Page 1

Midterm Learning Portfolio Enkhtuvshin
Ganbold


ARCH
102

Spring
2012



Table
of
Content
 • 
Understanding
the
course
objecBves
and
what
I
bring
to
the
table
 • 
The
first
assignment:
Tile


 • 
Understanding
the
concept
of
Fourfold
as
a
designer
 • 
The
iniBal
gesture
models
 • 
QuesBons
&
Concerns
 • 
Peer
criBque
 • 
Chapel
research
 • 
Works
driven
by
quesBons
 • 
Site
models
 • 
Before
moving
forward



Understanding
the
course
objecBves
 and
what
I
bring
to
the
table
 
The
introducBon
of
the
course
was
simple
and
welcoming.
It
was
 made
clear
that
it
takes
one
years
of
pracBce
to
become
a
decent
 designer.
With
that
said,
I
leR
behind
most
of
my
stress
of
reaching
 a
high
expectaBon
that
I’d
assumed
to
have
from
the
Design
101.
 Even
at
the
end
of
semester
of
Design
102,
one
will
not
be
expected
 to
excel
but
will
have
only
been
one
step
closer
to
a
“perfecBon.”
It
 was
stated
that
there
is
no
such
thing
as
perfecBon
in
a
design
 studio,
especially
as
we
just
start
to
develop
our
design
language
for
 the
second
semester.
We’ll
taste
different
ideas
and
explore
various

 materials
to
expand
our
design
process,
but
we’ll
not
design
a
 resolved
building
in
this
course.

I
understood,
however,
that
I
am
 responsible
to
constantly
seek
and
evolve
my
personal
design
 language,
bringing
something
on
the
table
as
designer.
Expressing
 something
specific
about
either
my
background,
personal
 experience
or
my
individual
characterisBc
that
is
different
from
 anyone
else
is
what’s
important,
which
will
drive
my
work.



Tile
 





As
the
first
assignment
was
announced,
I
was
absolutely
excited
about
it,
and
it
was
 certainly
a
fun
project
to
work
with.
All
the
restricBons
made
it
very
interesBng
to
 create
the
Ble.
The
most
significant
aspect
of
the
Ble
to
me
was
its
material.
Since
I
 hadn’t
known
what
corrugated
meant
before,
understanding
what
it
was
and
why
 the
Ble
had
to
be
made
out
of
it
mostly
influenced
my
design.
I
thought
that
the
 paZern
of
the
corrugaBon
was
what
needed
to
be
emphasized,
so
my
intenBon
was
 to
reveal
the
unique
quality
of
the
corrugated
board
in
3
dimensions.
In
order
to
 show
that
quality,
I
wanted
to
cut
the
board
into
thin
slices
and
place
them
in
such
 way
that
has
a
conBnues
corrugaBon
paZern.
One
of
the
requirements,
having
2
 levels
at
the
least
and
12
levels
at
the
most,
actually
then
gave
me
the
direcBons
to
 start.

 Because
layering
thin
slices
up
to
 make
12
levels
would
make
the
Ble
 textured
not
only
from
the
top
but
 also
from
the
sideways
verBcally.
 Thus,
I
first
designed
the
Ble,
 considering
how
it
should
look
in
2
 dimensions;
the
very
first
layer
is
 just
a
simple
surface
supporBng
the
 design
on
top,
and
the
second
layer
 is
cut
of
into
dynamic
paZerns
and
 space
of
which
are
filled
with
the
 cut
pieces
with
their
corrugated
 sides.




The
design
outline
was
inspired
by
a
photography
of
mine
about
light
and
shadow.
 The
regular
surface
of
the
board
represents
a
surface
on
the
sunlight,
and
the
 corrugated
side
represents
shadow.
Where
the
shadow
is
at
where
the
complexity
is
 since
I
believe
that
the
corrugated
side
cerates
visual
complexity.

The
Ble
gradually
 gets
into
shadow
from
the
light
exposure.

Where
the
shadow
is
dense,
there
is

three
 dimensional
layered
part,
which
is
a
place
where
I
aZempted
to
create
a
complexity.

 One
could
look
at
the
Ble
not
only
from
the
top,
but
also
experience
and
see
through
 from
its
sideways
or
elevaBon
and
different
angles.
The
elevaBon
view
of
the
Ble
 matches
the
plan
view
of
the
Ble.



I
also
noted
that
the
Bles

can
be
placed
 outside
in
the
sun,
so
the
corrugaBon
of
the
 board
at
a
certain
area
was
designed
with
 intension
to
cast
its
shadow
on
the
smooth
 surface.




Although
the
Ble
I
was
designing
was
abstract,
I
also
considered
it
literally.
When
Bles
 are
put
together
with
another
or
arranged
in
certain
way,
they
create
a
paZern.
So
as
I
 was
designing,
a
piece
of
Ble
that
I
design
can
be
mulBplied
and
cover
a
wall,
as
they
 connect
to
one
another
with
their
slanted
lines.



