Issuu on Google+

The Enquirer-Journal

SUNDAY October 25, 2009

www.enquirerjournal.com

$1.25

MOST IMPROVED

With its victory over Porter Ridge Friday night, Weddington’s football team piled up an increase in victories that is best in the league compared to last year. With two games to go, how much better can they get?

Page 1B

Cooler, sunny

Sunny, dry and a little bit cooler today . Showers are expected to return on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Today’s temps

High: 66 Low: 45 Full report: Page 12A

Swine flu called national emergency WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama declared the swine flu outbreak a national emergency, giving his health chief the power to let hospitals move emergency rooms offsite to speed treatment and protect noninfected patients. The declaration, signed Friday night and announced Saturday, comes with the disease more prevalent than ever in the country and production delays undercutting the government’s initial, optimistic estimates that as many as 120 million doses of the vaccine could be available by mid-October.

Health authorities say more than 1,000 people in the United States, including almost 100 children, have died from the flu, known as H1N1, and 46 states have widespread flu activity. So far only 11 million doses have gone out to health departments, doctor’s offices and other providers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials. Administration officials said the declaration was a pre-emptive move designed to make decisions easier when they need to be made. Officials said the move was not in response to

any single development. Health and Human Services chief Kathleen Sebelius now has authority to bypass federal rules when opening alternative care sites, such as offsite hospital centers at schools or community centers if hospitals seek permission. Some hospitals have opened drive-thrus and drive-up tent clinics to screen and treat swine flu patients. The idea is to keep infectious people out of regular emergency rooms and away from other sick patients. Hospitals could modify patient rules — for example, re-

quiring them to give less information during a hectic time — to quicken access to treatment, with government approval, under the declaration. It also addresses a financial question for hospitals — reimbursement for treating people at sites not typically approved. For instance, federal rules do not allow hospitals to put up treatment tents more than 200 yard away from the doors; if the tents are 300 yards or more away, typically federal dollars won’t go to pay for treatment. Administration officials said those rules might not make

sense while fighting the swine flu, especially if the best piece of pavement is in the middle of a parking lot and some medical centers already are putting in place parts of their emergency plans. The national emergency declaration was the second of two steps needed to give Sebelius extraordinary powers during a crisis. On April 26, the administration declared swine flu a public health emergency, allowing the shipment of roughly 12 million

See FLU / Page 12A

& QA

with Hannah Potter

Hospitality isn’t just Southern

BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer

MONROE Hannah Potter compares Egyptian manners to small-town Southern hospitality. “They can’t eat or drink anything without offering you some,” she wrote in an e-mail. “It is just amazing to find this same mannerism in one of the biggest cities in the world.” Potter, a senior at Forest Hills High Potter School, is spending the semester studying abroad in Giza, near Cairo, Egypt. It has been two months since she left and just over a month since classes began at Misr Language Schools. She will return home in February. Q: You have mentioned several times in your blog how warm and welcoming the Egyptians are. How is Egyptian hospitality similar to or different from American hospitality? A: Egyptians are some of the most hospitable people I have ever met. ... They are very selfless. ... All of my host families have been extremely welcoming and hospitable.

See EGYPT / Page 13A

E-J staff photo s by Rick Crider

Josh Aydlette, of Goose Creek, S.C., hurling the weight in the distance weight toss during the HIghland Games in Waxhaw Sarurday.

Clans gather again in Waxhaw BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

WAXHAW misty rain offered an authentic feel to the 30th Waxhaw Scottish Highland Games on Saturday, and crowds, pipers and competitors carried on despite the damp. “It’s like a typical Scottish day,” said Marietta Morrison, who helped organize the games. “We’re having a great time.” As she spoke, the sun began to shine through the clouds and Morrison grew even more excited. “Now that the sun is out, it’s even better.”

A

8A 11A Insert 6B 5-6A

be in charge. Just then an athlete threw a perfect 12 o’clock on the caber toss. “Oh wow! That was great,” exclaimed Morrison, then explained that the caber toss was a game in which the participant throws a long log, attempting to get it to land perfectly straight at 12 o’clock. “Back in Scotland, years and years ago, when they were putting up cabins, they had to toss the wood in the air because they didn’t have a whole lot of machinery,” she explained. “Everything has a reason.”

See GAMES / Page 13A

Faces at games: left to right, Palmetto Pipes and Drums piper Billy Dubose, of Columbia, S.C.; Clan MacBean member Charles Lochary, of Stallings ; Tim St.Clair, of Callaway, Va., hoists 56 pound weight; and Civil Air Patrol guard Daniel Fratila, of Wesley Chapel stands at attention.

What’s Inside Brides Business Comics Classified Letters

Despite good turnout, the Highland games — an annual celebration of Scottish heritage in Union County — is struggling to survive another year. Only one pipe-and-drum band, The Palmetto Pipes and Drums, of Columbia, S.C., attended, and organizers say they are growing too old to keep the festival going. “It’s quite a bit on us,” Morrison, 72, said. “I can’t predict what will happen in the future. This may be our end.” Organizers said they hope the town or another civic group could take over the games. Morrison said she would be happy to help coordinate the games, but does not want to

Obituaries Opinion School News Sports Weather

2A 4A 10A 1B 12A

Cutest bAbies

Voting in The Enquirer-Journal’s annual cutest baby contest will begin on Tuesday when pictures and rules will be published. Voting will continue through Nov. 6 in this fund-raising effort.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially: Jouhette Hernandez, Pat Mills Haigler, Cecelia Neal, Louever Chambers, Rodger Blakney, Lewis Huntley, Clifford Lee Huntley, Troy Moore, Kerstyn Helms, Markes Ray Tyson, Pat Haigler, Alexandria Purser, Sherry Chambers, and Pat Haigler. Best wishes also are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday Monday, especially: Melissa Hall, Lauren Helton, Carolyn Chambers Williams, James Calvin McClain, Brent Purser, Kay Watts, Elizabeth Teague, Doris Simpson, John McNeeley and Brenda McNeeley.

“Union County’s Largest Community Newspaper Network” Post News and Events • Share Photos and Videos ^ ^ The Enquirer-Journal • Indian Trail Trader • The Waxhaw Exchange EnquirerJournal.com


2A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

DEATHS

The Enquirer-Journal copyright 2008

500 W. Jefferson St., P.O. Box 5040 Monroe, NC 28111 (704) 289-1541, FAX (704) 289-2929 www.enquirerjournal.com Advertising (704) 261-2251 adcopy@theej.com Classified Advertising (704) 261-2214 sharon@theej.com Circulation (704) 261-2219 circulation@theej.com News (704) 261-2252 news@theej.com Sports (704) 261-2253 jsnow@theej.com Publisher (704) 261-2200 menderle@theej.com

Donald W. Griffin

Tuesday—Sunday Mornings

Home Delivery Rates 1 Year $138

6 Mo. $72.50

3 Mo. $38.75

Mail subscriptions rates available upon request. Carriers are independent contractors. The E-J is not responsible for payments made to them. We reserve the right to increase subscription rates.

Delivery.

Missed and Replacement Papers. Newspapers should be

delivered by 6 a.m., Tuesday through Friday, and 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. If you do not receive a newspaper and would like a replacement, phone the circulation department between 8 and 10 a.m. In outlying areas and calls received after 10 a.m., replacement newspapers will be delivered the next delivery day. Circulation closes at 10 a.m. on weekends.

MARSHVILLE Donald Wayne Griffin, 63, of Marshville, died Friday, October 23, 2009, at North Carolina Baptist Hospital. Funeral will be Monday at 2 p.m. at Union Grove Baptist Church. Burial will follow in the church cemetery, Born May 16, 1946, he was son of the late Thomas Brice Griffin and the late Bertha Taylor Griffin. He was owner and operator of D-G Carts and Parts. Survivors include a brother, Ed Griffin of Charlotte and a sister, Dorothy Edwards of Charlotte, one niece, Freida Schipman of Charlotte and two nephews, Ray Edwards of Matthews and Kent Griffin of Mint Hill. Visitation will be from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday in the church fellowship building. PAID OBITUARY

Office Hours. 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,

Monday thru Friday.

News. The news department may be reached by phone until 11 p.m., Monday thru Saturday. Advertising. The Enquirer-Journal is

the source for Union County shopping information. The newspaper may, in its sole discretion, edit, classify, reject, or cancel at any time any advertising submitted by an advertiser.

Commercial Printing. Call for quotes.

Management Staff. Publisher Circulation Manager Managing Editor Advertising Director Systems Manager Press Manager

Marvin Enderle Gary Grunwald Stan Hojnacki Janet Littler Kenn Bowers David Benton

The Enquirer-Journal is published Tuesday through Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid at Monroe, NC. Postmaster: send address changes to The Enquirer-Journal, P.O. Box 5040, Monroe, NC 28111.

Jack Poole, helped land Olympics

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — Jack Poole, the man who brought the 2010 Winter Olympics to Vancouver, died Friday. He was 76. Poole died in the hospital following a lengthy battle with pancreatic cancer, Vancouver Olympic offi. Poole spearheaded the city’s bid for the Olympics, working for a decade to bring the games to British Columbia. He was also chairman of the Vancouver Olympic organizing committee’s board of directors.

Who do You Trust With Your Medicare Supplement And Insurance Needs?

ALLAN PRESSON INS. 704-283-5950

The Enquirer-Journal

COMING EVENTS Lawson P. Sims

JEFFERSON, S.C. Infant Lawson P. Sims died Thursday Oct. 22, 2009. Graveside service will be at 3 p.m. Sunday, October 25, 2009, at High Point Baptist Church of Pageland Cemetery. Survivors include parents, Richard and Casey Crisp of Jefferson, S.C.; grandparents, Steven and Becky Crisp of Jefferson, S.C., and Curtis and Cynthia Laney of Monroe. Memorials may be made to CMC Levine Center, 200 South Tryon Street, Suite 1400, Charlotte, N.C., 28202 Sutton-Baumg ar tner Funeral Home of Pageland, S.C. is handling arrangements.

Charles A. Grimsley

MONROE Charles Alexander Grimsley, 71, of Monroe, died recently. Funeral arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by Harris Funeral Home & Cremation Service of Monroe.

Ray Browne, pop culture coiner, dies

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ray Browne, an Ohio university professor credited with coining the phrase “popular culture� and pioneering the study of things such as bumper stickers and cartoons, died Thursday. He was 87. Browne died at his home, according to his family and officials at Bowling Green State university. He developed the first academic department devoted to studying what he called the “people’s culture� at Bowling Green in 1973. Browne wrote and edited more than 70 books, including “The Guide to United States Popular Culture,� published in 2001. Browne taught at the University of Maryland and Purdue University before moving to Bowling Green with the idea of starting a popular culture department. He often was quoted in the media.

You’re Invited

Saturday, November 7th

9am to 6pm Hourly Giveaways Free Gifts to the First 50 Customers! Come see our New Ornaments, Florals and Holiday DĂŠcor

Mark your calendar for this special event!

Monday, Oct. 26

•  EXERCISE CLASS, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center. Open to ages 55 and up. For details, call 704-2824657. • COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Indian Trail United Methodist Church. Flu clinic. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • INTERNET BASICS CLASS, 10 a.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-2838184. • BABY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Union West Library. Details, 704-821-7475. •  TODDLER TIME, 11:15 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. • BABY TIME, 11:30 a.m., Waxhaw Library. Details, 704-843-3131. • MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 2 p.m., Monroe Library. Free. Registration required; call 704-2838184. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-283-7233. • HALLOWEEN EVENING STORY TIME, 5:45 p.m., Waxhaw Library. For the whole family; wear your costume. Details, 704-843-3131. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • UNION COUNTY NAACP, 6 p.m., Bazemore Center, 1001 Winchester Ave., Monroe. Details, call 704-843-6971. •  INDIAN TRAIL TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), private weighin, 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m; meeting 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Indian Trail United Methodist Church, 113 Indian Trail Road. First visit free. Details, 704-843-9365. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. •  WINGATE LIONS CLUB, 6:30 p.m., Wingate University, LaVerne Banquet Hall. Visitors welcome. • TOPS (TAKE OFF

POUNDS SENSIBLY), 6:30 p.m. weigh-in, 7 p.m. meeting, First Baptist Church, 109 Morrow Ave. For details, call 704-226-1341. • WAXHAW TOPS No. 800, 6:30 p.m., Bonds Grove United Methodist Church. Details, 704-8432735. •  MONROE CIVITAN CLUB, 7 p.m., Wingate University LaVerne Banquet Hall. Details, Pat Laney, 704-283-5711. • UNION CHORALE, 7 p.m., Stallings United Methodist Church, 1115 Stallings Road. Details, Sandy McReynolds, 704238-1555. • UNIONVILLE LIONS CLUB, 7 p.m., Unionville Community Building. Details, Betty Hinson 704283-6364. •  INDIAN TRAIL LIONS CLUB, 7:30 p.m., Indian Trail Civic Building. • NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friendship Missionary Baptist Church administrative building, 501 Burke St. Details, 704-8214256, 704-763-0784. • WINGATE LIONS CLUB, 6:30 p.m., LaVerne Banquet Hall at Wingate University; call 704-2335593.

Tuesday, Oct. 27

• COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Wingate Methodist Church. Flu clinic. • COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Emmanuel Baptist Church. Flu clinic. • THE MOMS CLUB, Moms Offering Moms Support, Indian Trail and Monroe, 10 a.m., Hank’s Frozen Custard, 5250 Old Charlotte Highway. Details, Kim, 704-340-3281; or e-mail momsclubofindiantrail@yahoo.com. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 12 months to 36 months. For details, call 704-283-8184. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  BASIC SPANISH, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., must be member of Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center and age 55 or over. Ellen Fitzger-

2C<IFNBDQDIB ¹¹¹¹¹¹¹

.D@N

ald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St. Details, 704-2824657. â&#x20AC;˘Â  STORY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-283-8184. â&#x20AC;˘ SENIOR APPRECIATION DAY, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Union County Agricultural Services Center. Reservations required; call 704-283-3785 for information. â&#x20AC;˘Â  MARSHVILLE ROTARY CLUB, noon, Pier Restaurant, Marshville. For details, call Johnny Pigg, 704-624-2602. â&#x20AC;˘Â  MONROE ROTARY CLUB, noon to 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. Details, 704-283-4645. â&#x20AC;˘ LUNCH BUNCH, noon, Monroe Library. Topic, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lunch at the Piccadillyâ&#x20AC;? by Clyde Edgerton. Details, 704-283-8184, ext. 241. â&#x20AC;˘Â  AARP (AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF RETIRED PERSONS), 2 p.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St., Monroe. â&#x20AC;˘ MICROSOFT EXCEL I CLASS, 3 p.m., Union West Library. Free. Registration required; call 704821-7475. â&#x20AC;˘ HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704-283-8184, ext. 238. â&#x20AC;˘ MICROSOFT EXCEL II CLASS, 5 p.m., Union West Library. Free. Registration required; call 704821-7475. â&#x20AC;˘Â  TOPS NO. 373 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting, 805 South Bragg Street, Monroe. For details, call 704-282-0073. â&#x20AC;˘Â  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. â&#x20AC;˘ ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. â&#x20AC;˘ LAKE PARK CUB SCOUT PACK, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Faith United Methodist Church. For details call, 704-882-7533. â&#x20AC;˘Â  OLD HICKORY OPTIMIST CLUB, 6:30 p.m., Operation Reach-Out building, corner of Miller and Phifer streets. For details, call 704-821-6747. â&#x20AC;˘Â MONROE JAYCEES, 6:30 p.m. social, 6:55 p.m. meeting, Oasis Restaurant, 116 S. Main St. New members welcome. Details, call 980-328-8702. â&#x20AC;˘Â OVERCOMERS OUTREACH, 7 p.m., Waxhaw Bible Church. For details, call 704-764-3960. â&#x20AC;˘Â  PRENATAL CLASS, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., CMCUnion. Come during seventh month of pregnancy. Call 704-283-3254.

PRE-ORDER YOUR

THANKSGIVING

PIES

BY 215 E. Franklin St. Downtown Monroe

704-254-3738

NOVEMBER 1ST & BRING THIS COUPON FOR $

1 OFF PER PIE!

When choosing a funeral home, people usually go with who they feel comfortable with.

<OÂą2C@Âą1CJKNÂą<OÂą,JOODIBC<HÂą.G<U< Everything to decorate your home beautifully and special gifts for those important people in your life! Aromatique Candles Jack Herring Pottery Mark Roberts Fairies Tween Booth Dining Room Groups Lampe Berger Collegiate Gifts -IRRORSs,AMPSs"OOKS Bedroom Groups &URNITUREs(OME$ECOR Marie Osmond Handbags

Unfortunately, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always know how comfortable they can be. Being the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preference is a hard thing to earn, only because people by nature are skittish to try something NEW4HATSWHYWEINVITEYOUTOSTOPBYANDMEETOUR staff... youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be surprised by how comfortable our place is.

So much more... No need to drive into another county... SHOP UNION!!! 2585 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Monroe, NC 28110

  

www.shopsatnottinghamplaza.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Comforting as Our Name...â&#x20AC;? /LD-ONROE2OADs)NDIAN4RAIL .#s  


The Enquirer-Journal

City dedicates water tower

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 3A

South Carolina Episcopals break with the U.S. church MOUNT PLEASANT, South Carolina (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Diocese of South Carolina voted Saturday to distance itself but not completely split from the national Episcopal Church because of church positions on same-sex unions and ordination of gays. Eighty-seven clergy members voted to pass the resolution after a nearly hour-long debate during a special convention in Mount Pleasant, Canon Kendall Harmon said, with 17 voting no. The vote allows leaders of the diocese to reduce its participation in the national church without severing ties completely, as some dioceses and parishes have. The discord stems from the national churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consecration in 2003 of its first openly gay bishop and its authorizing bishops to bless same-sex unions, a decision made at its national convention last summer.

MONROE The City of Monroe Water Resources Department dedicated the new Rocky River Road water storage tank on Oct. 21. Mayor Bobby Kilgore, several City Council members and representatives from Willis Engineering were on hand to celebrate the completion of the project. ]The new water tank is the tallest in the Monroe system at more than 185 feet tall. The tank holds a volume of one million gallons (8.3 million pounds of water when full), and provides a significant increase in storage capacity in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s west pressure zone. The total project budget was $2.3 million. Completed at the same time were the West Zone Water Main projects. These projects provided water transmission mains that connected the new tank to the water pumping facility on Goldmine road, and were completed for a total cost of $1.7 million. The tank has an innovative composite materials design (concrete pedestal and steel bowl) and is the first of this type in Union County. The new tank and the west zone water main improvements significantly expand the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s service area for potential new developments in the Rocky River and Weddington Road area.

to the challenges before us. ... Once we have done that, then the question is how do we engage the larger Episcopal Church?â&#x20AC;? Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vote authorizes the South Carolina bishop and the diocesan Standing Committee to begin withdrawing from church councils and governing bodies that have â&#x20AC;&#x153;assented to actions contrary to Holy Scripture,â&#x20AC;? according to the resolution text. The Diocese of South Carolina is comprised of 75 parishes in the southern and eastern part of the state. Other Episcopal churches in the state are in the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina. The 2.3 million-member Episcopal church is the U.S. branch of the Anglican Communion, a 77 million-member communion that is the third-largest group of churches worldwide, behind the Roman Catholic and Orthodox.

The Diocese of South Carolina and two others opposing consecration of gay bishops voted in 2006 to reject the authority of the national churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presiding bishop, but stopped short of a full break with the church. Last June, four breakaway conservative dioceses formed a rival national province to the Episcopal Church called the Anglican Church in North America. Other parishes have since joined. Bishop Mark Lawrence has said the Diocese of South Carolina does not want a split but a discussion with the national church on the divisive issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only model thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been out there for us has either been leave or acquiesce, and that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been working,â&#x20AC;? Lawrence has said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to get the 30,000 members of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina awakened

Fall Home Improvement

SPECIALS Heating PRICE ROLLBACK $ System XLi Heat Pump Systems Install this Tax Credit Qualifying System for $3,500.00 (After 1,500 tax credit)

Installed to your ductwork. Advertised price includes 2 ton heat pump, variable speed air handler, digita thermostat, labor and applicable taxes. Valid while supplies last. Other sizes available at alightly higher cost. 10 yr warranty.

49

Valid Mon-Wed 8am-4pm Expires 10/31/2009

Tune-Up & Safety Inspection

19

$

95

Valid Mon-Wed 8am-4pm Expires 10/31/2009

New tower on Rocky River Road towers over the landscape . City officials gathered last week to deidicate the 185foot tower.

Award Winning SERVICE

Contributed photo

NC License #22092

BEST TIME TO BUY!!!

Winterize your home with our energy-efficient windows backed by the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy star rating!

DOUBLE YOUR SAVINGS!

Buy your windows before December 31, 2009 and take advantage of a tax credit up to $1500 on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taxes. Also, with each purchase of ten windows or more we are offering a rebate of $200 in CA$H!!! Our New vinyl window is backed by the government energy star rating. These windows will not only add value and beauty to your home, but will pay for themselves by lowering your cooling and heating bills for years to come!

