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FATMAG l

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Find us on Facebook!

We’re at www.facebook.com/ constructionsupplyspecialists

HEART

Laser focus

AND

SOUL

All you need to know about lasers Page 18

DeWalt racing

Josh Teskey, lead singer for the awardwinning Teskey Brothers, has a secret life as a tradie.

Meet the team behind Team 18

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Page 32

Safety special report

Work tickets

Mandatory trades registration is coming to Victoria

Best advice on PPE from head to toe. Page 21

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JULY - SEPTEMBER 2021

C SS M E M BE RS – AU STR A L IA N OWN ED AN D I N DEP EN DEN TLY OPER AT ED

CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY SPECIALISTS 90+ Stores Nationally

For Your Nearest Store Location Visit www.constructionsupply.com.au


TOOLS TO TRUST SINCE 1909

spearandjacksonaust

www.spearandjackson.com.au


Construction Supply Specialists Pty Ltd Administration - Head Office 17 Lakeside Drive, Broadmeadows VIC 3047 Tel: (03) 9357 4228 Fax: (03) 9357 4229 jeff@cssgroup.com.au www.constructionsupply.com.au

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CONTENTS July-September 2021

About us The store listed on the front of this magazine is a member of the Construction Supply Specialist Group. While the majority of your work will be conducted with your local CSS Member, this store is part of a national network of stores that can provide you with exceptional service and support wherever you may be working in Australia. For more store locations, visit www.constructionsupply.com.au.

COVER STORY

10

Soul man

Josh Teskey, lead singer of The Teskey Brothers, has a secret life—as a tradie.

21

04. Welcome

06. News The Federal Budget will have big impacts on building; Tom Drane news; and more…

14. Supplier profile Quality, innovation and sustainability define uvex safety Australia.

18. Tech talk What should you look for when selecting a laser to help ensure a level point?

21. Safety There’s personal protective equipment designed for every job, trade and workplace.

28

28. Profile Meet Michael Domajnko, the 2020 MBA Residential Young Builder of the Year

32. Lifestyle Team 18 owner Charlie Schwerkolt takes DEWALT® Racing to the top.

36. Legal matters Mandatory trades registrations are coming for the Victorian building industry.

COVER PHOTO: SUPPLIED

44. F.A.TMAG fun Crosswords and more! PLUS Supplier editorials

Advice, new products and more from a selection of CSS suppliers. Check out past issues of the CSS F.A.T.MAG at www.cssfatmag.com.au. CSS F.A.T. MAG 3


WELCOME

On the road again Hi to all. With the relaxation of Covid caused travel restrictions, I grabbed the opportunity to do a good old fashioned road trip and catch up with some of the people, personalities and protagonists that have been an important part of my existence over the past 48 plus years in business (Not really many protagonists). WOW! What a buzz! Hotel rooms one night after the other, long hauls in the car, early starts, country pie shops and loving every minute of it. I did not realise just how much being cooped up had gotten to me and how much I missed the cut and thrust that comes with those great discussions/ conversations/arguments (good and bad) you get to have when you are right there, in striking distance, of real, live people. What a sensational release of pent-up frustration and an opportunity to, once again, immerse myself in the physicality that comes with human interaction. Melbourne to the Gold Coast by plane and a bit of R&R before a drive through to Yeppoon and a catch up with old mate (North Queensland term—not necessarily meaning an old bloke who is a mate— but in this case it does.) Geoff Gumley from C Q Fasteners. From there it was on to Mackay where I met with Steve Dowden and Mathew Woodward of Dowden’s Pumping & Water Treatment. What a professional show they have, and the great news is, come July 1, 2021 they officially become a CSS Member alongside our well established W.A.S.P.S. out there at Paget. Looking forward 4 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“Our business is about people and our interactions as partners, suppliers, customers and friends and how we work with and assist each other to achieve our individual and common goals.” to even greater things to come out of Mackay moving forward. From there it was over to Emerald with a catch up with Brendan Buckton at the very impressive Emerald Industrial Supplies before making my way South through Biloela, Monto and Eidsfold and visiting all three branches of D J’s Steel and Hardware. Aren’t they all looking good as well? By the time we got back to Brisbane and caught up with our local Members there—Gary Beeston at Brisbane Fasteners, Michael Dann at Allfix, Steve and Drewe from The Tradesman’s Toolbox and Andrew and Jenny from Centenary Power Tools—we had driven over 2,500 kilometers and I had talked myself hoarse. What a hoot though, and what a lesson for this old dog. I came back with a renewed energy and understanding of just how important that physical presence plays in business at all levels and how

