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FASTENERS, ADHESIVES AND TOOLS I October - December 2018

More money, more work The tradies’ guide to marketing online

DRIVING FORCE

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Brothers Will and Alex Davison are steering Milwaukee Racing to victory in this year’s endurance races

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CONTENTS October-December 2018

About us The store listed on the front of this magazine is a member of the Construction Supply Specialist Group. While the majority of your work will be conducted with your local CSS Member, this store is part of a national network of stores that can provide you with exceptional service and support wherever you may be working in Australia. For more store locations, visit www.constructionsupply.com.au.

COVER STORY

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Brothers in arms

Will and Alex Davison are brothers-in-arms in this year’s endurance races.

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04. Welcome Tom Drane in the USA. 07. News Looking after your health HSV’s new Colarado SportsCat CanTeen, making a difference

12. Something new One of the older houses in Marrickville, NSW, has been restored, rejuvenated and rebooted into an exceptional family home.

16. Members in Action Two CSS member businesses have joined forces.

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19. Good advice Good housekeeping is critical when it comes to dangerous goods.

23. Global Spill Control What does it take to

COVER PHOTO: COURTESY 23REDRACING

thrive as a business over many decades?

31. Marketing for tradies How to get started and succeed in marketing your business.

40. F.A.T.MAG fun Puzzles and crosswords. PLUS Supplier editorials From Milwaukee, HB Fuller and ICCONS. Check out past issues of the CSS F.A.T.MAG at www.cssfatmag.com.au. CSS F.A.T. MAG 3


WELCOME As many of you know, CSS is a collective of independently owned and operated Australian companies working together with key industry suppliers of quality products and services. Our united aim is to deliver industry best practice, service, support and competitive pricing across the industry segments we are connected to: Construction, Mining, Industrial, Engineering, Infrastructure and Agriculture. Our industry is based on the interaction of and between people (at all levels) and as such, sees the need to remain open, approachable, responsible and accountable at all times, as key ingredients in how we go to market. To keep member stores and suppliers working together and ahead of the rapidly changing market, we arrange trade-based events dedicated to providing forums to ensure this happens. Last May we had such an event in Sydney with the main attraction being a Suppliers’ Market Day held at the famous Randwick Racecourse track. As part

of the event we had a gala dinner as a thank you to everyone for their efforts and support throughout the year. This year one of the members (Ross Wharton of Resource Trading in Kalgoorlie) won a bottle of whisky as a prize donated by Imex Lasers and immediately asked us if we would like to raffle it off to raise a few dollars for our selected charity—CanTeen. CanTeen is a remarkable organisation that works with kids and teenagers suffering from cancer. Our resident auctioneer, Fred Hall (DBF Tools, Melbourne), took to the stage and called on the members to bid and for suppliers to donate products or services to the pool. At $32,000, Tony Scali (No. 1 Roofing and Building Supplies in Sydney) won the auction and bought the pool of donated products. The entire $32,000 from the auction went to CanTeen along with a further $32,000 donated by CSS and yet another $4,650 donated by the individual CSS members. The grand total of $68,650

was handed over to a very happy and appreciative Ruby Hart, Victorian State Manager of CanTeen and her team down here in Melbourne. A very large thank you to Ross Wharton for his kind gesture and the following suppliers for making this wonderful outcome possible—Imex Lasers, ITW Paslode, ITW Ramset/Reid, Milwaukee Power Tools, Stanley Black & Decker, Pferd Abrasives, Nitto Kohki, Karcher, Sheffield Group, Sutton Tools, ICCONS Fasteners, Tilbury, Bordo International, Promac, Dy-Mark, Paramount Safety, IFS Pty Ltd and Brighton Best. There is a whole lot more to CSS, its members and our supplier base than meets the eye. We all appreciate your continued support of us as independent business owners and look forward to working with you in the future. If you enjoy what we have in this edition, tell others. If you don’t, please tell me. (jeff@cssgroup.com.au) Jeff Wellard

Tom Drane Racing in the USA Hi, Tom Drane here to provide a little update as to what my TDR team have been up to and where we are at. Back in May we headed across to the United States to compete in the American Flat Track Grand Nationals being held in Springfield, Illinois. My team consisted of Matt Drane (my father and owner of M D Steel Fabrications in Forbes), Darren Herrick (chief mechanic and former Australian Dirt Track National Champion) and Daniel Wicks (mechanic and current Australian Whip Cracking Champion). My aim was to compete in three different classes (65ccDTX, 85ccDTX and 85ccMOD) over a three-week period of the US Nationals and it was sensational to have a great team behind me helping me achieve the goals I’d set. When we

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got into Springfield, there were only a few days for me to get to know the bikes I was going to ride in three different classes, on a track I did not know and against kids whose racing ability and style were totally unknown to me. Daunting to say the least. Prior to the Nationals we actually signed up for an unrelated race meeting so we could test the bikes and I could get the feel of US tracks in the six-lap heat races and final which was known as the Main Event. The track consisted of right-hand turns and a large jump in the middle. Our aim was to make the Main Event, which

I did in the two classes we entered and then I actually went on to win both. On May 29 the Nationals started and my team and I were ready to do my sponsors and country proud. Over the next four days, we took on intense competition and hard work. Early starts, late finishes and hard riding were physically and mentally demanding but all of us at Team Drane enjoyed every second of the experience. At the end of the day, I placed 1st in the 65ccDTX and 85ccDTX and 2nd in the 85MOD behind fellow Aussie racer Harrison Voight. 


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Promoter is Construction Supply Specialists Pty Ltd ABN 67100073087. October promotion, Starts 01 October 2018 8:00 AM AEST and ends 31 October 2018 11:59 PM AEDT. Prize is a 15 Piece Tradie Pack valued at $999 INC GST (AUD). Prize draw at 12:00 PM AEDT on 08 November 2018. Winner notified by 15 November 2018. November promotion, Starts 01 November 2018 8:00 AM AEDT and ends 30 November 2018 11:59 PM AEDT. Prize is a Makita Outdoor Pack valued at $928 INC GST (AUD). Prize draw at 12:00 PM AEDT on 10 December 2018. Winner notified by 17 December 2018. All promotions are open to Australian Residents 16+ who fulfil the entry/eligibility requirements. All promotions are drawn at Manbrands; 71 A Grosvenor Street, South Yarra, VIC 3141. All promotions are authorised in Australia under NSW Permit Number LTPM/18/03455. For full terms & conditions go to www.constructionsupply.com.au


