 1

L 3 5 6 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .444 .333 .111

West

Today’s Game Miami at Carolina, 8:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Detroit, 1 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Oakland, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Tennessee at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 26 Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Denver, 8:20 p.m.

College football College Football Schedule All Times EST (Subject to change)

Today

SOUTH Nicholls St. (2-8) at SE Louisiana (6-4), 7 p.m. MIDWEST Tennessee St. (3-7) at E. Illinois (8-2), 6:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST Colorado (3-7) at Oklahoma St. (8-2), 7:30 p.m.

Friday, Nov. 20

MIDWEST Akron (2-8) at Bowling Green (5-5), 5:30 p.m. E. Michigan (0-10) at Toledo (4-6), 7:00 FAR WEST Boise St. (10-0) at Utah St. (3-7), 9:30

Saturday, Nov. 21 EAST

North Carolina (7-3) at Boston College (7-3), Noon Bryant (4-6) at Duquesne (3-7), Noon Robert Morris (4-6) at Monmouth, N.J. (5-5), Noon Maine (5-5) at New Hampshire (8-2), Noon Harvard (6-3) at Yale (4-5), Noon Brown (6-3) at Columbia (3-6), 12:30 Princeton (3-6) at Dartmouth (2-7), 12:30 p.m. Lafayette (8-2) at Lehigh (3-7), 12:30 Northeastern (2-8) at Rhode Island (1-9), 12:30 p.m. Holy Cross (9-1) at Bucknell (3-7), 1:00 Fordham (4-6) at Georgetown, D.C. (0-10), 1 p.m. Massachusetts (5-5) at Hofstra (4-6), 1:00 Cornell (2-7) at Penn (7-2), 1 p.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (8-2) at St. Francis, Pa. (2-8), 1 p.m. Liberty (8-2) at Stony Brook (5-5), 1:00 Kent St. (5-5) at Temple (8-2), 1 p.m. Albany, N.Y. (6-4) at Wagner (6-4), 1:00 Rutgers (7-2) at Syracuse (3-7), 3:30 Delaware (6-4) at Villanova (9-1), 3:30 SOUTH Maryland (2-8) at Florida St. (5-5), Noon Duke (5-5) at Miami (7-3), Noon William & Mary (9-1) at Richmond (9-1), Noon Louisville (4-6) at South Florida (6-3), Noon Chattanooga (6-4) at Alabama (10-0), 12:20 p.m. Fla. International (3-7) at Florida (10-0), 12:30 p.m. Jacksonville (6-4) at Campbell (3-7), 1 Howard (2-8) at Delaware St. (3-6), 1 Morgan St. (5-5) at Hampton (5-5), 1 p.m. E. Kentucky (5-5) at Jacksonville St. (7-3), 1 p.m. Winston-Salem (1-9) at Norfolk St. (6-4), 1 p.m. Gardner-Webb (5-5) at Presbyterian (0-10), 1 p.m. Coastal Carolina (5-5) at Charleston Southern (5-5), 1:30 p.m. Savannah St. (2-6) at N.C. Central (3-7), 1:30 p.m. N. Carolina A&T (4-5) at S. Carolina St. (9-1), 1:30 p.m.

Old Dominion (8-2) at VMI (2-8), 1:30 The Citadel (4-6) at Georgia Southern (4-6), 2 p.m. Alcorn St. (2-6) vs. Jackson St. (3-6) at Jackson, Miss., 2 p.m. Austin Peay (4-6) at Tenn.-Martin (4-6), 2 p.m. Tulane (3-7) at UCF (6-4), 2 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (5-5) vs. Florida A&M (7-3) at Orlando, Fla., 2:30 p.m. Murray St. (3-7) at Tennessee Tech (5-5), 2:30 p.m. MVSU (3-7) at Alabama A&M (6-4), 3 p.m. Wofford (3-7) at Furman (5-5), 3 p.m. Towson (2-8) at James Madison (5-5), 3 p.m. Stephen F.Austin (8-2) at Northwestern St. (0-10), 3 p.m. Elon (8-2) at Samford (5-5), 3 p.m. W. Carolina (2-8) at Appalachian St. (8-2), 3:30 p.m. Virginia (3-7) at Clemson (7-3), 3:30 UAB (5-5) at East Carolina 3:30 p.m. LSU (8-2) at Mississippi (7-3), 3:30 p.m. N.C. State (4-6) at Virginia Tech (7-3), 3:30 p.m. Florida Atlantic (3-6) at Troy (7-3), 4:15 p.m. SMU (6-4) at Marshall (5-5), 4:30 p.m. Arkansas St. (2-7) at Middle Tennessee (7-3), 4:30 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (6-4) at LouisianaLafayette (5-5), 7 p.m. Tulsa at Southern Miss. (6-4), 7 p.m. Vanderbilt (2-9) at Tennessee (5-5), 7 Kentucky (6-4) at Georgia (6-4), 7:45 Cent. Arkansas (5-5) at McNeese St. (8-2), 8 p.m. MIDWEST Ohio St. (9-2) at Michigan (5-6), Noon Minnesota (6-5) at Iowa (9-2), 12:02 p.m. Drake (8-2) at Butler (9-1), 1 p.m. Marist (7-3) at Dayton (8-2), 1 p.m. N. Iowa (7-3) at Illinois St. (5-5), 1 p.m. Morehead St. (2-8) at Valparaiso (1-9), 1 p.m. Iowa St. (6-5) at Missouri (6-4), 2 p.m. Youngstown St. (5-5) at N. Dakota St. (3-7), 2 p.m. N. Illinois (7-3) at Ohio (7-3), 2 p.m. S. Illinois (9-1) at SE Missouri (2-8), 2 S. Dakota St. (7-3) at W. Illinois (1-9), 2:05 p.m. Connecticut (4-5) at Notre Dame (6-4), 2:30 p.m. Purdue (4-7) at Indiana (4-7), 3:30 p.m. Penn St. (9-2) at Michigan St. (6-5), 3:30 p.m. Wisconsin (8-2) at Northwestern (7-4), 3:30 p.m. Kansas St. (6-5) at Nebraska (7-3), 7:45 SOUTHWEST Mississippi St. (4-6) at Arkansas (6-4), 12:21 p.m. Oklahoma (6-4) at Texas Tech (6-4), 12:30 p.m. Memphis (2-8) at Houston (8-2), 1 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (5-3) at Prairie View (7-1), 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. (5-5) at Texas St. (6-4), 3 p.m. UTEP (3-7) at Rice (1-9), 3:30 p.m. Baylor (4-6) at Texas A&M (5-5), 3:30 Army (4-6) at North Texas (1-8), 4 p.m. Kansas (5-5) at Texas (10-0), 8 p.m. FAR WEST Cal Poly (4-6) at Weber St. (6-4), 2 p.m. TCU (10-0) at Wyoming (5-5), 2 p.m. Montana (10-0) at Montana St. (7-3), 2:05 p.m. Air Force (7-4) at BYU (8-2), 3:30 p.m. Arizona St. (4-6) at UCLA (5-5), 4 p.m. San Diego St. (4-6) at Utah (8-2), 4 p.m. Louisiana Tech (3-7) at Fresno St. (6-4), 5 p.m. E. Washington (7-3) at N. Arizona (5-5), 5:05 p.m. UC Davis (6-4) at Sacramento St. (4-6), 5:05 p.m. Colorado St. (3-7) at New Mexico (0-10), 6 p.m. Oregon St. (7-3) at Washington St. (1-9), 6:30 p.m. California (7-3) at Stanford (7-3), 7:30 Oregon (8-2) at Arizona (6-3), 8 p.m. Hawaii (4-6) at San Jose St. (1-8), 8 p.m. S. Utah (4-6) at San Diego (4-6), 9 p.m. Nevada (7-3) at New Mexico St. (3-7), 10:30 p.m.