much people enjoy the opportunity to express themselves ‘in the flesh’. You do not get the vibe over a Zoom or Facetime call. Certainly, they have played extremely important roles throughout the past year and a bit, but you do not get to feel that ‘atmospheric charge’ when you chat, discuss, debate, argue, laugh, disagree or empathise with other people. Our business and the business of our members is about people and our interactions as partners, suppliers, customers and friends and how we work with and assist each other to achieve our individual and common goals. Group to Member, Supplier to Group, Supplier to Member, Member to Customer, and all that happens in between. Each link in the chain is important to the end result. I hope you are all having the opportunity to get out and catch up with people you have not seen for a while and trust that the business world is treating you well. CSS and its members are all independently owned and operated, Australian companies, working together and partnering with a wide range of key industry specialist suppliers to help us and, in the end, you do your job. Being a small independent operator is a tough gig, as many of you would know but, by being part of the CSS family and having the support of customers like you, our members can compete with the big end of town all the time. We would not be able to do it without your support. Thanks, and enjoy the read.  Jeff Wellard


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NEWS

Tom Drane, the young Superbike champion partially sponsored by CSS, has been able to compete overseas for the first time in a year in March when he flew to Doha, Qatar, to represent Australia in the Idemitsu Asia Talent Cup for Round 1 and 2. He was on a plane less than 24 hours after competing in the Australian Superbike championships at Winton Victoria, where he had finished with multiple podium finishes. He came third overall in the 300 Supersport and sixth for the round in the R3 Cup after having a crash in the last race. Tom, now 15-years-old, was one of three Australians to represent our nation in the 2021 series of the Asia Talent Cup. In fact, he was one of 23 athletes up to the age of 21 identified to contest the Cup from the international region and one of only five ‘rookies’ to take his place on the grid. Racing a grand prix bike for the first time, he really stepped up to a new level of competition. There is little opportunity to race these bikes in Australia, but Tom held his own with the up-andcoming of the world’s elite MotoGP riders in the opening rounds.

The schedule was punishing: 14-hour days with little downtime for the entire three and a half weeks Tom was over there, with COVID tests every three days. The month-long journey began with a four-day test, Tom’s first opportunity to take the track on the Moto 3 bike. In qualifying, the young Australian earned 14th position on the starting grid, and set himself the goal of a top 10 finish as he headed into the competitive rounds. The two rounds of the competition were held back to back on successive weekends. In round 1, Tom secured a 13th place in the first race and a 12th in the second. In round 2 he placed 9th in both races, achieving his goal of a top 10 finish. He will not travel again now until October where he will finish the remaining four rounds in Japan, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, all alongside Moto GP. While he was in mandatory 14-day quarantine he missed a round of ASBK at Wakefield Park, so his goal in Australia is to go into the next few rounds of ASBK and get his points back up in both the 300 Supersport and the R3 cup. 

Budget infrastructure boost to help tradies The Federal Government has made an additional $15.2 million commitment to infrastructure projects in the latest Federal Budget. “Builders and tradies will strongly back the budget. It will boost the confidence of the industry that the recovery can continue to largely ride on the ute’s back,” Denita Wawn, CEO of Master Builders Australia, said. As part of the spend, $2 billion will go towards the Great Western Highway Upgrade—Katoomba to Lithgow, $2 billion will be invested in a new Melbourne Intermodal Terminal and $400 million will go towards additional funding for the Bruce Highway. Other projects that receive additional funding include the METRONET:

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Hamilton Street/Wharf Street Grade Separations and Elevation of Associated Stations in WA, the Truro Bypass in South Australia, the National Network Highway Upgrades (Phase 2) in the Northern Territory, and Bass Highway Safety and Freight Efficiency Upgrades. This funding comes in addition to the Federal Government’s existing investment into projects such as the Western Sydney International (NancyBird Walton) Airport, Sydney Metro, and the Melbourne Airport Rail Link. “The investment of an additional $15 billion in the nation’s infrastructure will play a vital role not only in completing the economic recovery but underpinning a strong economy into

the future. This will be complemented by the $250 million for infrastructure for regional communities to be delivered by the Building Regions Fund,” said Ms Wawn. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: (TOP) SUPPLIED; (BOTTOM) QIUN -123RF