NEWS Tradies health in the spotlight

The cost of not looking after health and safety on site is being highlighted by new research from the Australian Physiotherapy Association. New research by the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) shows Australian tradies are more likely to take care of their tools than their own bodies. The Empirica Research survey commissioned by the APA revealed that 79 per cent of tradies report taking good care of their tools compared to just 47 per cent who took good care of their bodies. The research came out around the same time as News Ltd newspapers have been campaigning around a recent increase in cases of silicosis—a progressive, incurable condition that has been dubbed “the new asbestos”. It has even sparked calls for a national ban on dry cutting techniques in workshops. According to the APA research, nearly two thirds (64 per cent) of tradies said they had been injured in their current job and half of these said they expected to be injured again. “Many tradies are not seeking treatment or are delaying treatment until their injury becomes a much bigger and more complex issue. We know that lower back pain, knee and shoulder issues are common, yet almost a quarter (22 per cent) of tradies in our survey said they didn’t seek assistance from a health professional for their injury, which led to a longer recovery time or chronic injury,”

said APA national president Phil Calvert. Mr Calvert said a proper warm-up before work including appropriate stretching and using correct lifting techniques could help prevent injuries. “While health and safety messages are getting through—with 68 per cent saying they follow safe lifting guidelines—only 23 per cent of tradies said they warm up before they start work.” Mr Calvert said attitudes were changing slowly, given that 55 per cent of tradies still thought aches and pains were just normal for the work

they do and nearly a quarter (24 per cent) said they would think a work mate was ‘a wuss’ if they complained about an injury. “Too many tradies are living with the attitude that injuries come part and parcel with the job, but that just doesn’t have to be the case,” he said. From a management perspective, while looking after the tools is important, a recent Government report has found healthy workers are a boon to the bottom line. The healthiest workers in an organisation are almost three times more effective at their job than unhealthy workers, according to an Australian Government Comcare paper on workplace health and wellbeing programs. It states for every dollar invested by companies in workplace health programs, on average $5.81 will be returned in savings. These savings come from a range of elements including reduced staff turnover, absenteeism and workers’ compensation claims, attracting higher quality staff, as well as increased creativity, innovation and general productivity. Organisational image and fulfilling corporate social responsibilities were also cited as benefits. 

Industry upbeat Builders remain relatively upbeat despite the moderating housing market, according to the latest real time snapshot of business confidence in the building industry. Denita Wawn, CEO of Master Builders Australia, said, “The index for business confidence recorded in the latest National Survey of Building and Construction for June quarter 2018 is at 55.8, a good sign that despite the transition underway in the residential construction sector businesses are still reasonably comfortable with the current state of the industry.” “The survey covers building and construction businesses across all states and territories in Australia and across all

sectors of the building and construction industry. It is widely considered as a key source to test the temperature of the industry,” she said. “Importantly, survey respondents across both the residential and non-residential sectors expressed a positive view on current conditions in the building and construction industry. “We are in a good position where the business environment for residential and non-residential builders are both very supportive. We are also seeing early signs that better activity in places like WA and SA are beginning to add to rather than take away from the index,” she said.  CSS F.A.T. MAG 7


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NEWS

GM Holden & HSV launch new Colorado SportsCat

The new Colorado SportsCat delivers comfort and performance

GM Holden and HSV have announced the launch of the new Colorado SportsCat, a derivation of the volume-selling Colorado 4x4 Crew Cab Pick-up and the first vehicle to be produced under the new agreement struck between the two companies. Playing to HSV’s niche design and engineering capabilities, the Colorado SportsCat features a raft of styling and chassis enhancements that the company believes will position it as the most advanced sports 4x4 on the market. To be available in two variants— SportsCat and SportsCat+—the styling enhancements begin with modified exteriors featuring all-new stylish fascias and grilles that, with the addition of LED fog lamps and functional tow hooks, combine to deliver two distinctive and sporty front-end appearances. “Class-leading stature and stance, combined with bold graphics, sum up the design direction we wanted to take with the SportsCat program,” said HSV chief designer Julian Quincey. “We wanted our design to look strong and purposeful, yet beautifully integrated. We also wanted to provide some visual distinction between SportsCat and SportsCat+,” he said.

A better ride

From a chassis perspective, the modifications are marked and deliver the SportsCat’s unique driving dynamics. Both SportsCat models feature HSV Sports Suspension with the front spring rate stiffened to 110 Newtons/mm. The modification to the spring rate helps deliver a noticeable improvement in the handling characteristics of the vehicle, providing improved front-end support (less body roll) and more accurate transient response. The (MTV) dampers have been tuned to suit the revised spring rate with the overall result being a more performance-based handling characteristic. In addition to the increased spring rate, front ride height has been lifted by 25mm. This modification further improves the approach angle of the vehicle (to 32 degrees), increases ground clearance to the body and reduces the vehicle’s overall rake, delivering a more natural on-road stance. The chassis enhancements continue with the adoption of a Rear De-Coupling Anti-Roll Bar on the SportsCat+. Developed specifically for the vehicle by HSV’s chassis engineers, the de-coupling

rear sway bar improves the higher speed road driving performance of the vehicle by controlling rear roll, and thereby improving overall vehicle balance and turn-in transient response.

Best-in-class

In commenting on the engineering enhancements, HSV’s engineering director, Joel Stoddart, said, “We set ourselves some pretty aggressive targets heading into the SportsCat program. We wanted to set a benchmark for on-road driving dynamics without compromising the vehicle’s off-road performance. The adoption of the rear de-coupling anti-roll bar, combined with the improvements we’ve made to the vehicle’s driving dynamics through suspension revisions and braking upgrades, has me confident that the team has delivered.” According to HSV’s managing director, Tim Jackson, “Most Pick-up 4x4s are inherently capable off-road—and we’ll be among the best-in-class in this regard.” The SportsCat range started production at HSV’s new facility in Clayton, Victoria, in January, and is now available from any HSV dealer.  CSS F.A.T. MAG 9


NEWS

CanTeen youth ambassador Harry, who has personal experience in living with cancer

The joy of giving

A donation from CSS members will make a real difference to young people affected by cancer. Harry is a Youth Ambassador for CanTeen, the charity that supports the 23,000 young people that go through a cancer experience in Australia every year. “CanTeen became a part of my life when my Mum discovered that she had ovarian cancer,” Harry recalls. Young people between the ages of 12 and 25 often fall through the gaps when it comes to cancer care – they’re not children and they’re not quite adults. It was during this period when Harry’s family was, in his own words: “on the rocks harder than a recent shipwreck”, that they found CanTeen. As well as supporting young people aged 12-25 with cancer, CanTeen also supports those living through a family member’s cancer, a sibling’s or the death of a loved one. And it’s down to generous donations and ongoing support from local communities that can make all the difference in allowing CanTeen to roll out specialist programs that deal with everything from grief and emotions to fun activities and team building. 10 CSS F.A.T. MAG

A surprise gift

During the CSS gala dinner at our May conference in Coogee, Ross Wharton of Resource Trading in Kalgoorlie won a very select bottle of whiskey as a prize donated by Imex Lasers. He immediately asked us

if we would like to auction the bottle off to see if we could raise a few dollars for our selected charity—CanTeen. Many of the attending suppliers donated items to the ‘pool lot’. In the end Tony Scali, on behalf of No1 Roofing and Building Supplies, won with a bid of $32,000. Prior to the auction, Jeff Wellard (CSS Managing Director) announced CSS would match the winning bid dollar for dollar, so the total jumped to $64,000. In addition to this, the CSS members attending the conference donated a further $4,650 dollars which took the grand total donation to an amazing $68,650.00. Paul Davy of CSS and Fred Hall (DBF Tools) then met with Ruby Hart, Victorian State Manager of Canteen, to present the donation. They explained the auction process. They never mentioned the final bid amount but rather just handed over the cheque from No.1 Roofing and Building Supplies for the $32,000. After letting Ruby catch her breath, they handed her the second cheque. Later, Ruby wrote a letter of thanks, saying: I am still finding the right words to acknowledge the significance of the donation. These funds support us to do incredibly important work with young people dealing with cancer, and support their families when life is turned upside down. It is truly a rare experience to receive the kind of support we have from you, your team and members of CSS.  Paul Davy of CSS (front left), Ruby Hart (front, second from left), Fred Hall from DBF Tools (right) and Canteen staff celebrating the donation.