Auto racing 2009 NASCAR Sprint Cup schedule and standings

Feb. 7 — x-Budweiser Shootout, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Kevin Harvick) Feb. 15 — Daytona 500, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Matt Kenseth) Feb. 22 — Auto Club 500, Fontana, Calif. (Matt Kenseth) March 1 — Shelby 427, Las Vegas. (Kyle Busch) March 8 — Kobalt Tools 500, Hampton, Ga. (Kurt Busch) March 22 — Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) March 29 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va. (Jimmie Johnson) April 5 — Samsung 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Jeff Gordon) April 18 — Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Mark Martin) April 26 — Aaron’s 499, Talladega, Ala. (Brad Keselowski) May 2 — Crown Royal Presents the

Russell Friedman 400, Richmond, Va. (Kyle Busch) May 9 — Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. (Mark Martin) May 16 — x-NASCAR All-Star Challenge, Concord, N.C. (Tony Stewart) May 24 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. (David Reutimann) May 31 — Dover 400, Dover, Del. (Jimmie Johnson) June 7 — Pocono 500, Long Pond, Pa. (Tony Stewart) June 14 — LifeLock 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Mark Martin) June 21 — Toyota/Savemart 350, Sonoma, Calif. (Kasey Kahne) June 28 — LENOX Industrial Tools 301, Loudon, N.H. (Joey Logano) July 4 — Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Tony Stewart) July 11 — LifeLock.com 400, Joliet, Ill. (Mark Martin) July 26 — Allstate 400, Indianapolis. (Jimmie Johnson) Aug. 2 — Pennsylvania 500, Long Pond, Pa. (Denny Hamlin) Aug. 9 — Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips At The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Tony Stewart) Aug. 16 — Carfax 400, Brooklyn, Mich. (Brian Vickers) Aug. 22 — Sharpie 500, Bristol, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) Sept. 6 — Pep Boys Auto 500, Hampton, Ga. (Kasey Kahne) Sept. 12 — Chevy Rock & Roll 400, Richmond, Va. (Denny Hamlin) Sept. 20 — Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H. (Mark Martin) Sept. 27 — AAA 400, Dover, Del. (Jimmie Johnson) Oct. 4 — Price Chopper 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Tony Stewart) Oct. 11 — Pepsi 500, Fontana, Calif. (Jimmie Johnson) Oct. 17 — NASCAR Banking 500, Concord, N.C. (Jimmie Johnson) Oct. 25 — Tums Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va. (Denny Hamlin) Nov. 1 — Amp Energy 500, Talladega, Ala. (Jamie McMurray) Nov. 8 — Dickies 500, Fort Worth, Texas. (Kurt Busch) Nov. 15 — Checker O’Reilly Auto Parts 500, Avondale, Ariz. (Jimmie Johnson) Nov. 22 — Ford 400, Homestead, Fla. x-non-points race Driver Standings 1. Jimmie Johnson, 6,492 2. Mark Martin, 6,384 3. Jeff Gordon, 6,323 4. Kurt Busch, 6,281 5. Tony Stewart, 6,207 6. Juan Pablo Montoya, 6,203 7. Greg Biffle, 6,171 8. Denny Hamlin, 6,140 9. Ryan Newman, 6,081 10. Kasey Kahne, 6,016 11. Carl Edwards, 5,972 12. Brian Vickers, 5,826 13. Kyle Busch, 4,310 14. Matt Kenseth, 4,265 15. Clint Bowyer, 4,224 16. David Reutimann, 4,103 17. Jeff Burton, 3,847 18. Marcos Ambrose, 3,767 19. Joey Logano, 3,700 20. Casey Mears, 3,653

NASCAR Nationwide Series schedule, standings

Feb. 14 — Camping World 300, Daytona Beach, Fla. (Tony Stewart) Feb. 21 — Stater Bros. 300, Fontana, Calif. (Kyle Busch) Feb. 28 — Sam’s Town 300, Las Vegas (Greg Biffle) March 21 — Scotts Turf Builder 300, Bristol, Tenn. (Kevin Harvick) April 4 — O’Reilly 300, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle Busch) April 11 — Pepsi 300, Lebanon, Tenn. (Joey Logano) April 17 — Bashas’ Supermarkets 200, Avondale, Ariz. (Greg Biffle) April 25 — Aaron’s 312, Talladega, Ala. (David Ragan) May 1 — Lipton Tea 250, Richmond, Va. (Kyle Busch) May 8 — Diamond Hill Plywood 200, Darlington, S.C. (Matt Kenseth) May 23 — CARQUEST Auto Parts 300, Concord, N.C. (Mike Bliss) May 30 — Heluva Good! 200 Dover, Del. (Brad Keselowski) June 6 — Federated Auto Parts 300, Lebanon, Tenn. (Kyle Busch) June 13 — Meijer 300, Sparta, Ky. (Joey Logano) June 20 — NorthernTool.com 250, West Allis, Wis. (Carl Edwards) June 27 — Camping World RV Sales 200, Loudon, N.H. (Kyle Busch) July 3 — Subway Jalapeno 250, Daytona Beach, Calif. (Clint Bowyer) July 10 — Dollar General 300, Joliet, Ill. (Joey Logano) July 18 — Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250, Madison, Ill. (Kyle Busch) July 25 — Kroger 200, Indianapolis (Carl Edwards) Aug. 1 — U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa (Brad Keselowski)