Understanding
the
Concept
of
 FourFold
as
a
Designer
 




As
the
next
or
rather
the
rest
of
the
semester’s
project
was
assigned,
I
 learned
another
big
and
unfamiliar
term,
the
fourfold.
But
before
 understanding
what
a
fourfold
is,
one
should
understand
what
a
building
 is.
According
to
MarBn
Heidegger,
“For
building
is
not
merely
means
and
a
 way
toward
dwelling‐
to
build
is
itself
already
to
dwell.”
Thus,
to
be
an
 architect
means
to
be
able
to
preserve
peace,
because
to
build
or
design
 means
to
dwell,
whose
nature
is
“to
be
set
at
peace,”
to
spare,
and
to
save
 from
being
harmed
or
destroyed.
Therefore,
as
designers,
or
more
 generally
as
builders
and
dwellers,
we
(
me
and
my
peers)
are
fourfolders,
 ones
who
acBvate
the
core
of
the
fourfold.

It
is
believed
that
dwelling
 essenBally
means
to
be
a
mortal
on
the
earth,
under
the
sky
before
the
 diviniBes,
which
suggests
that
how
we
dwell,
alternaBvely,
what
we
design
 basically
means
a
way
in
which
we
sustain
peace
on
the
earth.

Designing
a
 FourFold
Chapel
is
a
perfect
form
of
preserving
peace,
as
one
gets
to
 design/build
a
shelter
space
for
meditaBon,
which
is
a
common
acBvity
for
 mortals
to
create
peace
in
their
internal
and
external
natures.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
1



As
the
class
was
introduced
with
the
 concept
of
fourfold,
it
was
asked
to
design
a
 chapel
that
is
representaBve
of
the
same
 idea,
which
is
to
be
named
the
“FourFold
 Chapel.”
We
were
also
given
its
site
and
 program.
Knowing
where
the
chapel
is
going
 to
be
located
and
how
it
is
going
to
funcBon
 was
very
exciBng,
yet
at
the
same
Bme
it
 made
my
first
experience
in
gesture

models
 preZy
overwhelmingly
frustraBng
as
the
 basic
restricBon
was
“no
glue.”
I
forgot
 about
or
actually
didn’t
understand
exactly
 what
a
gesture
model
was,
so
if
I
could
use
 glue,
I
would
actually
have
made
an
ugly
 “chapel.”
Since
there
was
no
way
to
reach
a
 certain
point
without
glue,
I
started
 quesBoned
my
process
aRer

hours
of
 struggle.
Nonetheless,
I
tried
to
respond
to
 the
fourfold
by
making
a
cross
lie
“roof”
that
 has
four
points,
and
made
a
transparent
 “wall”
and
“floor”
that
respond
to
the
site,
 exposing
one
to
the
beauty
of
the
nature.



FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
2



Because
I
struggled
through
my
first
 couple
of
models,
one
of
which
I
never

 finish,
I
had
only
a
few
hours
leR
to
 finish
my
models
before
their
due.
 Since
I
worked
with
wire
last
semester,

 I
decided
to
quickly
make
something
 with
the
familiar
material.
Although
it
 took
a
lot
less
hours
to
make
the
 model,
it
didn’t
having
anything
to
do
 with
the
fourfold.


What
maybe
beZer
about
it
 compared
to
the
first
model
 could
be
that
it
now
is
more
 abstract
gesture
model,
which
 addresses
some
of
the
design
 biases,
such
as
being
abstract
 over
the
literal,
asymmetrical
 over
symmetrical,
expandable
 rather
than
closed




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
3



I
was
sBll
struggling
with
the
fact
that
 glue
was
excluded
from
our

design.

I
 was
aware
of
the
purpose
behind
it
 though;

buildings
are
not
constructed
 with
glue
that
designers
need
to
build
 structures
which
become

what
is
called
 architectural
design.
I
now
feel
like
I
 should
have
stuck
with
my
wire
at
this
 point,
but
there
were
couple
of
reasons
 that
kept
me
stay
away
from
the
wire.
As
 I
researched
structures
with
no
glue,
 perfectly
cut
and
folded
paper
models
 would
pop
out
so
that
I
would
want
to
 create
something
similar.
Also,
I
was
 afraid
of
creaBng
things
that
would
end
 preZy
similar
to
what
I
have
done
in
 design
101.
As
a
result,
a
model
that
I
 made
out
of
a
mat
board
is
one
on
the
 right,
trying
to
depict
a
quality
of
wave.
 What
I
realized
aRer
making
this
model
 was
that
working
with
only
one
material,
 especially
paper,
is
not
what
I
like.



FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
4



I
think
the
“no
glue”
method
has
been
the
 most
cruel
yet
the
most
essenBal
part
of
 my
design
process.
It
forced
me
to
make
 a
decision
that
I
must
work
with
wires.
 Wire
has
many
advantages,
most
 important
of
which
is
that
it
can
wrap
or
 sew
things,
so
the
whole
dilemma
about
 glue
would
be
resolved!
Although
I
didn’t
 exactly
think
of
that
at
the
moment,
I
 subconsciously
realized
it
and
made
my
 next
model
real
quickly
and
easily.
 Whereas
I
devoted
hours
to
cut
the
 curvilinear
shapes
in
order
to
make
the
 previous
model,
I
literally
spent
couple
of
 minutes
to
put
up
this
model.
Even
 though
I
didn’t
consider
any
criBcal
 quesBons
about
the
program
in
the
 process,
I
feel
as
if
this
was
an
excellent
 experiment
and
big
move
from
my
 fixaBon.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
5



Now
that
I
have
figured
out
what
material
I
am
really
aZracted
to,
I
could
go
back
to
the
 mat
board
and
tried
to
incorporate
it
into
the
wire
work.
Besides
loving
the
flexible,
light
 and
graceful
quality
of
the
wire,
I
wasn’t
really
responding
to
the
concept
of
chapel
as
I
 wasn’t
really
sure
what
I
was
doing.
However,

there
was
a
hope;
I
saw
a
direcBon
where
 my
model
could
go.
I
accidently
found
an
image
(
on
the
right)
that
is
similar
to
my
model
 above,

and
the
blue
planes
in
it
actually
a
form
a
roof
of
a
real
exisBng
meditaBon
space.
 So
there
we
go,
my
extremely
abstract
gesture
models
has
a
potenBal
of
a
chapel.



What
appeared
as
wire
in
the
previous
image
now
became
the
main
support/structure
of
 this
meditaBve
place.

So
it
was
an
inspiraBonal
moment,
which
encouraged
me
to
use
 wire
as
my
main
or
significant
part
of
my
design.



QuesBons
&
Concerns





CriBcal
quesBons


•  How
do
we
know
that
we
are
finished
with
the
model?

 •  How
do
we
know
that
our
model
is
a
good
model?

 •  How
do
we
determine
whether
a
model
is
good
or
not?



 






Such
quesBons
would
tell
us
that
we
need
to
have
a
set
of
criterion
to
evaluate
our
 work.
So
we
were
reminded
to
refer
to
the
design
studio
biases,
our
program,
site,
 reread
the
reading,
“Building
Dwelling
Thinking,”
and
do
outside
research,
which
will
 inform
our
work
a
lot.


Things
to
keep
in
mind








 •  Be
aware
of
the
certain
quality
that
is
working
in
my
models
 •  Seeking
qualiBes,
such
as
heavy,
light,
sharp,
and
curvilinear,

in
my
work
is
how
I
would
 evaluate
my
work
 •  Without
any
feed
back,
try
to
establish
my
own
process
to
create
the
next
set
of
model

 •  
look
at
what
worked
and
what
didn’t
work,
reflecBng
on
what
I
have
made.
 •  Don’t
wait
for
another
person
to
tell
me
what
to
do
next.
Figure
out
what
direcBon
I
 should
go
on
my
own.
 •  Look
at
the
models
and
see
if
there
is
something
in
common
either
in
material
or
form.
 Ask
myself
what
connects
some
of
or
all
of
my
models,

and
what
thread
runs
through
 them



Peer
CriBque

 Since
I
had
only
two
models
and

hated
the
first
one
 so
much,
I

I
gave
my
second/wire
model
to
be
 criBqued.
I
recall
that
it
was
said
that
the
white
 circular
shapes
made
of
paper
were
too
randomly
 thrown
together
with
the
wire
forms.
Also,
the
model
 consists
of
only
circular
shapes
so
that
is
too
boring
to
 look
at.

 I
agree
with
my
peer
both
about
the
randomness
of
 the
paper
and
the
too
much
of
the
circular
shapes.
I
 wonder
how
it
might
have
looked
if
there
was
a
 plasBc
circles
instead
of
paper.

 I
also
know
that
anything
is
more
interesBng
if
it
 consists
of
various
or
opposing
elements,
such
as
 verBcal
vs.
horizontal
and
figure
vs.
its
void,
so
it
 might
have
been
more
aZracBve
if
there
ware
some
 straight
lines
or
metal
surfaces
that
fill
the
circular
 frames
but
certainly
not
squares
because
personally
I
 like
curves.




Peer
CriBque
 I
love
the
pointy
edges
and
the
way
 the
model
is
slanted
as
it
reaches
up
 to
the
sky.
It
is

characterized
by
 sharp
edges,
which
seem
fierce
and
 sleek.
I
also
like
the
slightly
 inconstant
order,
in
which
the
pieces
 are
arranged.
The
clean
and
neat
cut
 of
the
carton
contributes
to
its
sharp
 and
elegant
quality.

 I
hate
the
copper
wires
that
connect
 the
main
objects.
They
seem
to
be

 there
only
to
support
the
paper
parts
 but
not
as
a
part
of
the
design
itself.
 The
color
of
the
copper
doesn’t
 either
blend
or
complement
the
 model.
They
are
crooked
and
aZach
 the
pieces
so
poorly
so
that
the
 whole
thing
aRer
all
look
cheap.




Chapel
Research/Exterior



Interior




Rocky
Site




Thoughts
aRer
the
research
 










It
was
very
good
experience
to
expose
to
various
design
 languages
in
terms
of
chapel
and
our
site.
I
parBcularly
loved
how
 some
of
the
architects
used
the
nature,
such
as
rock,
as
the
part
of
 the
interior
beauty
or
exterior
main
support
of
the
building.