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PROFILE

One of the older houses in Marrickville, NSW, has been restored, rejuvenated and rebooted into an exceptional family home. By Kerryn Ramsey

Something old, something new 12 CSS F.A.T. MAG


A

few years ago, Neil Mackenzie—who started architecture firm Mackenzie Pronk with his partner Heidi Pronk—was regularly kayaking on the Cooks River in Marrickville, in Sydney’s Inner West. During his paddles, he would admire the quiet elegance of a row of homes overlooking a bend in the river. One day, a ‘For Sale’ sign appeared attached to the back fence, pointed towards the river. Twelve months later Mackenzie and Pronk were the proud owners of Ellerslie. Built in 1886, the house had been poorly treated over the preceding decades and was—it’s fair to say—a dump. But it was their award-winning restoration of this crumbling heritage building that has really showcased how to mix the old and new in a way that did justice to its house’s history and location. “It had been a rental property for some years and was in terrible condition,” says Mackenzie. “All the heritage features had been removed or damaged beyond repair but we could still see the grandeur of the old building. So the solution was to restore the front and add a contemporary addition to the rear.” In terms of the streetscape, Ellerslie is the oldest house on the street. The sympathetic restoration has returned the building to its glory days while allowing it to sit comfortably in its surroundings. The extension at the back is modern and makes the house completely liveable. Faux federation has been scrupulously avoided— instead new and the old flow into each other while retaining their own characteristics. Recently, Ellerslie won the 2018 Marrickville Medal for Conservation during the Inner West Council’s Built Environment Awards.

PHOTOGRAPHY: SUPPLIED

Doing it the hard way

The scope of what you can and can’t do in a heritage restoration is set out in The Burra Charter, which Mackenzie describes as “a set of standards that form the basis of how we approach heritage restorations and renovations for the past 20 years”. In the introduction to the 2013 edition,

it says, The Burra Charter advocates a cautious approach to change: do as much as necessary to care for the place and to make it useable, but otherwise change it as little as possible so that its cultural significance is retained. “When you turn up to a building like this one for the first time, it’s like it has missing teeth,” Mackenzie adds. “And half of the things that are missing aren’t manufactured anymore. But The Burra Charter sets out in really clear detail how we preserve our heritage. There are clear lines between what you can do when you’re restoring and when you’re reconstructing something.” Without any original photos of the house to guide them, Mackenzie and Pronk found themselves scouring recycled building suppliers. At one point, they drove halfway up the coast of New South Wales to find the appropriate cast iron lace balcony balustrade. The one they found was date-stamped 1886—originally built the same year as the house. “In the end, we found our best shot at getting it right was we drove around the area and found six houses that had elements that were similar to ours,” says Mackenzie. “Then we knocked on the door, talked to the owners, and I went in with a tape measure and measured things up.” The technical challenge of following The Burra Charter involves trying to retain as much as possible. At one point, Mackenzie bought tilers in to help him excavate the original front path, which had been cemented over. They looked at the 120-year-old tiles and advised him to just rip it up and start again—they could get exactly the same tiles at a place up the road. “This is like Pompeii,” he told them. “We don’t redo it. The original artifact has its own value.” As a result, he says, the tilers spent the rest of the job chuckling about the fact that they were restoring Pompeii.

The restored front of Ellerslie which has been awarded the Marrickville Medal for conservation.

The difficulty of simplicity

To keep matters simple, Mackenzie and Pronk chose a relatively economic materials palette for the two-storey, lightweight construction in the new part of the building. It’s a slab on ground, timber-framed first floor and timberframed wall construction. The external cladding is Zincalume Custom Orb combined with inset cedar cladding and cedar doors. But the simplest things are often the most difficult. The new part of the build at the rear is very contemporary and yet sits comfortably adjoined to the restored front of the 19th-century dwelling. “It was very intentional to make the new part of the house feel very contemporary,” says Pronk. “The

“All the heritage features had been removed or damaged beyond repair but we could still see the grandeur of the old building.” Neil Mackenzie, Mackenzie Pronk Architects CSS F.A.T. MAG 13


PROFILE

Left: The view through the new kitchen to the river below. Above: Looking back up past the swimming pool from the river.

original floors are Oregon timber. The floor sander said that in his 30-year career, he had never seen Oregon flooring. We mirrored the tone and hue of the original floor in the new section so that there’s a connection.” One technically difficult aspect for the builders was raising the steel portal frame on one end. The trim on the edge was the big steel angle around the outside that the architects had drawn as a 150 angle. “It’s pretty heavy but we thought two blokes could carry it,” says Mackenzie. “The builders convinced us a 200 angle would look better but a piece of 200 angle that’s six metres high needed a crane. “That was one of those moments in a project that everyone had to maintain a good humor and understand some things would cost more to achieve. You had to admire the crane driver’s skill, backing down into the driveway.”

Marrying old and new

“We always tell our clients, if at all possible, move out,” says Pronk. “Because if you stay, you’ll go a bit spare. We decided to ignore our own good advice and lived in the house 14 CSS F.A.T. MAG

Building team Builders Morgan & Civil P/L: Tycho & Jim Lethbridge Wilred Constructions: Bill Wilson D2 Constructions: Frank Daniele Make Projects: Tom Hulme Seymour Building: Anthony Seymour Architect Mackenzie Pronk Architects Project Team: Neil Mackenzie, Heidi Pronk, Kitty Lee Engineer BVG Consultants—Brent Guest

through the entire renovation. At one stage we were cooking on a little camp stove on the front balcony.” The finished house marries the best of the old and the new. While the front of the house embraces the original elements, such as fireplaces, cornices and period tiles, the modern kitchen includes a plywood surface finish. “We

like it because it’s not a compressed product; it’s an actual timber product which is rather robust,” says Pronk. “Joiners are a bit cautious when it comes to large pieces of ply but it’s worth taking this on. It’s great when you cut and display its edge so you can see the plywood edges.” When it comes to major renovations, the key is communication between the architect, the builder and the owner. “All our projects are a team effort,” says Mackenzie. “Often we will take advice from our builders on the best way to get something done. I’ve worked in offices where there is a sometime combative culture towards tradespeople and it always ends badly. Our practice is the complete opposite—we enjoy and appreciate a respectful working relationship with all our builders and tradespeople. The end result is undoubtedly better because of that.” Pronk recalls, “Interestingly, there were no controls on the old building. We could have demolished everything and put in a big house with an ugly garage. Obviously, it was never on our agenda—we saw its potential and beauty. Ellerslie is our home now.” 


MEMBERS IN ACTION

Building a better business

Two CSS member businesses, Ultimate Fasteners and Kencor Sales, have joined forces to provide a wider range of products—and a wider range of customers. By Merran White

W

hen your business is selling essential but low-unit-cost industrial hardware in regional areas, you need to find ways to expand your market while satisfying existing customers. This is what CSS member companies Ultimate Fasteners and Kencor Sales hope to achieve with their new ImpactA-branded business in Bendigo’s CBD. The new business is the brainchild of Mark Shanahan and Dean Jones of Shepparton-based Ultimate Fasteners, and Peter Corstorphin, cofounder-director of long-established construction-supply company Kencor Sales and manager of its Bendigo branch, established in 2002. “We service the construction industry

16 CSS F.A.T. MAG

with all sorts of bolts and fasteners; we’ve been doing it for 26 years,” says Corstorphin. “Our Bendigo branch is a smaller part of our operation that always just ebbs and flows a bit. The boys at Ultimate service the engineering and bolt market. By joining forces with them, we’re putting a different outlook on our business.” Ultimate Fasteners supplies engineering and construction trades, manufacturing and maintenance companies across Victoria’s Goulburn Valley with a vast range of industrial fasteners—hex bolts in mild and high-tensile steel, dynabolts, selfdrilling screws, rivets, washers, screw bolts, high-load bolt fixings and chemical anchoring—as well as fixings, abrasives and tools.