Aug. 8 — Zippo 200 at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Marcos Ambrose) Aug. 15 — Carfax 250, Brooklyn, Mich. (Brad Keselowski) Aug. 21 — Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn. (David Ragan) Aug. 30 — NAPA Auto Parts 200, Montreal (Carl Edwards) Sept. 5 — Degree V12 300, Hampton, Ga. (Kevin Harvick) Sept. 11 — Virginia 529 College Savings 250, Richmond, Va. (Carl Edwards) Sept. 26 — Dover 200, Dover, Del. (Clint Bowyer) Oct. 3 — Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan. (Joey Logano) Oct. 10 — Copart 300, Fontana, Calif. (Joey Logano) Oct. 16 — Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C. (Kyle Busch) Oct. 24 — Kroger On Track for the Cure 250, Memphis, Tenn. (Brad Keselowski) Nov. 7 — O’Reilly Challenge, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle Busch) Nov. 14 — Able Body Labor 200, Avondale (Carl Edwards) Nov. 21 — Ford 300, Homestead, Fla. Driver Standings 1. Kyle Busch, 5,487 2. Carl Edwards, 5,297 3. Brad Keselowski, 5,237 4. Jason Leffler, 4,431 5. Mike Bliss, 3,960 6. Justin Allgaier, 3,946 7. Steve Wallace, 3,860 8. Jason Keller, 3,831 9. Brendan Gaughan, 3,784 10. Michael Annett, 3,498 11. Kenny Wallace, 3,457 12. Tony Raines, 3,454 13. Michael McDowell, 3,449 14. Kevin Harvick, 3,248 15. Joey Logano, 3,206 16. Scott Wimmer, 3,071 17. Eric McClure, 2,883 18. David Ragan, 2,632 19. Brian Vickers, 2,403 20. Danny O’Quinn Jr., 2,346

Pro basketball NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

W Boston 9 Philadelphia 5 Toronto 5 New York 2 New Jersey 0

L 3 6 6 9 12

Pct GB .750 — .455 3 1/2 .455 3 1/2 .182 6 1/2 .000 9

Southeast Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 10 2 .833 — Orlando 9 3 .750 1 Miami 7 4 .636 2 1/2 Washington 3 7 .300 6 Charlotte 3 8 .273 6 1/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Cleveland 8 4 .667 — Milwaukee 6 3 .667 1/2 Chicago 6 4 .600 1 Indiana 5 4 .556 1 1/2 Detroit 5 6 .455 2 1/2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Dallas 8 3 .727 — Houston 7 5 .583 1 1/2 San Antonio 4 4 .500 2 1/2 New Orleans 4 8 .333 4 1/2 Memphis 3 8 .273 5 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Denver 8 3 .727 — Portland 8 4 .667 1/2 Oklahoma City 6 6 .500 2 1/2 Utah 4 6 .400 3 1/2 Minnesota 1 11 .083 7 1/2 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Phoenix 10 2 .833 — L.A. Lakers 8 3 .727 1 1/2 Sacramento 5 5 .500 4 L.A. Clippers 4 9 .308 6 1/2 Golden State 3 8 .273 6 1/2 Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 114, Golden State 108 Indiana 91, New Jersey 83 Oklahoma City 100, Miami 87 New Orleans 110, L.A. Clippers 102 Phoenix 111, Houston 105 Denver 130, Toronto 112 Chicago 101, Sacramento 87 L.A. Lakers 106, Detroit 93 Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 105, Miami 90 New York 110, Indiana 103 Orlando 108, Oklahoma City 94 Washington 108, Cleveland 91 Philadelphia 86, Charlotte 84 Boston 109, Golden State 95 Milwaukee 99, New Jersey 85

Memphis 106, L.A. Clippers 91 Houston 97, Minnesota 84 Toronto at Utah, late San Antonio at Dallas, late Detroit at Portland, late Today’s Games Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Utah at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Miami at Toronto, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m. Memphis at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Houston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Boston, 8 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

Transactions Wednesday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Purchased the contracts of RHP Brandon Erbe, RHP Luis Lebron, INF Josh Bell and INF Pedro Florimon from Bowie (EL) and INF Rhyne Hughes and INF Brandon Snyder from Norfolk (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Named Doug Henry pitching coach of Omaha (PCL); Tony Medina trainer of Northwest Arkansas (Texas); Mark Stubblefield trainer of Iowa (MWL); Brian Buchanan manager, Carlos Martinez pitching coach and Julio Bruno hitting coach of Idaho Falls (Pioneer); Darryl Kennedy manager, Andre David hitting coach, Jon Williams scout and Dale Gilbert trainer of the Royals (Arizona); Bill Fischer special assistant to player development and pitching coordinator; Rusty Kuntz special assistant to player development; Luis Silverio minor league outfield coordinator; Mark Harris minor league infield coordinator; Chris DeLucia minor league medical coordinator; and Tim Scheierman minor league rehab coordinator. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Agreed to terms with manager Jim Tracy on a three-year contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Purchased the contracts of CF Lorenzo Cain from Huntsville (SL) and RHP Amaury Rivas from Brevard County (FSL). Claimed C George Kottaras off waivers from Boston. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Purchased the contracts of LHP Tyler Norrick, RHP Adam Ottavino, RHP Francisco Samuel, C Bryan Anderson, INF Mark Hamilton, OF Allen Craig, OF John Jay and OF Daryl Jones from Memphis (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Named Davey Johnson senior advisor to the general manager. BASKETBALL NBA Development League RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS— Released G Cliff Clinkscales, G Antoine Hood and F Rashad Woods. Waived G Jamarcus Ellis and F DeAngelo Alexander. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed WR Troy Bergeron to the practice squad. BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed PK Billy Cundiff. BUFFALO BILLS—Placed TE Derek Fine on injured reserve. Signed TE Joe Klopfenstein. Signed OL Christian Gaddis to the practice squad. Placed WR C.J. Hawthorne on the practice squad-injured list. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Placed P Dave Zastudil and TE Steve Heiden on injured reserve. Claimed WR Jake Allen off waivers from Green Bay and LB Arnold Harrison off waivers from Pittsburgh. Signed WR James Robinson to the practice squad. Released WR Chris Williams from the practice squad. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Waived WR Jake Allen. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Signed CB Chris McAlister. SOCCER Major League Soccer RED BULL NEW YORK— Terminated the contract of D Leo Krupnik. COLLEGE WESTERN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE—Suspended Louisiana Tech DB Chad Boyd for the first half of Saturday’s game against Fresno State for a hard hit in last week’s game against LSU for which he should’ve been ejected but wasn’t penalized. IMMACULATA—Named Jennifer Wong women’s lacrosse coach. LEHMAN—Named John Foster baseball coach. SOUTH CAROLINA-UPSTATE— Named Renee Lopez women’s soccer coach.


The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 3B

Williams’ last-second layup lifts Sixers over Bobcats PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Elton Brand reverted back to his All-Star form. Instead of watching the fourth quarter from the bench, the two-time All-Star forward was right in the middle of the action for Philadelphia. Lou Williams’ layup with 3.1 seconds remaining lifted the 76ers to a come-from-behind 86-84 victory over the Charlotte Bobcats on Wednesday night. Andre Iguodala scored 25 points, Williams had 19 and

Brand contributed season highs of 19 points, 11 rebounds and six blocked shots for the Sixers, who snapped a two-game losing streak. Rodney Carney had 10 points for Philadelphia. Brand was clearly a catalyst in this victory. “That’s not my best,� Brand said. “I’ve still got a lot better games ahead of me. I still feel like I missed some easy shots.� Brand played a season-high 41 minutes, including meaningful minutes down the stretch.