 










In
addiBon,
this
exercise
helped
me
to
understand
the
difference
 between
what
is
to
describe
a
model
and
what
is
to
give
qualiBes
to
 a
model.
During
class,
we
were
first
asked
to
pick
our
favorite
 images
and
explain
why
that
so
in
a
few
words.
Then
we
had
to
 choose
two
words
that
we
liked
the
most
out
of
all
the
word
we
 had
for
the
images.
The
words
I
chose
were
s/mula/ng
and
 strenuous.

From
all
the
words
on
the
board,
we
then
idenBfied
the
 ones
that
can
be
used
to
explain
an
architectural
structure
from
its
 visual
or
objecBve
aspects,
such
as
its
color,
surface
condiBon
and
 size.




Quality
vs.
DescripBon
 





I
learned
that
the
words
such
sBmulaBng
and/or
strenuous
are
not
 objecBve
but
really
subjecBve
words
for
describing
an
architectural
work.
 That’s
because
one
understands
or
associated
a
word
s/mula/ng
with
 something
specific,
for
another
person
the
same
word
can
suggest
a
 totally
different
idea.
With
that
in
mind,
I
developed
my
own
 understanding
of
quality
over
descrip/on.
I
could
be
wrong.
But,
in
my
 understanding,
quality
is
a
visual
and
objecBve
characterisBc
of
something
 that
can
be
universally
agreed
upon
whereas
descrip/on
can
be
abstract
 and
doesn’t
have
to
be
agreeable
for
different
people.
To
confirm,
I
looked
 up
the
words
in
DicBonary.Com.
The
word
quality
in
its
noun
form
is
an
 “1.essenBal
or
disBncBve
characterisBc,
property,
or
aZribute,
2.character
 or
nature,
as
belonging
to
or
disBnguishing
a
thing,”
and
the
word
 descripBon
is
“a
statement,
picture
in
words,
or
account
that
describes
 descripBve
representaBon.”
I
was
close!
We
need
not
to
over
think
as
we
 try
to
idenBfy
qualiBes
of
an
architectural
piece
but
need
to
look
for
 characterisBcs
that
are
obvious
to
anyone.




QuesBons
 Big
quesBons
about
architecture
in
general:
 •  What
makes
an
architecture
unaZracBve
or
aZracBve?

 •  
What
is
the
most
challenging
aspect
of
architecture?


Specific
quesBons
about
the
program:
 •  What
is
important
about
meditaBon
or
chapel?
 •  Am
I
more
fascinated
by
the
site
or
about
the
concept
of

meditaBon?
 •  What
is
an
experience
of
human
being
as
he
sits
down
and
meditates,
and
 how
would
it
differ
from
being
in
a
building
of
a
busy
city
than
chapel
on
 the
edge
of
an
ocean?



Set
of
ideas
that
I
would
consider
for
the
next
set
 of
models:
 •  A
specific
quality
of
the
material
being
used
is
expressed
or
 emphasized
in
the
model
as
an
advantage∙




 •  
Responding
to
the
site;
elements,
such
as
rough/
hard
 rocks
and
smooth
waves
of
water,
are
compared
and
 contrasted
against
the
model
 •  Express
a
visual
repeBBon
 •  Aspect
of
hiding
&
revealing
of
the
nature

 •  Enhancing
the
experience
of
meditaBon
and
mood
 •  Design
theme
that
reflects
the
personality
and
atmosphere
 of
the
site




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
7



From
the
previous
lecture,
I
learned
that
a
 model
should
reveal
a
specific
quality
of
its
 material.
And
I
was
fascinated
by
how
 fragile
and
elegant
the
glass
looked
in
 contrast
with
rough
and
though
rocks.
 Since
one
of
the

main
elements
of
our
site
 is
rock,
I
experimented
with
plasBc
which
 looks
as
though
a
glass.
A
neat
quality
of
 glass
is
that
if
reflects
things
surround
it
as
 it
is
also
see
through,
which
is
a
nature
of
 water
that
is
another
element
of
the
site.



FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
8



If
glass
shares
some
the
qualiBes
that
 water
has,
what
is
the
the
difference?

 The
differences
and
the
similariBes
of
 glass
and
water
are
interesBng
that
 they
can
coexist
in
a
place
as
one
 enBty,
and
or
they
can
be
two
separate
 enBBes
that
can
disBnguish
one
from
 the
another.

 For
example,
a
glass
under
water
 wouldn’t
be
as
much
as
noBceable
than
 glass
on
the
rocks.
A
person
who
is
over
 the
water
would
see
water
and
glass

as
 one
thing,
the
water.
Yet
if
a
person
is
 under
water
but
in
a
glass
structure,
 now
the
glass
divides
the
water
or
it
 separates

the
person
from
the
water
 as
it
reveals
its
quality.
 Glass
which
can
mimic
the
gliZery
and
 transparent
qualiBes
of
the
water,
is
 sewn
by
wires
and
hold
them,
in
this
 model,
which
is
quality
that
water
 doesn’t
posses.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
6




For
this
Bme
we
were
asked
to
make
an
abstract
gesture
model
that
somehow
 reflects
to
something
from
the
real
world.
It
could
be
anything,
such
as
chapel,
kind
of
 imagery
or

creature
in
nature,
or

a
secBon
of
something.