“Kencor are heavily into the construction side of things: on-site silicones, sealants, grouts, that sort of stuff. We add in the nuts and bolts,” says Jones. “Ultimate is buying into Kencor to form Impact-A. Together, we’re trying to offer a total package.”

The nuts and bolts of the deal

The Impact-A collaboration was first mooted about two years ago when Shanahan and Jones met up with Corstorphin at an industry networking event. “The idea came out of conversations we had at a CSS conference with Peter about his business in Bendigo, and where it was and where it was heading,” recalls Jones. “We decided, out of


“It’s about convenience to customers and [keeping abreast of the] competition, basically— diversifying. We only just started but I think it’s going to be a really good move.” Peter Corstorphin, co-founder-director, Kencor Sales

Above and below: Inside the new Impact-A store in Bendigo.

that conversation, that it might be good to join forces. “It took about 18 months of chatting about how we’d put it together and what we’d do,” Jones adds. “Obviously, then, you’ve gotta go through the process. But once we got serious, it all took shape pretty quickly.”

Expanding the market

Not only will the amalgamation mean a more comprehensive product range, it also expands each business’s

customer base, with Kencor Sales gaining users in the engineering and agricultural markets and Ultimate Fasteners benefiting from Kencor’s construction trades clientele. “We’ve widened our range of products but the main change is we’ll be servicing a different market,” Corstorphin says. “The original Kencor was very much constructionfocused, whereas Impact-A will also be catering to farmers who previously wouldn’t have paid any attention to us but can now come in and buy, say, three bolts for a tractor.” Impact-A will raise the profile of both businesses in the region, Corstorphin contends. “It’s a new outlook for us, but now we won’t be as reliant on the ebbs and flows of construction. And we should pick up a lot of new business.” Kencor will benefit more from market expansion than will Ultimate, says Jones, but both companies stand to gain from the collaboration. “Doing this [will] help us push into some markets we haven’t had before,” he says. “And it’s the first time two CSS members have come together to make something different that works for  both of us.”

Keeping customers happy

The joint venture is a triple-win for Kencor, Ultimate and their clients, says Corstorphin. “It’s about convenience to customers and [keeping abreast of the] competition, basically—diversifying. We only just started but we’re hoping for positive outcomes!” Jones sees plenty of upside to the new business, including “more things available” and a brand-new retail premises. “Kencor had been in the same Bendigo premises for 10 years, so it’s a new lease of life for those guys,” he says. As for how Impact-A will resonate with customers, he says, “It’s too early to tell, but I’m expecting the feedback will be positive—that customers will love it. I think it’s going to be a really good move, for Kencor and us.”

CSS: helping bolt the new business together

Impact-A is a wholly owned subsidiary of CSS, and the organisation is integral to the new venture, say its founders. “Peter’s a founding member and UF’s been a member for 10 years,” Jones explains. “CSS helps us with buying power in the industry, suppliers, promotional gear and, as members, with our reputability.” Corstorphin says CSS backing gives the new business a solid foundation. “CSS owns the Impact-A trademark— the new identity we’ll use—and is promoting the brand,” he says. “Because it’s CSS-backed, that adds to its credibility. It’s not that wellknown yet—but it will be. “The idea is that eventually we’ll be able to put it into all our stores,” he continues. “It will be up to the various member outlets as to whether to extend to include Impact-A products, but if it’s successful [in Bendigo], it will be in their interests to do so.” 

CSS F.A.T. MAG 17


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GOOD ADVICE

It’s the responsibility of a site occupier to ensure stored dangerous goods are labelled correctly.

Safe storage of dangerous goods

It can seem costly and maybe even excessive, but good housekeeping is critical when it comes to dangerous goods. By Meg Crawford

A

ustralian workplace health and safety laws require that businesses identify and eliminate the risks associated with dangerous goods as far as possible, but it’s easier said than done in the construction industry where dangerous goods are not only prevalent but necessary. With that in mind, one of the next rungs down the legislative ladder is the requirement for occupiers to store dangerous goods safely. But what does that mean?

KNOW WHAT YOU’VE GOT Luckily, dangerous goods are easy to

identify in Australia because they’re required by law to be labelled as such with coloured diamonds specifying the nature of the substance. Further, since the introduction of United Nation’s Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), the symbols are now internationally standardised. In general terms, dangerous goods are defined and labelled as corrosive, oxidising, flammable, combustible, explosive and water-reactive substances—their danger lying in the fact that they carry the potential for damage (possibly catastrophic) to person, property and environment.

In a construction context, common types of dangerous goods include flammable liquids (including petrol, kerosene, turpentine and flammable paints), corrosives (specifically, hydrochloric acid), flammable gases (most frequently LP gas), nonflammable non-toxic gases (like CO2), asbestos and explosives.

KNOW AND OBSERVE YOUR STORAGE OBLIGATIONS

The management of dangerous goods varies from substance to substance. For instance, some require physical separation from other substances, while CSS F.A.T. MAG 19


GOOD ADVICE

others require certain types of venting. Keep in mind that while vendors can provide generic advice about how to store them, it falls back on the occupier or person using the dangerous goods to make sure that they’re storing them safely and lawfully. “Each employer and business is still responsible for assessing the storage of their dangerous goods, including logging and listing the goods, noting how much and what types they have, how and where they’re stored and familiarising themselves with the regulations,” says Clive Barker, Pratt Safety’s technical manager (now a subsidiary of Paramount Safety). “It’s your responsibility to know whether you’re complying with the regulations. Shrugging your shoulders and saying you didn’t know just isn’t an excuse.” Global Spill Control, which has nearly 30 years’ experience in providing Australian-manufactured storage solutions for dangerous goods ranging from safety cabinets and aerosol cages through to bottle cages and bunding, has a broad philosophy, which sums up the very point of dangerous good storage. “It’s what we call the ‘three Cs’,” says Global Spill Control director and partner Brad Lowson. “Capture, contain and the final C is to clean up. You don’t want to let the genie get out of the bottle.”

SEGREGATE YOUR DANGEROUS GOODS

According to Lowson, it’s all too frequent for workplaces to overstuff dangerousgoods storage units, with little regard for what’s being stored and beside what. “There’s segregation that needs to be employed,” he says. “People cut corners and not realise, for instance, that you shouldn’t store an oxidising agent with a corrosive substance. You might get a spill from one and a drip into the tray from the other and when you mix the two together they’re highly volatile. You really need to sort and store things by compatibility.” While this might seem like common sense, Barker has also observed alarming practices, citing examples ranging from rags used to wipe down flammable liquid spills being thrown into 20 CSS F.A.T. MAG

Managing access to dangerous goods is fundamental to successful storage.

“Each employer and business is still responsible for assessing the storage of their dangerous goods, including logging and listing the goods.” Clive Barker, technical manager, Pratt Safety a dump-master, generating heat under their own weight, self-combusting and burning down a workplace, through to solvents being used like water. “I can think of plenty of examples where workplaces have burned down simply through poor management of dangerous goods,” he says. “People become complacent about the nature of what those chemicals are.”