In six of the last seven games, Brand didn’t play at all in the fourth quarter. “He didn’t lobby,� Sixers coach Eddie Jordan said of Brand’s minutes. “What he did on the floor warranted playing time.� With the score tied at 84, Boris Diaw missed a baseline jumper and Iguodala gathered the rebound. He dribbled to midcourt and passed to Williams for the layup on the fast break. “I’m glad the shot went in,�

Williams said. “We needed a win. To be honest, I was kind of mad that we were behind. I took it personally.� The Bobcats never got off a shot on their final possession. Stephen Jackson scored 10 of his 26 points in the fourth quarter. Gerald Wallace added 11 points and 12 rebounds for the reeling Bobcats (3-8), who dropped their sixth straight and fell to 0-6 on the road. Brand was in the starting lineup for the Sixers despite

Panthers Continued from Page 1B

Photo by Dale Barbee

Panthers RB DeAngelo Williams (34) has rushed for 860 yards this season, which ranks fourth in the NFL, but he’s listed as questionable for tonight’s home game against the Dolphins.

Knaus learning how to relax, enjoy ride Knaus was certainly HOMESTEAD, Fla. headed in that direction at (AP) — Chad Knaus was the end of 2005, when he clearly distracted as he and Johnson fell short of a leaned against a cart championship for a second during a casual conversaconsecutive season. He’d tion before last week’s had Johnson in contention race in Phoenix. His eyes every year since their 2002 darted around, finally debut, but their best opporsettling on an aerosol tunities came in the first can and a box of towels. two years of the Chase “Move,� he ordered, for the championship. just as he began spraying When they came up cleaner across the top of empty — Johnson fell the nylon cover on the tool eight points short in 2004, cart. He wiped away the and blew a tire in the 2005 offensive dust and dirt, finale to fall out of contenrolled the towels into a tion — Knaus knew no ball and fired them into a way of handling nearby trash can. the defeat other “So, I was saythan to work more ing,� he started. and push his Yeah, sure he’s team harder. His mellowed out. methods had Knaus, the most driven a wedge intense crew chief into his relationin NASCAR, is one ship with Johnson, step from guiding and Hendrick driver Jimmie intended to split Johnson and the KNAUS the two during No. 48 Hendrick the infamous “milk and Motorsports team to a cookies� sitdown. record fourth consecuBecause they’d been tive Cup championship. behaving like children, He’s meticulous, Hendrick served them relentless and maybe what he felt was an approeven a bit obsessive. priate snack. Point made, And that’s the imKnaus and Johnson aired proved version. their issues and resolved to Those close to Knaus repair their relationship. insist he’s matured But doing so meant tremendously during Knaus would have to put Johnson’s reign, evolvsome balance into his life. ing from a maniacal Johnson, the laid-back Caltaskmaster who came ifornian, urged the type-A close to being removed as Knaus to chill out once Johnson’s crew chief to in a while and enjoy life. an effective communicaOn his own since he tor and motivator of the was a teenager, Knaus best team in NASCAR. had clawed his way from Johnson will wrap up the a mechanic working on Sprint Cup title in Sunhis father’s race car to day’s finale at Homesteadthe opportunity to build Miami Speedway with a a team from scratch for finish of 25th or better. “The one thing he has al- NASCAR’s most successful team owner. That path ways possessed is the fire, had instilled a take-nothe will and the determiprisoners work ethic in nation to win,� boss Rick Knaus, but little else to Hendrick said. “He’s willshow for his efforts. ing to dedicate everything “I really dedicated everyhe has to be successful, and thing I had to (2005) to try he really, truly leaves no to win the championship, rock unturned. But I think and we came up short, and the thing he’s learned is that not everybody can run Mr. Hendrick and Jimmie showed me at the end of at that pace, and I don’t think that Chad could have that season, ’Look, you can’t do this. You can’t do continued at his pace from it at the level that you’re three, four, five years ago trying to do it,’ “ Knaus because you burn out.�

learned as a play caller was that the head coach can get in the way sometimes. People in your ear, too many chefs in the kitchen, that can be a problem. I like to stay out of the way of Dan as much as possible.� That wasn’t the case with the Panthers. Conservative coach John Fox limited what Henning could do. Many felt Henning was made the scapegoat after a miserable 2006 season — even after his inventive way to win a game late that season. Jake Delhomme was hurt and backup Chris Weinke was hampered by an injured throwing shoulder. Henning lessened Weinke’s load by occasionally putting DeAngelo Williams behind center against Atlanta. The then-rookie picked up first downs on seven of eight third-down carries. The Panthers threw seven passes all game and won 10-3. A month later, Henning was gone, and the Panthers have used the wildcat sparingly since. “He’s a good football coach, a very smart man,� Delhomme said. “I do miss him, but that’s coaching. Sometimes things just don’t mesh at certain times.� After a year out of football, Henning returned to work for buddy Bill Parcells, unveiling double-reverse passes by running backs that Fox never would have signed off on as the Dolphins won the AFC East last season. The Panthers, with Jeff Davidson calling plays in their run-first approach, won a division title, too. Both teams got off to 0-3 starts this year before winning four of their next six to put them back on the edge of the playoff picture.

speculation over the past couple of days that he might be coming off the bench. Two years ago, Brand signed a five-year, $80 million free agent contract. But he missed the majority of last season with a shoulder injury and he entered Wednesday’s game with career-low averages in points (9.8) and rebounds (5.3). Brand has also been on the bench in the fourth quarter six of the last seven games before this one.

“Mirror images, both had doubledigit wins last year and they’re just trying to get back to .500,� Delhomme said of the first Thursday game in Carolina’s 15-year history. “We’re doing some decent things and we’ve got to see if we can carry it over.� Carolina veered from its play-itsafe approach a bit Sunday, using a no-huddle offense that produced two touchdown passes to Steve Smith in a 28-19 win over the Falcons. Delhomme went turnover-free for the third straight game after 13 interceptions in his first six. But the Panthers lost left tackle Jordan Gross to a broken ankle, causing them to shuffle the offensive line. Delhomme hinted that might lead to ditching the no-huddle. Sparano said maybe Brown’s injury will mean no wildcat, too. Or, with only three days of preparation time, maybe both teams are already running misdirection plays. “You have to recover from a game pretty quickly,� Dolphins linebacker Jason Taylor said. “I’m not 25 anymore.� Joey Porter is expected to line up with Taylor at linebacker Thursday after he was a healthy scratch in Sunday’s uncomfortably close 25-23 win over Tampa Bay. But how much he’ll play is uncertain after replacements Charlie Anderson and Cameron Wake combined for two sacks. Now Carolina faces the NFL’s fourth-ranked rushing offense without Brown. Ricky Williams rushed for 102 yards in his place Sunday and is averaging 5.3 yards a carry despite being 32. He’s taken some snaps in the wildcat, but Brown’s injury could mean more time for White. “It’s good to have that kind of backup at the running back position, so we aren’t going to change our package,� quarterback Chad Henne said.