Tom Drane update


PHOTOGRAPHY: (TOP) ROWAN JACKSON - 123RF; (BOTTOM) BOLINA - 123RF

Powerline incidents prompt safety warning WorkSafe is urging employers operating mobile machinery near overhead powerlines to put safety first following a spate of electric shock incidents and near misses. Since November 2020, one worker has died and five others were taken to hospital with serious injuries after their machinery contacted powerlines. A 54-year-old construction worker was taken to hospital in a critical condition on Monday following an electric shock when the arm of the excavator on his truck struck powerlines at Pakenham. Separately, two construction workers were injured, one critically, when a crane

arm struck live 22kV lines at Dromana on 12 April. There were also two incidents last month involving the farming and transport industries. On 30 April a tipper truck driver was taken to hospital in a serious condition after his truck hit a high voltage conductor at Narracan, near Moe. And a 72-year-old farmer was also airlifted to hospital on 27 April after the auger he was moving with a forklift touched powerlines, resulting in serious injuries at Harston near Shepparton. WorkSafe Executive Director of Health and Safety Julie Nielsen said no matter the situation, care had to be taken when

using machinery near electrical wires. “Electrocution can occur in just moments and if an electric shock doesn’t kill, injuries can be severe and lifelong,” Ms Nielsen said, “It doesn’t matter whether you are a large employer in construction, transport or a sole farm operator, all duty holders should review their systems of work when operating near overhead powerlines. “Make sure you assess the environment you are operating machinery in and keep clear of live electrical cables, because WorkSafe will not hesitate to prosecute duty holders that fail to protect workers.” 

Building more homes The Federal Government has introduced a raft of targeted new measures to help increase residential construction activity as Australia recovers from the pandemic slowdown. During the pandemic, HomeBuilder was introduced to motivate people to build new houses or significantly renovate existing homes, creating work for tradespeople and others in the industry. Budget papers reveal that more than 120,000 applications have been received for HomeBuilder grants since the scheme was unveiled in June last year, but does not confirm how many of those have actually been approved. The 2021-22 Budget builds on that strategy, extending the leg-up over the deposit hurdle. This time, there is assistance specifically for single parent households, as well as support for first home buyers purchasing or building new homes. “Home ownership is the key to economic security and vital for a strong economy. The Family Home Guarantee will be life-changing for single custodial parents, the vast majority of whom are women. Combined with 10,000 new places under the New Home Guarantee it will mean that the people who build new homes and the people that want them continue as the lynchpin of recovery,” Denita Wawn, CEO of Master Builders Australia, said. Overall, this budget is one that extends on the Federal Government approach to housing affordability. “Making targeted, low deposit loans available, increasing savings measures and providing demand-side grants for new construction of housing does not change the fundamentals of our housing system,” said Eliza Owens from CoreLogic. “Rather, it increases participation in an existing framework.”  CSS F.A.T. MAG 7


NEWS Updated traffic management guidelines

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANCOAY - 123RF

Safe Work Australia has updated its workplace traffic management guidance to include information on working on or near public roads. When managing traffic on a public road, there are actions you should take to ensure the safety of workers and the public. This could include installation of barriers and warning devices to ensure workers and vehicles stay separated.   You can read the workplace traffic management guidance for practical measures on managing the risks of working on public roads at www. safeworkaustralia.gov.au/media-centre/ news/updated-workplace-trafficmanagement-guidance-now-available:  This guidance complements information issued by WHS regulators and local road authorities. 

Fast becoming the established alternative to welding when dealing with steel work fabrication involving “blind” box sections. FOUR (4) STEP FAST AND SIMPLE APPLICATION Example

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More information is available through any CSS store 8 CSS F.A.T. MAG


YOU’LL LIKE WHAT YOU FIND AT FLEXTOOL NEW Flextool PortaScreed®

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Check out our new range of equipment, all covered by The Flextool Promise. If the unexpected happens and something goes wrong with your Flextool equipment within the first 12 months of purchase, we’ll arrange to give you a loan machine for 2 days, free of charge, while we work to repair or replace your Flextool product.* The Flextool Promise. Job Done. Go to Flextool.com.au to find out more *Qualification criteria applies. Terms and conditions for The Flextool Promise can be found at www.flextool.com.au/flextool-promise-terms-and-conditions. Flextool, the Flextool logo, PortaPac and PortaScreed are registered trade marks of Parchem Construction Supplies Pty Ltd.