MEET THE STANDARDS

The importance of buying storage that meets the relevant Australian standards is obvious. That said, not all products

that meet the standards are made equal. Lowson harkens back to a horror story where a company had an outdoor bund (made by another company) that buckled after exposure to unrelenting sun. Global Spill Control’s products, in contrast, are engineered and independently tested in conditions that simulate the high ambient temperatures like those in Queensland and Western Australia. “We can look people in the eye and say our products won’t fail,” Lowson reflects.

MANAGE ACCESS

There’s a security aspect in all of this too: dangerous goods are classed that way for a reason. They’re a hazard, which makes it all the more important to ensure that untrained staff and unauthorised personnel are denied access. “If you’ve properly locked up a very aggressive chemical in a cabinet and the appropriate person has a key, it means that when Scooter wants to get in the cabinet he’s going to have to ask for access, and without good reason, he’s not going to get it,” says Lowson. 


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SUPPLIER PROFILE

A selection of Global Spill Control’s product range.

Keeping it clean For nearly 30 years, Global Spill Control has focused on investing in business and delivering quality products that can weather changing markets and trends. By Sue Nelson

W

hat does it take to survive and thrive as a business over many decades? In Global Spill Control’s case, it was an entrepreneurial spirit and a healthy curiosity for the way the world works. Back in 1991, Rob Watson, who started the business, was curious about the vast number of oil spills that had occurred during the first Iraq War—particularly, how this mess could be cleaned up. He investigated further and discovered oil and fuel absorbent mats, which readily absorb hydrocarbons like oil and diesel and repel water like quicksilver.

At around the same time, environmental laws in Australia were starting to change, and there was a greater focus on regulation. Watson recognised that this was the right point in history to enter the market with a product that could address spills, and this recognition helped establish the spill industry in Australia. “Rob is a classic entrepreneur and a lateral thinker,” says Brad Lowson, Watson’s partner in the business for the past eight years. “He brings a creative flair to the business that has made it what it is today.” Lowson, who bought out his father-in-law in 2011, brings a keen business acumen honed in

corporate finance roles for big Australian companies. Together, their skills perfectly complement each other.

Keeping Global local

The company has survived and thrived through the changing fortunes of time, with a staff of over 100 employees and a vast range of high-quality custom safety and spill equipment. Lowson sheets this success home to remaining fiercely Australian, manufacturing these products here rather than offshore. The east-coast manufacturing business merged with its Perth-based sister company three years ago, at the back end of the mining boom. CSS F.A.T. MAG 23


SUPPLIER PROFILE

This merger provided the opportunity for Global Spill Control to diversify its product range and move into the safety product space, adding a vast range of manufactured items to its product suite—from PPE and signs to safety cabinets and road signs. Global Spill Control also manufactures or supplies niche items such as aerosol cages and protective clothing— from asbestos grade all the way to Type 1 gas-tight hazmat emergency response suits. “We have diversified quite significantly,” says Lowson. “Margins have eroded following the mining boom in WA and Queensland, and it’s a crowded space. But we are able to customise products to ensure they comply with the strictest safety standards—and we export too.” Around 18 months ago Global Spill Control became a supply partner to the CSS Group. “We needed a specialised supplier for the storage of dangerous goods and management of spill containment, as our store’s

“We don’t believe customers should have to pay more for Australian made products. We’re highly efficient, we vertically integrate and do almost everything ourselves in house.” Brad Lowson, Global Spill Control customers were requesting solutions in these areas due to the enforcement of regulations. Global Spill Control was a perfect fit—not only were they an Australian manufacture, they had expert knowledge, great support and capability of supply,” says Paul Davy, CSS Group marketing manager. Not long after the merger, the

company received a significant government grant, committing it to creating local manufacturing jobs. The car industry was in free fall and the government wanted to assist car workers to move to new jobs. The terms of the grant included a number of new positions and jobs and increased Global Spill Control’s overheads by over $2 million per annum. “We invested millions of dollars in new manufacturing capability within Australia,” says Lowson. “We have created jobs in Australian manufacturing—we employ a lot of people in Melbourne in a range of manufacturing roles. In three years we’ve doubled the size of the east coast business. “We don’t believe customers should have to pay more for Australian-made products. We’re highly efficient, we vertically integrate and do almost everything ourselves in house. There’s no subcontracting and leakage of costs,

DUST EXTRACTION

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Left: Brad Lowson of Global Spill Control. Above: Containing the mess.

so we can compete quite comfortably with imported Chinese goods. “These are changing times. Until recently it was all about price but we’ve seen that the market is sick and tired of cheap rubbish. People want things to work as they expect them to, and they’re finding that doesn’t cost them more” Lowson adds. “We have 30 years behind us, so there is a lot of implicit trust in our brand. If we say something is going to have a 200-micron paint coat, it does—no

less and probably more. If we say it is going to be 2mm, it will be 2mm.”

acting first and asking questions later.” Ultimately, Global Spill Control’s success is based on its resilience to change. “During the mining boom, we saw the ebbs and flows of business cycles and we knew this time of prosperity was going to be an aberration rather than the norm,” says Lowson. “So while others were spending money, we were saving and reinvesting capital in our products and staff. We’ve got great people, great products and a great business.” 

Surviving the boom

This reputation for responsiveness and integrity was called upon during the oil spill off the coast of New Zealand seven years ago. “Containers were falling off the ship and the situation was rapidly worsening,” says Lowson. “We sent emergency supplies over to New Zealand—a lot of it was agreed over the phone and we sent the supplies in trust,

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Don’t risk unsecured hazardous chemicals at work! 27/07/2018 9:59:35 AM CSS F.A.T. MAG 25


COVER STORY

Alex Davison (left) and his brother Will have teamed up with Milwaukee Racing to tackle the Enduro Cup.

26 CSS F.A.T. MAG


They say the family that plays together stays together. Two of Australia’s best drivers will put it to the test as ‘brothers-inarms’ in this year’s endurance races. By Liz Swanton

Brothers in arms S

ome bucket list wishes are relatively simple to fulfil, while others depend on a mix of luck and hard work. Will and Alex Davison share two wishes. The brothers grew up in racing, mainly against each other. Competing together has always been on their bucket list. They have twice tackled the Australian enduro season together. This year they can again tick off Item One as they team up for the three rounds that make up the Pirtek Enduro Cup—Sandown 500, Bathurst 1000 and Gold Coast 600. The second shared bucket list item is a win, or at least a podium place, with Bathurst the preferred venue. They finished fourth at ‘The Mountain’ in 2014. Will is no stranger to the podium with others, especially at Mt

Panorama: there was third in 2007 with Steven Johnson, a win in 2009 with Garth Tander and again in 2016 with Jonathon Webb, but a podium with his brother—and his new team—is this year’s goal. “It’s special to drive together and we love doing it,” says Will, a Supercars series regular, this year in the Milwaukee Tools-sponsored 23RedRacing Team Ford. “A few years have passed since we last drove together and you wonder if you will get another opportunity. Not only is it cool to be doing this with my brother, I am doing it with one of the best co-drivers on the grid.”

Motorsport before Phil Munday bought the team’s licence to create 23Red Racing. Will told him to take the drive, with no idea he himself would join the team. “Alex got to know Phil who was sponsoring Lucas’ team. As soon as I signed with Phil, we started talking about co-drivers and he mentioned Alex before I did. “That was really special. I wouldn’t expect him to do it just because Alex is my brother, but we both wanted the best co-driver we could get and that happens to be Alex.”