Indoor Air Quality & Duct System Leakage Analysis

  sWWWDORTONSHEATINGCOM

Family Owned & Operated â&#x20AC;&#x153;Same Day Service Guaranteedâ&#x20AC;? if scheduled by 3pm. Since 1998

Fight the Flu Flu Shots Available Monday October 26th

from 9am to 5pm American Red Cross %&RANKLIN3Ts-ONROE Flu Shot $25

â&#x20AC;˘ No pressure selling-Affordable prices â&#x20AC;˘ References available â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed & insured â&#x20AC;˘ Call for free estimate

Attention Medicare Recipients: there is no out-of-pocket expenses when you present your Medicare Card and valid Part-B (Medical) coverage, and are not already enrolled under Medicare HMP protection.

DECKS â&#x20AC;˘ ROOM ADDITIONS â&#x20AC;˘ REMODELING

Flu shots will not be given to anyone under 18 years of age. Pneumonia shots are recommended every 5-7 years. Check with your physician first.

Porch Enclosures

Sunrooms

Vinyl Siding

NO JOB TOO SMALL!! MATTHEWS WINDOWS & SIDING

Showroom Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

704-291-9555

622 C. Roosevelt Blvd., Monroe Located Beside Tag Office

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all the ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy paths. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proverbs 3:5, 6

Sponsored by:

Franklin St. Pharmacy American Red Cross Commmunity Health Services

For more info call 704-289-1523 or 704-296-0909

Bring in your Church Bulletin for 10% off your entire

Sunday Dinner 3pm to 9pm

For Dinner, Hours 3pm to 9pm

Come and Watch the Sunday Game with Us! We televise ALL football games. 1/2 OFF APPETIZERS ALL DAY* *At bar sections only with the purchase of a beverage (alcoholic or non-alcoholic) Limited Time Offer


V

iewpoint

4A Sunday, October 25, 2009

www.enquirerjournal.com

“Pay attention to your enemies, for they are the first to discover your mistakes.”

Antisthenes

Editor: Stan Hojnacki / shojnacki@theej.com

The Enquirer-Journal

Since 1873, a heritage of commitment and involvement

Publisher: Marvin Enderle Managing Editor: Stan Hojnacki News Editor: Jim Muldrow City Editor: Betsy O’Donovan

AN AMERICAN VIEW

Health care for everyone

H

ealth insurance for all: That’s not too much to expect in the world’s richest nation. Nor is it too much to expect of Congress, which desperately needs to shed its image of intransigence and incompetence. The bill that cleared the Senate Finance Committee last week would leave an estimated 17 million citizens and legal residents uninsured. Eight million illegal residents would also remain uninsured. ... But it’s not good enough. Universal coverage is the fundamental requisite for health care reform. Aside from the moral imperative, economics demands covering everyone. Insurance is sharing risk. The more people who are sharing the risk, especially the more young and healthy people who don’t need a lot of expensive care, the lower the cost for everyone. ... The Baucus plan does some good things, including requiring insurance companies to sell all customers the same policy and ending industry practices that deny care for spurious reasons. It falls short in holding down insurance costs because there’s no public option to compete with private insurers. ... It seems to us, though, that the public option is a more streamlined way to achieve reform’s goals than a new bureaucracy to police 50 state insurance markets to be sure that insurers aren’t illegally denying coverage and cherry-picking customers. A self-supporting public option would keep insurers honest by injecting real competition into the market. This would help make universal coverage affordable, while insurers would profit from an influx of millions of new customers. Lexington, Ky., Herald-Leader

Balloon boy busts my bubble

L

ast week’s column, in which I described in vivid detail the theft of one our newspaper racks, my comically heroic efforts to recover it from behind a grocery store and the debilitating back injury I suffered while loading its remains onto a truck, drew much sympathy from readers. “Serves you right,” said one. “Considering what’s in newspapers these days, they ought to give the thief a medal,” said another. Yes, the public was on the side of a brave, dedicated worker who probably should have paid more attention to the proper-lifting portion of the safety video. Then Balloon Boy burst onto the scene. A nation watched spellbound as a homemade, helium-filled “flying saucer” streaked across the Colorado sky, purportedly with a 6-yearold child aboard, only to be sucker-punched in a hoax perpetrated by a family - or at least a dad - seeking reality-show fame. Suddenly, public sentiment turned against me, of all people. “If Balloon Boy was fake, I bet the inspiring story of that guy recovering a stolen newspaper rack from behind a grocery store was fake, too,” said someone I just made up. “Let’s destroy him!” Speculation grew so intense, I was forced to conduct a hardhitting interview with myself to set the record straight. Here is a transcript: “Scott, your saga of the stolen newspaper rack captivated an entire nation.” “If your idea of an entire nation is four people in Bristol, Va., Aunt Nell in Winston-

Scott

Hollifield Columnist

Salem and a guy in Pensacola, Fla., who accidentally stumbled across it on the Internet while Googling ‘how to steal a newspaper rack,’ then, yes, I guess it did.” “Rumors are swirling that you staged the much-talked about incident in an effort to land a reality show in which you and a trained chimp named Professor BoBo would travel the country in a high-tech van solving newspaper-related crimes.” “That’s ridiculous. One of our newspaper racks was stolen and I wrote a column about the absurdity of someone stealing a newspaper rack, considering the paltry return on his or her effort. And I hurt my back. End of story.” “Was your 6-year-old son trapped in that newspaper rack?” “I don’t have a 6-year-old son.” “Did you hire a child actor or even a leprechaun to play the person now commonly known in the media as the Li’l Rack Rooster?” “No. There was no one, not a child, not a leprechaun, trapped in the newspaper rack.” “Are you now saying leprechauns are real?” “No, I’m saying I didn’t hire one.” “Are you now saying when it comes to leprechauns, you have

discriminatory hiring practices?” “Not at all.” “Has the child actor/leprechaun you hired to fool the public into believing your outlandish story had any contact with Balloon Boy?” “I didn’t hire anyone to do anything. I just wrote a column about something that happened.” “So you are saying, unequivocally, that the newspaper rack theft, a story that captivated a very, very tiny portion of an entire nation, was not a hoax?” “It was not a hoax.” “If bearded CNN strongman Wolf Blitzer asked you if it was a hoax, would you admit that it was?” “I would not.” “If anyone else with the first name of a ferocious animal asked you if it was a hoax, would you admit that it was?” “I would not.” “Tiger Woods?” “No.” “Crocodile Dundee?” “Not a real person, and no.” “Bear Bryant?” “Bear Bryant is dead.” “The ghost of Bear Bryant?” “No.” “Thank you for your time, Scott. Stay tuned for Larry King, whose guests include Professor Bobo’s attorney, a firstgrader who once made Balloon Boy snort chocolate milk out of his nose and James Carville.” Whew! Glad I could clear that up. • Scott Hollifield is editor/general manager of The McDowell News in Marion, N.C. and a columnist with the Media General News Service. Contact him at P.O. Box 610, Marion, NC 28752 or e-mail rhollifield@mcdowellnews.com.

Hate crimes legislation won’t silence critics of gays After years of heated debate, the Senate is poised this month to give final approval to legislation already passed by the House that expands federal hate-crimes statutes to include sexual orientation and gender identity. President Obama has promised to sign it into law. Last-ditch efforts by many conservative Christian groups have failed to stop the bill – known as the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, after the gay man murdered in Wyoming in 1998 and the AfricanAmerican man dragged to his death behind a pickup truck in Texas that same year. Once it becomes law, the Department of Justice will have broader authority to investigate and prosecute violent crimes “motivated by prejudice based on the actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability of the victim.” Of the various arguments advanced by some social conservatives against the bill, the

Charles Haynes Columnist

one that has gotten the most traction with the public is the charge that the legislation would “criminalize preaching the Gospel and put preachers in the crosshairs,” in the words of a letter sent to senators by 60 conservative leaders in June. Scary stuff, but is it true? To illustrate their fears, religious conservatives cite cases in Europe and Canada where a few pastors have been prosecuted in recent years for “hate speech” after they spoke out against homosexuality. These prosecutions are indeed insidious attacks on free speech and free exercise of religion – but they all occurred in countries

without a First Amendment. In my view, it can’t happen here. Americans have, after all, lived under hate-crimes laws, federal and state, for decades – and some of the state laws already include sexual orientation. In all that time, religious leaders of various stripes have preached controversial beliefs about race, religion and national origin without ever being charged with a hate crime based on the content of their speech. Thanks to the First Amendment, we enjoy the strongest protection for free expression in the world. In a society where even white supremacists, antiSemites and anti-gay hatemongers like the Rev. Fred Phelps are free to speak, local pastors need not worry about being prosecuted for preaching the Gospel as they understand it. But just to be certain that the legislation will not be misused, sponsors of the hate-crimes bill have added language to ensure that “nothing in the Act shall be construed to prohibit any constitutionally protected

speech.” Further, “nothing in this Act shall be construed to allow prosecution based solely upon an individual’s expression of racial, religious, political, or other beliefs or solely upon an individual’s membership in a group advocating of espousing such beliefs.” The only speech affected by this bill is speech that has no constitutional protection now, such as speech that directs people to commit violence, in a manner likely to incite imminent lawless action. Bias-motivated acts of violence are the target of this legislation, not speech protected by the First Amendment. While Americans remain divided about homosexuality, we are largely united on the question of safety. That’s why surveys show widespread public support for including sexual orientation and gender identity in hate-crimes laws – 68% in favor, according to a 2007 poll. Since a crime is a crime, argue opponents of the bill, no special legislation is needed to address attacks on gay people.

Proponents respond that when people are singled out because of their race, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, or disability, the crime is more than an attack on an individual victim; it is a hate crime that intimidates an entire group of people. In a free society, no one should live in fear because of who they are. According to the FBI, hate crimes motivated by sexualorientation bias are a growing problem in the United States. Our challenge is to do everything we can to combat these crimes without in any way undermining constitutional protections for freedom of speech and free exercise of religion. • Charles C. Haynes is senior scholar at the First Amendment Center, 555 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. Web: firstamendmentcenter.org. E-mail: chaynes@freedomforum.org.


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 5A

YOUR VIEW Report might alter lunches for kids A new report just might change what ends up on your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lunch tray. As a dietitian, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thrilled that the Institute of Medicine just issued an extensive report recommending that schools load lunch lines with a variety of fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains. Right now, most lunch lines are full of processed meats and cheese productsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and more than 80 percent of schools serve too much high-fat food to comply with federal guidelines. But this new report could really turn the tables in cafeterias. It recommends cutting down processed meats, and it joins the American Public Health Association and the American Medical Association in calling for vegetarian school meal options. We need to ask Congress to revise the Child Nutrition Act to help all schools make these healthy changes in their cafeterias. Sign the petition today at www. HealthySchoolLunches. org. Kathryn Strong Staff Dietitian Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Mayor Paxton used faulty information As I was drafting my letter to endorse a candidate for mayor, I learned that the current mayor is using a 2007 police study as a reference. This was study was found to be incorrect due to incorrect data (which was due to inadequate software with the county). The current mayor has implied the Chief of Stallings PD wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t being truthful when it came to the faultiness of this data. She basically called him a liar! The Union County Sheriff, the Union County Communications Director, a county IT specialist, another county employee, and the Stallings town manager all agree with the Stallings Chief. There was an Observer article where the Monroe Chief agreed how the software being used was inaccurately counting the calls for service. So how can

all of these people who are law enforcement, or work with law enforcement be wrong? Sorry, Mayor Paxton, you need to get your facts straight before you tell half truths or bald-faced lies! So how can citizens trust a mayor who uses an inaccurate study? How can a mayor be trusted when she responds that she wants to â&#x20AC;&#x153;outsourceâ&#x20AC;? the police department? Stallings ranks #7 when it comes to crime by population. I believe Mayor Paxton can be NOT trusted because her answers depend on her audience. She takes partial truths and makes them as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re whole. That isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t how an elected official should act. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to verify some of the above, then you can goto votelucydrake.com. There you can view documents for yourself. I hope you come to the same conclusion as I did and vote November 3rd for a person who will let you know where she stands on issues and will fight for all of Stallings (not just her side of town). This person is Lucy Drake. Shawna Steele Stallings

Schools should rethink bus policy The tragic death of 7 year-old Somer Thompson, the near-kidnapping of two Cornelius girls, and the threat to four Union County girls as

Pageland Antique Mall MICHEAL KEE DESIGNS %-C'REGOR3Ts0AGELAND 3# 843-672-2050

Cordially invite you to our

Christmas Open House 2009

Thursday, November 5th 6pm til 9pm Come stroll the mall where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find trees, garlands, wreaths and ornaments nestled among antique and vintage furniture. We have 20 plus vendors which offer a wide array of Christmas items and fine antiques.

Refreshments will be served. Also visit the Gwenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Merle Norman Open House at 202 S. Pine St.

Insurance? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about people, not things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about security. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about relations. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about trust. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about you!

As a local independent agent, we can design an insurance program thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just right for you and your family. Give the people you love Safe.Sound.Secure.ÂŽ protection from Auto-Owners Insurance Company

!UTO /WNERS)NSURANCE

122 S. Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ P.O. Box 5070 Monroe, NC 28111-5070 Phone: (704) 289-6437 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: (704) 283-7797

they got off their bus has brought to the forefront once again the issue of child abduction. News reports state Somer separated from her group while making the one mile walk from school. Unfortunately only incidents such as these will draw attention to child safety and the ongoing

threat of child predators in our communities. It painfully forces families and law enforcement to raise awareness and review public safety practices that will minimize these risks. While government cannot be everywhere, all the time, for everybody, government should avoid

policies that facilitate environments where these situations can occur. Our Charlotte Mecklenburg school system has reduced school bus stop sites from 40,000 to 26,000 in the name of budget efficiency measures. As a state senator, I keenly recognize the need for greater budget austerity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly with North Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s struggling economy. However, I also recognize priorities and the foundational principle that governmental policies must protect citizens and not create conditions hindering that. The wholesale reduction of school bus stops further increases the distances young children must walk (by half the distance around a high school track) before and after school, thereby increasing their risk of danger from unsavory in-

dividuals and dangerous Charlotte streets. Beyond the very real public safety concerns are other practical issues. Extended distances will force greater time demands on students and families coupled with health issues pertaining to young children carrying heavy backpacks farther as well as exposure to cold. This doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include the simple inconvenience of the extended journey. I know of no school superintendents or teachers giving up their parking spaces. It would be painful to have an incident like this occur locally and for the reduction of school bus stops to perhaps have abetted a predator such as the Florida monster. I ask that our school boards across North Carolina revisit this customer unfriendly policy and we get more use of the wheels and brakes that come standard on our school busses. Eddie Goodall State Senator Weddington


6A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

YOUR VIEW Elect Danny Figueroa to council If you are concerned how our community of Indian Trail will look in the near future, you must consider the person you VOTE for carefully. Danny Figueroa is running for Indian Trail council. I believe he wants what is best for the citizens of Indian Trail. The use of our hard earned tax dollars wisely. No frivolous spending. This is our money and we need to elect our officials carefully. Make sure you vote, but vote wisely. Elect Danny Figueroa to our Indian Trail town council. Marc Krinsky Indian Trail

Do the right thing, pass health care Do the right thing and vote to take care of the American people. You will be remembered for taking action when it was most needed instead of standing by and letting this country collapse un-

der the weight of an unsustainable system driven by corporate greed. Most of you seem to have little or no idea what it’s like to pay your health care premiums every month knowing full well that there is probably a very good chance that your private insurance company will most likely NOT to pay your claim. This is the fear that most of us average Americans live with, IF we can afford the premiums at all. We cannot go on like this in perpetuity. It is not sustainable. Please do the right thing. Wendy allen Monroe

Discouraged by vote in Waxhaw My name is Donovan Matthews. I am a local business owner and a Waxhaw resident of 22 years. I have spent my whole life in this town, watching it grow from basically nothing. Recently, a developer had made a

proposal to put a large development in the heart of the town. This developer had a vision that fit Waxhaw’s future better than any other project has before or will in the future. When the four commissioners voted to deny the zoning, they killed this town for future generations. I’m only 22 and had planned on living in Waxhaw for the rest of my life. But, after seeing how close-minded our elected officials and citizens can be, I am reconsidering my decisions of investing my time and business in this dying creature we call Waxhaw. Why should any business stay in a town that doesn’t encourage growth? Look at all the vacant buildings in town now; you think they will ever be filled without a project like this? We need foot traffic to keep this town alive; without it, we are destroying any chance of prospering. One point I would like to make regarding the commissioners’ comments is one made by Sylvester McManus that pertained

C:L76A6C8:6K6>A67A:6I

BDCGD:;6B>ANH=D: ¸LZ]VkZV\gZViegd\gVb[dgeaVciVg[VhX^^i^h#¹

BVcnbdgZhinaZh!VcYXdadghidX]ddhZ[gdb# 7dVgY8Zgi^ÃZYEZYdgi]^hiDcHiV[[

BDCGD:»H;6B>ANH=D:8:CI:G ¸AdXVaanDlcZYVcYDeZgViZY¹ &--%%9^X`Zghdc7akY#WZh^YZBdcgdZBVaa BdcgdZ!C8™E]dcZ,%)'-("*-&) =djgh/Bdc&%"+!IjZh";g^."+!HVi&%"+

to the appearance of the apartment complex. Since the vote was to deny the zoning, why were the esthetics even brought into the issue? Appearance has nothing to do with the zoning nor should it be a reason for denying the rezoning request. The way it sounds to me, the commissioners were covering themselves, and our mayor from lawsuits, by saying it was a “zoning issue” versus a “we don’t like the way it looks” issue. Checkmate has not been announced yet and I hope we have not seen the last of this. If they want to save this town and the businesses within its city limits, they should reconsider what they have done. Donovan Matthews

Waxhaw

Louis Philippi is best candidate I have been watching this Mayors’ race closely for the last month or so. Two candidates seem to be telling me they can govern my town if I just elect the Council members they can work with. Does this mean if we elect a Mayor but different Council members we will have the same crazy conflicts we have been having for the past several years? Then comes Barbara Anne Price with her letter implying the Town Manager and his staff are conspiring to keep a Council candidate from connecting with the voters. Additionally she all but accuses a sitting Councilman running for re-election of corruption. I have to ask, if she is elected how will she be able to work with the Town manager, staff as well as the maligned Council member if he is re-elected. The only candidate that conducts himself with dignity as well as projects a reasonable plan for Stallings is Louis Philippi. He will have my vote on November 3rd. Samantha Micele Stallings

Support Harry Stokes for council

I am writing in support of Harry Stokes for District 1 Town Council in Stallings, NC. As Harry’s sister, I know firsthand how qualified he is for this position. Harry comes from a humble background and has experienced adversity first hand. He rose up from that adversity and built a successful business from the ground up, while remaining a dedicated husband, father, brother, and son. Harry is a visionary and has demonstrated the skills necessary to master the ever more complex challenges of a town council. He is a strategic thinker who has the ability to manage many projects simultaneously. He’s objective, intelligent and communicates very effectively. These are precisely the skills a community like Stallings needs as it faces the economic challenges. More importantly, Harry has always conducted himself with integrity. He can be counted on not just to work hard, but to represent your community in a positive light. He is a strong Christian dedicated to serving others and making a difference in his community. His excellent communication skills and a strong moral compass will serve the community well. Please vote on Tuesday, November 3 for Harry Stokes. A vote for Harry is a vote for a better future. Norma Honeycutt China Grove

Stalling should re-elect Paxton

Stallings should re-elect Lynda Paxton for mayor. In her term, Paxton has kept focused on reaching out to and including all citizens in town matters. She’s worked to make the town better for everybody, not just those connected to the “in crowd”. Paxton has pushed to improve town roads, seek new commercial development (like the old Winn Dixie store), clean up town eyesores, revamp the downtown area and reduce the budget. Taxes have also

gone down the past two years. Along with a renewed parks committee, Paxton is bringing exciting changes to Stallings Park and getting things done in FairHaven Park. She’s worked to minimize the Monroe bypass’ effects on neighborhoods and the school, and she is determined to improve Stallings Rd. without destroying residences, businesses and churches. These are typical of her willingness to tackle tough problems. Paxton also isn’t afraid of physical labor. Many politicians favor projects but leave them for others to do. Not Paxton. She’s put in hours of dirty, hard work for park events and Spring Hill cleanups because she believes in the projects and knows that actions speak louder than words and bring communities together. Paxton’s hard work for Stallings has not lessened in spite of the false attacks on her character and lies about her record and positions on the issues. These disgraceful actions have been bad for our town, but we can change course by electing candidates that will work for the greater good. Electing Reed Esarove, Paul Frost, and Harry Stokes and re-electing Wyatt Dunn will give the new council business, financial and community experience that seems to have been missing far too long in Stallings. Let’s give these candidates a chance to bring in sound, civilized board relations and policies. That’s the government that Stallings deserves. Fran Harrington Stallings

Write to us

The EnquirerJournal welcomes letters to the editor about issues affecting Union County. Preferred length is 300 words. Please include your signature, address and telephone number where we can reach you with any questions.