 













I
decided
to
research
on
how
to
create
a
meditaBon
space
first
to
let
myself


randomly
find
something
I
like
from
the
research.
I
looked
at
What

meditaBon
is
 and
found
a
definiBon
as
follows.
 






 
 

It
is
a
state
of
consciousness
that
brings
serenity,
clarity,
and
bliss.
Human
being
 bounce
from
one
thought
to
another
follow
with
emoBon
and
physical
reacBon.
And
 one
way
to
meditate
is
to
concentrate
to
gain
control
over
mind.
It
is
done
by
picking
on
 an
object
to
place
ones
aZenBon
and
focus
exclusively
without
diversion.
One
could
 also
repeat
a
word
as
meditaBon
strategy.
So
repeBBon
is
somehow
associated
with
 meditaBon.
And
the
model
expresses
that
concept,
repeBBon.





If
we
are
exploring
some
aspect
about
our
 site,
program
and
trying
respond
to
that
idea
 through
our
work
we
had
to
become
the
 “experts”
on
that
topic.
So
in
my
next
model,
I
 aZempted
to
respond
to
concept
of
 meditaBon,
what
it
is
and
what
its
experience
 is.





Transcendental
MeditaBon

 





To
understand
what
it
is,
I
looked
up
what
was
transcendental,
which
 means
to
go
beyond,
exceed
in
excellence,
common
experience
and
 thought.

 
Such
meditaBon
is
not
a
religion,
philosophy,
or
lifestyle,
and
it
is
 considered
the
most
effecBve
method
of
self
development.
It
allows
mind
 to
seZle
inward
beyond
thought
to
experience
the
source
of
thought,
pure
 awareness,
which
is
known
as
transcendental
consciousness
or
the
unified
 field.
This
is
the
most
peaceful
level
of
consciousness.
In
this
state
of
 respul
awareness,
and
one’s
brain
funcBons
greater
and
body
gains
 deepest
restoring,
which
is
a
experience
of
higher
states
of
consciousness.
 The
transcendental
MeditaBon
allows
the
mind
to
simply,
naturally
and
 effortlessly
transcend
and
experience
deep
state
of
respully
alert
 consciousness.



Mindfulness
MeditaBon
 





It
helps
one
put
aside
all
thoughts
of
the
past
and
the
future
to
stay
in
the
 present



Understanding
meditaBon
in
general










It
is
a
deeper
level
of
consciousness
than
a
normal
consciousness
which
means
 
 
‐
geqng
one’s
mind
and
body
into
meditaBve
zone.
 
 
‐enter
with
flow
(
resistance
free)
 
 
‐tuning
one’s
mind
by
focusing,
relaxing,
melBng
away
stress

 
 
‐revive
and
achieve
peace

 




It
is
finding
peace
within
environment.


Defining
Peace



 
‐
freedom
from
strife
 
 
‐
state
of
serenity,
calmness
and
sBllness
that
is
difficult
to
achieve
without
meditaBon

 
 
‐
finding
transitory
moments
of
tranquility

 






 
 
(It
is
said
said
that
everything
in
the
world
is
subject
to
change
so
that
finding
 
 
 
that
transitory
moment
is
not
definite
or
saBsfactory.
And
lasBng
peace
can
only
 
 
be
found
within
us.
)
 









‐
experience
which
earns
the
existence
of
an
inner
spiritual
reality
(
which
is
non
–


 
denominaBonal
that
one
can
find
peace
within
oneself
regardless
of
any
named
god)



RelaBng
meditaBon
and
peace
to
the
program

 






In
order
to
find
a
peace
in
the
world,
we
first
have
to
find
it
within
 ourselves.
MeditaBon
is
a
great
tool
to
achieve
that.
Once
peace
is
found
 in
our
mind
the
world
may
look
more
peaceful.
Things
surround
us
may
 seem
to
embrace
us
more
closely.
In
other
word
experience
in
life
may
 become
more
meaningful
and
pleasant.
The
sun,
sky,
ocean,
rainbow
and
 air
may
seem
brighter
and
warmer
and
broader,
or
that
one
feel
more
 close
to
the
nature
the
earth.
And
our
site
of
the
program
is
a
perfect
 seqng
for
such
experience
aRer
meditaBon.




InterpreBng
“Building
Dwelling
Thinking”
 In
order
to
beZer
understand
the
concept
of
fourfold,
I
have
read
through
the
essay
 once
again.
From
this,
I
hoped
to
inform
my
design
process
and
bring
my
conceptual
 models
to
the
next
level
by
having
more
big
quesBons
about
architecture
in
general
 as
well
as
specific
quesBons
about
our
program.

 
Being
human
simply
means
to
dwell
as
we
are
able
to
be
on
the
earth
as
a
 mortal.
Then
to
dwell
means
to
be
at,
to
be
brought
to,
and
to
remain
in
peace.
 Then
if
peace
means
free
of
and
protected
from
the
danger,
it
therefore
means
to
 spare,
not
worrying
about
neither
the
future
nor
the
past
and
remaining
“at
peace
 within
the
free
sphere
that
safeguards
each
thing
in
its
nature.”
Thus,
dwelling
is
 one
being
secure,
isolated
from
both
physical
and
mental
threats,
and
yet
being
 completely
associated
or
united

with
the
earth,
the
nature.