JOINING THE TEAM

The co-driver’s role is a tough one. They play second fiddle to the lead driver, but they need to be able to match that driver’s pace to ensure the car stays in contention. They also need

Ironically, Alex Davison was effectively driving for the team before his younger brother signed up. Alex drove the enduros in 2017 for Lucas Dumbrell

KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY

CSS F.A.T. MAG 27


COVER STORY

“Alex is a perfectionist, a real detail guy, whereas I am much more cruisey, but we bounce well off each other and we can make good compromises.” Will Davison, 23Red Racing

Lucky 13

to keep out of trouble so the car is faultless when it is time for Number One to return to the wheel. Match fitness is vital, but it can be difficult for co-drivers to pick up enough racing during the season to stay up to speed. Not so for the older Davison. Alex is contesting the 201819 World Endurance Championship, and some Porsche Carrera Cup races when he is home. October will be particularly hectic, with a race in Japan the weekend 28 CSS F.A.T. MAG

between Bathurst and the Gold Coast. Race-sharp would be a perfect description for this co-driver, and while the WEC cars are very different, Alex also has a huge amount of Supercar experience. He has contested every race at Mt Panorama since 2004 (aside from 2016) and spent several seasons full-time in the series. “Doing endurance racing all year gets you used to long stints in the car,” Alex says. “All the WEC races are 1000km, so it will feel normal, like my regular weekends. We won’t have a massive advantage because there are many experienced co-drivers, but it will give us a slight edge because of the number of hours I’m doing, and the fact I am so used to long stints.”

LEARNING TO SHARE

Between driver stints are pit stops, the make or break of a result. The 23RedRacing team is constantly practising—refuels, wheels, brake pad changes, driver swaps. Will says it is the mix of professionalism, mutual respect and brotherly understanding that helps them work so well together. “Alex is a perfectionist, a real detail guy, whereas I am much more cruisey, but we bounce well off each other and we can make good compromises.” His brother agrees, saying their

differences and their similarities are what make their relationship so strong, personally and professionally. “We are different and we work quite differently, but we work together well,” says Alex. “We’ve always been each other’s biggest fans, even when we were competing against each other in Supercars. We want to see each other do well, and we want a good result, for the team and for us.”

THE DREAM TEAM

As soon as 23RedRacing launched this year, the Milwaukee Tools’ sponsorship was announced. The heavy-duty power tool manufacturing company has been a long-time sponsor of different sports but was keen to focus on one to maximise its activities. “We’re excited about the synergies we have with 23Red Racing and eager to see what the partnership will bring,” says Milwaukee Tools’ managing director Mike Brendle. So, can everyone’s dreams come true this year? “I’m not making speeches, but obviously a podium together is the fairytale,” Will says. “With endurance races, it takes extra preparation and patience and clean racing and being on the pace—and a bit of luck on the day. I think we can string together some good results.” 

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF 23RED RACING

Up until this year, Alex Davison had done something no other driver on the circuit had achieved. He had finished every one of his first 12 Great Race starts. That looked to end as he was headed into last year’s event. He was in a backmarker car, with a 17-year-old rookie co-driver, facing very difficult conditions. The team looked at their situation, and asked Davison to do most of the driving. The result? Davison and regular driver Alex Rullo came home a good 15th. Against expectations, Davison’s wonderful reliability record had stayed intact.


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YOUR BUSINESS

You don’t need a massive marketing budget to build your small business. But you do need a little know-how and the right marketing strategy in place. Here’s how to get started. By Shane Conroy

The tradies’ guide to marketing

W

hen it comes to the wide world of marketing, a lot of jargon gets thrown around. You can safely ignore most of it, but there is one important concept you need to understand in order to build an effective marketing strategy that will get results for your small business. And that’s the difference between paid and organic traffic. Think of it like this: winning new business in the digital age is all about driving as many potential customers—or ‘traffic’—to your website as you can. You can either do this through placing ads that you pay for, or have people find you ‘organically’ through a free Google search.

CSS F.A.T. MAG 31


YOUR BUSINESS

TO PAY OR NOT TO PAY

Declan Reynolds is the director of Melbourne-based digital marketing agency, iformat, that specialises in marketing for tradies. He says the most effective channels are paid and organic marketing techniques, but you must understand how they fit into your overall marketing strategy. “The best thing about placing paid ads through a platform like Google AdWords is that it generates immediate work for your business,” he says. “Your ad pops up on Google when customers do a relevant search, it sends them straight to your website, and they book a job. You can turn on paid ads when you need more work, and switch it off when you’re busy. “Organic search, on the other hand, is a much longer-term strategy. It’s about building your ranking on search engines like Google so your business appears up the top of a Google search. It takes time as the trade-

32 CSS F.A.T. MAG

based markets are very competitive, but it’s essential for growing your business in the long-term without having to constantly pump money into paid advertising. “For example, we work with an electrician who currently ranks in first place on Google for 91 different search phrases. That has taken about two-and-a-half years to achieve, but it has been essential to the growth of his business.”

CLIMBING GOOGLE’S RANKS

Trent Dyball, creative director of ManBrands, expands on the topic. “It is dangerous to run campaigns in isolation. Any truly successful digital campaign will have a mixture of paid advertising and organic activity. The end goal is to drive potential customers to your website. “Your website is the centre of your digital universe. It’s the one place that houses all the relevant information

about your business and once there, potential customers are close to making a purchase decision. “It is critical your website is easy to navigate, mobile friendly, has multiple calls to action and is updated regularly. Regular updates are critical to not only engage visitors, but to improve your organic ranking in Google.” “For Google to continue to dominate as the preeminent search engine, it needs to quickly deliver the most current, accurate and interesting content to users who are completing a search,” Dyball says.

CONTENT IS KING

As a part of their organic ranking process, Google frequently reviews the content of your site to see how recently new content has been added. Dyball says that content you publish on your website, such as regular blog articles, isn’t all about converting your website visitors to customers,


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YOUR BUSINESS

Instagram and LinkedIn, they will be more likely to click on your business when it is served up on a Google search engine results page (SERP),” adds Dyball. “Good content should travel everywhere, so once you have your blogs or news articles posted to your website, don’t forget to push them out across all your social media platforms.”

THE SECRET TO SOCIAL

Sophie Hall, marketing co-ordinator at Melbourne-based Gallant Plumbing, agrees that posting regular content is vital to ranking highly in Google searches. “We post between one and three blog articles on our website every week,” she says. “Posting expert knowledge helps us to build credibility with our website visitors. It’s also important to include keywords in your blog articles that people are likely to use when searching for your service.” Hall also uses social media as part

of her marketing strategy for Gallant Plumbing, but says it’s important to understand where to spend money and where to invest time into building your organic following. “Facebook is more of a pay-toplay platform, for example. If you post something on your businesses Facebook page that has a sales focus, Facebook will likely decrease the amount of people who see it. But if you pay for it to be a sponsored post, then Facebook will prioritise it and push it out to more people.” Hall uses a free online platform called ‘Later’ to manage her social media posts, and tends to spend about 30 minutes each day engaging with her community. “I also sit down every Monday to assess the performance of my previous week’s posts and create and schedule posts for the week ahead. You quickly develop an understanding of which content works for your business.” 

CO M

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but should rather focus on providing information that visitors to your website will find valuable. Obviously, there is a cost in developing content, and this needs to be weighed up against paid advertising, search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimisation (SEO). “SEM gives instant results as your advertisement will appear directly against the selected search term,” Dyball says. “The challenge is that this can get expensive fast, especially if you’re bidding on popular search terms. Without a supporting SEO strategy, many businesses can become addicted to SEM if it’s their only source of website traffic.” Social media also plays an important role in any digital campaign as it can both drive web traffic and influence behaviours in Google. “If you have been actively engaging potential customers on social media platforms such as Facebook,


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Otter Industrial Zip-Fixx Screw with split thread and EPDM weather seal washer, designed for fixing roofing & cladding sheeting to timber or metal.