Friends of the Library to Host Author John Hart The Friends of the Union County Public Libraries are honored to have the bestselling and Edgar Award-winning Author John Hart as the guest speaker at the Annual Fall Author’s Dinner on Thursday, November 5 at 7:00pm at the South Piedmont Community College Conference Center in Monroe. Tickets are $35.00 per person and may be purchased by calling Krista Cahoon at (704) 283-6233 or Jane Newton at (704) 843-5133

AAA Siding & Windows Siding, Windows & Porch Enclosures Locally Owned & Operated

Save money ($1500.00 Tax CREDIT) with Energy Efficient windows & siding while making your home beautiful! Donnie Baucom Jack Baucom Bonded & Insured Quality Work/Lifetime Warranty 704-221-1967 or 704-221-2727


The Enquirer-Journal

Ten marching bands compete for pirate chest

Golf carts back on agenda for town

BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

Staff Writer

BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 7A

STALLINGS An ordinance allowing Stallings residents to drive golf carts on neighborhood roads was voted down in September, but is up for reconsideration Monday. Some council members said the initial proposal contained too many restrictions. “The main reason we’re bringing it back is because that’s what the community wants,” Councilman Wyatt Dunn said. Mayor Lynda Paxton said there was “outcry from the community when we didn’t pass it,” although many locals were not in favor of some of its limitations. Residents of Shannamara and Emerald Lake — both of which have golf courses — have a particular interest, Dunn said, and claim a handful E-Jstaff photo by Rick Crider of reasons for using their Olivia Chapman on trumpet for Piedmont during the carts. Since Union County Pirate Cove Classic marching band competition. Public Schools cut some of its bus stops to save gas, parents in Emerald Lake use golf carts to transport students to pick-up locations. This saves them gas as well, they say. Others drive golf carts to the pool in the summer. Some residents have been driving golf carts through their subdivisions for months, but town officials say an ordinance is necessary to make it legal. The Town Council unanimously denied the original ordinance, which called for golf carts to be both registered and inspected by the Police Department. Dunn said it would have been too difficult to enforce and “cumbersome” for police officers. Dunn is in favor of a revised ordinance that eliminates the need for registration and inspection. If adopted, an ordinance would still require golf cart operators to be at least 16 years of age with a valid driver’s license. Carts could be driven on roads with a 25 mph or less speed limit and must stay on the right edge of the road. They must have working headlights and turning signals and cannot exceed the maximum passenger capacity. Other residents are still concerned about permitting such an ordinance, saying it isn’t safe to allow golf carts on subdivision roads. If implemented, Paxton said, the ordinance would apply to all town residents. The topic is open for discussion only. The public is invited to comment at the beginning of the meeting, and both Paxton and Dunn expect that some people will. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at Town Hall, located at 315 Stallings Road.

MONROE From a voyage out at sea to a day in the life of a soldier, every band that performed Saturday at Porter Ridge High School took visitors on a journey with its music and choreography. At the fourth annual Pirate Cove Classic, 19 bands competed for – what else? – a pirate’s chest. Representing 10 counties and two states, the bands each gave a performance surrounding a particular theme. The two big winners of the day were Dorman High School of Roebuck, S.C., which was named the grand champion, and Marvin Ridge High School, which received the H. James Hill Union County Band of Excellence distinction. Their themes were nautical and medieval respectively. Nautical was a common theme for the day. Dorman titled their performance “The Voyage,” which follows a ship from its launch to dangerous waters. Props on the field displayed varying levels of intensity out at sea and a 25-foot ship. “Judges are going to be looking at the coordination of the elements,” said Dave Bruce, band director. “They all should point toward that topic sentence.” One of the heavier subjects of the day was portrayed by Piedmont High School’s band, which told the story of the soldier, beginning with daybreak and ending in Arlington cemetery. “The last song is a memorial to the fallen soldier,” Amy Vitulli, assistant band director said. “The whole band is in

crosses, and someone plays taps.” Vitulli said someone will read the written work “Each Time You Tell Their Story” near the end. She added that the performance isn’t specific to one war because “too often that gets tied up in politics.” Drum major Matt Corum, 17, said the piece is one of the hardest he’s performed in his five years of marching band. “It’s a lot more intense. More emotional,” he said. “It’s the hardest piece we have ever done musicality and drill wise.” To put students in the mind set for the serious performance, the band directors put the names of fallen World War II soldiers from Union County in each student’s hat. Bruce and Vitulli said local competitions like the one Saturday give bands a chance to practice for larger ones. For instance, this is the last weekend before Vitulli’s band heads to Atlanta for the Bands of America Regional Championship. “We came up with this show with the focus of going to Bands of America,” said Jody Lukac, Piedmont’s band director. Porter Ridge’s band director Ian Faires said hosting the competition is one of the year’s biggest fundraisers for the school’s band. Although the competition ran into some hiccups when it started to rain and the competition moved inside briefly, Faires deemed the day a success. “We want it to be a positive experience for everyone,” he said. “I would like to see this be the premier contest for this date.”

THURSDAY,OCTOBER 29, 2009 | 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Rolling Hills Country Club, Monroe | $30 General Admission Featuring comedy performances by “The Southern Fried Chicks” Tickled Pink is an exclusive charity and comedy event designed to raise awareness and funds for uninsured and underserved women fighting breast cancer in Union County. Proceeds from the event will be donated to the Edwards Cancer Center at CMC-Union. In addition to a great comedy show, the evening will also include a silent auction, “Bras for the Cause” contest and breast cancer education.

For tickets or event information, please call 704-225-2577 or visit www.tickledpink4breastcancer.com


8A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

WEDDINGS

The Enquirer-Journal

ANNIVERSARY

Norwood — Mills Stephanie Kathleen Norwood and Daniel Ray Mills were united in marriage July 18, 2009 at six o’clock in the evening in an outdoor ceremony. The traditional ceremony was held at Firethorne Country Club in Marvin, NC with the Reverend R. Britton Hadley, Jr. officiating. A reception with dinner and dancing followed the wedding in the St. Andrews room at Firethorne Country Club. The bride is the daughter of Martha Norwood of Monroe, NC and Danny Norwood of Sunset Beach, NC. She is the granddaughter of: Regina Barringer of Charlotte, NC; the late Dr. Phil L. Barringer and Mrs. Phil (Vivian) Barringer of Monroe, NC; Gloria Patricia Norwood and the late Bill R. Norwood of Monroe, NC; and Virginia and Vaughn Lemmond of Monroe, NC. Stephanie is a graduate of Forest Hills High School in 2004 and Appalachian State University in 2008. She is employed by Appalachian State University in Boone, NC and UCA. The groom is the son of Tami and David Mills of Marshville, NC. He is the grandson of: Martha and Michael Warriax of Monroe, NC; Patsy and Leroy Mills of Marshville, NC; and great grandson of Sally Cochran of Charlotte, NC. Daniel is a graduate of Forest Hills High School in 2003 and attended Western Carolina University. He is employed by Industrial Sign and Graphics in Charlotte, NC. The bride, given in marriage by her parents, wore a long gown of ivory Taffeta with beaded lace appliqués on the bodice and skirt. It was fashioned with a strapless neckline, draped A-line waist and a chapel length train. She wore a Swarovski crystal and pearl Tiara in her hair. She carried a bouquet of white hybrid lilies, white spray roses, white hydrangeas, and green cymbidium orchids complimented with a collar of burgundy rubber plant leaves and laced together with sheer and ivory satin braid accented with pearls. Maid of honor was Ashley Glenn, college roommate of the bride, of Fortville, Indiana. Also attending were bridesmaids Kristen Mullis, bride’s cousin, of York, SC, Amanda Mills, groom’s sister, of Marshville, NC, Amanda Soper, bride’s friend, of Boone, NC, and junior

SENIOR BIRTHDAY

Georgia Witmore Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mills (Stephanie Kathleen Norwood) bridesmaid Cassidy Barringer, bride’s cousin, of Thonotosassa, Florida. They wore black knee length jersey dresses with charmeuse straps and waist, trimmed with champaign ribbon at the waist. They carried nosegays of green hydrangeas, red roses, eggplant mini calla lilies, and green cymbidium orchids. The groom’s father served as best man. Groomsmen were Clint Mills, groom’s brother, of Marshville, NC, Jonathan Norwood, bride’s brother, of Monroe, NC, Tyler Griffin and Jonathan Bell, groom’s friends, both of Charlotte, NC, Ryan Taylor, groom’s friend, of Wingate, NC, and junior groomsman Tyler Helms, groom’s cousin, of Marshville, NC. Also in the wedding party were Alexys Evans, bride’s cousin, of Goose Creek, SC, who was the flower girl and Hunter Mills, groom’s nephew, of Marshville, NC who was the ring bearer. Alexys wore a long ivory gown with black bows on the back. She carried an antique purse filled with rose petals. Wedding music included classical selections by N. Gustavson, Claude Debussy, Pachelbel, Samuel Pratt, and Bach and was played by Camille Gallant Gotta on the harp. The rehearsal dinner was held on July 17, 2009 at Hilltop Bistro in Monroe, NC. After a wedding trip to Florida, the Mills will reside in Hickory, NC.

Brookses mark 60

Witmore turns 80

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hilton Brooks of Wingate celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary Sept. 5, 2009, with a reception at Trinity Baptist Church in Monroe. It was hosted by their children and grandchildren. They were married Sept. 4, 1949 in Marshville. Mrs. Hilton Brooks is the former Joan Pigg, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Raymond Pigg; She is a homemaker. His parents are the late Mr. and Mrs. James Boyce Brooks. He is the founder of Brooks Sales, Inc. of Monroe.

MONROE Georgia Witmore of Monroe celebrated her 80th birthday on Aug. 23, 2009, with a reception at Unionville Community Center. It was hosted by her children. She was born Aug. 25, 1929, in Monroe. She is the former Georgia Newsome, daughter of the late George and Nancy Newsome of Monroe. Her children are David Crump, Anita McCarver, Wanda Plyler and Michael Witmore all of Monroe and the late Allen Crump. She has six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Submit social news online at enquirerjournal. com

Their children and spouses are Philip and Sheila Brooks of Marshville, David and Joy Brooks of Wingate and Gina and Steve Morris of Lenior City, Tenn. They have seven grandchildren and 14 greatgrandchildren.

Five generations

IN SERVICE Douglas Whitfield

Army National Guard Pvt. Douglas K. Whitfield has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission and received instruction and training exercises in drill and ceremonies, Army history, core values and traditions, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid, rifle marksmanship, weapons use, map reading and land navigation, foot marches, armed and unarmed combat, and field maneuvers and tactics. He is the son of Rhonda Whitfield of Monroe, N.C. and a 2008 graduate of Weddington High School.

Felipe Muraco

Army Pvt. Felipe A. Muraco has graduated from the Infantryman One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The training consists of Basic Infantry Training and Advanced Individual Training. During the nine weeks of basic combat training, Muraco received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid skills, and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and experienced use of various weapons

and weapons defenses available to the infantry. The Advanced Individual Training course is designed to train infantry soldiers to perform reconnaissance operations; employ, fire and recover anti-personnel and antitank mines; locate and neutralize land mines and operate target and sight equipment; operate and maintain communications equipment and radio networks; construct field firing aids for infantry weapons; and perform infantry combat exercises and dismounted battle drills, which includes survival procedures in a nuclear, biological or chemical contaminated area. Muraco is a 2007 Sun Valley High School graduate.

James Skaggs

and Mrs. Mark Ellerman, of Monroe, and Frank Price and the late Mildred Price, of Monroe. Colby’s great-grandmothers are Mary Wellman, of Coldwater, Ohio, and Rosella Ellerman, of Ft. Loramie, Ohio.

divant, of Monroe. His g r a n d p a rents are William and Shirley Sturdivant, of Monroe, and Marie Rorie, of Monroe. D’s greatgrandparents are Mary Ruth Sturdivant, of Monroe, and Maria Williams, of Monroe.

Air Force Airman James C. Skaggs graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Skaggs completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of Audrey and Phillip Smith of Bridgeview Drive, Iron Station, and James Skaggs of Midway Drive, Indian Trail.

Contributed photo

The Oxner-Cunningham family gathered for a fivegeneration photo on Sept. 24, 2009. Johnny Brooks Oxner, 79, of Monroe, is in the far right of the photograph. HIs great-grandson, Travis Tremaine Cunningham, holds Oxner’s great-great-granddaughter, Jaiya Amore Crowder. In the second row are Gloria Jean Cunningham, Oxner’s granddaughter, and Mary Lutricia Cunningham, his daughter. All are Union County natives and live in Monroe.

Five generations policy

The Enquirer-Journal will publish photos of five generations with the family name, the reason and date of the family gathering, the names of all who make up the five generations and their relationship to the matriarch or patriarch of the family. The newspaper is not responsible for lost or damaged photos.

BIRTHDAYS Beckett Carver

Beckett Alexander Carver will be 1 year old on Oct. 26, 2009. He is the son of Casey Carver and Kerri Carver (Little) of Monroe. His grandparents are Lanny and Wanda Little of Monroe and Floyd Carver of Clayton and Sarah Carver of Hopewell, Va. Beckett’s great-grandparents are Annie Lee Little of Monroe and Thomas Vickery of Indian Trail.

Hannah Moore

Hannah Grace Moore was 2 years old on Oct. 12, 2009. She is the daughter of Ted and Ashley Moore (Haywood) of Monroe. Her grandparents are the late Randy Haywood and Joey Haywood of Monroe and Tommy and Virgie Long of Stanfield and Ted and Mary Moore of Wadesboro. Hannah’s great-grand-

parents are Larry and Evelyn Hilton of Monroe and Carolyn and Jack Hemby of Waxhaw. Her greatgreat-grandmother is Gladys Hilton of Monroe.

Sarah Wentz

Sarah Elizabeth Wentz will be 2 years old on Nov. 7, 2009. She is the daughter of Matthew and Heather (Rouse) Wentz, of W a x h a w. Her grandparents are Hugh and Carol Wentz, of Kinston, and Dean and Amanda Rouse, of Seven Springs. Sarah’s great-grandparents are Alvin and Emily Davidson, of Kinston, and Dolly Rouse, of Seven Springs.

Colby Price

Colby Dawson Price will be 2 years old on Oct. 28, 2009. He is the son of David Price and Janna Wellman, of Monroe. His g r a n d p a rents are Mr.

Omar Sturdivant

Omar Sturdivant will be 9 years old on Nov. 9, 2009. He is the son of Courtney Woods, of Columbia, S.C., and Genine Sturdivant, of Monroe, and the step-son of Jonathan Clyburn, of Monroe. His grandparents are William and Shirley Sturdivant, of Monroe, Marie Rorie, of Monroe, Beverly Parker, of Charlotte, and Brenda Hailey, of Marshville. O’s great-grandparents are Mary Ruth Sturdivant, of Monroe, and Maria Williams, of Monroe.

Derek Miller

Derek Miller will be 8 years old on Oct. 28, 2009. He is the son of Jonathan Clyburn and Genine Stur-

Drey Covington

Shirdrea Covington was 11 years old on Oct. 20, 2009. She is the daughter of Brandon Mungo and Laurelle Sturdivant, of Monroe. Her grandparents are William and Shirley Sturdivant, of Monroe, and Lewis and Rhonda Hugue, of Monroe. Drey’s great-grandparents are T.C. Mungo, of Monroe, and Mary Ruth Sturdivant, of Monroe.

Joshua Haigler

Joshua Scott Haigler was 2 years old on Sept. 5, 2009. He is the son of Scott

and Kelly (Austin) Haigler, of Wingate. His grandparents are Dan and Charlene Austin, of Chesterfield, S.C., and Lane and Kay H a i g l e r, of Marshville. Joshua’s great-grandparents are Billy Ray and Jane Sullivan of Jefferson, S.C., and Doris and James Smith of Wingate.

Jackson Brown

Jackson Wayne Brown was a year old on June 20, 2009. He is the son of Kevin and Dayna (Yarbrough) Brown, of Marshville. His grandparents are Jimmy and Dianne Yarbrough, of Marshville, and Dottie Brown of Felton, Del. Jackson’s greatgrandparents are Leta Mills, of Marshville, and Effie Stiller, of Salisbury.

Cassie Brown

Cassie Lynn Brown was a year old on June 20, 2009. She is the daughter of Kevin and Dayna (Yarbrough) Brown, of Marshville. Her grandparents are Jimmy and Dianne Yarbrough, of Marshville, and Dottie Brown of Felton, Del. Cassie’s greatgrandparents are Leta Mills, of Marshville, and Effie Stiller, of Salisbury.

Christopher Tolleson

Christopher Tolleson will be 7 years old on Nov. 17, 2009. He is the son of Dave and Janna To l l e s o n , of Monroe. His grandparents are John and Judy Sorrenti, of Weirton, W.Va., and Mike and Esther Tolleson, of Weirton, W.Va. Christopher’s great-grandfather is Tom Husvar, of Weirton, W.Va.


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 9A

Bad driving endangers business

BIRTHS Addison Swann

Mr. and Mrs. Steve M. Swann (Bethany Brooks) of Wingate announce the birth of their daughter, Addison Grace, on Oct. 14, 2009, at Presbyterian Hospital in Matthews. Addison weighed 3 pounds 14 ounces and was 17 inches long. Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Brooks of Wingate and Mr. and Mrs. Dell Pittmon of Concord. She is the great-grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Hilton Brooks of Wingate, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Edwards of Marshville and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Trexler of Wadesboro.

Morgan Swann

Mr. and Mrs. Steve M. Swann (Bethany Brooks) of Wingate announce the birth of their daughter, Morgan Brook, on Oct. 14, 2009, at Presbyterian Hospital in Matthews. Morgan weighed 3 pounds 14 ounces and was 16 inches long.

Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Brooks of Wingate and Mr. and Mrs. Dell Pittmon of Concord. She is the great-grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Hilton Brooks of Wingate, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Edwards of Marshville and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Trexler of Wadesboro.

DEAR ABBY: My husband, “Harvey,” and I have operated a homebased business for more than 20 years. Harvey is an amazing technician, extremely efficient with his time on the job. The problem is, he is always in a hurry to get to the next job. I receive calls from angry motorists complaining that “the driver of one of our trucks” cut them off, yelled at them or flipped them off in traffic. When I receive one of these calls I say, “Thank you for calling. I’ll be sure to speak to the appropriate driver about the incident.” Harvey feels I should support him by telling the caller it was probably his own fault for talking on a cell phone, driving too slow or cutting him off. I have no doubt that some of these motorists actually do those things, but my husband is driving

Jaiya Crowder

Travis Cunningham and Tomesha Crowder of Monroe announce the birth of their daughter, Jaiya Amore, on Sept. 24, 2009, at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. Jaiya weighed 7 pounds 15 ounces and was 20 inches long. Her grandparents are Billy Polk and Hannah Crowder-Polk of Monroe, Gloria Jean Cunningham of Monroe and Darryl Dunn of Harrisburg. She is the great-grandchild of James and Mary Wright of Monroe and Sam and Lutricia Cunningham of Indian Trail.

Grand Opening

Dear Abby Columnist

around with his phone number on his truck and they’re not. When I mention the complaints, he wants to call them back using caller ID. Am I handling this appropriately? — BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE DEAR BETWEEN: Harvey may be a great technician, but it appears he’s a little short on common sense and good manners. It’s time you mentioned to him that what he’s doing is also bad for business. Those he offends in traffic are not likely to say a kind word about the business he’s advertising on his truck. DEAR ABBY: My

husband, “Adrian,” and I have been married five years, but there is something looming in our future that both of us dread — our parents’ old age. Adrian is an only child. I have one sister, but when it comes to caring for our parents, I might as well be an only child. Adrian’s parents live month-to-month on Social Security and pension checks. If they ever have any extra money, they don’t save it. They buy each other expensive gifts and eat out. Neither one of them is in good health, and the day will come when they won’t be able to care for themselves or each other, and I know they’ll expect us to do it. My parents are about the same, except they’re banking on an inheritance to see them through retirement. That money may or may not be enough,

considering how long people live now. Our parents think it’s our duty to care for them. We cringe at the idea that after all our hard work we’ll go from caring for our children to caring for our parents with no time for ourselves. — AFRAID FOR THE FUTURE IN SAN ANTONIO DEAR AFRAID: No one can foresee the future, so stop ruining the present by obsessing about what “might” happen. You say your in-laws are not in good health? One or both of them could die before they become completely dependent on you and your husband. The same is true for your parents. Forgive me if this seems cold, but it happens to be the truth. — Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips.

The Holidays are right around the corner,

new Ownership!

new Management! new Attitude!

90 days same as cash — FINaNcING aVaILaBLe!

quality oil change & lube

From

includes 17 Point inspection

• Change oil (up to 5 qts (5W30) • 5W20 & 10W30 additional • Replace oil filter • Lubricate chassis

• Free vehicle maintenance inspection • Free brake inspection • Appointment suggested

18

$

90*

With the coupon Expires 12/01/09

put your best smile forward! You Deserve A Beautiful Smile! Have A Beautiful Smile At Any Age! We specialize in helping take great care of your teeth and their overall health.

Preserving. restoring. enhancing. smiles. * Book Appointments Anytime Online

indian trail

310 Unionville Indian Trail Rd. W. (Next Door to Subway)

(704) 882-2233

Hours: M-F 7:30am-5:30pm, Sat. 8:00am-4:00pm • Appts. Available *Most vehicles. Some vans, pick-ups, transverse & hard to tune engines additional. Some manufacturer specified fluids additional. Call your center for pricing & details. Shop supply surcharge & environmental fees may apply to some services.