COVER STORY

Soul man Y PHOTO: ARUNAS KLUPSAS

Josh Teskey, lead singer of the multi-award winning Teskey Brothers, has a secret life— as a tradie. By Rob Johnson

ou assume potential rock stars get a trade to support themselves while they pursue their dream of playing music. But Josh Teskey did it the other way around. He became a rock star to support himself while getting a trade. “Music helped me get through my plumbing apprenticeship financially,” he explains. “When you are starting out as a 19-year-old, you’re earning about six bucks an hour. But I’d be playing with the band at a wedding on a Friday night or playing at the pub on a Saturday afternoon. And that would be my pocket money for the week—that extra bit of cash to get you through.” That love for his trade isn’t just paying lip-service to a long-forgotten job. Even though Josh’s band, The Teskey Brothers, has released three albums and won four ARIA awards (among many other accolades), he’ll still occasionally go out and work on site between tours and concerts. The day we spoke with him, he was ducking out to quote on a job after the interview was finished. “Plumbing is an absolutely beautiful trade,” he says. “I’m really passionate about it. And I’m really proud to be a plumber. The music and trade mix is such a fantastic thing when you can do

10 CSS F.A.T. MAG

it. For many years, some of my happiest years of doing music was gigging on the weekends and working during the week.”

THE PLUMBING SINGER

All the rock and roll clichés about ‘overnight success’ apply to The Teskey Brothers—except their overnight success took 10 years. Although their first album, Half Mile Harvest, came out at the beginning of 2017 and shot straight to the top of the independent charts, they’d been slogging away at it for a decade by then. Comprising Josh on vocals, his brother Sam on guitar, along with school friends Brendon Love (bass) and Liam Gough (drums), they progressed from playing parties and street corners to concert stages. Their fan base grew, and by the time their second album, Run Home Slow came out in 2019, it went straight to the number 2 position on the album charts. “A lot of my aunties and uncles are musos, and my folks still play to this day,” says Josh. “We have a lot of fun with that. The biggest influences on our sound came from what was going on in the neighbourhood. I was lucky enough to grow up in and around Melbourne, and the outskirts of Melbourne, where there’s always been a thriving rhythm and blues scene. I grew up listening

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“I’m really proud to be a plumber. The music and trade mix is such a fantastic thing when you can do it. For many years, some of my happiest years of doing music was gigging on the weekends and working during the week.” Josh Teskey, rock star/plumber

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CSS F.A.T. MAG 11


COVER STORY

Josh Teskey (left) and Ash Grunwald, his collaborator on Push the Blues Away

to people like Geoff Achison and Chris Wilson and Sam Linton-Smith.” The band’s sound is directly influenced by blues, soul and R&B performers of the early-to-mid 1960s. Josh’s vocal performances are particularly reminiscent of singers like Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett. You can hear the influences in tracks like ‘Hold Me’ or ‘I Get Up’, in Josh’s smoky vocals that used to ring out across building sites when he was working. “Anyone who knows me, knows I’m constantly singing,” he says. “They used to call me the singing plumber, because you hear me coming across the site. I liked that when I was doing more plumbing and a little bit of singing, it was the singing plumber. Now we call me the plumbing singer, because people are really surprised that I plumb on the weekends. With my record label crew, when they saw my car, they said, ‘What are you still driving this big plumbing truck for? You don’t need to be plumbing.’ I say, ‘I don’t need to be plumbing, but I like plumbing. I love my trade. I’ll always do it’.”

SECRET KNOWLEDGE

The connection between his music and 12 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“I liked that when I was doing more plumbing and a little bit of singing, it was the singing plumber. Now we call me the plumbing singer.” Josh Teskey, rockstar/ plumber his trade goes deeper than you think. Knowledge of how to play blues and soul music was often passed down from older performers to the next generation as they worked together. Josh sees his trade the same way. “I was honoured enough to be given this skill and have this beautiful knowledge passed down to me from older plumbers,” he says. “A lot of the stuff’s not written down. It’s an old-fashioned way of passing down knowledge from plumber to apprentice, or whatever your trade might be. A lot of this stuff, everyone does it a very similar way, but it’s story time, it’s knowledgebased. “So, I love that old-fashioned aspect of it, which I guess is an influence in my

music as well. So, the secret society of plumbing, I think of it sometimes. The tricks that we know, that no-one else does.” In between plumbing jobs, Josh is planning to spend the rest of this year touring to promote the album Push the Blues Away which he made with Ash Grunwald, and which was released in November last year. “Ash has been a really great influence for me in all sorts of ways,” he says. “I learnt so much just listening to Ash playing in the corner pub here at home. We just have a lot of fun on the stage together. It’s really just the two of us, real raw blues.” Throughout June they’ll be playing around the country, finishing in Melbourne around the middle of the month. Then it’s back into the studio to work on more Teskey Brothers material. “We’ve been doing some things all together in the one room. One take, rehearse it, and it’s just a real good old-fashioned recording process. And of course, it’s all recorded analogue through our tape machine here. It’s just a really good old-fashioned way of doing it. And it’s been really, really fun and we’re getting some great outcomes.” 