FEATURES • • • •

Quick and easy installation Split thread for extra grip EPDM weather seal washer Drilling range into metal from 0.55 - 1.9mm • Class 4 galvanised coating • 5/16 Hex Nutsetter required

1819a Marketed and Distributed by Airco Fasteners Pty Ltd ABN 94 068 705 699

CSS F.A.T. MAG 35


next break thoughr is here

Milwaukee Tool is proud to announce The Next Breakthrough in lithium-ion and M18™ with the introduction of their most capable battery ever – the M18™ REDLITHIUM-ION™ HIGH OUTPUT 12.0Ah Battery. The new 12.0Ah Battery delivers 50% more power, runs 50% cooler, and provides 33% more run-time than their powerful 9.0Ah battery – significantly elevating the performance of the entire M18™ System.

The M18 HIGH OUTPUT 12.0Ah battery utilises new-to-world cell technology that provides a massive leap in the overall power and capabilities of the pack. To take full advantage of the high-power cells, Milwaukee® advanced the power delivery system and communication in the pack electronics, driving system compatibility*.

In addition, this massive increase in power made it critical that Milwaukee® minimised heat generation through lower impedance cells and optimised pack construction. This results in the pack running 50% cooler than the 9.0Ah battery, so users can work harder and longer than ever before without the need to worry about overheating the pack.

The advanced pack design of the HIGH OUTPUT 12.0Ah battery also makes it the best cold-weather performing pack ever made, able to operate in extreme weather conditions (-28°C) during heavy applications.

These advancements will help deliver maximum performance on a range of new M18 FUEL™ products, as well as elevate the performance of the entire M18™ system, providing faster application speeds and fade-free power through the full discharge.

When working in collaboration with the POWERSTATE™ Brushless Motor and REDLINK PLUS™ Intelligence, the HIGH OUTPUT™ 12.0Ah battery delivers 33% more run-time than the 9.0Ah battery and more work-per-charge of any other professional power tool battery in the industry – finally bringing to fruition a complete corded replacement on the jobsite.

Milwaukee® is committed to improving productivity by providing performance-driven and trade-focused solutions so users can perform an entire day’s work on one battery system. The M18™ System includes more than 150 tools and is a true testament to Milwaukee’s focus on investing in technology to deliver breakthrough solutions for users.

36 CSS F.A.T. MAG

In addition to the launch of the 12.0Ah battery, Milwaukee® will also introduce the M18™ REDLITHIUM-ION™ HIGH OUTPUT Extended Capacity 6.0Ah battery – providing 50% more power, running, 50% cooler, and delivering 20% more run-time than the widely popular M18™ REDLITHIUM-ION™ Extended Capacity 5.0Ah Battery.


*vs. Milwaukee® M18™ Redlithium-ion™ 5.0Ah

®

CSS F.A.T. MAG 37


ADVERTORIAL

The Better Bit

H

ave you ever asked yourself, “Why have three or four different sized countersinking bits for all those different screws? There’s got to be something that’s versatile and user-friendly enough to make countersinking easier!” Welcome “The Better Bit”! It’s a new intuitive way to pre-drill and countersink your decking boards. Extensive market research and prototype field testing has led to the development of a breakthrough countersinking tool. An ICCONS original with features and benefits that will save you time and alleviate the need to carry excessive countersinking tools and drill bits all to do the one job. The Better Bit is unique due to a fully customisable depth stop ensuring the screw head is flush every time. The result? A mega looking deck!! It is as simple as adjusting the depth collar

to the correct height and spinning the locking ring down, allowing you to easily make adjustments throughout the drilling and screwing process of laying decking boards. We have developed a countersinking tool suitable to 8, 10 and 12-gauge screws. We also have an application specific model that is suitable to a 14-gauge screw. The Better Bit means you only need two countersinking bits for every decking screw! That’ll get any chippy chompin’ to lay some deck! The Better Bit has: l A ¼” driver suitable to both impact drivers and drill drivers. l Twin low friction spin bearings, keeping the countersink stable whilst drilling. l Adjustable countersinking depths without the need for hex keys or screw drivers. l A dual function rotating stop collar

THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER

designed with engineered o-ring to prevent those dreaded surface marks. l Three long-life countersinking blades, designed to cut perfectly. Especially for hard wood applications. l AND … each and every Better Bit comes with two replaceable pilot drill bits that are designed for high-speed repetitive use. Here at ICCONS we are always striving to think outside the box. Changing the fundamental way we use countersinking tools shows at ICCONS we mean business. The Better Bit: a smarter solution! 

New laser packages! Even better value for money Choose a package to suit: Dry battery or rechargeable Premium options with Topcon LS-100D mm receiver

Industry-leading reliability and accuracy Topcon 5 year warranty Find your nearest reseller: 1300 96 LASER www.topconlaser.com.au 38 CSS F.A.T. MAG


ADVERTORIAL

H.B. Fuller Polyurethane Sealants

W

hen you need a sealant that’s going to last, polyurethane (PU) is a well proven technology that has been used with great success for many years. H.B. Fuller’s FulaFlex™ polyurethane sealants offer excellent durability, flexibility and high bond strength. Coupled with both UV and weather resistance they are ideal for most construction applications— delivering performance and reliability without compromise. FulaFlex™ 550LM is a low modulus, Class-A, PU sealant with excellent flexibility and elasticity

(±35%). Compatible with almost any construction substrate it is perfect for expansion joints in precast concrete and masonry; as a water-proofing bond breaker and where a significant level of movement is expected. FulaFlex™ 570FC is a fast curing PU sealant that can also be used as an adhesive. It is suitable for trafficable joints—both foot and vehicle—and saw cuts. At ±25% it’s slightly less flexible than its brother FulaFlex 550LM and with a higher hardness rating, it is pick resistant which is great for schools, public spaces, even prisons. Polyurethane sealants will not shrink or slump in the joint, are highly flexible,

hard wearing and weather resistant. They remain permanently flexible and can be painted once cured. They bond to almost any construction material from brick, masonry and concrete to metals, timber and glass. FulaFlex™ PU sealants are also low in VOC (volatile organic compounds) which satisfies the requirements for the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). In addition to the existing sausage packs, both FulaFlex™ 550LM and 570FC are now available in 310ml cartridges in white, grey and black colours.  For more information contact your local CSS Member store.