New Patients Welcome Emergency Appointments Available We’re Open Friday & Saturday By Appointment Most Dental Insurance Accepted and Filed

Beware Check Our Prices Before Selling To Buyers At Hotels Buying Pre-1936 U.S. Silver Dollars

BUYING GOLD BUYING GOLD CLASS RINGS, WEEDING BANDS GOLD JEWELRY (in any condition)

10K gOLD 14K gOLD 18K gOLD

Paying Paying Paying

BUYING GOLD COINS 1 OZ. gOLD COinS

Paying

1/2 OZ. gOLD COinS

Paying

1/4 OZ. gOLD COinS

Paying

1/10 OZ. gOLD COinS Paying

BUYING U.S. SILVER COINS DATED 1964 OR EARLIER

Dimes Quarters Halves

Paying Paying Paying

BUying KEnnEDy HaLF DOLLaRS DaTED BEFORE 1970

Paying

BUying STERLing SiLVER in any COnDiTiOn

BUying

COin COLLECTiOnS U.S. 1 OZ. SiLVER DOLLaRS DaTED 1986-2007 any gOLD OR SiLVER iTEM

Monday thru Friday 10-5pm • Saturday 10-2pm.

A&D Coins 1325 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Monroe, NC

next to Bob Bob Gibson’s BBQ in Boulevard Specialty Shops 704-289-8233 Serving Monroe since 1989


10A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

LUNCH MENUS Elementary

Monday: Chicken nuggets with barbecue sauce, cheese enchilada, pinto beans, mexicali corn, blueberry cup, fruit, muffin Tuesday: Cheese stix dippers, chili-stuffed spud, baked french fries, caesar salad, spiced apples, fruit, sesame seed roll Wednesday: Spaghetti and

meat, sauce, pork chopper on whole wheat bun, corn on the cob, broccoli, spinach salad, pineapple and applesauce, fruit, french bread Thursday: Cheeseburger, on a bun, hot dog on a bun, barbecued beans, creamy coleslaw, potato salad, chips, pear halves, fruit Friday: Cheese pizza, barbecue on roll, potato bites, salad, sliced peaches, fruit

HOROSCOPES Middle School

Monday: Chicken nuggets with barbecue sauce, cheese enchilada, pinto beans, mexicali corn, pasta salad, blueberry cup, fruit, muffin Tuesday: Cheese stix dippers, chili-stuffed spud, baked french fries, California blend, caesar salad, spiced apples, fruit, sesame seed roll

Wednesday: Spaghetti and meat, sauce, pork chopper on whole wheat bun, corn on the cob, broccoli, spinach salad, pineapple and applesauce, fruit, french bread Thursday: Cheeseburger, on a bun, hot dog on a bun, barbecued beans, creamy coleslaw, potato salad, chips, pear halves, fruit Friday: Cheese pizza, barbecue on roll, potato bites, green beans, salad, sliced peaches, fruit

High school

Monday: Chicken strips with honey mustard, pork chopper on whole wheat bun, baked beans, glazed carrots, spinach salad, pineapple and applesauce, fruit, muffin Tuesday: Pepperoni pizza, yogurt cup/turkey on whole wheat bread, corn, broccoli, veggie dipper, fresh apple wedges, fruit Wednesday: Spaghetti and meat, sauce, deli roll-up, oven roasted, potatoes, California blend, caesar salad, blueberry cup, fruit, french bread Thursday: Oven fried chicken, veggie sub, hearty bun, mashed potatoes with gravy, peas and carrots, salad, pear halves, fruit, cornbread Friday: Taco salad, hot dog on a bun, potato smiles, green beans, creamy coleslaw, peach cups, fruit

After school

Monday: Giant goldfish graham, milk Tuesday: Cheese sticks, juice Wednesday: Rice krispie treat, milk Thursday: Doughnut ball, milk Friday: Cheddar sun chip, juice

Oct. 25, 2009

In the year ahead, you will have a change of outlook concerning your philosophical point of view on many facets of life. These alterations will make you a stronger person. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Someone who may be a bit jealous might try to put obstacles in your path. An authority will have them removed again. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Be objective when evaluating the thinking of your associates and, when one has a superior idea, back him or her all the way. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’re likely to be rewarded with a heftier paycheck for a job well done, but that doesn’t mean this will hold true for everything you do. Take your good luck where you find it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Your wonderful give-andtake attitude will serve you well. However, once you start to think you’ve given enough, you might argue rather than compromise. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — It may not be possible to accomplish all that you had planned, so be happy with what you get done. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — It’s generally a good day for you and things should go well, but there is a possibility that you could explode over something that shouldn’t matter. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Those strong tactics that you used successfully at work need to be toned down at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You’re good at accepting the opinions of others, but if someone rubs you the wrong way, you won’t hold your tongue. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — A joint effort should work out, provided it isn’t one-sided. While

each is pulling his weight, all will go well. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — That pleasant disposition will work w in a collective endeavor. A oneon-one situation is likely to yield a different story. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — You perform well, even when challenged, until you tire. Once that takes place, you won’t retain your usual pleasant mood. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Instead of dealing on the same plane as moody or temperamental types, you’ll know how to bring them up to your level.

Oct. 26, 2009

You’re ready to move on to larger enterprises. An associate will open the door not only because you’re qualified but because he or she likes you. It pays to make friends. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — If you are working on a labor of love and hoping to make some progress, try to muster as much privacy as possible. The less interference you have, the more you’ll get done. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t stay at home if there is any chance you can get to a place where lots of friends hang out. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Conditions in general are extremely favorable with regard to your material interests. As the saying goes, “Make hay while the sun shines.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — This could be one of those wonderful days when profits can be realized from past work. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — A successful person may pass on some valuable information that will be just what you need to finish an important project. You will be most grateful. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — It’s important to be nice to all those with whom you share your day, but be considerate to the person with you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Distasteful tasks could prove to be surprisingly pleasant to handle. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Treat whatever transpires philosophically, and you will have an extremely pleasant day. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Something negative will collapse of its own weight; there is no reason to harbor phantom fears. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Put mundane projects aside for the moment, and work on those things that require fresh ideas. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Create a firm foundation and you’ll find the success you desire. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Let your heart rule your head when it comes to those who are closest to your heart.

Judging of pumpkin contest – Oct. 30 at 5pm Trick or Treat – Oct. 31, 6-7 pm costume contest – Oct. 31, 7-8pm

Trick or Treating and costume contest

for those 12 and under. Gift cards will be awarded to the top 3 winners

NEED A NEW ROOF?

in each age group. Age groups are 4 and under, 5-8, and 9-12.

New this Year!

pumpkin carving contest for all ages

Bring your fully carved pumpkin to Monroe Crossing customer service desk on Thursday, Oct. 29 after 5pm or Friday Oct. 30 before 12 noon. Gift cards will be awarded in each category: best overall, most creative, best traditional, best kids’ entry, scariest.

We offer free estimates!

Shingles • Residential Metal Roofing • Membrane Roofing • Commercial &

youR fRiendly neighboRhood RoofeR!!

40 plus years of experience locally owned and operated Wayne Cooke, owner

Residential www.wayncoroofing.com Roofing

704-814-9566

NC licensed & insured 1300 Matthews Mint hill Rd, Matthews, nC 28105


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 11A

Cap and trade would cost jobs, higher prices The US Chamber of Commerce continues to oppose the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009(HR2454), alleging that it would cost American jobs and drastically increase energy costs at the gas pump, grocery story an in our homes with no environmental gain. In June, the U.S. House of Representatives narrowly passed the HR 2454 also known as the Waxman-Markey Act. The Senate is considering several provisions similar to the House bill. Let’s examine the specifics of the legislation and the US Chamber’s concerns. Waxman-Markey would establish four mechanisms for reducing greenhouse gas emissions: • A cap-and-trade regulatory system for electric utilities and other large emitters of greenhouse gases. • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-enforced equipment performance standards for all other emissions producers. • A mandatory renewable electricity standard that requires electric utilities to generate 20% of their power from renewable sources and efficiency gains by 2020. • Widespread new energy efficiency standards for buildings, equipment, and appliances. Under a cap-and-trade system, the federal government would set an annual cap on the amount of greenhouse gasses that can be emitted. The cap in Waxman-Markey would decline over time, with a goal of reducing emissions 17% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 80% below by 2050. The federal government would grant large emitters credits giving them the right to emit greenhouse gasses up to a certain level. Companies needing additional credits could purchase them. Companies whose emissions are less than their allotment could sell them to other firms. Cost estimates of the bill vary widely. A May 2009 study by the National Black Chamber of Commerce estimates an annual decline in GDP of $170 billion in 2015, $350 billion in 2030, and $730 billion in 2050. The study also says that 2.3 million to 3 million net jobs would be lost-a number that takes into account green jobs that would be created. The US Chamber believes that the

Jim

Carpenter

Columnist

Black Chamber study is a strong analysis and a good predictor of future economic costs. Oil refiners would be hit hard by Waxman-Markey, and consumers would be forced to pick up the tab. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that cost impacts could be as much as $0.77 per gallon for gasoline, $0.83 per gallon for jet fuel, and $0.88 per gallon for diesel fuel. Electricity prices are also expected to increase 7.3 percent by 2015, 22 percent by 2030, and 45 percent by 2050, according to the National Black

Chamber of Commerce study. This legislation creates 397 new regulations and 1,060 new mandates. The US Chamber maintains the bill would not reduce the global level of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere or international climate change. The Chamber maintains that the bill falls short on moving renewable and alternative technologies into the marketplace and enabling our transition to lower carbon use. Carbon tariffs to be imposed on goods imported in to the US would spur retaliation from global trading partners, hurting US businesses and consumers. Even if the United States completely eliminated greenhouse gas emissions, global levels would still rise because developing countries’ emissions are rapidly increasing. WaxmanMarkey would put American businesses at a competitive disadvantage due to higher domestic energy prices. The bill does little to ensure

that renewable or alternative energy sources would be brought online quickly enough to replace the fossil-based energy that the bill’s declining emissions caps would force out of the system. The Chamber is urging Congress to add a provision that would streamline the siting and permitting process for clean energy production and transmission facilities. Waxman-Markey also fails to address the need for meaningful expansion of emissions-free nuclear energy. This legislation expands Davis-Bacon--a law requiring that workers on federal contracts be paid the local prevailing wage--to any projects or activities funded by the bill, thereby shutting out many qualified minority, small, and nonunion businesses from energy projects. Waxman-Markey would also allow states to enact their own parallel cap-and-trade systems after 2017. Further, the bill does not shield small businesses from

New Source Performance Standards--EPA regulations for pollution control--with regard to greenhouse gases. This would leave a glaring regulatory hole through which activist groups could potentially force EPA to impose strict greenhouse gas regulations on small emitters. The US Chamber maintains that it supports increasing renewable sources of electricity. The Chamber advocates: · Increasing Congressional funding for wind, solar, geothermal and ocean programs at the Department of Energy from $250 million (current) to $450 million. · Extending for eight years the renewable energy tax credits and establishing a four year phase-out period. · Extending the existing Clean Renewable Energy Bond program to enable public power systems and electric cooperatives to seek alternative financing mechanisms for clean energy projects not eligible for production tax credits.

Forgetting something? Annual mammograms save lives. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and nothing is more important than remembering to get your yearly digital mammogram at a Presbyterian Breast Center. The crystal-clear images can help save your life. And all of our digital mammograms are performed exclusively by highly trained female technologists. Make a mental note. Schedule your mammogram today at one of our seven convenient locations. Call 1-888-844-0080 or visit www.presbyterian.org/mammogram to make an appointment.

Seven convenient Breast Center locations. CHARLOTTE 1718 East 4th Street Charlotte

HUNTERSVILLE 10030 Gilead Road Huntersville

EASTOVER 2900 Randolph Road Charlotte

BALLANTYNE 14215 Ballantyne Corporate Place Charlotte

MATTHEWS 1500 Matthews Township Parkway Matthews

UNIVERSITY 8401 Medical Plaza Drive Charlotte

MONROE 2000 Wellness Boulevard Monroe


12A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Flu-fighting drug has Carolina connection

Flu Continued from page 1A

By Jamie Rogers

doses of flu-fighting medications from a federal stockpile to states in case they eventually needed them. At the time, there were 20 confirmed cases in the U.S. of people recovering easily. There was no vaccine against swine flu, but the CDC had taken the initial step necessary for producing one. “As a nation, we have prepared at all levels of government, and as individuals and communities, taking unprecedented steps to counter the emerging pandemic,” Obama wrote in Saturday’s declaration. He said the pandemic keeps evolving, the rates of illness are rising rapidly in many areas and there’s a potential “to overburden health care resources.” The government now hopes to have about 50 million doses of swine flu vaccine out by mid-November and 150 million in December. The flu virus has to be grown in chicken eggs, and the yield hasn’t been as high as was initially hoped, officials have said. “Many millions” of Americans have had swine flu so far, according to an estimate that CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden gave Friday. The government doesn’t test everyone to confirm swine flu so it doesn’t have an exact count. He also said there have been more than 20,000 hospitalizations. ——— On the Net: CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

Media General News Service FLORENCE, S.C. — A drug used to treat thousands of people afflicted with the seasonal flu and the H1N1 virus has its roots in Florence. Oseltamivir phosphate, the active ingredient in the drug Tamiflu, is produced by Roche Carolina at its facility on Old Marion Highway in eastern Florence County. Roche Carolina is the only facility in the United States that makes oseltamivir phosphate, Timothy Culbreth, Roche’s director of manufacturing, said. It is one of only two facilities in the world that makes the active component in the drug. From Florence, that ingredient is shipped around the world to other Roche sites or to contracted manufacturers for formulation into capsules, Culbreth said. A number of orders go directly to the World Health Organization. Culbreth said some governments also receive oseltamivir phosphate for stockpiling in case of a pandemic. The drug was discovered by a smaller pharmaceutical company which licensed it to Roche for marketing. “(Osltamivir phosphate) interferes with one of the reproductive cycles of the virus, so the virus can’t continue to grow and spawn new virus cells,” Cul-

(&))=ln,):Vhi BdcgdZ!C8'-&&' ,%)"'((")')'

DeZcBdcYVn";g^YVn,/(%"*/(%!HVijgYVn-"&'

lll#Wgdd`hhVaZh#Xdb New Holland Tractor Pricing Low APR / 0% for 72 Months*

Cash / No Financing

$12,585. For OCT. $12,885. For NOV. $9,900. For OCT. $10,200. For Nov. $15,995. For OCT. $16,295. For NOV. $18,550. For OCT. $18,850. For NOV. $24,285. For OCT. $24,585. For NOV. $21,995. For OCT. $22,295. For NOV.

$11,115. For OCT. $11,415. For NOV. $8,695. For OCT. $8,995. For Nov. $16,250. For OCT. $16,550. For NOV. $17,225. For OCT. $17,525. For NOV. $21,565. For OCT. $21,865. For NOV. $20,495. For OCT. $20,795. For NOV.

T1510 4WD HST TC24 4WD Gear TC34DA 4WD w/ 240 Loader HST TT60A 4WD TN75A 4WD TT75A 4WD

“From Florence, that ingredient is shipped around the world to other Roche sites or to contracted manufacturers for formulation into capsules.”

breth said. Roche produces about 50 drums a day of oseltamivir phosphate, which appears as a white fluffy powder. A new batch of the drug is produced every 30 hours, and it takes about five days for Roche Carolina scientists to complete a batch. Roche strives to be extremely efficient in its production of the drug so there’s always a batch of it in some phase of the five-day process, Culbreth said. Unlike the crisis that has unfolded concerning the shortage of the vaccine for the H1N1 virus, Roche’s production of the ingredient is keeping up with demands, Roche officials said. Roche usually doesn’t produce oseltamivir phosphate all the time, but the plant adjusted its output of the drug when the H1N1 virus became a major

Call now for 3.9% APR OR 15 Months Same As Cash OR up to a $1000 and a free in home consultation*.

Up to $1,000 Rebate OR Great Financing Options PLUS Up to $1,500 Tax Credit!*

While you can’t control the elements outside your home, inside the control is yours. Make your indoor environment perfect with Trane heating, cooling and beyond. And when you purchase a qualifying Trane system, you can get one of THREE great offers! 3.9% APR OR, 15 Months Same As Cash OR up to $1,000 rebate*. Just purchase a qualifying system, and get Trane reliability, Trane energy efficiency, Trane air quality and be rewarded with a Trane rebate. Every home is different. That’s why Trane EarthWiseTM Hybrid Heating and Cooling Systems give you greater control over your comfort and energy consumption by allowing you to select what’s best for you -- gas or electric. Whether it’s utilizing an electric heat pump during winter’s milder days, or switching to natural gas to combat winter’s frigid freezes, you or your Trane EarthWiseTM Hybrid System can determine the best heating option based on climate conditions and energy costs -- the control is yours. And don’t forget those blistering summer months when the heat pump delivers the most efficient, effective, and reliable cooling as well!

704-624-2351

October is the best time to buy. November will cost a little more! *For agricultural use. Offer subject to CNH Capital America LLC credit approval. See your New Holland dealer for details and eligibility requirements. Depending on model, a down payment may be required. Offer good through November 30, 2009, at participating New Holland dealers in the United States. Offer subject to change. Taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, additional options or attachments not included in price. © 2009 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. New Holland and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC.

The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Sunny

Clear

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

66º

44º

68º 51º

71º 49º

71º 51º

73º 53º

Today we will see sunny skies with a high temperature of 66º, humidity of 63% and an overnight low of 44º. The record high temperature for today is 85º set in 1940. The record low is 25º set in 1962. Monday, skies will be mostly sunny with a high temperature of 68º.

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.24"

Tarboro 67/48 Washington Asheville 67/49 Greensboro Raleigh 64/36 64/44 67/46 Charlotte Cape 66/42 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 68/49 68/59 Shown is today’s weather. 66/44 67/49 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 72/54 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

Moon Phases

Full 11/2

New 11/16

Last 11/9

Local UV Index

H

UV Index

Around Our State

L

This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

s . .67/48 s s . .64/44 s s . .67/48 s s . .69/51 pc pc .72/60 sh s . .67/49 s s . .68/50 s s . .55/39 s s . .71/54 pc s . .63/44 s s . .66/49 s pc .71/55 sh s . .71/54 mc pc .67/62 pc s . .66/49 s s . .68/50 s s . .69/51 s pc .69/57 mc s . .68/45 s s . .69/55 pc s . .67/49 s s . .70/50 s

Stationary Front

Warm Front

L

H

Low Pressure High Pressure

National Extremes High: 94° in Indio, Calif. Low: 18° in Limon, Colo.

Across The Nation Today

Monday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Albemarle . . . . . .66/46 Brevard . . . . . . . .65/39 Burlington . . . . . .65/44 Cape Fear . . . . . .67/47 Emerald Isle . . . .70/59 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .67/49 Gastonia . . . . . . .68/43 Grandfather Mtn. .55/37 Greenville . . . . . .67/48 Hendersonville . .63/39 Hickory . . . . . . . .66/43 Jacksonville . . . .69/50 Kinston . . . . . . . .67/48 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .66/59 Mount Mitchell . .66/42 Roanoke Rapids .66/46 Southern Pines . .67/48 Swanquarter . . . .67/54 Wilkesboro . . . . .68/40 Williamston . . . . .67/49 Yanceyville . . . . .66/44 Zebulon . . . . . . . .67/47

2360STO  

H

Cold Front

0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

City

Exclusive Pre-Opening Tour Event!

L

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+

Today

Please join us for our

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:37 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:35 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .2:10 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . . .Next Day

First 10/25

Durham 66/45

Winston-Salem 64/43

*Up to $1,000 mail in rebate offer OR financing offers available on qualifying systems only. Available through participating independent Trane dealers. All sales must be to homeowners in the contiguous United States. Void where prohibited. Systems must be purchased between September 1, 2009 and October 31, 2009. See your participating independent Trane dealer or visit Trane.com for complete program eligibility, details and restrictions.

3ATURDAY /CTOBERsAM PM

North Carolina State Forecast

In-Depth Forecast

concern, Culbreth said. “This originally was not on our production plans for this year,” he said. “We got some directions from headquarters. We did an acceleratory changeover, one of the fastest ones we’ve ever done,” he said. “We started about a week earlier than we thought we could. So we are about a week ahead of schedule right now.” Roche had an inventory of Tamiflu because of the previous threat of the bird flu. Culbreth said this helped the company stay ahead of the schedule. “When the swine flu started to take off, we started utilizing the inventory to meet needs,” he said. “We had some on hand in our warehouse. We sent that out to meet the initial surge of requests and demands.” In addition to treating the H1N1 virus, Tamiflu can be used in the short term to prevent someone from contracting the virus. In other words, if a family member is ill and someone is in constant contact with that person, he or she can take the drug as a preventive measure, Culbreth said. Roche officials plan to continue producing about 50 drums a day of the drug until January. Culbreth said, at that point, they will revisit the situation and make a determination about adjusting production levels.