Cup Chase heading to Homestead A glance at the 12 drivers competing in NASCAR’s Chase for the Sprint Cup championship heading into this weekend’s race at Homestead-Miami Speedway (in order of points):

CHASE CHATTER: “We’re gaining points and we’re still doing a good job,� Busch said. “Gordon is within distance going into Homestead for third place overall.�

Jimmie Johnson

Tony Stewart

CHASE POINTS: first, 6,492 CAR: No. 48 Lowe’s Chevrolet TEAM: Hendrick Motorsports CAREER HOMESTEAD STARTS: 8 AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 13.6 (best: 2nd in 2004) LAST WEEK: Drama? What drama? Johnson bounced back from his nightmare at Texas to dominate at Phoenix and move a step closer to history. Needs to finish 25th or better to clinch record fourth straight championship. Now will he finally get some love? CHASE CHATTER: “We obviously have one more race to go,� Johnson said. “We saw in Texas anything can happen so I’m not going to get too excited just yet.�

Mark Martin

CHASE POINTS: second, -108 CAR: No. 5 Carquest/Kellogg’s Chevrolet TEAM: Hendrick Motorsports AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 12.0 (best: 2nd in 2005) LAST WEEK: Steady as ever running fourth behind Johnson to stay mathematically alive. Has made up 108 points on Johnson nine times in a single race, but has never won at Miami. CHASE CHATTER: “I really thought we could get to Jimmie with 35 to go, and then the car just got too tight,� Martin said.

Jeff Gordon

CHASE POINTS: third, -169 CAR: No. 24 DuPont Chevrolet TEAM: Hendrick Motorsports AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 9.9 (best: 3rd in 2004) LAST WEEK: All but assured Hendrick of capturing the top three spots in the championship with a ninth at Phoenix, but the driver nicknamed “Four Time� won’t be adding to his title collection this year. CHASE CHATTER: “(Johnson’s team) did what they needed to do,� Gordon said. “That’s why they’re three-time champs.�

Kurt Busch

CHASE POINTS: fourth, -211 CAR: No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge TEAM: Penske Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 21.5 (won in 2002) LAST WEEK: Continued his strong run through the Chase with a sixth-place finish at Phoenix. Considering the drama surrounding the team when the Chase started, a fourth-place finish would be considered a major boost.

said. “It wasn’t the level of success, it was the level of intensity, because ... I was losing that edge that I had, and I was beginning to flame out.� So Knaus began to pick up outside interests — travel, scuba diving and yoga, to name a few — and now occasionally takes time off to unwind. Added up, he probably takes off no more than two weeks a year. But it’s a start.

CHASE POINTS: fifth, -285 CAR: No. 14 Office Depot/Old Spice Chevrolet TEAM: Stewart/Haas Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 11.9 (won twice) LAST WEEK: First season as an owner/driver won’t end with a title, and a 25th-place finish at Phoenix extended an underwhelming Chase for the regular-season champ. CHASE CHATTER: “Just by getting two cars in the Chase and winning the races we’ve won this year exceeded more than what any of you guys could have anticipated, and we could have anticipated,� Stewart said.

Juan Pablo Montoya

CHASE POINTS: sixth, -289 CAR: No. 42 Target Chevrolet TEAM: Earnhardt Ganassi Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 22.0 (best: 15th in 2007) LAST WEEK: Montoya’s solid debut in NASCAR’s playoffs continued with an eighthplace finish at Phoenix, his sixth top-10 in nine Chase races. CHASE CHATTER: “We’ve got to try to finish as high as we can, high in points,� Montoya said. “It would be nice to try to get a win this year. It’s been a great year otherwise.�

Greg Biffle

CHASE POINTS: seventh, -321 CAR: No. 16 3M Scotch Brand Ford TEAM: Roush Fenway Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 13.4 (won three times) LAST WEEK: Finished 14th at Phoenix, continuing a trend where he’s spent the Chase practically stuck in seventh. Loves Miami, however, and could sneak into the top five with a fourth career win at the 1.5-mile track. CHASE CHATTER: “I would still like to finish in the top five in the standings and that will be our goal heading into Homestead,� Biffle said.

Denny Hamlin

CHASE POINTS: eighth, -352 CAR: No. 11 FedEx Toyota TEAM: Joe Gibbs Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 13.0 (best: 3rd, twice) LAST WEEK: Finished third behind Johnson at Phoenix, but made bigger headlines when his ongoing feud with Brad Keselowski escalated during the Nationwide Race. CHASE CHATTER: “No matter what you throw in the car, I’m the best of the worst or the worst of the best, one of the two,� Hamlin said.

“I’m enjoying things, I’m going places, and I owe all that to Jimmie,� he said. “I had never had a vacation until 2002 when Jimmie and I went to Cabo San Lucas together, and it was like, ’Man, there’s something else to do other than racing.’ “Still, to this day, I don’t do as much stuff as what I would like. But I definitely take time off and enjoy myself.�

Ryan Newman

CHASE POINTS: ninth, -411 CAR: No. 39 U.S. Army Chevrolet TEAM: Stewart/Haas Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 20.3 (best: 6th in 2002) LAST WEEK: Best news from last week was the addition of a sponsor for his No. 39 Chevy for next season. Finished a forgettable 20th at Phoenix. CHASE CHATTER: “It’s not that we would ever be disappointed because of all the things that we’ve achieved,� he said. “It’s just that we may not be totally satisfied.�

Kasey Kahne

CHASE POINTS: 10th, -476 CAR: No. 9 Budweiser Dodge TEAM: Richard Petty Motorsports AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 17.6 (best: 4th in 2006) LAST WEEK: Qualified fourth at Phoenix before settling for 15th after developing front-end problems. A solid run at Homestead would give Kahne a boost heading into an offseason full of questions at RPM. CHASE CHATTER: “At one point in the race, I felt like I could feel every crack in the race track,� he said.