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SUPPLIER PROFILE

In safe hands E very time uvex employees walk into their head office in Parramatta, they get a reminder as to why their job supplying safety equipment is so important. On the wall is a Beijing 2008 Olympic Games cycling uniform with a handwritten message from track champion Anna Meares that reads: “Thank you for providing me the helmet that saved my life.” Although the revered cyclist fractured her C2 vertebra and dislocated her right shoulder in a terrible crash at a World Cup meet just five months out from the games in China, the tribute from Meares recognises that it could have been so much worse. The brand ambassador for uvex has attributed her safety gear to preventing her from being paralysed during the fall. Meares, the only Australian athlete to have won individual medals at four consecutive Olympic Games, recovered sufficiently to win silver in the women’s sprints in Beijing before going on to claim a bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics. Managing director David Sierra, who took the reins at uvex early in 2020, says the partnership with Meares has been a winner for both parties.

“Anna genuinely credits uvex with saving her life. When we all come to work and see that uniform, we are inspired to continue on uvex’s mission of protecting people,” he says. “Anna embodies qualities that make up uvex’s core values in leadership, quality and enthusiasm, and we thank her for what she has done for our brand and what she has done for sport in Australia.”

PROUD HISTORY

Uvex is a brand that is synonymous with safety. Founded in the German town of Fürth in 1926, the company manufactures a wide range of products such as safety glasses, earmuffs and safety gloves. In Europe, it is renowned for supplying safety equipment to alpine skiers and other elite winter sport stars. The global uvex group has a presence in 22 countries. In the Australian market, where it has been for 30 years, uvex operates in sectors such as construction, mining, food, healthcare and defence services, but is perhaps best known for supplying high-quality safety glasses and gloves to the industrial safety sector. What makes uvex different to its rivals? Chris Douglas, the national channel manager at uvex safety

Australia who is an experienced professional in the safety industry, says uvex safety glasses feature a flood coating technology that individually coats both sides of the lenses. This ensures they are anti-fog on the inside and scratch-resistant on the outside, whereas industry rivals have typically dipped their products into a solution that applies the same coating on both sides of the lenses. “Flood coating is a unique uvex coating technology and the market knows that it works,” Douglas says . Uvex also goes out of its way to create specific product innovations to meet the needs of its clients. For example, its uvex Ultrashield protective shield incorporates a goggle-visor combination that allows workers to protect their faces in hot, caustic environments while still being able to quickly open the shield to drink water. Douglas says the concept was developed specifically in response to a need from a major industrial client. “That’s what we’re all about. We come up with solutions that matter to people.”

QUALITY COMES FIRST

Uvex is planning to expand its product suite in Australia, starting with the

In Australia, uvex is perhaps best known for supplying high-quality safety glasses and gloves to the industrial safety sector.

14 CSS F.A.T. MAG

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY OF UVEX

A commitment to quality, innovation and sustainability has seen uvex safety Australia further enhance its reputation during the pandemic—and more growth is on the agenda. By Cameron Cooper


“What we do well and differently is based around our product quality and being a market leader and sticking to that.” David Sierra, managing director, uvex CSS F.A.T. MAG 15


SUPPLIER PROFILE

uvex has been swamped by orders for PPE from companies seeking to comply with new safety regulations introduced since COVID.

“We’re engaging in a robust development process and it speaks volumes about us as a company and why we succeed.” Chris Douglas, national channel manager, uvex safety Australia launch in October of a range of safety footwear for the Australian worker. Although the Australian division could have simply imported its quality range of European safety footwear down under, Douglas says uvex has spent two years developing, testing and adapting footwear for Australian users and conditions. “Our boots are designed here and tested for the Australian worker, including getting the right size matrix for our market,” he says. “We’re engaging in a robust development process and it speaks volumes about us as a company and why we succeed.” With demand soaring for personal protective equipment during COVID-19, uvex has been swamped with orders from companies seeking to comply 16 CSS F.A.T. MAG

with new safety regulations and norms. However, Douglas says the business’s chief focus has been on maintaining quality and serving its existing clients rather than simply chasing more profits. “We didn’t take the opportunistic sales that a lot of other companies did, but rather remained focused on supporting our customer base, and supporting the frontline workers across the country during the pandemic.” The approach reflects uvex’s strategic principles encapulated by the following catchphrases: ‘manufacturing excellence from head to toe’; ‘value follows innovation’, ‘business is people’ and ‘quality made in uvex’. Douglas says the business is constantly trying to innovate, rather than copying others. “And that’s been a real cornerstone of our success in Australia.”

SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

An embrace of sustainability that promotes good environmental, employee and human rights outcomes is another area of focus for uvex, with its production facilities in Höör, Sweden, and Ceva, Italy, adopting measures to minimise the use of water, generate their own electricity and eliminate waste during the

manufacturing process. “We’re really serious about our Protecting People mission, so we have to take responsibility for protecting the environment as well,” Sierra says. Although uvex has performed strongly during COVID-19, the pandemic has posed inevitable challenges, with some of its products being subject to European export embargoes. While supply-chain disruptions are a reality, Sierra says the uvex team has sought to communicate clearly with customers over deliveries. It has also emphasised an ongoing dedication to providing the highest-quality products in the market at a time when some suppliers have been offering sub-standard masks, shields and goggles that meet minimal compliance standards. “What we do well and differently is based around our product quality and being a market leader and sticking to that rather than just ticking the compliance box,” Sierra says. On the back of that quality guarantee and an expanded range in the offing for the Australian market, he says the future looks bright for uvex in Australia. “We’re in an exciting spot—and ready to go to the next level.” 


IMPACT-A PRO SERIES WHEELBARROW DESIGNED FOR TRADE AND ENGINEERED TO HANDLE THE TOUGHEST JOBS ON ANY WORKSITE. NEW PRODUCT

Stabiliser bars

60mm x 35mm heavy duty handles

40mm diameter hardened steel legs to withstand heavy loading

Dual high quality heavy duty bearings 5mm thick steel front nose piece

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For more details, enquire at your local CSS Member store

TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL


TECH TALK Following a straight line is often harder than it looks. But what should you look for when selecting a laser to help ensure a level point? By Tracey Porter

Laser focus L aser levels are the first line of defence against everything from uneven plumbing to crooked garden beds. Primarily used for internal and external construction tasks requiring a level point or straight line, they offer a degree of accuracy many thousands of times more precise than the old-school tape measures relied upon by traditional craftsmen and women. But there is no such thing as onesize-fits-all approach when it comes to picking the right tool for the job—and when it comes to lasers, accuracy and authenticity are everything.

THE OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Used by everyone from electricians and flooring experts to landscapers and tilers, modern lasers can broadly be categorised into three different models: dot, liner or rotating. IMEX national sales manager Carl Sandeman says there are vast differences in the features, functions and laser level distances offered between the three therefore it’s important to

understand the strengths of each to ensure you select the correct one for the task at hand. Sandeman says most basic level lasers come in the form of a plumb or dot laser which produces a single or multiple points of reference on a wall or work surface. A line laser—which emits a line beam, usually one horizontal and between one and four vertically—is slightly more complex. Used for tiling, kitchen or cabinet set-out, electrical drywall set-up and partitioning, this type of laser is visible over distances up to around 10 metres. Sandeman, whose company has been manufacturing lasers since 2008, says the third, and perhaps hardest working offering is a rotating laser. Typically used for concreting, excavation, suspended ceiling set-up and earthworks, this type of laser has a diode prism that spins at fast speeds. It is usually mounted on a standard tripod and works in conjunction with a detector on a measuring staff which picks up the beam.

PRICING A KEY CONSIDERATION

It should come as no surprise that pricing of the different types of lasers also varies significantly. Sandeman says while an entry level line laser is likely to set you back between $350 and $1000, a rotary laser can cost anywhere from $1000 to $5000 or more. At the top end of the pricing scale is a drainage pipe laser which can cost upwards of $7000. “Generally the higher the unit cost, the more added features like gradient, scan, vertical etc. the unit will have,” he says. Sandeman says all reputatable brands sold through licensed dealers and with similar features should be around the same price. “With the rise of pirated copies and global giants who work on low margins, there is a proliferation of similar looking tools that sell for sometimes up to 50 per cent cheaper. These may not have metal internal components, back-up, proper warranties, the same features and accessories and proper accuracy. Generally they will not have individual pre-calibration checks.” As a general rule for a professional tradesperson, if a laser level has similar features and functions, always purchase the more expensive known brand, rather than an unknown brand with no local service network, he says.