City

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Atlanta . . . . . . . . .72/44 Baltimore . . . . . . .65/43 Chicago . . . . . . . .56/46 Denver . . . . . . . . .44/28 Detroit . . . . . . . . .54/44 Houston . . . . . . . . . .79/65 Indianapolis . . . .60/42 Los Angeles . . . .83/61 Miami . . . . . . . . . .86/77 Minneapolis . . . . .46/38 New York . . . . . . .64/45 Orlando . . . . . . . .86/71 Philadelphia . . . .65/41 Reno . . . . . . . . . .70/45 Sacramento . . . . .75/54 Salem, OR . . . . . .59/44 Salt Lake City . . .54/44 San Francisco . . .71/56 Seattle . . . . . . . . .55/48 Syracuse . . . . . . .53/37 Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/70 Washington, DC .65/42

Around The World Today

Monday

s . .69/50 s s . .64/49 s pc .57/45 ra rs .61/32 s pc .56/46 sh s . .73/59 t s . .59/44 sh s . .83/60 s t . .86/79 t ra .50/37 mc s . .63/46 s mc .87/73 t s . .65/46 s s . .70/42 s s . .73/50 s ra .58/42 sh s . .59/43 mc s . .69/58 s ra .54/45 sh sh .58/45 s pc .85/73 t s . .65/47 s

City

Monday

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .90/76 Athens . . . . . . . . .72/63 Baghdad . . . . . . .84/62 Beijing . . . . . . . . .77/51 Berlin . . . . . . . . . .56/45 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .89/69 Hong Kong . . . . .87/68 London . . . . . . . .60/51 Madrid . . . . . . . . .71/49 Mexico City . . . . .75/53 Moscow . . . . . . . .39/35 Nassau . . . . . . . .88/78 Paris . . . . . . . . . .61/46 Rio de Janeiro . . .79/68 Rome . . . . . . . . . .73/51 San Juan . . . . . . .89/79 Stockholm . . . . . .45/40 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .63/61 Toronto . . . . . . . .51/39

t . .88/77 t ra .71/61 ra ra .87/62 s pc .70/47 s ra .55/45 pc s . .88/71 pc s . .86/67 s s . .58/49 pc pc .72/50 pc t . .74/55 t cl . .44/35 sh t . .88/77 sh pc .63/44 pc cl . .76/70 sh pc .71/51 pc t . .89/79 t pc .46/40 ra ra .65/61 sh mc .52/44 mc

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

Secrest shortcut Rd. Monroe, NC 28110 It is open to the general public. INDIAN TRAIL

www.carillonassistedliving.com


The Enquirer-Journal

Egypt Continued from page 1A My family is constantly making sure I am alright, and making sure I am eating plenty of food. All of the families go out of the way to make me comfortable. It is not only my host families that are hospitable, but most of the people in Egypt. People on the street tell me welcome to Egypt every other day. Also, people on the streets are always very willing to help in any way possible. This hospitality is very similar to small town America, and the South. People back home are the same way — always trying to make you feel cared for. Q: You have been learning Arabic for a little over a month now. Do most people around you speak English or Arabic? What has been the best way to help you learn the language? A: My host family mostly speaks Arabic when talking to each other, but they will translate for me usually. My host family has been really good at helping me to progress in Arabic. I can have a simple conversation in Arabic with them. My school is taught in English, but many of my classmates speak a lot of Arabic. ... I still have Arabic lessons three times a week for three hours each lesson, and those help tremendously. I feel like I have improved a lot in a short amount of time. I am reading and writing small sentences, and I can comprehend what our teacher says most of the time. Q: What’s your favorite word or phrase in Arabic and why? A: “Dahme khafif ” is a saying that literally means my blood is light. It is interpreted as meaning I have a sense of humor or I like to laugh. This phrase is my favorite because my Arabic teacher always says that about me and has me say it. Our Arabic teacher is very funny, so we laugh throughout the class. Q: Will you be celebrating Halloween or Thanksgiving while you are there? If so, how will you celebrate? If not, will you miss it? A: I will celebrate Halloween because my school is having a spirit day where we have to wear costumes, and we will participate in several festivities. Also, I was invited to several Halloween parties. It is not as widely celebrated, so I will miss the atmosphere. ... I doubt I will be celebrating Thanksgiving. How can you really celebrate it without your family? I do have a break from school for Thanksgiving, and our school may do something, but Thanksgiving is over a month away, so I am not really sure. I will miss stuffing, macaroni and cheese, which I doubt I will find here, but maybe I will make some for my host family. Q: Being a young lady in a new country, do you generally feel safe or are there times you are ill at ease? A: Cairo is an amazingly safe city. There are over 20 million people in Greater Cairo, and I have never felt physically threatened. I feel very comfortable walking down the street at any time of day or night. Sure, there are cat calls and such, but never anything physical. People here are also so helpful that I feel that if anything was to happen, people would come running. Q: What are your new friends like? Do they have similar personalities to your friends back home? Are they mostly exchange

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 13A

students or locals? A: My new friends are great. Mostly I hang out with the other seven exchange students I take Arabic with. We see each other the most often, and two of them are in my school. We have all bonded really well, and it has been great to have such a strong support system. I have made several Egyptian friends who are equally nice. I have become good friends with my host siblings. I have a host sister who is 17, a host sister who is 14, and a host brother who is 14. I have met a lot of their friends who are also very nice. In Egypt, it seems that you only have to meet a person once and then they are your friend. Q: Before you left for Egypt in August, you said, “I think a lot of people have a misconception about Muslims and their religion, and I want to help break that barrier and show that we’re all people.” As a Methodist, do you find that there is a misconception among Muslims about Christians and other religions as well? Have you had many conversations about the differences? A: Muslims respect the other religions of the Book — Christians and Jews. Religion definitely plays a huge role in this culture, but I haven’t heard any judgments directed toward Christians. Sure, there are misconceptions that Egyptians hold about America in general, but none specific toward religion. One of the main misconceptions held is that many people equate Jews with Zionists, which is not true at all. We work through these misconceptions and try to reach understanding.

EXCERPT FROM ROGERS’ BLOG Oct. 20, The Compassion of a Country “Constant assistance, food until I can’t eat another bite, selflessness, and hospitality. The people of this country are some of the most generous and caring people I have ever met. ... It reminds me of southern hospitality. An Egyptian who had lived in South Carolina told me how similar the ways of the people are in both places. “I have been placed with three host families. I may still be moving again, but inshallah (God willing) this is the last. ... I have been told that their home is my home even by families not even hosting me. “People are also very willing to help each other. ... The other day, I was riding in a taxi, and we got bumped by another car. It was a very minor accident, yet the driver was angry bought the taxi the day before. Within thirty seconds, there were at least 6 other taxi drivers who stopped in the road to see if their fellow taxi driver needed any help. “On a different day, I was getting out of the taxi with two of my friends, and when we handed the driver the money he wouldn’t take it and he simply started yelling at us. Before we knew it a policeman came up to help us. Another guy stopped by to help, and then a third guy came to show us where to go. It was amazing to have all of the willing help. ... I have never felt threatened in Egypt. ... I think it is a combination of an evident reliance of religion, strong family ties, and a natural good nature. Shokran (thank you) to the people of Egypt, Shokran!”

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

The Palmetto Pipes and Drums band, of Columbia, S.C. was the only band in attendance this year.

Games Continued from page 1A Morrison said her ancestors were some of the first settlers in the area so she comes from a long line of preserving Scottish traditions here. “I just think it’s wonderful for our young people to know what our ancestors did and the customs they brought from the mother land.” Museum of the Waxhaws director Sharon Murrer agreed with Morrison that the history should be preserved and passed on. “One of the most exciting things is that there are young people here,” she said. Arthur Lightbody stood in attendance and soaked in all the events. “I think it’s going great,” he said. “This is a lot of fun.” Murrer noticed a slight uptick in attendance this year, something unexpected especially with the rainy weather. She surmised it could have to do with a still-suffering econo-

my in which people look to local entertainment instead of out-of-town trips. “I think there is a renewed local interest,”

she said. It was unclear what would happen with the games next year, but Morrison promised to do her best to pass the

flame in order to keep the tradition alive. “We’re preserving of our family heritage,” she said.

Need Financing?

AMERICAN STANDARD

14 SEER SYSTEMS QUALIFY FOR

UP TO $1500 TAX CREDIT!

16 MONTHS 14 Seer Systems are Central Heat and Air and can be Gas compatible!

SAME AS CASH** NO PAYMENTS NO INTEREST

*** Interest accumulates from the date of charge. If balance is paid in full during the option period, the customer pays no interest. If the balance remains on the account at the end of the option period, the customer must pay the accumulated interest.

“Your Comfort Matters, Call Us Today”

(704) 289-3807

421 E. Old Hwy. 74, Monroe www.jerrysmechanical.com


14A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

From the Sidelines: Sports medicine today By Laura Edwards

Autumn is here, bringing with it a new school year, cooler weather and shorter days. For Eric Warren, M.D., autumn also means a return to the sidelines. Dr. Warren, a physician with Waxhaw Family Physicians & Sports Medicine, spends crisp fall Friday nights devoted to caring for football players in Union County, where he is the team physician for local area high schools. As a primary care sports medicine physician, Dr. Warren is trained in nonsurgical treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, concussions and acute and chronic conditions (such as diabetes) in addition to sports psychology, nutrition and injury prevention. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many people think that sports medicine is synonymous with orthopaedic surgery. In reality, though, about 95% of

sports medicine is nonsurgical.â&#x20AC;? He lists overuse injuries, fractures, head injuries, mononucleosis and asthma as a few of the issues he tackles regularly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These conditions are typically pretty minor,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But when you take someone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constantly pushing his or her body to the limit, these conditions can suddenly have a huge impact on performance or quality of life.â&#x20AC;? He adds that this is true for more than just serious athletes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such as the recreational golfer or occasional jogger and even people whose jobs require physical tasks, such as heavy lifting. The field of sports medicine has grown tremendously over the past few decades, making it more important than ever that caregivers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from primary care sports medicine physicians like Dr. Warren and orthopaedic surgeons to physical therapists and athletic trainers, have

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many people think that sports medicine is synonymous with orthopaedic surgery. In reality, though, about 95% of sports medicine is nonsurgical.â&#x20AC;? appropriate, up-to-date training. This is perhaps most true in the case of concussions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Concussion management is, by far, the aspect that has changed the most over the last five to six years,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Warren. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The brain is the most complicated organ in the body, and 100 people can have 100 different responses to the same head injury.â&#x20AC;? He lists learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, mood disorders, previous injuries and even the amount of sleep a person got the previous night as factors that can affect the impact of a

Warren

concussion. Regardless of the details, though, a concussion should always be treated as a serious injury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A concussion can impact you for the rest of your life,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Warren. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tearing up your knee is one thing, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different story altogether to be stuck with long-term memory loss or other permanent brain damage.â&#x20AC;? While he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to scare people, Dr. Warren is up front about the risks that come with playing sports â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly a high-impact sport like football. Last year, three high school football play-

ers in North Carolina died as a result of injuries sustained on the field â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and yet two out of the three were completely preventable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the players died from heat illness â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which is 99.9% preventable if precautions are taken. Another died from second impact syndrome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; meaning he sustained a second head injury before the first was fully healed. Increased swelling in the brain after an initial head injury leads to death 50% of the time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and permanent damage 100% of the time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when a second head injury occurs.â&#x20AC;? Dr. Warren stresses these and other issues during his frequent talks with parents, coaches and other first responders, such as athletic trainers. He often finds himself up against well-known stories of high-profile athletes coming back from injuries, such as the recent one about Florida quarterback and former Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow coming back from a concussion to lead the Gators to victory over LSU. What many people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize, Dr. Warren says, is that a fully developed, mature brain like that of Tebow, a college senior, is completely different from the brain of a younger athlete. â&#x20AC;&#x153;An adult brain is much less vulnerable than a brain thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still developing,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The average athlete with three or more concussions is 300 to 500 times more likely to have significant, long-term memory problems, and younger athletes are even more vulnerable.â&#x20AC;? He urges the athletes he works with â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and their parents â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to have perspective, pointing out that they have many years ahead of them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;re truly capable of going on to a college or professional sports career, the main goal should be to heal properly and preserve years of future sports participation, rather than making an ill-advised comeback for one big game and risking permanent injury or disability.â&#x20AC;? Dr. Warren speaks from personal experience on this last note. A former star football player in high school, he came back too quickly after major knee surgery. A second injury to the same knee was much more severe than the first and effectively ended his playing career. Though he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hesitate to highlight the dangers of playing sports, Dr. Warren is also quick to point out that there is a huge upside, especially in light of our ability to prevent many injuries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the privilege of working with a lot of kids whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone on to earn athletic scholarships to college â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an opportunity that many of them wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have gotten if not for improved sports medicine care. It takes

a whole team of people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from the motivated athlete to his or her parents, coaches and the sports medicine team working behind the scenes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to achieve those dreams, and it happens every day.â&#x20AC;? Dr. Warren is leading an initiative by Presbyterian Healthcare to continue helping athletes achieve their dreams, right here in Union County. The health system has donated crucial supplies, including automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and spine boards, offered free sports physicals and educational talks and provided team physicians to Union County schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During my first year as a team physician, I had to hold the neck of an athlete with a suspected spine injury while we waited for the ambulance to arrive,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The school didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a spine board, so we had no other way to stabilize the neck.â&#x20AC;? Presbyterian donated spine boards to Union County schools earlier this year. Another missing piece, he says, was an AED, a device used to prevent a person from going into life-threatening cardiac arrest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most schools had AEDs, but they were in the main office and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be removed. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out on the field and an athlete is in trouble, an AED in the office might as well be in Georgia.â&#x20AC;? Thanks to Presbyterian, many Union County schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; athletic departments now have dedicated AEDs that can be taken to games. In addition, emergency medical services (EMS) are now stationed at all of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high school football games. Sports medicine care has been vastly improved in recent years, and the picture will only continue to improve â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in Union County and beyond. Advancements in the field and the efforts of people like Dr. Warren help ensure that the fun of sports is preserved and the focus remains on the field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My proudest moment is when a game ends, and no one knows I was even there,â&#x20AC;? says Dr. Warren. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect game when I evaluate kids on the sidelines and determine that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all okay, and everyone is engrossed in the action on the field, and no one even knows who I am.â&#x20AC;? To schedule a sports medicine evaluation with Dr. Warren, call Waxhaw Family Physicians & Sports Medicine at 704384-8640. The practice offers a variety of sports medicine services, including nonsurgical treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses, concussion management, joint injections, physical therapy, digital X-ray and overall wellness care. To learn more, visit www.waxhawfamilyphysicians.com.

s LOCALCHILDRENAND SENIORS LIVEINPOVERTY s 3ENIORSANDGRANDPARENTSCANNOT AFFORDPROPERNUTRITION s)NTHELASTYEAREMERGENCYPANTRYREQUESTS HAVEINCREASEDOVER


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 15A

UCPS receives grant to reduce diesel pollution Thanks to a $536,000 federal grant that will be shared between Union County Public Schools and Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, the air quality might just be a little better for students getting on and off the school bus and the community in general. The announcement was made at a joint press conference between officials from UCPS, CMS and Clean Air Carolina. It was held Wednesday (Oct. 21, 2009) at Matthews Elementary School in Matthews. “I’m excited about the partnership with all the local, state and regional organizations that have come together to secure this grant,” said UCPS Superintendent Dr. Ed Davis. “I think it’s a fine example of what can be accomplished for our citizens, for our communities and for our students when we all work together. I think it’s always great when we can partner with a sister

Members of Clean Air Carolina demonstrate the difference in pollutants between a bus fitted with the diesel particulate filters and one without. school system.” “We’ve been working with school systems to reduce diesel emissions because of the negative health impacts diesel pollution brings to the table,” said Phil Rossi, program director of NC Clean Diesel Campaign. “Reducing diesel emissions is one of the most important air quality challenges facing the country today. Diesel engines emit large

amounts of nitrogen oxides and other air toxins that cause serious health risks.” UCPS Transportation Director Adam Johnson said the grant will allow the UCPS Transportation Department to retrofit 24 school buses with diesel particulate filters. A similar grant last year retrofitted 20 buses. “We’re well on our way to reducing these harm-

Monroe

Dental Group

Monroe Dental Group is proud to announce the addition of Dr. Shana Crawford to our staff!

ful emissions,” Johnson said. “It will reduce about 85 to 90 percent of the particulate matter. We’re very excited about this opportunity to work together to provide a greener environment for our children.” CMS plans to retrofit 47 school buses and 15 fuel trucks with diesel multistage filters that will hopefully reduce harmful emissions by at least 55 percent. “Breathing-related illnesses such as asthma or other respiratory challenges, are the number one reason why students miss school,” said CMS Superintendent Dr. Peter Gorman. “Anything we can do to help clean that up will improve the quality of life for not just our students, but our community in general.” Beth Martin, vice president of the Union County Asthma Coalition, confirmed Gorman’s assessment. “We know for a fact that there is a link

between the particulate matter in the air and increased asthma,” Martin said. “I think this is really going to make a difference for our children and our community.” Rossi said the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant is federally funded and each state has the opportunity to apply for the grant. The grant was the combined efforts of Clean Air Carolina, the Mecklenburg Urban Metropolitan Planning Organization and the North Carolina Department of Transportation. CMS has 1,150 buses that travel more than 120,000 miles daily, transporting 84,000 students to and from school. In Union County, about 26,000 students are transported to and from school each day on 322 buses. Johnson said about 20 percent of these have the diesel particulate filters, which help reduce harmful diesel emissions by at

least 85 percent. All new buses have the filters installed already. “Union County is one of the fastest growing school systems in the nation and our (bus) fleet continues to grow to support our growth in student population,” Davis said. “Because of that, I think it’s particularly important that we set a good example of being environmentally responsible. Part of our globalization initiative in Union County Public Schools is to look at all the things affecting our world and certainly the impact of the environment is a very important thing to be teaching our children about. “Setting the example of being environmentally responsible is just the sort of thing that schools systems need to take a leadership role in participation,”Davis said.

•This article was provided courtesy of the Communications Office of the Union County Public Schools.

“THE MIGHTY Listen to… 1190” REAL TALK WITH RICHARD

Dr. Crawford is currently accepting new patients at this time.

AND LLOYD

NOW OPEN FRIDAYS FROM 8-5!

704.289.1105

Visit us on the web at www.monroedentalgroup.com

SATURDAY 11:00 – 11:30 Richard Price and Lloyd Trimble of Keller Williams Real Estate will answer your questions, calm your fears, and give you good solid real estate advice absolutely free! Call 704-283-1190 while you’re driving around, parked in front of a home for sale or thinking about selling.


16A / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

This is a Paid Advertisement


Chance to reach .500 After their painful 0-3 start, the Panthers have a chance to win their third straight game today by playing at home against the 2-4 Bills in a late-afternoon start (4:15). Page 3B October 25, 2009

Sports

Jackets

SUNDAY

with ease

Georgia Tech used its dominant run game to cruise to a 34-9 victory over Virginia. The 11thranked Yellow Jackets are now 5-1 in the ACC and 7-1 overall. Page 3B

The Enquirer-Journal

Sports Editor Jerry Snow

Warriors most improved

After going 0-11 in 2008, Weddington is 5-4 overall and tied for first in league BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

E-J Sports Writer

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Senior Domonique Ardrey continues to star for Weddington. Ardrey had two sacks and a forced fumble in the Warriors’ 31-24 win at Porter Ridge on Friday.

INDIAN TRAIL Weddington High junior linebacker Hunter Moore had his best defensive game of the season in Friday’s 31-24 road win over Porter Ridge. In addition to his 68-yard interception return for a touchdown in the third quarter, Moore also had a sack and a tackle for loss to help the Warriors improve to 5-4 overall and 2-1 in the Southern Carolina Conference. If Weddington wins its last two games — at home against Sun Valley this Friday and at Marvin Ridge the following week — the Warriors will be guaranteed at least a share of the conference title. MOORE That’s coming a long way for a program that entered the season on a 16-game losing streak. WHS has five more wins than a year ago, the biggest improvement of any team in UC. “We’ve just got to keep playing and keep getting better,” said Moore. “We played well enough to win (Friday), but we’ve got to keep getting better every week.” Senior Domonique Ardrey contributed with two sacks while senior defensive tackle Darius Kilgo added a sack of his own late in the fourth quarter on Porter Ridge’s final drive. One of Ardrey’s sacks resulted in a fumble that he also recovered in the second quarter.

Senior defensive end Adam Sainz also had a tackle for loss for the Warriors, who clinched a playoff berth with their win over the Pirates (6-3, 2-1).

Lang contributing

Weddington senior kicker Casey Lang converted a 36-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter to give him seven for the season. Lang is currently tied with Marvin Ridge senior Matt Frein for the county record, which was set by former Mavericks kicker Jordan Day (who made seven in 2008). Piedmont senior Mason Montgomery currently has six made field goals in 2009. Frein, who made a 24-yard field goal and all three extra points in his team’s critical 24-20 win over Anson, leads all UC kickers in scoring with 58 points; Lang is second with 53 points.

Odds and ends ...