Carl Edwards

CHASE POINTS: 11th, -520 CAR: No. 99 Aflac Ford TEAM: Roush Fenway Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 6.4 (won in 2008) LAST WEEK: Another ho-hum finish (16th) in a season few imagined this time last year, when Edwards finished second to Johnson. He heads to Miami looking for his first win since taking the checkered flag in the 2008 finale. CHASE CHATTER: “We have to get better,� Edwards said. “We have to figure out where we are behind and then fix that.�

Brian Vickers

CHASE POINTS: 12th, -666 CAR: No. 83 Red Bull Toyota TEAM: Red Bull Racing AVERAGE HOMESTEAD FINISH: 31.7 (best: 18th in 2004) LAST WEEK: The hottest driver entering the Chase is the coldest one ending the season. Got caught up in a 10-car pileup on lap 171 at Phoenix and wound up 38th, his worst finish since the Daytona 500. CHASE CHATTER: “It was very difficult to pass out there,� Vickers said. “And I think it was so hard to pass that no one was willing to give anything up.�

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4B / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

CELEBRITY CIPHER

SUDOKU PUZZLE

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

NORTH CAROLINA UNION COUNTY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK FILE NO. 09-SP-1616 In the Matter of the Foreclosure of the Deed of Trust of LASHONDA R. ROBINSON Mortgagor(s)-Grantor(s) To MARK T. LOWDER Substitute Trustee And UNITED STATES OF AMERICA by and Through RURAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENT, an agency of the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Noteholder(s) As recorded in Deed of Trust Book 3153, Page 363 NOTICE OF SALE Under and by virtue of an Order of the Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, North Carolina, entered on the 28th day of October, 2009. In this Special Proceeding entitled In the Matter of the Foreclosure of the Deed of Trust of LASHONDA R. ROBINSON to MARK T. LOWDER, Substitute Trustee and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA by and through RURAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENT, an agency of the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, the undersigned, was by said Order appointed Substitute Trustee to sell the lands described in the petition, and will on the 2nd day of December, 2009 at 12:00 A.M. at the Courthouse, in Monroe, Union County, North Carolina, offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash, that certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in Marshville Township, Union County, North Carolina and more particularly described as follows: BEING all of Lot Number 32 of Anna Perry Hallman Subdivision, as shown on that plat recorded in Plat Book 4 at page 181, Union County Register of Deeds, to which plat reference is hereby made for a more complete description. For reference see Deed Book 3153, Page 361, Union County Register of Deeds. The address of the property is: 410 Perry Lane Marshville, NC 28103 The above-described property will be sold subject to any liens or encumbrances, including unpaid county and city ad valorem taxes, including those for the year 2009, and also city assessments, if any. In earnest money deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the bid price or a minimum of $750.00, whichever is greater will be from the highest bidder at the time of sale as evidence of good faith. This sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids. This the 31st day of October, 2009. Mark T. Lowder Substitute Trustee Attorney at Law 120 King Avenue Albemarle, NC 28001 Phone: 704-982-8558 Fax: 704-986-4808 November 19, 26, 2009 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 1646 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Jimmy A Sanchez to PRLAP, Inc., Trustee(s), dated August 31, 2006, and recorded in Book 4288, Page 413, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on December 03, 2009, and will

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: Being a portion of that property conveyed to Horman Wallace and wife, Ruby Wallace by deed recorded in Deed Book 111 at Page 523 in the Union County Public Registry and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron found within the right of way for Old Pageland Marshville Road, said point being located at a common corner of the subject property and that property conveyed to Ralph N. Bivens and Nancy W. Bivens, now or formerly, by deed recorded in Deed Book 3290 at Page 31 in the Union County Public Registry, said point also being in the Southwestern corner of that property conveyed to Ralph and Nancy Bivens, now or formerly, by deed recorded in Deed Book 246 at Page 423 in the Union County Public Registry, and running thence along the Southern margin of the aforesaid Ralph and Nancy Bivens property, conveyed by deed recorded in Deed Book 246 at Page 243 in the Union County Public Registry, S 85 degrees 38 minutes 43 seconds E 540.85 feet, passing an iron found at 62.08 feet, to an iron found; thence S 03 degrees 34 minutes 36 seconds West 71.92 feet to an iron found; thence S 85 degrees 36 minutes 10 seconds E 543.46 feet to an iron found; thence S 04 degrees 34 minutes 21 seconds W 1495.56 feet, passing an iron set at 700.63 feet to an iron set; thence N 85 degrees 51 minutes 43 seconds W 573.24 feet to an iron set; thence N 07 degrees 00 minute 14 seconds E 142.07 feet to a point; thence N 82 degrees 59 minutes 46 seconds W 251.43 feet to a point; thence N 06 degrees 00 minute 47 seconds E 50.00 feet to an iron set; thence N 77 degrees 31 minutes 13 seconds W 388.18 feet to a point; thence N 18 degrees 22 minutes 08 seconds E 45.59 feet to an point; thence N 09 degrees 50 degrees 58 seconds E 43.75 feet to a point; thence N 04 degrees 55 minutes 11 seconds E 61.46 feet to a point; thence N 03 degrees 16 minutes 03 seconds E 69.71 feet to a point; thence S 71 degrees 44 minutes 51 seconds E 228.04 feet to an iron set; thence N 76 degrees 54 minutes 32 seconds E 170.29 feet to an iron set; thence N 43 degrees 46 minutes 46 seconds E 259.21 feet to an iron set; thence N 72 degrees 28 minutes 11 seconds E 173.18 feet to an iron found; thence N 60 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds W 555.66 feet to a point at the approximately centerline of the aforesaid right of way for Old Pageland Marshville Road; thence N 33 degrees 16 minutes 30 seconds W 36.21 feet to a point; thence N 47 degrees 23 minutes 12 seconds E 650.30 feet to the point and place of beginning and containing 43.86 acres, more or less, as shown on a survey entitled "Ruby Wallace Estate," as Lot 1 and Lot 2 Ruby Wallace Estate, prepared by Bobby F. Simpson, P.L.S. And dated November 3, 2004 LESS AND EXCEPTING:. Beginning at a point in the centerline of Old Pageland Marshville Road, which point is the common corner of the northwest most point of the Centerview Baptist Church property as described in that deed recorded in Deed Book 3665, Page 787, Union County Registry, and also being the southwest corner of that property conveyed to Jimmy A. Sanchez as described in that deed recorded in Deed Book 4288, Page 407, Union County Registry, and proceeding thence from said Beginning Point as follows: Proceeding along and with the centerline of Old Pageland Marshville Road for three calls: (1) N. 18-22-08 E 45.59 feet to a point; (2) N 09-50-58 E 43.75 feet to a point; and (3) N. 04-55-11 E 7.34 feet to a point; thence a new line, S. 7144-51 E. 220.00 feet to a point designated by an iron set; thence a new line, N. 89-02-14 E. 686.04 feet to