A simple solution for temporary hand rails

Safety Boot A re-usable, cost effective base for constructing free-standing temporary guardrails. - Complies with requirements of AS4994.1 & AS4994.3 - Easy set up and take down - Can be used on most base materials

CSS F.A.T. MAG 39


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ACROSS 1. Least fatty 5. Covered cart 9. Slack 12. Layabouts 16. Elicit 17. Surgical dressing 18. Cleans (carpet) 20. Ashamed 22. Restraining cord 23. Swimming stroke 24. Fruit pastes 26. Tempting 27. Fragile 28. Gossips (6-7) 31. Furious 32. Persist 34. Mark of disgrace 36. Luau souvenir 37. Stealthy thieves (3,8) 40. Major computer firm (1,1,1) 42. Supply (entertainment) (3,2) 43. Leaks slowly 45. Comes before 47. Domestic helpers 49. Dud car 50. Deviates 52. Set of beliefs 54. Happen 55. Nips 56. Relaxation routine 58. Dethrone from 59. Promotional hype 60. Hovel 61. Narrow part of bottle 62. Lingered (on) 63. Plant, ... vera 64. Pure 67. Hurt 68. Facet 69. Jumpier 72. Lingerie item 74. State grants 78. Drily humorous 79. Olympic Games body (1,1,1) 80. In vogue, ... mode (1,2) 81. Granule 82. Fencing blades 85. Dessert, ... pie 87. Follow next 88. Slippery fish 90. Sweethearts’ card 91. Dues 92. Eccentric pop star, Lady ... 93. Baghdad citizen 94. Better late than ... 95. Skim swiftly 96. Home stereo (2-2) 97. Creamy cheese 100. Sigh of relief 102. No-man’s-land 103. Go for dip

104. Study tables 106. Surmise 108. December 31, New Year’s ... 109. Crony 110. Mum & ... 112. Merriment 116. Graze 118. Appraised 120. Apparel 121. Scan 123. Chesty gasp 125. Origin 126. Dapper 127. Alcoholic derelict 128. 12 o’clock 129. Heredity DNA units 130. Ellipse shapes 131. Jaunty 132. Small bell sounds 134. Most socially popular group (1,4) 136. Wise people 139. Indestructible 141. Section 142. Excursions 144. Chile’s capital 146. Sibling’s daughter 147. Adds seasoning to 148. Flit (about) 149. Opponents 151. ... & outs 152. Counterfeiter 155. Zimbabwe’s largest city 158. Welsh dog 159. Moody 162. Misgivings 164. Cracked on surface 165. Up on ahead 166. Discards 170. Port-au-Prince is there 171. Robben Island detainee, Nelson ... 172. Advantage 173. Olive farm 174. Local dialect 175. Broke promise 176. Backslide 177. Vacuous 178. Abominates DOWN 1. Disconnect from the internet (3,3) 2. March birthstone 3. Showed by example 4. Inns 5. Bowler’s goals 6. Insect larva 7. Twig shelter 8. Ambitious person (2-6) 9. Frond 10. Acceptable 11. Totally deplete

12. Accommodating 13. Loyalties 14. Assessing 15. Realm 19. Is obliged to 21. Stain on character 25. TV comedy series 26. Teaching session 29. Sexual drive 30. Rudder bar 33. In so far (as) 35. Unpalatable 36. Miming to prerecorded lyrics (3-7) 38. Word puzzles 39. Nomadic 41. Misinterpret 42. Shank 44. Take a chair 46. Barbiturate 48. Frowns 49. Soothed 51. Thin layer 53. Mistrustfully 55. Cricket legend, Sir Donald ... 57. Abdominal muscles 60. Used spade 65. Composition 66. Steak cut (1-4) 70. Dutch sea walls 71. Whiskey-laced hot beverage (5,6) 73. Rescued by helicopter 75. Fertiliser compound 76. Lifeless 77. Biblical garden 78. Animal’s drinking pool 83. Eject from house 84. Goo 85. Wrote in icing 86. Dollars & ... 89. Country, ... Lanka 91. Scarcely any 92. Roaming frivolously 96. Mob 98. Throat-clearing noise 99. Riding strap 101. Span 103. Chides 105. Spreads out untidily 107. Refusals 111. Nimble 112. Descended rock-face by rope 113. Elementary 114. Slightest 115. Cross 117. Aroused 119. Decimal base 120. Staring 122. Tragedy 124. Extrasensory perception (1,1,1)

132. Dealing illegally 133. Granny 134. Agree 135. International cycling event, ... France (4,2) 137. Butane or neon 138. Actor’s dilemma (5,6) 140. Not to excess, in ... 141. Petrified 143. Flounce 145. Moving cartoons 150. Bus terminals 153. Obtained more weapons 154. Timeless 156. In a distant manner 157. Reviewed (ledger) 158. Code 160. Orange skin 161. Zilch 163. Braces (oneself) 166. Light 4WD army vehicle 167. Story 168. Orchestra woodwind 169. Trim

Sudoku 

Sudoku 

© Lovatts Puzzles

TOP WORDS 1004 © Lovatts Puzzles

CSS F.A.T. MAG 41


SOLUTIONS

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31/7/18 3:32 pm


8-18MM 5/16-3/4" CHAMFER AND DE-BURR BOLTS, PIPE, THREADED ROD, BAR & DOWELS. M2-HSS FOR EXTREME TOOL LIFE. Create a perfect chamfer on ferrous and non-ferrous metals including hardened steels, timber, fibreglass and plastics.

✔ MILD STEEL ✔ HARD STEEL ✔ VERY HARD STEEL ✔ STAINLESS STEEL ✔ SUPER HARD STEEL

U.S. Grade 2, Metric Grade 4.8 U.S. Grade 5, Metric Grade 8.8 U.S. Grade 8, Metric Grade 10.9 300 Series

U.S. Grade ASTM-A574, Metric Grade 12.9

CSS F.A.T. MAG 43


CSS STORE LOCATIONS These stores might all be independent traders, but due to their alliance with the CSS group, over 90 stores nationally, they work as a collective and

CSS member stores are recognised by their ‘Proud Member of CSS sign’ displayed on their building. Be rest assured that the business displaying the sign is a trusted distributor of quality products that are backed by exceptional knowledge, service and support.

customers who require it.

If you need a national supply arrangement for your business, contact your nearest CSS member store. AG & Trade

WA

C & L Tool Centre

Ross’s Diesel Service

QLD

DBF Tools Qld

Minewarehouse.com

Queensland Tools & Constr uction Supplies

Broome Bolt Supplies

Urenco Supplies

Banks Bolts & Fasteners

Centenary Power Tools

D J’s Steel & Concrete

Mount Isa Mining Supplies

CFI

VIP Industrial Supplies

Brisbane Fasteners & Engineering Supplies Pty Ltd

CQ Fasteners

Flexistrut

The Bolt Place Bundaberg

Jim’s First

WA Bolts

Dalby General Steel

Fraser Coast Bolts

W.A.S.P.S

L&T Venables Bearcon

NSW

Mid Coast Fasteners

Mandurah Bolt Supplies Building Component Sales

NT QLD

Multi-Fix W.A.

WA

CFS

SA

Ortons

Building Supplies

NSW

Omer Tools Pty Ltd

David Brand Builders Supplies

Sullivans Mining and Hardware

Flexistrut

Switched On Electrical Supplies

Maddison Safety

The Bolt Barn

MD Steel Fabrication

VEK Tools

Pilbara Tools & Fasteners

VIC Warren Electrical Service

Resources Trading

TAS

NT

ACT

Impact-A Construction Supply Specialists

NT Fasteners

VIP Fastening Systems

LM Trade Supplies

SA

TJ&H Agencies

Able Air & Power Tools

VIC

DBF Tools and Construction Supplies

Hallam Bolts

Impact-A Fasteners & Construction Supplies FASTENERS & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES

A G M Construction Supplies Ferntree Gully Bolts Geelong & Ballarat

Build Tech Supplies

TAS

Rapid Supply

Bayswater Bolts

Flexistrut

Impact-A Kencor Sales Hoisting Equipment Construction Supply Specialists Specialists

Independent Fastening Systems

Melbourne Bolt Co

Visit Us At: constructionsupply.com.au

Kencor Sales

Ultimate Fasteners Shepparton & Wodonga

Profile for Engage Media

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