... Brenda Hardin, the mother of Porter Ridge coach Blair Hardin and Weddington coach Justin Hardin, was in charge of the coin toss on Friday. Brenda wore a shirt that was half purple and half green to support her twin sons. ... PR senior cornerback PJ Freeman had an interception on Friday — his county-best sixth of the season — while senior defensive end Tyler Kirk added a sack. Junior linebackers Zach Bevington and John Bryant each had a tackle for loss for the Pirates.

See FOOTBALL / Page 3B

Bulldogs dominate Catawba, 42-17, have shot at SAC title from staff reports

SALISBURY Wingate University got a big road win in the South Atlantic Conference on Saturday, beating Catawba 42-17. The Bulldogs, now 4-1 in the SAC and 6-2 overall, set up a home showdown with first-place Carson-Newman (5-0) next Saturday.

The Bulldogs rolled up 518 yards of total offense with a balanced attack of 284 rushing yards and 239 passing yards. The one-two punch of Nelson Woods and Vince Jordan did most of the damage on the ground. Jordan carried 17 times for

160 yards and Woods added 88 rushing yards. Both ran for two TDs — including once each on fourthdown plays. Woods scored twice from 2 yards out and Jordan’s TDs were from the 2 and 22. Jordan set up one of his

scores with a 52-yard run. Jordan now has 10 touchdowns on the season and 842 rushing yards. WU quarterback Cody Haverland threw for 220 yards and two TDs — including a 75-yarder to Antonio Cotton and a 28-yard score to Philip Thomas. Wingate trailed 3-0 before Woods and Cotton combined

for 14 unanswered points. Jordan’s first score put the Bulldogs ahead 21-10 and he added a fourth-down TD run as the final score in fourth. Haffly now has 1,698 passing yards and 15 touchdown passes for the season. Wingate’s defense held Catawba (1-4, 4-4) to just 60 rushing yards and a total of JORDAN 295 for the day.

Piedmont advances in 2A state playoffs By Eric Rape

E-J Correspondent

Unionville Piedmont High advanced to the second round of the 2A state playoffs with a 3-1 win over Central Davidson on Saturday. The Panthers (23-1) looked like they might run away with the match after jumping out to big leads in the first two sets, which they won 25-18 and 25-10. Again Piedmont got out to a lead in the third set at 7-1 but the Panthers seemed to lose focus and the Spartans took the lead at 9-8 and from there both teams were back and

Prep Soccer

Several UC schools in contention for titles

Volleyball forth the rest of the way with Central taking just a small advantage before winning the third set 25-23. The fourth set held much of the same close play as the third as the teams were tied at 12-all, but Piedmont made an offensive push that held on the way to the decisive 25-19 win. “We came out here ready to win today in the first two games,” said Piedmont coach Kim Canty. “We got a little

By Eric Rape

E-J Correspondent

See VOLLEYBALL / Page 2B

Branham, Schmitt, Rowe qualify for states By David Sentendrey

E-J Correspondent

CHARLOTTE Both Weddington and Marvin Ridge High were represented in the North Carolina 3/A Regional Tournament for girls tennis at Waddell High this weekend. WHS senior Meredith Branham reached the regional final against Charlotte Catholic’s number-two seed while WHS’ doubles team of Kindell Schmitt and Casey Rowe made the semifinal round before deciding third place against a

Girls Tennis doubles team from Harding High. Each of those players have qualified for the individual state tournament. Both matches were scheduled past The EnquirerJournal’s deadline, but full results will be posted in Tuesday’s issue. Branham is currently 15-4 overall on the season, while Schmitt/Rowe are 4-1 as a doubles team.

See TENNIS / Page 2B

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Monroe’s Fernando Estevez helped Monroe go 3-0 this week by scoring three of his team’s seven goals. MHS is 13-3 overall and 11-2 in the RRC.

Monroe There were numerous games that had a major impact on conference standings and playoff seedings for Union County boys soccer teams last week, and the regular season wraps up this week. Monroe (13-3, 11-2 RRC) went 3-0 during last week with wins over Central Academy and North Stanly on Monday and Wednesday, followed by their biggest win of the year — over Cuthbertson 2-1 Thursday — to move into position to at least grab a share of the Rocky River Conference title. Fernando Estevez and Jesus Cornejo combined for six of the Redhawks’ seven goals during the week, scoring three apiece. Cuthbertson dropped to 12-2 in the conference with the loss after getting two easy wins to start the week. If the Cavs win their last two and the Redhawks their last three, they will be co-champions. Piedmont is sitting a game back in the loss column with an 11-3 conference record.

See SOCCER / Page 3B


2B / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Blue Devils hold off Maryland, 17-13 the fourth quarter before the ACC’s most turnover-prone team had problems keeping hold of the ball. After forcing Lewis to fumble at the 2 and then forcing a punt with about 5 minutes left, the Terrapins gave it right back moments later when Turner’s pass to Ronnie Tyler was intercepted by Vincent Rey. Maryland forced another punt with just under 2 minutes left, but Tony Logan fumbled it, Brandon King recovered and the Blue Devils ran out the clock. Both teams kept the ball in the air despite rainy conditions. Yet Duke seemed to have taken complete control with Lewis’ second touchdown pass — a play-action flip to Parker that made it 17-6 with about 5 1/2 minutes left in the third and came after a 44-yard down-the-sideline heave to Connor Vernon. The Terrapins responded moments later with their only touchdown of the day. Turner dumped off a swing pass to Meggett, and he cut back to

DURHAM (AP) — Thaddeus Lewis threw for 371 yards and two touchdowns and Duke held off Maryland 17-13 on Saturday. The Atlantic Coast Conference’s leading passer was 30 of 43 with touchdowns covering 24 yards to Donovan Varner and 1 yard to Danny Parker in his third straight 300-yard performance for the Blue Devils (4-3, 2-1). Duke never trailed, outgained Maryland 394-249, withstood the Terrapins’ late charges and held on for the Blue Devils’ third win in four games. They also claimed consecutive conference victories for the first time since 1994. Chris Turner was 16-for-23 for 182 yards with a 67-yard touchdown to Davin Meggett for the Terrapins (2-6, 1-3), and he moved past Boomer Esiason into second place on the school’s career passing list. But Turner couldn’t keep Maryland from losing its third straight game and fifth in the last six. Still, the Terrapins gave themselves some chances in

Tennis Continued from Page 1B

“We’re excited for [Branham] to qualify (for the state tournament0 for the first time in singles, she’s been

Volleyball Continued from Page 1B sloppy in the third set and we weren’t playing to our level and in the fourth one we came around. If we play like we did in the first two sets the rest of the

the left, dashed down the sideline and ran through a tackler at the goal line to make it a four-point game. For Duke, it was a rare matchup with an ACC rival it hadn’t beaten in a decade, and an even rarer position — as a 4-point favorite. The expanded conference’s rotating, divisional schedule kept Maryland off the Duke schedule since 2004. With representatives of the Champs Sports and Chickfil-A bowls looking on, Lewis picked up where he left off two weeks ago when he threw for a career-high 459 yards and five touchdowns in a 49-28 victory over North Carolina State. Lewis regularly found receivers open across the middle, with his 24-yard pitchand-catch to Donovan Varner making it 7-0 about 7 1/2 minutes in. Varner and Vernon — the ACC’s only two players averaging at least 100 yards receiving — each hit that mark in this one, with Varner catc hing eight passes for 120 yards and Vernon finishing with five catches for 102 yards.

Local Events Monday

Devine rallies No. 22 West Virginia past UConn 28-24 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Connecticut nearly pulled out a win for Jasper Howard. Noel Devine’s 56-yard touchdown run in the closing minutes lifted No. 22 West Virginia to a 28-24 win over the Huskies on Saturday in the Huskies’ first game since the starting cornerback was fatally stabbed outside a universitysponsored dance a week ago. Devine ran for 171 of his 178 yards in the second half as West Virginia (6-1, 2-0 Big East) overcame the inspired play of the Huskies (4-3, 1-2). “That’s what football is all about — making big plays when your teammates need you,” Devine said. The determined Huskies outgained the Mountaineers 501-387. “We really wanted to go out and get this win for Jazz, but we came up short,” Easley said. UConn coach Randy Edsall will fly his team to Howard’s funeral Monday in Miami. “I just feel empty,” Edsall said.

there as a doubles player,” WHS coach Mike Murphy said. “I’m very happy for [Rowe and Schmitt] because they just started playing together (as a doubles team).” Marvin Ridge’s number one seed Hannah Florian was defeated in the

quarterfinals by Branham, while WHS’s doubles team of Samantha Wingo and Sarah Carroll lost in the quarterfinals as well. The 3A state tournament will be held in Burlington beginning next Friday.

playoffs we will be fine.” Nicole Hyatt led the Panthers with 11 kills, one ace and three digs. Also having big games for the Panthers were: Katie Simpson (six kills, two aces, four digs, and a block) and Alison Florence (six kills, four digs, and three blocks). Courtney Barrineau had just one kill, and two aces but led the team with

five digs; Anna Farmer had four kills and two digs; and Taylor Simpson had six kills, two aces, 21 assists and three digs. The Panthers will play at home Tuesday against East Gaston (23-2), the top seed from the Southern Piedmont Conference. East Gaston beat Maiden 3-0 to advance.

High School Boys Soccer Central Academy at Piedmont, 6 p.m. Union Academy at Forest Hills, 6 p.m. Weddington at Charlotte Catholic, 6:30 p.m. North Stanly at Cuthbertson, 6:30 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. ABC — NASCAR, Sprint Cup Series, Tums Fast Relief 500, at Martinsville, Va. GOLF 8:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Castello Masters, final round, at Castellon, Spain 2 p.m. TGC — Nationwide Tour Championship, final round, at Charleston, S.C. 5 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, final round, at Scottsdale, Ariz. 7:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, AT&T Championship, final round, at San Antonio (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 8 p.m. FOX — Playoffs, American League Championship Series, game 7, L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees (if necessary) MOTORSPORTS 3 p.m. SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Portimao, Portugal (same-day tape) 5 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP 250, Malaysian Grand Prix, at Sepang, Malaysia (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader 4 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage 4:15 p.m. FOX — Buffalo at Carolina 8:15 p.m. NBC — Arizona at N.Y. Giants SOCCER 3:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Spanish Primera Division, Barcelona vs. Zaragoza, at Barcelona, Spain 6 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, New England at Columbus

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East

New England N.Y. Jets Miami Buffalo

W 4 3 2 2

L 2 3 3 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .500 .400 .333

Indianapolis Jacksonville Houston Tennessee

W 5 3 3 0

L 0 3 3 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .500 .500 .000

Cincinnati Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland

W 4 4 3 1

L 2 2 3 5

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .667 .500 .167

PF 163 114 112 93

PA 91 104 106 129

AFC 3-2-0 3-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0

Div 1-1-0 1-2-0 2-0-0 1-2-0

PA 71 147 137 198

AFC 3-0-0 2-1-0 3-2-0 0-6-0

NFC 2-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Div 2-0-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-3-0

PA 118 112 130 148

AFC 3-2-0 3-1-0 3-2-0 1-4-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

Div 3-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-3-0

South

PF 137 120 143 84

North

PF 118 140 169 69

West

Denver San Diego Oakland Kansas City

W 6 2 2 1

L 0 3 4 5

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .400 .333 .167

PF 133 124 62 98

PA 66 136 139 144

AFC 5-0-0 2-3-0 1-3-0 0-2-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-1-0 1-3-0

Div 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-1-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East

N.Y. Giants Dallas Philadelphia Washington

W 5 3 3 2

L 1 2 2 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .833 .600 .600 .333

PF 178 122 136 79

PA 119 98 99 96

NFC 3-1-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-3-0

AFC 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

Div 2-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

South

New Orleans Atlanta Carolina Tampa Bay

W 5 4 2 0

L 0 1 3 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .800 .400 .000

Minnesota Green Bay Chicago Detroit

W 6 3 3 1

L 0 2 2 5

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .600 .600 .167

PF 192 123 85 89

PA 93 77 125 168

NFC 3-0-0 3-0-0 2-3-0 0-5-0

AFC 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 0-0-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

PF 189 130 119 103

PA 121 93 99 188

NFC 4-0-0 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-4-0

AFC 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0

Div 2-0-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-3-0

PF 112 112 118 54

PA 98 92 109 169

NFC 3-2-0 1-1-0 1-3-0 0-5-0

AFC 0-0-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

Div 3-0-0 1-1-0 1-2-0 0-2-0

North

West

W San Francisco 3 Arizona 3 Seattle 2 St. Louis 0

L 2 2 4 6

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .600 .600 .333 .000

Today’s Games New England vs. Tampa Bay at London, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Houston, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at St. Louis, 1 p.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Carolina, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. Chicago at Cincinnati, 4:15 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 4:15 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m. Open: Denver, Seattle, Detroit, Jacksonville, Baltimore, Tennessee Monday’s Game Philadelphia at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 1 St. Louis at Detroit, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Seattle at Dallas, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 1 p.m. Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Houston at Buffalo, 1 p.m. San Francisco at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Oakland at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m. Carolina at Arizona, 4:15 p.m. Open: New England, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Kansas City, Washington, Tampa Bay Monday, Nov. 2 Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

College football Saturday’s results College Football Scores EAST Albany, N.Y. 35, Monmouth, N.J. 10 Alfred 31, St. John Fisher 28 Brown 34, Cornell 14 C.W. Post 42, East Stroudsburg 24 Cent. Connecticut St. 24, Bryant 23 Colby 16, Hamilton 0 Curry 20, Plymouth St. 9 Dartmouth 28, Columbia 6 Dickinson 38, Gettysburg 28 Edinboro 32, Mercyhurst 22 Harvard 37, Princeton 3 Hobart 28, Merchant Marine 0 Holy Cross 42, Colgate 28 Lafayette 26, Fordham 21 Lehigh 35, Bucknell 16 Maine Maritime 49, Framingham St. 21 Middlebury 28, Bates 18 Northeastern 27, Towson 7 Pittsburgh 41, South Florida 14 Rochester 24, WPI 17 Thomas More 28, Thiel 14 Trinity, Conn. 45, Bowdoin 31 Wagner 49, Sacred Heart 28 Washington & Jefferson 49,

Westminster, Pa. 7 West Virginia 28, Connecticut 24 Wilkes 7, FDU-Florham 6 SOUTH Alabama St. 24, Alcorn St. 17 Butler 23, Campbell 16 Campbellsville 21, Georgetown, Ky. 14 Carson-Newman 77, Brevard 7 Cumberlands 44, WVU Tech 14 Delaware St. 35, Morgan St. 22 Drake 21, Davidson 16 Duke 17, Maryland 13 Elon 45, Chattanooga 10 Gallaudet 37, Becker 0 Georgia Tech 34, Virginia 9 Kentucky Christian 22, Faulkner 14 Kentucky St. 21, Miles 6 Liberty 20, Charleston Southern 13 Marist 24, Morehead St. 14 Marshall 27, UAB 7 Mississippi 30, Arkansas 17 N. Carolina A&T 30, Howard 19 S. Carolina St. 21, Hampton 9 Shepherd 55, W. Virginia St. 14 Shorter 56, Union, Ky. 41 The Citadel 38, Furman 28 VMI 31, Presbyterian 20 William & Mary 24, James Madison 3 MIDWEST Adrian 7, Hope 6 Allegheny 21, Kenyon 18 Alma 42, Olivet 23 Augustana, S.D. 27, Wayne, Neb. 24 Ball St. 29, E. Michigan 27 Cent. Michigan 24, Bowling Green 10 Coe 48, Simpson, Iowa 14 Dayton 38, Valparaiso 7 DePauw 26, Trinity, Texas 18 Findlay 9, N. Michigan 6 Grand Valley St. 34, Ashland 7 Heidelberg 41, Baldwin-Wallace 36 Iowa St. 9, Nebraska 7 Kansas St. 20, Colorado 6 Marian, Ind. 28, Albion 10 Mount Union 56, Wilmington, Ohio 0 N. Illinois 27, Miami (Ohio) 22 Northwestern 29, Indiana 28 Northwood, Mich. 33, Ferris St. 7 Ohio St. 38, Minnesota 7 Otterbein 35, Capital 34 Purdue 24, Illinois 14 Saginaw Valley St. 38, Michigan Tech 28 St. John’s, Minn. 10, St. Olaf 3 St. Joseph’s, Ind. 48, Kentucky Wesleyan 7 Trine 41, Kalamazoo 20 Walsh 31, Malone 14 Washington, Mo. 26, Ohio Wesleyan 14 Winona St. 70, Minn.-Crookston 7 Wis.-Stout 36, Wis.-Eau Claire 15 Wis.-Whitewater 38, Wis.-River Falls 14 Wittenberg 28, Carnegie-Mellon 7

Saturday’s boxscores No. 11 Ga. Tech 34, Va. 9 Georgia Tech Virginia

3 10 7 14 — 34 3 3 0 3 — 9

First Quarter GaT—FG Blair 24, 8:14. UVa—FG Randolph 49, 2:12. Second Quarter UVa—FG Randolph 19, 14:51. GaT—Nesbitt 1 run (Blair kick), 9:34. GaT—FG Blair 23, :00. Third Quarter GaT—Allen 1 run (Blair kick), 4:13. Fourth Quarter UVa—FG Randolph 30, 14:51. GaT—Allen 20 run (Blair kick), 9:37. GaT—Nesbitt 2 run (Blair kick), 3:04. A—43,016.

First downs Rushes-yards Passing Comp-Att-Int Return Yards Punts-Avg. Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

GaT UVa 20 11 71-362 12-30 85 168 4-8-0 18-32-0 0 8 2-42.0 4-38.0 3-1 1-1 8-70 4-40 42:43 17:17

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Georgia Tech, Dwyer 25-125, Allen 11-103, Nesbitt 21-82, Lyons 6-34, Wright 1-10, A.Barnes 1-3, Shaw 1-2, Peeples 2-2, Watson 2-2, Team 1-(minus 1). Virginia, Sewell 5-26, Simpson 6-4, Jackson 1-0. PASSING—Georgia Tech, Nesbitt 4-80-85. Virginia, Sewell 18-32-0-168. RECEIVING—Georgia Tech, D. Thomas 3-76, Melton 1-9. Virginia, Hall 5-51, Simpson 4-30, Green 2-20, Phillips 2-20, Burd 2-16, T.Smith 1-23, Brown 1-5, Torchia 1-3.

#18 Ohio St. 38, Minn. 7 Minnesota 0 Ohio St. 0

0 0 7 — 7 7 21 10 — 38

Second Quarter OSU—Posey 62 pass from Pryor (Pettrey kick), 9:47. Third Quarter OSU—Pryor 15 run (Pettrey kick), 13:43. OSU—J.Hall 11 run (Pettrey kick), 6:00. OSU—Posey 57 pass from Pryor (Pettrey kick), 2:59. Fourth Quarter OSU—Martin 39 run (Pettrey kick), 11:28. OSU—FG Pettrey 44, 7:37. Minn—Stoudermire 16 pass from Gray (Ellestad kick), 4:15. A—105,011.

First downs Rushes-yards Passing Comp-Att-Int Return Yards Punts-Avg. Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Minn OSU 17 27 30-123 49-270 163 239 15-29-2 13-26-1 5 66 7-42.0 4-32.3 3-2 1-0 8-72 5-45 28:10 31:50

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Minnesota, Gray 11-81, Whaley 7-31, Bennett 4-14, Stoudermire 2-6, Team 1-(minus 1), Weber 5-(minus 8). Ohio St., Pryor 15-104, Martin 7-75, Saine 11-45, J. Hall 10-38, Small 2-4, Bauserman 2-3, Christian 1-2, Team 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Minnesota, Weber 10-23-2112, Gray 5-6-0-51. Ohio St., Pryor 13-25-1-239, Bauserman 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—Minnesota, Stoudermire 4-47, Ni.Tow-Arnett 3-35, Decker 3-27, Green 2-22, Allen 1-19, Bennett 1-7, Whaley 1-6. Ohio St., Posey 8-161, Sanzenbacher 3-62, Small 1-11, J.Hall 1-5. #22 W. Va. 28, UConn 24 Connecticut 7 24 West Virginia 7 28

10

0

7

7

7

7

First Quarter WVU—Austin 98 kickoff return (Bitancurt kick), 14:46. Conn—Todman 5 run (Teggart kick), 5:46. Second Quarter Conn—FG Teggart 38, 2:53. WVU—Brown 5 run (Bitancurt kick), :49. Conn—K.Moore 17 pass from Endres (Teggart kick), :21. Third Quarter WVU—Urban 1 pass from Brown (Bitancurt kick), 2:55. Fourth Quarter Conn—Easley 88 pass from Endres (Teggart kick), 3:50. WVU—Devine 56 run (Bitancurt kick), 2:10. A—58,106. Conn WVU First downs 21 17 Rushes-yards 37-123 40-234 Passing 378 153 Comp-Att-Int 25-41-3 16-27-1 Return Yards 47 55 Punts-Avg. 4-43.0 6-41.8 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 5-40 4-45 Time of Possession 31:16 28:44 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Connecticut, Todman 20-94, Dixon 14-38, Endres 3-(minus 9). West Virginia, Devine 23-178, Brown 10-41, R.Clarke 4-16, Austin 1-5, Team 2-(minus 6). PASSING—Connecticut, Endres 25-413-378. West Virginia, Brown 16-27-1153. RECEIVING—Connecticut, Easley 5-157, K.Moore 4-62, Kanuch 4-47, Sherman 4-18, Griffin 3-27, I.Moore 2-44, Todman 1-13, Dixon 1-9, Difton 1-1. West Virginia, Sanders 8-81, Arnett 5-51, Devine 1-13, Starks 1-7, Urban 1-1.