a point designated by an iron set; thence a new line S. 06-01-44 W. 209.40 feet to a point designated by aniron found; thence a new line along and with the common boundary line of the Wiley and Cynthia Mangum property as described in Deed Book 1124, Page 152 Union County Registry, N. 85-4750 W. 523.00 feet to a point designated by an iron found; thence a new line along and with the north boundary line of the said Centerview Baptist Church property, N. 06-00-47 E. 50.00 feet to a point designated by an iron found; thence a new line, N. 7731-13 W. 388.18 feet to the point and place of BEGINNING, containing 3.00 acres, more or less, as based upon that boundary survey for Centerview Baptist Church dated November 12, 2007, drawn by Bobby F. Simpson, NCPLA, L-3626 Said property is commonly known as Old Pageland Marshville Road, Marshville, NC 28103. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A-308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Jimmy A Sanchez. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 158.0930145NC / LMS November 19, 26, 2009

undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on December 03, 2009, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: BEGINNING at point located in pavement of Jim Parker Road, which beginning point is established by a nail set at a control corner located S. 30-14-17 E. 25.13 ft. distant in edge of pavement on east side of road, and runs thence from the beginning point and within the road right of way, S. 10-36-04 209.96 ft. to a point, J. Brice Birmingham et ux property corner, now or formerly (Book 304 pg. 415); thence running with Birmingham's north line, N. 56-15-00 W. 330.00 ft. to an EIP, another common corner with the Birmingham property, now or formerly; thence with another line of Birmingham, N. 26-59-00 E. 133.97 ft., a new corner indicated by a 1" EIP control corner at N. 26-59-00 E. 232.63 ft.; thence a new line running with Marvin Ray Burges and Jean C. Burgess property, S. 6905-40 E. 270.00 ft. to the BEGINNING and containing 1.14 acres according to physical survey dated May 25, 1998 by Russell A. Courtney, Sr., Being portion of that property described in Deed Book 720, pg. 199, Union County Registry. 0.14 acre of above described property is located within the right of way of Jim Parker Road, and this deed is made subject thereto. Said property is commonly known as 507 Jim Parker Road, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A-308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Vidyia Williams, Vijai R Dick and Steve Anthony Williams. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 1656 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Vidyia Williams, Vijai R Dick and Steve Anthony Williams to W.R. Starkey, JR., Trustee(s), dated May 29, 2008, and recorded in Book 4904, Page 438, and re-recorded in Deed Book 4940 and Page 515, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the

004 Legals Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 432.0932257NC November 19, 26, 2009 STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK 09 E 617 EXECUTOR’S NOTICE HAVING qualified before the Honorable J. R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, North Carolina, as Executors of the Estate of Wilhelmina Simmons Hamer, deceased, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 3rd day of February, 2010, or the same shall be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All person indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This the 5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th days of November, 2009. Eugene F. Hamer, Jr. P.O. Box 25 Carboro, NC 27510 Executor Sandra Cecilia Hamer P.O. Box 608 Monroe, NC 28111-0608 Executrix Harry B. Crow, Jr. Attorney for the Estate 315-B North Main Street Monroe, N.C. 28112 Telephone: (704)283-1175 Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2009 STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK FILE #9E0651 ADMINISTRATOR EXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J. R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of James L. Banta, deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 20th day of February 2010 or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All person indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 13th day of November, 2009. James L. Banta Jr. 7715 Carriker Williams Rd. Monroe, NC 28110 Dana N. Banta 7406 Sims Rd. Waxhaw, NC 28173 November 19, 26, 2009 December 3, 10, 2009 PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE The Town Council of the Town of Stallings will conduct a Public Meeting on Monday, November 23, 2009 at 7:00 pm at the Stallings Town Hall to consider the following matter: TX09.11.01: Zoning Ordinance amendment to Section 152.172 Prohibited Signs and Section 152.176 (B) (2) Specifications for Signs Requiring a Permit. The amendment will restrict the use of pole signs and require all ground and monument signs to have an architectural base. Citizens are invited to make written or oral comments. The Town of Stallings does not discriminate on the basis of disability. If you need auxiliary aid or service or other accommodations in order to attend or participate at the public hearing, please contact the Town Clerk (704-8218557) as far in advance as possible so that your request may be considered. Lynne Hair Town Planner November 12, 19, 2009 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 1645 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Rayford E Rahmings Sr to R.J. Daniel, Trustee(s), dated July 31, 2008, and recorded in Book 4949, Page 806, Union County Registry, North


The Enquirer-Journal

Thursday, November 19, 2009 / 5B

004 Legals

005 Special Notices

Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on December 03, 2009, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: Being all of Lot 147, Breckonridge, Phase 1, as same is shown on plat thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet E, File 581, Union County Registry, to which reference is hereby made for a more complete metes and bounds description. Said property is commonly known as 2815 Rosemeade Drive, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A-308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Rayford Rahmings Sr.. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 432.0932135NC November 19, 26, 2009

business ads. Business accounts may apply for pre-approved credit. For your convenience, we accept Visa, Master Card, cash, or checks

005 Special Notices ★★★★★★★★★★★★

GENERAL INFORMATION

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm

069 Appliances Refrigerator & Stoves $99.99 Washers & Dryers $79.99 704-649-3821

078 Feed/Seed/Plants

FAX: 704-289-2929

POINSETTIAS

014 Lost & Found

free delivery to area churches. (704)624-6179 Haigler Greenhouses

★★★★★★★★★★★★

FREE FOUND ADS If you find an item, call us and place your FREE ad.

3 LINES, 5 DAYS, FREE There is a charge for Lost Ads The Enquirer-Journal CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

704-261-2214 Lost large brown dog close to Wolf Pond community. Please call (704)7647871.

BUSINESS SERVICES EMPLOYMENT

092 Firewood

FINANCIAL 104 Bus. Opportunities

INVESTIGATE

082 Yard/Garage Sales BIG GARAGE SALE! Children’s & adult clothes, toys, 2 motorized Barbie Jeeps, hshld items! Fri & Sat 7AM-2PM 3313 Neal Boyce Rd. off Baucom Deese

Church Attic Sale Sat. Nov. 21, 8-2 First Presbyterian Church Church St. Monroe 30+ Vendors inside Sat. 11/21, 7AM 2000 William Clark Trail, off Rogers Rd. clothing hshld & small furnishings

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR

BEFORE YOU INVEST!

Advance Fee Loans or Credit Offers Companies that do business by phone can’t ask you to pay for credit before you get it. For more information, call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP. A public service message from The Enquirer-Journal and The Federal Trade Commission.