 
Also,
human
beings
as
dwellers,
preserve
the
fourfold
of
earth,
sky,
mortals
and
 diviniBes.

As
far
as
humans
live,
it’s
understood
that
they
are
as
mortals
are
able
to
 experience
the
sunshine
and
sunset
and
the
life
on
the
earth
before
the
diviniBes.




Issues/QuesBons

 •  What
could
water/ocean
represent
or
symbolize
in
terms
of
 spirituality?










‐spiritual
reflecBon,
divine
mirror
 






‐
allowing
one
reflecBng
upon
one’s

thoughts
and
acBon
internally

 







‐process
of
self
evaluaBng
and
meditaBon

 





‐
mirror
simply
reflects
that
which
is
currently
true.
As
enlightened



beings
we
 have
both
the
ability
and
responsibility
to
change
our
personal,
mental,
and
 spiritual
reflecBon
whenever
we
"see"
something
in
our
mirror.
 
‐so
mirror
or
the
ocean
helps
one
to
know
one’s
true
self
and
IsolaBng
one
self
 from
past
and
the
future
to
just
live
in
the
moment.


•  How
could
one
relate
to
and
isolate
from
nature
and
hold
no
before
 and
aRer

thoughts?
 





‐MeditaBon!
As
it
is
a
state
between
consciousness
and
unconsciousness,
it
can
be
 interpreted
as
a
bridge
between
those
states
as
well.
In
other
words,
meditaBon
 can
bridge




More
general
quesBons
about
 architecture

 •  How
should
a
space
be
representaBve
of
and
 related
to
its
chosen
site?

 •  How
can
architecture
highlight
the
specific
site
 character
that
it’s
built
on?

 •  RepresenBng
the
architecture
or
the
client’s
 message
to
the
occupiers.

 •  Building
a
space
that
is
welcoming
and
warm
that
 makes
a
person
to
want
to
return.
(How
 architectures
should
evoke
a
memorable
personal
 experience)



Ideas
related
to
the
site
that
are
 driving
my
project:
 



One
of
the
essenBal
elements
of
the
site
is
the
ocean.
In
 terms
of
meditaBon,
ocean
symbolizes
experiences
of
one’s
 in
and
out
of
meditaBon
process.
When
a
person
is
in
a
 meditaBve
state,
s/he
might
experience
intuiBonal
feelings
 and
insights
and
be
isolated
from
the
logical
world.
So
the
 surface
below
the
ocean
could
metaphorically
symbolize
 this
sort
of
subconscious
state.
On
the
other
hand,
when
 one
is
not
in
meditaBve
state,
s/he
would
have
raBonal
and
 logical
experience
and
be
connected
to
and
aware
of
the
 natural
world/the
earth.
Only
human
as
a
mortal
can
have
 such
different
feelings,
as
they
are
able
to
meditate.
And
 the
act
of
mediaBon
serves
one
as
a
bridge
to
be
 psychologically
both
connected
and
isolated
from
the
 natural
experience.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
9



In
this
set
of
models,
I
focused
on
 what
it
means
to
meditate
or
more
 or
abstractly,
going
to
one
moment
 to
a
peaceful

moment,
what
is
 peace,
and
how
one
becomes
 peaceful.
 I
thought
of
one’s
feelings
in
 entering
a
mediaBon
space
and
 how
it
would
differ
from
one’s
 experience
in
exiBng
of
that
space.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
10



This
model
was
made
based
on
the
same
idea
of
bridging,
thinking

one’s
experience
in
 entering
and
exiBng
the
bridge.
The
bridge
is
supposed
to
be
very
inviBng/welcoming
 and
the
one
who
is
exiBng
it
should
have
a
pleasant
feelings.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
11



I
see
an
experience
of
meditaBon
as
a
thought
process,
process
which
is
so
dynamic
and
 unpredictable.
Forms
that
are
seen
in
my
bridge
symbolize
that
indefinite
moment.

It
would
 be
hard
to
define
what
is
like
to
mediate,
experience
of
which
is
different
for
others.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
12



This
model
can
be
called
a
side
 experimentaBon.
I
was
advised
to
work
 with
different,
cheap
and
easy
to
work
 with
materials
in
order
to
quickly
capture
 gestures
I
wanted
to
make.
That
ideas
was
 great,
in
fact,
just
imagining
myself
making
 models
in
small
amount
of
Bme
was
 exciBng.
However,
I
figure
that
working
 with
paper,
for
example,
rather
than
wire
 would
completely
change
the
aqtude
or
 character
of
my
model.
So
wanted
not
to
 completely
abandon,
but
decided
to
make
 wire,
which
has
been
the
primary
part

of
 my
old
models
to
be
secondary
and
a
wire
 mesh
to
by
the
main
material
of
the
 current
model.
Here,
the
wire
mesh
twists
 itself
to
express
the
change
in
one’s
 experience
before
and
aRer
going
through
 its
tunnel.
And
the
thin
wires
represent
 one’s
thought
process
that
is
someBmes
 fats
and
swirling
and
someBmes
slow
and
 ordered.



FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
13



As
our
model
making
experience
developed,
we
were
expected
to
have
more
complexity
and
 density
in
our
work,
that
has
more
architectural
qualiBes,
such
as
integraBon
of
both
surface
 and
frame
works,
incorporaBon
of
various
materials.




FourFold
Chapel
Gesture
Model
14



Here
I
simply
made
a
model
based
 on
what
was
asked
of
me,
which
I
 hated
aRerwards.
I
intended
to
 integrate
or
combine
what
worked
in
 my
previous
models.
Besides
only
 throwing
parts
of
two
different
 model
into
one,
I
was
not
exploring
 more
ideas
or
responding
to
 anything
specific
about
either
site
or
 the
program.




Site
Model
1



Criteria
for
moving
to
site
were
our

 capacity
to
sustain
a
series
of
model/
 gestures,
and
level
of
density
complexity,
 and
hierarchy
in
our
models.
However,

 I
admit
that
Jumping
into
site
was
a
big
 step,
in
which
I
lost
my
direcBon.
I
felt
as
 though
I
have
made
another
gesture
 model
that
actually
less
complexity
and
 density.
The
main
failure
was
that
it
 didn’t
respond
to
the
site
and
could
go
 anywhere.




Things
that
I
should
have
considered
before
 making
my
site
model
 •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

Take
stand
about
the
place
in
order
to
approach
my
project

 Think
of
the
project
as
I
though
I
am
designing
the
site
but
not
a
building
 Be
able
to
know
why
I
design
a
structure
on
or
off
the
island

 Consider
if
one
can
access
the
island
by
the
high
Bde
or
only
by
the
low
 Bde
 The
client
wants
the
chapel
to
be
especial,
a
FourFold
Chapel,
so
how
can
 my
design
respond
to
both
the
site
and
idea
of
fourfold
(
seek
some
aspect
 about
the
site
that
relate
to
the
fourfold)
 Not
enBre
program
has
to
go
on
either
the
island
or
the
main
land
 NoBce
that
the
island
is
naturally
connected
with
the
main
land
although
 it
looks
separate

 The
Bdes
change,
so
bridging
is
not
a
necessity,
so
my
bridging
should
 serve
something
more
than
what
just
a
common
bridge
serves




Things
we
know
about
the
site
scienBfically

 •  •  •  • 

Wind/climate/soil
condiBon,
its
color,
hardness
and
soRness

 High
and
low
Bdes/elevaBon
 Color
and
general
character
of
the
rocks
 OrientaBon/
the
north
and
south
sides


Non
scienBfic
facts
about
the
site
 •  The
quality,
movement,
sound
of
the
ocean
 •  Temperature
and
wind
differences



Person’s
possible
experiences
on
the
site

 •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

Idea
of
being
on
an
edge
of
the
ocean

 Experience
of
being
on
or
standing
on
something
that
is
not
on
one’s
level
 Smell
of
the
ocean

 Sense
of
expansion,
limitlessness
 Eco
system,
biology
of
the
water
and
animals
in
the
ocean
 Way
in
which
light
hits
the
land
and
water
(
sunset
and
sunrise)
 Difference
between
light
hiqng
land
and
shimmering
water




More
inspiraBonal
ideas
about
the
site

 •  Archeology
of
shiR

 •  ConnecBon‐
temporary
bridge
 •  Experience
of
being
on
the
island
vs.
on
the
main
land
and
going
through
a
 bridge
 •  Natural
island
and
natural
bridge‐
cycle
of
the
Bdes‐
the
gravitaBonal
pull
 of
the
moon
 •  Nature
of
rock
in
terms
of
climate
 •  Island
is
a
place
where
one
can
look
back

 •  Mystery
of
water‐
dangerous/safe/stormy/calm
 •  Feeling
of
being
isolated
from
the
land
but
connected
at
the
same
Bme
by
 either
natural
or
man
made
bridges
 •  Concept
of
first
viewing
the
sits
and
leaving
it

 •  Adding
to
and
or
subtracBng
elements
to
the
original
site
 •  RelaBonship
between
truspul
and
stable
rock
and
risky
and
fluid
water.

 •  Duality
of
the
place
–
water
vs.
land
and
over
vs.
under
water
 •  A
way
in
which
a
quality
of
a
bridge,
being

stable

or
unstable
,
can
effect
 the
nature
of
the
site
or
one’s
experience
about
the
site.



Site
Model
2



From
the
last

lecture
in
 class,
I
became
aware
of
how
 to
be
site
specific,
or
what
it
 is
to
make
a
site
model.

 Simply,
site
model
has
a
 relaBon
with
the
site,
and
 one
way
or
another
the
 model
should
connect
with
 the
site.
While
I
wanted
to
 keep
my
design
language
in
 the
model,
I
was
making
 connecBon
between
my
site
 with
meditaBon.