The rotating laser is usually mounted on a tripod.

18 CSS F.A.T. MAG

Any decision should not be based on price alone however, and another important consideration is whether to select a red or green beam. Sandeman says the frequency of a green beam is such that the human eye can detect it four times better that red. “A laser with a green diode therefore emits a beam that can be seen over a longer distance, and therefore in many instances, does not require the detector and will be seen from the rotating laser

PHOTOS: SUPPLIED

RED OR GREEN BEAM?


A green beam laser is recommended for all-round construction.

as a solid line. This is a big advantage in interior work.” Sandeman says green beam is the best selection for all-round construction and tradesmen who do a mix of interior and exterior work. A green beam laser is not compatible with a red beam detector, so for earthmoving, where machine control receivers are used, green is not applicable, he says.

ACCURACY—AN ESSENTIAL COMPONENT

Position Partners building business manager David Gentle says the accuracy of each laser is also another important factor to consider. Gentle, whose company distributes the brands of Topcon and aLine laser levels via a network of hardware stores and tool shops, for example CSS Group stores, says the accuracy decreases

the further away you are from the laser, so any accuracy statements need to be given at the same distance to offer a true comparison. “A leading rotating laser level will offer an accuracy of +/- 1.5mm at 30-metres, while a budget system might be double that at +/- 3mm at 30-metres,” he says.

LET THE LASER DO THE HARD WORK

Sandeman says not all laser units are self-levelling with cheaper rotating laser levels needing to be levelled every time they are set up or moved by the operator. These are known as compensated lasers where the diode is rigidly mounted to the mainframe. That said, Gentle says the majority of leading laser levels available today are self-levelling, although some more basic models will have a bubble vial to manually level the unit on a tripod or flat surface.

Self-levelling helps users to work as accurately as possible by ensuring the unit is truly level before beginning work. “Many also feature a height alert function, whereby if the unit is bumped or knocked on site it will automatically sound an alert and stop working to prevent users working when the system may no longer be level,” he says.

THE FINAL WORD

Laser levels are instruments and are subject to harsh use in our working environment and as such require calibration and servicing on a regular basis, Sandeman says. “If a laser is used daily, such as a concreter’s laser, [we] suggest every six months for a check-up. If a laser is used more infrequently, every one or two years for a calibration is usually fine, unless you suspect it has been bumped, dropped or otherwise ill-treated.”  CSS F.A.T. MAG 19


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SAFETY

PHOTOGRAPHY: UVEX

Better safety

There’s personal protective equipment designed for every job, trade and workplace. By Frank Leggett

CSS F.A.T. MAG 21


SAFETY

All PPE should be comfortable to wear. Employees will be wearing it all day ... and if it’s not comfortable, there is risk of them taking it off. Todd Robertson, general manager, Bunzl Safety

22 CSS F.A.T. MAG

repercussion is potential physical damage to a person’s body but fines can be as high as $6000 for an individual employee.”

HIERACHY OF CONTROL

Some people find it surprising that PPE is actually the last line of defence in worker safety. There is a system for controlling risks in the workplace called the hierarchy of control. “When a risk is identified, the best thing to do is move the person away from the vicinity of that risk,” says Brad Rodgers, R&D manager at Paramount Safety Products. “Questions need to be asked, such as: Is it possible to substitute that risk out of the environment? Can you engineer machinery or protection levels around the risk? There are quite a few levels in the hierarchy of control, but PPE is the very last level of protection.” The structure of the hierarchy of control moves from most effective to least effective. 1. Eliminate the hazard or risk. 2. Reduce the risk through substitution, isolation or engineering. 3. Use administrative controls to minimise exposure. 4. Personal protective equipment.

RISK ASSESSMENT

Determining the correct PPE for a particular workplace is a complicated process. Everything is covered under

the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 which also spells out the legal requirements for an employer to protect the employee. Work Health and Safety Regulations must also be followed in the workplace while PPE manufacturers should follow the various manufacturing standards applicable to their products. The first thing a workplace should do is a risk analysis. “There’s professionals who can help in this area,” says Adrian Phillips, managing director at Maxisafe. “They’ll look at the risks associated with the tasks and make recommendations. Companies employed to do a risk analysis of a business will provide safe working procedures for every operation. Within that safe working procedure would be PPE recommendations.”