112 Apartments ★★★★★★★★★★★ 1/2 off 1st mo. rent !! Ask about other specials Completely Remodeled 2br, 1.5ba Townhouse Small pets allowed Shown by appt only 704-283-1912 ★★★★★★★★★★★

113 Duplexes 1br 1ba duplex spacious, cent H/A, $437mo. 903 A Guild, ref’s & dep req’d (704)225-1543

114 Houses For Rent

140 Mobile Homes - Sale

Owner financing 3br 2.5ba town home. $149,900.00 owner financing available. 4005 F Christine Lane Waxhaw NC (Alma Village) Call 704-609-5463

91 model 14x70 3br 1.5ba Mac Flowe Homes, Inc. (704)289-5147

Stallings brick house 2br 1ba new paint lg fenced yard, wired shop, $750mo +dep 980-721-6214

Land Owners Wanted Zero Down call for details (704)225-8850 TRANSPORTATION

REAL ESTATE - SALE

Always a good policy, es158 Trucks For Sale 109 REAL ESTATE pecially for business op126 Houses For Sale portunities and franchis99 Red Dodge 2500 V10 es. Call NC Attorney Gen$8,000 Tax Credit to buy REAL ESTATE - RENT 107,000 mls, over $2500 2br 1ba 900sf $595mo. eral at (919)-716-6000 or your first home Call to access. camo back top 3br 1.5ba 1050 sf $695mo. the Federal Trade Comsee if you may qualify $6000 obo 704-706-0253 112 Apartments both, great location in mission at (877)-FTCNew Homes Available Wingate cul de sac dep & HELP for free information; from $129,900 Leon 7041 bed 1 bath Apartment ref’s req’d (704)283-6490 or visit our Web site at 607-2602 163 ATVs $450 Cotton St. Monroe www.ftc.gov/bizop. Unionville Realty N.C. law requires sellers MOBILE HOMES Lovely 2br 1ba private set09 Honda 500 4 whler 4x4 704-753-1000 of certain business opporting storage Indian Tail, less than 10 hrs, must sell tunities to register with $750mo.dep. 980-721exc. cond. $6800 138 Mobile Homes - Rent NC Attorney General be- 2br 1.5ba Condo no dep. 6214 or (704)289-4017 (704)764-9294 aft 7pm fore selling. Call to verify 1st month rent moves in Very nice 5 mls out New cell 704-291-0762 LM 114 Houses For Rent lawful registration before (704)507-0722 Town Rd. 2br 1ba you buy. $525mo.+dep new paint 980-721-6214 ★ Monroe Apt. ★ 2br 1ba home w/cent

H/A city limits $550mo Special 2br 2ba 704-289-4022 Move in by DEC. 1st. Get Jan & Feb FREE Nearly new 3 & 4BR in Beautiful & quiet Monroe, $800-$950mo. paid water (704)289-5410 704-289-5949

090 Miscellaneous Metal Roofing 3ft wide $1.40 LF 1-803-789-5500

WOODEN PALLETS

FREE. Pick up at The Enquirer-Journal, 500 W. 040 Help Wanted Jefferson St., Monroe, Monday-Friday, 8am-4pm Avon- Do you need an extra $200-500? Act now! Ft/Pt. Free gift. Medical Ins. avail. 704/821-7398 Fast growing maid service needs person to clean houses & run office. Must be drug free with no criminal history, some customer & computer skills pref’d 704-243-4435

Seasoned Firewood $65 a load delivered (704)821-8395

108 Money To Loan

www.enquirerjournal.com

Newly Remodeled Townhouse 2bd/1.5 ba $600mo. 704-283-3097

Need to rebuild your credit? Let us build your new home while you build your credit Call to see if you qualify? 704-233-0236

1988 PETERBUILT (379) C at. M otor, 15 S peed W ith O verdrive, 411 R ear E nd, N ew P arts, 63” Flat Top S leeper, R ebuilt E ngine and Transm ission.

$12,000 704-651-9644

Wingate: 2 mo free rent 3BR 2BA $600 Cent H/A. No pets. 704-451-8408

140 Mobile Homes - Sale

Encourage your child to read the newspaper.

$500.00 DN moves you in. Call and ask me how. 704-225-8850

2003 Cadillac Seville STS Loaded, like new, new M ichelin tires. 41,000 M iles.

$14,500 704-608-4748 9A-9P

Needed Newspaper Delivery Routes Available

Peachland, Polkton & Marshville Early Morning Hours Paid Weekly 18-24 Hours Weekly Plus New Subscriber Commission

BRING DRIVER’S LICENSE & INSURANCE CARD WITH YOU. YOU MUST HAVE • Clean Driving Record • Current Auto Insurance • Economical Dependable • Vehicle Backup Vehicle •Cell phone •Substitute

Apply in person 9:00AM-4:00PM The Enquirer-Journal 500 W. Jefferson St. Monroe, NC 28110 Our company needs a male or female to act as our bookkeeper. This is a easy work for you and more so, its fun and you will be much happy to work for us. And you will be earning cash weekly payment. Contact the job department: (vmoyano76@yahoo.com)

READER NOTICE! While many work-athome opportunities listed provide real income, many seek only to sell booklets or catalogs on how to get such work.

Please use caution when responding to all such ads.

DEADLINES

Wanted Exp’d Baritone Singer for all male southIn Column ern gospel quartet call Call before 1:30pm the day 704-699-8506 prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on 041 Part-Time Thursday and for Sunday call before 1:30 pm on Fri- Exp’d Mechanic in small day. engine & 2 cycle, 25-30 Display hrs per week, good pay, landscaping company. Sunday 12 Noon Thurs 704-363-4257 Tuesday Wed. Thursday Friday Saturday

4PM Friday 4PM Monday 4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES The Enquirer-Journal reserves the right to edit or reject and correctly classify an ad at any time. The Enquirer-Journal will assume no liability for omission of advertising material in whole or in part. ERRORS

050 Management Convenience Store Mgr Indian Trail. great starting salary+bonus, 401k, health/dental plan, no 3rd shift, exp. needed. send resumes to angieh@ brewerhendley.com or apply at Market Express PO Box 769, Marshville, NC 28103, 704-233-2600

PETS & LIVESTOCK

TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL TODAY!

704-261-2213

Please check your ad the 060 Pets & Supplies first day it runs. If you find an error, call the first day so puppies your ad can be corrected. Bloodhound The Enquirer-Journal will for sale, 8wks, $150ea. give credit for only the first (704)233-1993 incorrect publication. Chihuahua M/F shots & PAYMENT wormed, L/S hair, all colors, adorable, also ChorkPre-payment is required for ie (704)218-6022 all individual ads and all

The Enquirer-Journal 500 West Jefferson St. P.O. Box 5040 • Monroe, NC 28111 704-289-1541 www.enquirerjournal.com


6B / Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven.

SKYECROFT

5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

.87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Enjoy entertaining in this wonderful Marshville home: over 3500 sq. ft. on 2 acres. Holiday dinners a breeze to prepare in the spacious kitchen. Grand living and dining rooms. 5 bedrooms; 5 fireplaces; den; screeened porch. Call Elsie: 704-363-8815 PRUDENTIAL CAROLINAS REALTY

REDUCED New 2007, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, rec room, s/s appliances, ceramic tile, 1 ac lot, lots of extras. Must see! $167,400 CALL 704-243-4656

Lot $30,000

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

$169,000

REDU LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.) 2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

CED!

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To adver tise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

We accept cash, checks or Mastercard, VISA and American Express. Cancellable but non-refundable.

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