Duke 17, Maryland 13 Maryland 3 Duke 7

3 7 0 — 13 3 7 0 — 17

First Quarter Duke—Varner 24 pass from Lewis

(Snyderwine kick), 7:24. Md—FG Ferrara 25, 1:37. Second Quarter Md—FG Ferrara 40, 8:34. Duke—FG Snyderwine 35, 3:31. Third Quarter Duke—Parker 1 pass from Lewis (Snyderwine kick), 5:35. Md—Meggett 67 pass from Turner (Ferrara kick), 4:30. A—24,650. Md Duke First downs 11 19 Rushes-yards 31-67 28-23 Passing 182 371 Comp-Att-Int 16-23-1 30-43-1 Return Yards 13 6 Punts-Avg. 5-40.4 4-37.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 3-2 Penalties-Yards 3-25 12-101 Time of Possession 27:55 32:05 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Maryland, Meggett 9-38, Porzel 15-28, Turner 6-2, Smith 1-(minus 1). Duke, Lewis 14-14, Hollingsworth 6-10, Kurunwune 2-8, B.King 1-1, D.Scott 1-1, Team 4-(minus 11). PASSING—Maryland, Turner 16-23-1182. Duke, Lewis 30-43-1-371. RECEIVING—Maryland, Cannon 6-66, Porzel 3-24, Meggett 2-68, Smith 2-13, Tyler 2-8, Dorsey 1-3. Duke, Kelly 9-67, Varner 8-120, Vernon 5-102, Williams 4-47, Hollingsworth 3-34, Parker 1-1.

Pro basketball National Basketball Assoc. EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 6 4 5 2 1

L 2 2 3 6 6

Pct GB .750 — .667 1 .625 1 .250 4 .143 4 1/2

Southeast Division W L Pct GB Orlando 8 0 1.000 — Atlanta 5 2 .714 2 1/2 Washington 4 4 .500 4 Miami 2 5 .286 5 1/2 Charlotte 2 6 .250 6 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 6 2 .750 — Detroit 4 4 .500 2 Cleveland 3 4 .429 2 1/2 Indiana 3 4 .429 2 1/2 Milwaukee 3 5 .375 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Dallas 5 2 .714 — Houston 4 4 .500 1 1/2 San Antonio 3 3 .500 1 1/2 Memphis 3 5 .375 2 1/2 New Orleans 2 6 .250 3 1/2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Utah 5 2 .714 — Denver 4 4 .500 1 1/2 Portland 4 4 .500 1 1/2 Minnesota 3 5 .375 2 1/2 Oklahoma City 2 5 .286 3 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 6 2 .750 — L.A. Clippers 5 2 .714 1/2 Golden State 4 4 .500 2 Phoenix 3 4 .429 2 1/2 Sacramento 2 5 .286 3 1/2 Thursday’s Games Atlanta 92, Miami 87 Minnesota 122, Detroit 114 Sacramento 104, Oklahoma City 89 L.A. Lakers 106, Denver 89 Portland 113, Phoenix 93 Golden State 126, New Orleans 92 Friday’s Games Memphis 95, Charlotte 92 Indiana 114, San Antonio 112 Orlando 123, Atlanta 86

Chicago 93, Washington 70 New Jersey 110, Philadelphia 88 Minnesota 98, Toronto 90 Detroit 95, Milwaukee 93 Dallas 98, Houston 94 Utah 95, Sacramento 85 Denver 119, L.A. Lakers 105 L.A. Clippers 91, New Orleans 88 End of Preseason

Auto racing NASCAR-Sprint Cup TUMS Fast Relief 500 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Today At Martinsville Speedway Martinsville, Va. Lap length: .526 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 96.795. 2. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 96.519. 3. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 96.509. 4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 96.504. 5. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 96.117. 6. (07) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 96.054. 7. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 96.034. 8. (96) Bobby Labonte, Ford, 96.01. 9. (43) Reed Sorenson, Dodge, 95.995. 10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 95.908. 11. (12) David Stremme, Dodge, 95.903. 12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 95.83. 13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 95.825. 14. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 95.815. 15. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 95.777. 16. (44) AJ Allmendinger, Dodge, 95.772. 17. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 95.762. 18. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 95.607. 19. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 95.578. 20. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 95.574. 21. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 95.545. 22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 95.501. 23. (26) Jamie McMurray, Ford, 95.477. 24. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 95.429. 25. (37) Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 95.381. 26. (9) Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 95.371. 27. (34) John Andretti, Chevrolet, 95.333. 28. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 95.304. 29. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 95.275. 30. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 95.271. 31. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 95.242. 32. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 95.232. 33. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 95.223. 34. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 95.194. 35. (71) David Gilliland, Chevrolet, 95.07. 36. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 94.984. 37. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 94.889. 38. (09) Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 94.789. 39. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 94.689. 40. (19) Elliott Sadler, Dodge, 94.661. 41. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 94.652. 42. (36) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 94.637. 43. (64) Derrike Cope, Toyota, 93.539. Failed to Qualify 44. (73) Josh Wise, Dodge, 92.443.

Transactions Saturday’s Sports Transactions HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Carolina F Tuomo Ruutu for three games for a boarding infraction during an Oct. 23 game against Colorado. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Recalled C Brandon Sutter from Albany (AHL). Placed F Erik Cole on injured reserve. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled C Jake Dowell from Rockford (AHL). COLORADO AVALANCHE—Recalled F Brian Willsie from Lake Erie (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned LW Tomas Fleischmann to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League SYRACUSE CRUNCH—Recalled LW Tim Miller from Gwinnett (ECHL). Sent G Dan Taylor to Gwinnett.


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 3B

No. 11 Georgia Tech runs past Virginia, 34-9 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — Georgia Tech ran around in the pouring rain. They also ran over, under and through the Virginia defense, breaking tackles and burning up the clock. The No. 11 Yellow Jackets dispatched the last team with an unbeaten record in Atlantic Coast Conference play Saturday, rushing for 362 yards and taking charge of the Coastal Division with a 34-9 win over the Cavs. Josh Nesbitt ran for 82 yards and threw for 85, but he attempted only two passes in Georgia Tech’s four touchdown drives: a 10-play, 60-yard march in the second quarter; a game-draining 18play, 82-yard marathon that took

up the first 10:47 of the third quarter; an 11-play, 66-yard putthe-game away possession in the fourth; and a didn’t-really-matter 10-play, 71-yard drive near the very end. Georgia Tech (7-1, 5-1) broke an eight-game Charlottesville losing streak, winning at Virginia for the first time since 1990, the year the Yellow Jackets claimed a share of the national title. The Cavaliers (3-4, 2-1) had a threegame winning streak snapped, a run that followed an 0-3 start that had fans calling for coach Al Groh’s job. The Yellow Jackets entered the game second in the nation with an average of 286.1 yards

rushing, and the option churned out even more against the Cavaliers. Penalties and bobbled balls stymied the offense in the early going, but Nesbitt, Jonathan Dwyer (125 yards) and Anthony Allen (103) ultimately proved too quick and too strong for Virginia’s defense. Nesbitt and Allen each had a 1-yard touchdown run, Allen also scored on a 20-yard scamper and Nesbitt on a 2-yard run, and Scott Blair kicked two field goals for the Yellow Jackets. Virginia’s scoring came on three field goals from Robert Randolph. The Cavaliers failed to make the most of excellent field position in the first half,

setting for three points instead of seven on back-to-back drives that began in Georgia Tech territory. The wet day made for messy football. Georgia Tech had three penalties and had burned two timeouts before the game was seven minutes old. The Yellow Jackets also fumbled three times in the first quarter: a muffed punt they were lucky to recover, a dropped snap to the upback that doomed a fake punt attempt, and a no-one-touched-him bobble by Nesbitt that was recovered by the Cavaliers. The failed fake punt and the Nesbitt fumble gave the Cavaliers the great field position on

back-to-back drives, but they could only convert them into field goals. A holding penalty killed the first drive, which ended in Randolph’s career-long 49-yard field goal in a downpour — the ball hit the curved part of the goalpost support as it went through. The next drive stalled after the Cavaliers had first-and-goal at the 2, forcing them to settle for a 19-yarder from Randolph. Georgia Tech capitalized on muffed punt for its first score, a 24-yard field goal by Blair, and an out-of-bounds kickoff gave the Yellow Jackets good field position to start the only touchdown drive of the first half.

Football Continued from Page 1B

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

Marvin Ridge senior Matt Frein (12) tied the Union County record with his seventh made field goal in a single season on Friday. Frein leads all UC kickers in scoring with 58 points. Frein has two rgames to break the record, but Weddinton’s Casey Lang also has seven made this year and Piedmont’s Mason Montgomery has six — so there’s competition for the record.

... With his 14-yard touchdown run in the first quarter on Friday, Weddington senior quarterback Anthony Boone now has 10 rushing scores for the year. ... Frein, a senior, had a chance to break the county field goal record in the fourth quarter with a 34-yard field goal attempt, but it was deflected at the line of scrimmage. Frein, aided by a steady tailwind blowing toward the school, booted four of his five kickoffs into the end zone for touchbacks. Frein also had a 67-yard punt that netted 64 and started a Bearcats drive at their own 7. ... Marvin Ridge junior safety Zack Lax, a three-year starter, had an interception and a fumble recovery against the Bearcats. Linebacker Dylan Williams had a big hit on the quarterback to force a bad pitch, allowing Lax to pounce on the loose ball in the backfield. LAX ... Marvin Ridge actually forced six turnovers in the win over Anson, rather than the five that was reported in Saturday’s issue of The E-J. Lax had two takeaways, LB Vinnie Sunseri had three (two interceptions and a recovery) and DT Raheem McKinney had a recovery. McKinney, a junior, also had a pass breakup in the backfield. ... At 8-1, Marvin Ridge has set a school record for wins. The Mavs were 7-6 last year and 4-8 in 2007 — their inaugural season. ... Marvin Ridge senior QB Chandler LeDoyen made his second straight start on Friday. Sophomore Tyler Chadwick started the first seven games of the season but is hampered by a sprained ankle suffered in Week 8 at Porter Ridge. Chadwick continues to hold for the kicker. — Sports Editor Jerry Snow contributed to this story

Under-used star receivers Smith, Owens take same field today CHARLOTTE (AP) — Steve Smith and Terrell Owens on the same field. A short, speedy, dominant and sometimes volatile receiver facing off against a tall, speedy, dominant and sometimes volatile receiver. In the past it would be billed as a matchup of big stars and bigger egos. This year, though, maybe the slogan should be: “Remember these guys?” When Owens’ Buffalo Bills visit Smith’s Carolina Panthers on Sunday, it’ll feature receivers ranked 49th and 92nd in the NFL in receptions. They’ve combined for only 474 yards receiving, one touchdown, four wins — and surprisingly only one blowup. That would be Smith’s outburst after catching just one pass last week against Tampa Bay and declaring that “I’m no longer an asset to this team.” “I feel his frustration,” said Owens, who was also held to one

catch last week. “I know where he’s coming from.” Neutralized by constant double teams, poor quarterback play, stagnant offenses and the basic frustrations of playing for losing teams have left both players in uncharted territory. Smith is off to his slowest start since becoming a starter in 2002. Owens recently had his 185-game reception streak, third longest in NFL history, snapped. And consider the game plan for Carolina (2-3) as it seeks its third straight win and prevent Buffalo (2-4) from winning road games in consecutive weeks for the first time since 2004. “We want to make them a onedimensional team,” Panthers safety Chris Harris said, who clarified that meant making Buffalo throw the ball. The Bills will likely have Ryan Fitzpatrick at quarterback with Trent Edwards recovering from

Today’s game: Buffalo (2-4) at Carolina (2-3) 4:15 p.m. on FOX Noteworthy: Two of the NFL’s most dominant receivers this decade had just one catch each last week — what will T.O. and Steve Smith do today? his second concussion in a little over a year. Fitzpatrick overcame windy conditions last week to lead the Bills to a 16-13 overtime win over the New York Jets that helped embattled coach Dick Jauron. Fitzpatrick attempted to get the ball to Owens more than Edwards had, but he managed one catch for 9 yards, stats that

Soccer Continued from Page 1B

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Piedmont’s Payton Hall (5) defends while Monroe’s Jesus Cornerjo battles with him for a header back on Sept. 2. Both teams are playoff bound. Piedmont hasn’t lost since Sept. 23 — the Panthers have won eight straight.

The Panthers started slow but they have put it together and are on an eight-game winning streak dating back to Sept. 23. The Panthers have outscored their opponents 38-7 during the streak, which includes a 3-2 win over Monroe and a surprisingly lopsided 3-0 victory against Cuthbertson. Piedm o n t p l a y e d DOSTER t w i c e this week and TJ Doster carried the load with five goals, which led the county for the week. Marvin Ridge is rolling this season in the Southern Carolina Conference with a record of 8-0 with two games left. The Mavericks are ranked fourth in the 3A state coaches poll and can close out the championship with a win over Weddington Tuesday. Garrett Condon and Matt Risher each

won’t help the Bills end a nineyear playoff drought. “It’s up to the coaching staff and everybody involved to communicate and try to create some ways to get myself more involved. And I think we’re doing this,” said Owens, who has 15 catches for 215 yards and a TD. “It’s a work in progress. As of now you see that I haven’t had any gripes about anything.” Indeed, Owens has gone out of his way not to create the controversy that has dominated his stops with other teams. It was Smith who grabbed the headlines after he vented his frustration after catching one pass for 4 yards in Carolina’s 28-21 win over Tampa Bay. “I want to win and be involved in a win,” Smith said. Quarterback Jake Delhomme has been trying to get the ball to his playmaker — perhaps too much. Several of his NFL-

scored four times in the past week as the Mavericks outscored their opponents 17-0 in three games. Weddington is ranked 11th in the state and has just one league loss, so the Warriors will try to create a co-championship with hopes of earning the top seed for the 3A playoffs. It is looks likely that eight teams will represent Union County throughout the state playoffs. M o n roe has cl i n ch e d the only guaranteed spot for the Rocky River ConferRISHER ence in 1A with Union Academy or CATA having to hope for one of the 12 wild card berths. Cuthbertson and Piedmont have clinched spots for the 2A playoffs and Piedmont is postseason bound as well. Marvin Ridge, Weddington and Parkwood will make the playoffs as 3A teams while Porter Ridge and Sun Valley get automatic bids into the 4A playoffs with a 64-team field.

high 10 interceptions have come on passes intended for Smith, who is facing constant bracket coverage because fellow receivers Muhsin Muhammad and Dwayne Jarrett have done little. After Delhomme’s interception was returned for the tying touchdown early in the fourth quarter against the Buccaneers, the Panthers took the ball out of his hands. Carolina’s gamewinning 80-yard drive included 15 runs and one pass. DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart were in 2008 form as they each surpassed 100 yards rushing. And with the banged-up Bills having the league’s worst run defense, Smith may have to wait for his catches. While the Bills tied a team record with six interceptions against the Jets, they allowed 318 yards rushing. In the past four games, they’ve given up 961 yards and seven touchdowns on the ground.


4B / Sunday, October 25, 2009

CELEBRITY CIPHER

The Enquirer-Journal

FREE

Classifieds SELL YOUR UNWANTED ITEMS AND

PAY ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!* SUDOKU PUZZLE

*FOR ITEMS FOR SALE. We’ll give you a 4 line, 3 day ad for FREE in The Enquirer-Journal and we’ll even put it on our website! Call 704-261-2213, email sharon@theej.com, or come by 500 W. Jefferson St. in Monroe and ask for your free ad. *For items for sale. For private party customers only. Excludes yard sales, employment ads, pets for sale, auctions, real estate, and commercial ads. Limited to one free ad per household every 30 days.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK FILE #9E0557 ADMINISTRATOR EXECUTOR NOTICE Having duly qualified before the Honorable J. R. Rowell, Clerk of Superior Court of Union County, as personal representative of the Estate of Stanley Bergman, deceased. This is to notify all persons having claims against said Estate to present them to the undersigned on or before the 5th day of January 2010, or the same will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This 1st day of October, 2009. Roena Bergman 1201 Styx Dr. Monroe, NC 28112 October 4, 11,18, 25, 2009

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Wesley Chapel Village Council will conduct two public hearings beginning at 7:00 PM in the rear Fellowship Hall of the Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church located at 120 Potter Road South, Wesley Chapel as follows: 1. Monday November 9, 2009 to consider an amendment to the Zoning Ordinance to add an RUC zoning district for property built under Union County and annexed into the town. 2. Tuesday November 17, 2009 to hear a subdivision petition for Trinity Development Company, LLC for parcels 06048001 and 06048001C on Billy Howie Road for modification of curb and gutter; sidewalks; road width; and cul-de-sac radius and length. The general public is invited to attend the public hearings and make comment. As a result of testimony received at the public hearing, the Village Council reserves the right to make changes to the proposed ordinance amendment prior to consideration of adoption. For more information, call Joshua Langen, Village Planner, at (704) 243-7392 between 8 am and 6 pm Monday – Thursday. The Village of Wesley Chapel does not discriminate on the basis of disability. If you need an auxiliary aid or service or other accommodations in order to attend or fully participate at this meeting, please contact the Village Clerk at (704) 243-7391 as far in advance of the meeting as possible so that your request can be considered. October 25, 2009 November 1, 2009 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that North State Storage, Indian Trail, LLC intends to sell the property of persons described below to enforce a lien imposed, for unpaid rent at the self storage facility, on said property pursuant to Article 4 Subsection G.S. 44A-43 of the North Carolina Self Service Storage Facility Act. The undersigned will sell at public auction on the 30th day of October 2009 at 12:00pm., on the premises where said property has been stored and is located at 4919 W. Unionville-Indian Trail Road, Indian Trail, NC. Robert R. Dunlap Unit D-27 Office Mark Bauer Unit D-03 Office Purchases must be paid for at time of sale in CASH only. All items sold AS IS and must be removed at time of sale. Sale of any/all unit(s) subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. October 18, 25, 2009 09 SP 1159 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Matthew Hirschler aka Matthew W. Hirschler Joined By His Wife Subashini Hirschler aka Suba-Hirschler to McMillan & Terry, PA, Trustee(s), which was dated July 14, 2005 and recorded on July 15, 2005 in

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

Book 3844 at Page 042, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on October 29, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING all of Lot 97 of QUELLIN, Map 5A as shown on map thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet H, File 701 of the Union County Public Registry. Being the same property described and conveyed by the deed recorded contemporaneously with this deed of trust. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 7908 Denholme Drive, Waxhaw, NC 28173. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Matthew Hirschler. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-14051-FC01 October 18, 25, 2009

the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-14751-FC01 October 18, 25, 2009

Said property is commonly known as 4403 Matthews Weddington Road, Matthews, NC 28104. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Antonio Cabrera and Mary Cabrera. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-14556-FC01 October 18, 25, 2009

09 SP 1160 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by VIRGINIA MOSS, UNMARRIED AND GREGORY MOSS AKA GREGORY A MOSS, AND ANGELA W MOSS AKA ANGELA P MOSS HUSBAND AND WIFE to GURLEY & COOKSON, PLLC, Trustee(s), which was dated April 20, 2007 and recorded on April 23, 2007 in Book 04529 at Page 0388, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on October 29, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING all of Lot 605 of ST. JOHN'S FOREST SUBDIVISION, Phase 3, Map 1, as same as is shown on map thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet I at File 859, Union County, North Carolina Public Registry. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 4730 Kiddle Lane, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Virginia Moss, Gregory Moss and wife, Angela W. Moss. An Order for possession of

09 SP 1181 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by ANTONIO CABRERA aka JOSE A. CABRERA, A MARRIED MAN and MARY CABRERA to BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC Aaron Anderson, Trustee(s), which was dated May 1, 2006 and recorded on May 3, 2006 in Book 04150 at Page 0417, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on October 29, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: being all of lot 60 of Mandy's plantation as shown on plat duly recorded in plat cabinet A, file 156-B of the Union County public registry. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record.