The
main
thing
to
work
with
the
site
is
to
be
specific

and
to
be
able
to
explain

 specifically
why
I
choose
a
certain
area
of
the
site.








Making
connecBons
between
the
site
model
with
the
fourfold:
 



‐

Why
does
the
bridge
goes
over
the
island?
 





The
bridge
enables
folks
to
be
able
to

go
over
the
island
and
look
into
the
place
from
 above,
from
where
only
diviniBes
can
see.
So
people
share
possibly
similar
experience
 with
gods.
 



‐

Why
does
the
bridge
go
under
the
water?
 





It
bridges
the
surface
of
under
and
over
water.
The
structure
visually
and
literally

 represents
a
bridge,

as
it
also
abstractly
expresses
an
experience
of
meditaBon.
 Because
meditaBon
enables
a
person
not
only
to
come
at
peace,
but
also
feel
both
 conscious
and
subconscious
states.
I
understand
consciousness
as
being
connected
to
 the
nature,
being
aware
of
things
that
happen
in
our
environment,

and
sub‐
 consciousness
as
being
isolated
from
the
logical
experiences
or
the
environmental
 phenomena.
And
going
to
the
island
through
the
bridge,
a
person
may
feel
somehow
 isolated
from
the
main
land
yet
connected
as
well
with
the
same
bridge.

 






A
difference
between
my
specific
bridging
out
of
any
other
bridging
is
that
it
bridges
the
 mainland
with
the
island
as
well
as
the
over
and
under
water
atmospheres.

 






It
would
not
be
an
ordinary
bridge,
it
would
be
a
bridge
that
invites
a
person
into
a
 journey
to
find
a
peace
and
enables
one
to
contact
with
the
sky,
earth
and
gods.
 Coming
out
of
that
bridge,
one
would
feel
as
though
one
has
come
to
a
complete
bliss,
 where
the
fourfold
may
complete
as
one.
Without
the
human
interpretaBons
or
logical/ subjecBve
understandings
of
the
fourfold,
fourfold
is
meaningless
since
the
other
parts
 are
passive.



Before
making
the
next
move
on
the
models,
either
it
would
be
site
or
gesture,
we
 were
suggested
to
sketch
or
ideas
quickly
on
a
paper
and
ask
ourselves
quesBons
that
 would
inform
our
process.
Although
there
were
many
ideas/images
floaBng
in
my
 head,
I
wasn’t
able
to
picture
them
on
a
flat
paper.

 I
thought
it
might
have
been
beZer
to
make
a
model.
I
guess
I
had
goZen
too
used
to
 making
models.
 As
I
saw
how
other
people
did
their
sketches,
I
realized
how
many
other
strategies
that
 I
could
have
used.
For
example,
plan,
secBon
and
elevaBon
drawings
would
have
been
 very
effecBve,
instead
of
trying
to
visualize
something
in
three
dimensions.

 Anyway,
it
is
definitely
an
effecBve
tool
that
will
be
handy
for
any
Bme,
especially
 exploring
and
brainstorming
design
ideas.




Site
Model
3



My
next
site
model
aZempted
to
bridge
the
island
to
the
main
land
from
its
northern
east
 side.
While
a
person
access
the
island,
s/he
has
to
go
under
the
water,
where
a
meditaBon
 space
is
located.
By
the
Bme
they
pass
that
mediaBon
area,
they
would
have
been
come
to
 the
island.
Then
the
island
becomes
the
main
area
to
celebrate
the
moment
aRer
mediaBon.
 It
is
the
place
where
one
can
feel
as
though
one
is
in
the
most
sacred
place
and
becomes
one
 enBty
with
nature.
Then
they
will
be
bridged
back
to
the
main
land
by
the
northern
west
side
 of
the
island.





To
be
site
specific,
we
need
to
consider
all
the
different
opBons
first
and
decide
which
would
 express
our
thoughts
the
best.
Trying
different
versions
will
open
up
more
possibiliBes
for
 developing
our
design
and
thinking
process
of
our
projects.



Before
moving
forward
 •  
It
was
said
that
we
need
to
let
the
site
really
alter
our
design
of
the
 site
model
but
not
to
make
the
model
decide
where
it
wants
to
go
 on
the
site.
For
now,
we
are
dealing
with
how
to
respond
to
the
site
 which
is
the
criBcal
point
for
the
development
of
our
chapel.
Once
 we
confidently
and
comfortably
establish
our
site
specific
model,
 we
then
can
move
onto
more
specific
aspects,
such
as
human
 acBviBes
and
funcBons
of
the
chapel.

 •  
 “What
we
make
is
the
result
of
what
me
think,
and
what
we
think
 is
the
result
of
what
we
make.”
This
is
something
that
stood
out
to
 me
in
the
beginning
of
the
semester,
which
I
had
never
thought
of
 before,
and
I
realize
how
true
it
is
that
our
design
process
can’t
exist
 without
one
or
the
other
of
the
thinking
and
making.
So
more
I
 work
on
my
models,
the
beZer
my
ideas
develop
from

possibiliBes
 that
come
out
of
my
design
process.
 •  QuanBty
of
work
produces
a
quality
of
work.



Midterm  

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