09 SP 1183 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by JACQUELINE GARY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN to SHAPIRO &


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 5B

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

004 Legals

KREISMAN, Trustee(s), which was dated July 30, 2003 and recorded on July 31, 2003 in Book 3161 at Page 398, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on November 3, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING ALL OF LOT(S) 71, TAYLOR GLENN, AS SHOWN ON PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT CABINET G, FILE(S) 830 & 831, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY Being the same property conveyed to the Borrowers herein by Deed recorded contemporaneously herewith. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 3010 Semmes Lane, Indian Trail, NC 28079. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Jacqueline Gary. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-14871-FC01 October 25, 2009 November 1, 2009

Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by ROBERT NEAL, AN UNMARRIED MAN to TRUSTEE SERVICES OF CAROLINA, LLC, Trustee(s), which was dated December 5, 2006 and recorded on December 13, 2006 in Book 04398 at Page 0060, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on November 5, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: Being all of LOT # 34, Harrison Park, MAP 3, as shown on Plat recorded in Plat Book H, Page 299. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 1900 Chadwell Court, Waxhaw, NC 28173. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Robert Neal, A married man. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-14952-FC01 October 25, 2009 November 1, 2009

by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-10277-FC01 October 18, 25, 2009

transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Brandon Hargett and wife, Rachel Hargett. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may request the court to declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. Substitute Trustee Brock & Scott, PLLC Jeremy B. Wilkins, NCSB No. 32346 5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200 Wilmington, NC 28403 PHONE: (910) 392-4988 FAX: (910) 392-8587 File No.: 09-10168-FC01 October 25, 2009 November 1, 2009

be held at 2pm on October 27, 2009 at PBH’s conference room at 300 Copperfield Blvd., Suites 202 & 203, Concord, NC 28025. Attendance at the pre-bid conference is mandatory for any General Contractor’s bid to be considered. Bid documents will be available for purchase after 2pm on October 28, 2009 from Richa Graphics, 204 North Tryon, Charlotte, NC 28202 Tel: 704 331 9744. Bids will be received until 2pm on November 24, 2009 at the offices of Entasis Design, PLLC, 110 West A Street, Kannapolis, NC 28081. Bids will then be transported un-opened to PBH at 300 Copperfield Blvd., Suites 202 & 203, Concord, NC 28025 where they will be opened at 3:00pm. The opening of the bids will be open to the public and all bidders are invited to attend. Bidders must be considered by PBH to be qualified to carry out such a project and will be required to provide a completed AIA Document A305 (Contractors Qualification Statement) with their bids. Such information will include as a minimum, the bidders most recent 2 years audited financial statement (this can be in a separate sealed envelope marked “Confidential and Proprietary Information – Financial Statement Enclosed”), list of qualifications of the anticipated primary subcontractors, list of at least three projects of a similar size and nature with a construction value of at least $8M completed within the last five years including contact information for references. Bidders are also notified that they must be properly licensed under the state laws governing their respective trades and that applicable provisions of Chapter 87 of the General Statutes of the State of North Carolina shall be observed in the receiving of bids and awarding of contracts for the Work PBH is committed to the participation of historically disadvantaged groups on all projects and specifically encourages the use of persons with disabilities and minority businesses. Bidders shall make good faith efforts to include the use of such persons and businesses on the project and to comply with the provisions of N.C.G.S § 143128.2. Failure to make such good faith efforts shall be grounds for rejection of the bid. PBH reserves the right to reject any or all bids for any reason(s) determined to be in the best interest of PBH. Signed: Deanna Metts Campbell, Senior Project Manager, for PBH, 245 LePhillip Court N.E., Concord, NC 28025 October 20, 25, 2009

09 SP 1199 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY

09 SP 1204 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a

Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by JAMES W. WALKER and RETHIA D. WALKER, HUSBAND AND WIFE to SCOTT R. VALBY, Trustee(s), which was dated September 6, 2007 and recorded on September 11, 2007 in Book 04682 at Page 0033, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on October 29, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: A certain tract or parcel of land in Union County, in the State of North Carolina, described as follows: Beginning at an iron pin found on the southern margin of the Branch Street right of way, a corner of the Andrew V. Talmadge and wife, Kathleen H. Talmadge property (434/288 UCR) (said Beginning begin referenced as follows: from said beginning pin N. 66-29-46 E. 11.25 feet to a pk nail in the right of way of Branch Street and thence S. 37-17-21 E. 283.60 feet to a pk nail) running thence from the beginning point with the southern right of way of Branch Street S. 38-21-01 E. 91.08 feet to an angle iron found on the southern right of way of Branch Street S. 38-21-01 W. 91.08 feet to an angle iron found on the southern margin of the Branch Street right of way, corner of the Lynda Reames Medlin property, now or formerly (413/98 UCR) thence with said Medlin line S. 5259-11 W. 132.55 feet to an iron pin; thence N. 36-2448 W. 90.97 feet to an iron pin found, a corner of the aforesaid Talmadge property; thence with said Talmadge line N. 52-56-47 W. 129.47 feet to the point and place of beginning and containing .27 acre more of less all according to a survey by John D. Skidmore dated December 15, 1998. This being the same property conveyed from Charles K. Byrd and wife, Brenda F. Byrd, grantor(s), to James W. Walker and wife, Rethia D. Walker., grantee(s), by General Warranty Deed, dated December 30, 1998, and recorded December 30, 1998, as/in Book 1189 at Page 574. Property Address (for Informational Purposes Only): 810 S. Branch Street Monroe, NC 28112 Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 810 South Branch Street, Monroe, NC 28112. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land transfer taxes, special assessments, easements, rights of way, deeds of release, and any other encumbrances or exceptions of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are James W. Walker and wife, Rethia D. Walker. An Order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days’ written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. If the trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the confirmation of the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged

09 SP 1240 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Rachel Hargett and Brandon Hargett to Angela M Greenberg, Trustee(s), which was dated October 30, 2006 and recorded on November 6, 2006 in Book 04358 at Page 0395, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at the courthouse door of the county courthouse where the property is located, or the usual and customary location at the county courthouse for conducting the sale on November 3, 2009 at 12:30PM, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property situated in Union County, North Carolina, to wit: BEING THAT LOT FRONTING ON BOTH LANCASTER AVENUE AND GRIFFITH STREET IN THE CITY OF MONROE, AND BEING 90 FEET ON LANCASTER AVENUE AND 100 FEET ON GRIFFITH STREET AND BEING LOTS 6, 7, 8 AND 9 OF THE H. D. STEWART PROPERTY AS SURVEYED BY T. W. SECREST ON THE 13TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1920, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN DEED FROM H. D. STEWART AND WIFE TO THE CITY OF MONROE RECORDED IN BOOK 72, AT PAGE 612, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY. LESS, SAVING, RESERVING AND EXCEPTING FROM THE WITHIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY: FIRST PARCEL: ALL OF THAT 0.186 ACRE TRACT AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 364, PAGE 338, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY, REFERENCE TO WHICH IS HEREBY MADE FOR A MORE PARTICULAR METES AND BOUNDS DESCRIPTION. SECOND PARCEL: ALL OF THAT PROPERTY AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 99, PAGE 368, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY, REFERENCE TO WHICH IS HEREBY MADE FOR A MORE PARTICULAR METES AND BOUNDS DESCRIPTION. REFERENCE IS ALSO MADE TO ESTATE FILE 04E425, OFFICE OF THE UNION COUNTY CLERK OF SUPERIOR COURT. Save and except any releases, deeds of release or prior conveyances of record. Said property is commonly known as 607 Lancaster Avenue, Monroe, NC 28112. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five Cents (45¢) per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pursuant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no personal checks) of five percent (5%) of the purchase price, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts are immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance “AS IS WHERE IS.” There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land

INVITATION TO BID. Sealed, single prime bids from qualified bidders are invited for the construction of a new headquarters office building and training/conference of approximately 69,000 SF in Kannapolis, NC, for PBH, an Area Authority pursuant to Chapter 122C of the North Carolina General Statutes. The project consists of the mass grading of approximately 20 acres of land, the formation of new streets built to City of Kannapolis standards and associated utilities, the construction of a steel moment framed office building on 3 floors of approximately 56,000 SF and a single story training wing and staff lounge of approximately 13,000 SF. The project will include full interior fit out of the building including a sprinkler system, a zoned HVAC system, raised floors, data room and associated cooling and fire suppression systems. A portion of the site will be prepared with temporary seeding as ‘for sale’ lots. The remaining part of the site will be developed with parking lots, site lighting, landscape and detention ponds for the PBH building. The bid is a formal bid and it is the intention of PBH to award the contract to the lowest responsible, responsive and qualified bidder, taking into consideration the type of building use, type and form of construction, quality, performance and time required to reach substantial completion. A bid security in the amount of 5% of the bid amount shall be submitted with each bid. The bid security shall be in the form of a Cashier’s Check or a Certified Check drawn on a bank or trust company insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and made payable to PBH or cash or a bid bond executed by a Corporate Surety(ies) listed in the latest State of North Carolina Department of Insurance, list of “Insurers Admitted to transact Surety Insurance in this State”. A separate Performance Bond and Payment Bond (Labor, Materials and Equipment) are also required in the amount of 100% of the contract sum and shall be submitted prior to executing the work. A pre-bid conference will

005 Special Notices

014 Lost & Found

There is a charge for 50 lb bag Fescue Grass Seed, 98.5% germ. Lost Ads $25Ea. 704-254-7775 The Enquirer-Journal CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

704-261-2214

EMPLOYMENT 040 Help Wanted Avon- Do you need an extra $200-500? Act now! Ft/Pt. Free gift. Medical Ins. avail. 704/821-7398

READER NOTICE! While many work-athome opportunities listed provide real income, many seek only to sell booklets or catalogs on how to get such work.

Please use caution when responding to all such ads. 042 Office/Clerical LOAN ASSISTANT – Monroe – Full time w/exc. benefits -Accounting, loan processing/servicing, and customer service. Skills in MS Office required. Assoc. degree req., pref. in Business or Acct. 1- 2 years office exp. preferred. Send confidential resume stating salary req. to hrdept@cfarmc.com. Respond by 10/31. EEO www. carolinafarmcredit.com Entry Level Accountant w/Quickbook Pro. Fax resume to 704-283-7939. No phone calls. Sal DOE.

044 Sales

046 Medical/Dental Carolina Clinic looking to hire CMA’s, FT Medical Biller, CDE & Ultrasound Tech, PT Medical Transcriptionist. Please fax all resume to attn: Michelle 704-296-2743

DEADLINES

PETS & LIVESTOCK

In Column 060 Pets & Supplies Call before 1:30pm the day prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on Happy Jack mange medicine promotes healing Thursday and for Sunday and hairgrowth to any call before 1:30 pm on Frimange, hot spot, ringday. worm on dogs and horsDisplay es. Warner Feed & Tack (243-3011) www.happySunday 12 Noon Thurs Tuesday 4PM Friday jackinc.com Wed. Thursday Friday Saturday

4PM Monday 4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES

42 inch 2 speed portable fax, new condition, $150 (704)292-1518 Metal Roofing 3ft wide $1.40 LF 1-803-789-5500

WOODEN PALLETS FREE. Pick up at The Enquirer-Journal, 500 W. Jefferson St., Monroe, Monday-Friday, 8am-4pm

FINANCIAL 104 Bus. Opportunities

INVESTIGATE BEFORE YOU INVEST! Always a good policy, especially for business opportunities and franchises. Call NC Attorney General at (919)-716-6000 or the Federal Trade Commission at (877)-FTCHELP for free information; or visit our Web site at www.ftc.gov/bizop. N.C. law requires sellers of certain business opportunities to register with NC Attorney General before selling. Call to verify lawful registration before you buy.

108 Money To Loan Advance Fee Loans or Credit Offers Companies that do business by phone can’t ask you to pay for credit before you get it. For more information, call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP. A public service message from The Enquirer-Journal and The Federal Trade Commission.

Inside Sales Rep. 2 years inside sales experience with proven track record. Ability to make sales over the phone via 109 REAL ESTATE cold calling prospects. Excellent computer skills, REAL ESTATE - RENT ACT! Software knowledge a plus. Candidate should be organized and able to 111 Commercial - Rent multi-task. Bilingual English/Spanish a plus. Full Warehouse/office with 4’ dock door. 2400 sf. Old time position – base salCharlotte Hwy. $600/Mo. ary plus commission. Lo(704)283-4697 cated in Indian Trail, NC. Reply To: sgaskey 112 Apartments @reliablesafety.com

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm

GENERAL INFORMATION

PINE NEEDLES

$3.85 / Bale. Free Delivery (704)291-7149

090 Miscellaneous BUSINESS SERVICES

PT/FT NC State certified Med Tech. Apply in person 9am-3pm, M-F, Union Park Assisted Living, 1316 Patterson St., Monroe.

★★★★★★★★★★★★

078 Feed/Seed/Plants

Shih Tzu pups 6wks 1 females 1 male $300ea. 1st shots (843)622-5681

$99 2 BR Special $199/Dep - $99/wk 704-283-5563 Camelot Apt free power for 1yr no dep. $125wk, $50mo. water no pets, $175 to move in weekly. 3605 Evans Mill Rd. Pageland SC 843-672-5616 (843)672-7445

★ Monroe Apt. ★ Special 2br 2ba Move in by Nov. 1st. Get Dec & Jan FREE Beautiful & quiet paid water 704-289-5949 ★★★★★★★★★★★ 1/2 off 1st mo. rent !! Ask about other specials Completely Remodeled 2br, 1.5ba Townhouse Small pets allowed Shown by appt only 704-283-1912 ★★★★★★★★★★★ Manor Ridge Apartments FREE Oct. Rent for 3BR Certain Restriction Apply (704)233-0482

The Enquirer-Journal re- Toy Poodles male & female call for more inforserves the right to edit or reMonroe 2br apt all applianmation (704)272-7778 ject and correctly classify an ces, cent A/H, $650mo. ad at any time. The Enquir+$650dep. 704-283-4712 062 Homes for Pets er-Journal will assume no lileave message ability for omission of advertising material in whole or in Free 7mo old full size male Newly Remodeled Chihuahua tan & wht for part. Townhouse 2bd/1.5 ba adoption (704)218-6022 ERRORS $600mo. 704-283-3097 Please check your ad the first day it runs. If you find an Free Gold kitten and white kitten, males, to good 113 Duplexes error, call the first day so homes. (704)242-0313 your ad can be corrected. 2br 1ba 900sf $595mo. The Enquirer-Journal will give credit for only the first FREE KITTENS to good 3br 1.5ba 1050 sf $695mo. both, great location in incorrect publication. homes, 6 weeks old, cute. Wingate cul de sac dep & Call 704-301-6436. ref’s req’d (704)283-6490 PAYMENT Free to good home beautiful Pre-payment is required for 114 Houses For Rent Himalayan cat. Call all individual ads and all (704)242-1496. $200/mo! 4 bed 2 ba! business ads. Business ac5% dn, 15 yrs @ 8%! counts may apply for pre-apMERCHANDISE For Listings proved credit. For your convenience, we accept Visa, 800-749-8106 x H611 Master Card, cash, or 068 Auctions checks 2BR, 1BA, heat/air, garage/ Estates, Antiques workshop. Marshville. FAX: 704-289-2929 Farm Equipment $530/Mo. + deposit. ★★★★★★★★★★★★ Belk Auction Co. (704)624-5105 (704)339-4266 014 Lost & Found www.belkauctionco.com 3br 2ba $750mo. + $750 Found ring in Harris Teeter dep. Monroe area. Refer069 Appliances parking lot 10/17 call to ences required. Refrigerator & Stoves identify (704)221-3365 (980)722-3700 $99.99 Washers & Dryers $79.99 3br home Waxhaw Rd, 704-649-3821 west of Monroe no pets, AC ref’s & dep. $650mo. 071 Furniture (512)771-9113 A beautiful 6 pcs. Cherry set brand new in boxes, 4BR 2BA, 1400sf, New Salem/Piedmont dist. Carl Must sell $425 (704)918If you find an item, call us Polk Rd. $850mo + dep. 8401 and place your FREE ad. (704)385-8218

FREE FOUND ADS

3 LINES, 5 DAYS, FREE

Read The E-J

A Brand New Queen Pillow Matthews area 3br 2ba no Top mattress set still in pets, 1750sf, cent H/A, plastic $150, (704)998garage +extras $870mo 8044 (704)847-6561


6B / Sunday, October 25, 2009 114 Houses For Rent Midland/Standfield area, 3br 2ba extremely nice, $750mo w/out building (704)641-5898

Nearly new 4br 2ba on S Church St, Monroe, $950mo. (704)289-5410

The Enquirer-Journal

MOBILE HOMES 138 Mobile Homes - Rent 2 & 3 BR mobile homes on 1ac lots 10 min from Monroe cross NC/SC line. call (843)672-7445 Atkinson Rentals

2br 1ba 5 miles out New Need to rebuild your credTown Rd. $525mo +dep it? Let us build your new & refs. req’d, (704)283home while you build your 4269 or 704-577-2253 credit Call to see if you qualify? 704-233-0236 5 miles out New Town Rd. 2br 1ba $500mo. +dep New Salem/Piedmont 704-289-4017 or 980-7212000sf 2br 1.5ba w/bonus 6214 room, split level w/13ac pasture, w/access to 600 Nash, 2BR, 1BA, cent horses, barn, out bldgs H/A, 14x60, 4 appl, new water/elec gd deer huntpaint. No pets. $560/Mo. ing, sm pond creek $1200 + dep. (704)847-6561 unfurnished, $1500 full Wingate: 2 mo free rent furnish 704-201-1197 3BR 2BA $600 Owner financing 3br 2.5ba Cent H/A. No pets. town home. $149,900.00 704-451-8408 owner financing available. 4005 F Christine Lane 140 Mobile Homes - Sale Waxhaw NC (Alma Vil$500.00 DN moves lage) Call 704-609-5463

you in. Call and ask

Spacious 2br house in me how. 704-225-8850 Piedmont area. $750. Tucker Construction. For Sale 3br 2ba Monroe (704)292-1329 w/1 acre for limited time only. No money down Sun Valley Sch dist. 3br 100% financing OAC 2.5ba 2 car gar. master Qualifiers for $8,000 Gov. down, loft, fenced yard, Rebate (704)320-4878 neighborhood pool, pets OK, 1014 Missouri River Dr. Meriwether Sub. Land Owners Wanted Zero Down $995mo. (704)821-8141 Unionville area 3bd 1ba brick, cent AC, gas heat, 3 acre fishing pond, $750 (704)641-5898

call for details (704)225-8850

TRANSPORTATION

Waxhaw 3br 2.5ba kit, dining, den w/fp, all appliances & yard maintenance include $1195mo. Sherin Realty (704)882-1634

REAL ESTATE - SALE 126 Houses For Sale $8,000 Tax Credit to buy your first home Call to see if you may qualify New Homes Available from $129,900 Leon 704607-2602 3 Bd 2 ba only $24,900! Priced to Sell! For Listings 800-749-8106 x B002 FSBO Lets Make A Deal! new home Unionville 3400sf dropped price 50K, 704-507-0492

128 Lots & Acreage 92.61 acres near Wingate University good frontage $795,000 HERITAGE REALTY 704-289-5596 FSBO 19ac. 20 yr old pond, Mt Pisgah community, $59,000 owner financing (803)427-3888

1988 PETERBUILT (379) C at. M otor, 15 S peed W ith O verdrive, 411 R ear E nd, N ew P arts, 63” Flat Top S leeper, R ebuilt E ngine and Transm ission.

$12,000 704-651-9644

2003 Cadillac Seville STS Loaded, like new, new M ichelin tires. 41,000 M iles.

Get the latest headlines, sports, school and business news from your county. You’ll find new reasons to read The Enquirer-Journal every day.

$14,500 704-608-4748 9A-9P

SUBSCRIBE NOW!

704-261-2219 www.enquirerjournal.com

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To advertise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

We accept cash, checks or Mastercard, VISA and American Express. Cancellable but non-refundable.

Auto Removal

Read The E-J

Computer Service

Concrete Work

Construction

Firewood

Heating and Air

Plumbing

Encourage your child to read To Subscribe Call 704-261-2219

the newspaper.

Find A Job! Read The E-J Classifieds!


The Enquirer-Journal

Sunday, October 25, 2009 / 7B

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven.

Lot $30,000

SKYECROFT

5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

.87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Enjoy entertaining in this wonderful Marshville home: over 3500 sq. ft. on 2 acres. Holiday dinners a breeze to prepare in the spacious kitchen. Grand living and dining rooms. 5 bedrooms; 5 fireplaces; den; screeened porch. Call Elsie: 704-363-8815 PRUDENTIAL CAROLINAS REALTY

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

CED!

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000 5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

REDUCED

Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

REDU

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

New 2007, 3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage, rec room, s/s appliances, ceramic tile, 1 ac lot, lots of extras. Must see! $167,400 CALL 704-243-4656

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

$169,000

LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.)

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath.

NEW SALEM/POLK MTN.

2200 HSF, cedar ext. w/ALL NEW paint, roofing, windows, air. 2-1/2 BA, 3 BR + bonus room over dbl. gar. Custom oak cabinets. Covered back porch overlooking nice 24’x40’ shop/office. 5 acs. in great location.

MLS 810187 $348,000 FSBO 704-694-8271 704-385-9294


8B / Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Enquirer-Journal

Keffer Hyundai 6cVbZndj`cdl#6cVbZndjXVcigjhi#

OVER 150 Santa Fe SUV’s to choose from!

That’s more than most dealers have in their entire inventory!

We want to be #1 in America! We’ve purchased more, and are offering HUGE volume DISCOUNTS! The Santa Fe is the BEST SUV on the market right now. Join the scores of people trading in their big gas guzzling SUV’s, getting LOWER payments and

AMERICA’S BEST WARRANTY! Up to

8000 Off

$

Sonata

Genesis Coupe

Veracruz

Accent

Elantra Touring

Tuscon

Genesis

Come see our Union County connections, Dewayne and Glenn, and see why we are the #1 volume dealer 2 years running.


10252009 ej