THE RIGHT FIT

For PPE to work effectively, it is critical that it fits correctly. PPE needs to be fitted to the individual; it’s not a one-sizefits-all situation. Some PPE such as hard hats and glasses are adjustable; some, such as boots, come in a variety of sizes but some, such as respirators, need to be fitted to the individual to ensure a good seal. PPE also needs to be inspected, maintained and stored correctly. “All PPE should be comfortable to wear,” says Todd Robertson, general manager at Bunzl Safety. “Employees will be wearing it all day at their respective tasks and, if it’s not comfortable,

PHOTOGRAPHY: PARAMOUNT, MAXISAFE

P

ersonal protective equipment (PPE) can literally save your life. It covers an incredibly wide range of items from sunscreen and earplugs to safety harnesses and respirators. It’s found on worksites, shop floors, factories, hospitals and any workplace where worker health and safety needs to be protected. It’s a ubiquitous part of the working life of tradies and an essential part of hundreds of different careers. Its purpose is to protect the wearer from associated risks they might find in any workplace space. Its importance cannot be overstated. A person conducting a business or undertaking is required by law to provide adequate PPE protection for anyone under their employment. There are some variations from state to state and region to region but Safe Work Australia’s Work Health and Safety regulations spell out the requirements employers must follow in regard to PPE. Basically, an employer must provide well-fitted, suitable PPE in good condition. Of course, the employee also has an obligation to wear the provided PPE— and not just because there’s a chance of injury. “If the workplace provides PPE and you choose not to wear it as an employee, there are substantial onthe-spot fines from Work Safe or Work Cover inspectors,” says Christopher Douglas, national channel manager at UVEX Safety. “Of course, the biggest


there is a risk of them taking it off and substituting it with something that’s not fit for the task. This is a dangerous situation where injury can occur.” As Australia’s workforce becomes more multicultural, manufacturers are making PPE to fit different face profiles and hand sizes. Even though it is no longer manufactured to solely suit a European profile, fit testing still needs to be done to ensure PPE will work correctly. Correctly fitted PPE is not just for user comfort but to ensure the PPE works effectively in minimising the risk for injury.

TRAINING IN THE USE OF PPE

It’s important all employees are trained in the correct way to wear and use PPE. Most manufacturers will come onsite and provide that training when PPE is ordered. There are also dedicated training organisations to provide training services. “It’s one thing to be given PPE but it’s essential that it’s used and fitted correctly, and fit for purpose,” says Brad Rodgers. “Some people make an assumption that they know how to put on a hard hat, that they know how to put on a respiratory mask, but that’s not always the case. There’s a legal obligation for the employer to ensure that staff are trained in the correct use of PPE.”

Often, users want to change, swap parts or wear their PPE differently. However, a hard hat worn backwards does not offer protection. Products are tested in a standard way and while it might look cool or be more comfortable, it will not protect the user from injury. While employers need to provide training in PPE, users must take the responsibility to use their PPE in the way in which they were trained.

REPERCUSSIONS OF INCORRECT USE

If PPE is used incorrectly and someone is injured, there will be an investigation into each case and the severity of the injury. Ideally, no-one should get injured at work. “When an accident occurs, it will be looked at by the appropriate authorities and the company,” says Adrian Phillips. “They will identify why the accident happened and how it could be prevented next time. However, no amount of PPE will stop an accident happening if the wrong thing is done. A cut resistant glove won’t stop a circular saw.” An employer will always bear some responsibility for an injury in the workplace. However, if an employer has provided the training, the education and the right PPE to suit the tasks, but the employee has not followed those instructions, then they’re just

as responsible. It’s the employer’s responsibility to train them, but once trained and correctly fitted to the right PPE that’s fit for purpose, then it’s up to the person wearing it to use it correctly whenever needed.

CATEGORIES

PPE is broken down into different categories, including head, eye, face, hearing, respiratory, hand, foot and height safety. We will explore each of the main categories and investigate the proper use, maintenance and purpose.

GLOVES

PPE gloves are designed to protect the hands from three types of hazards. 1. Mechanical hazards such as cuts, abrasions, crush injuries and splinters. 2. Chemical hazards caused by exposure to chemicals in all forms. 3. Thermal hazards and burns from exposure or contact to temperatures either too hot or too cold. “In some cases, the hazards cross over,” says Michael Riggall, business product and development manager at UVEX Safety. “For example, tasks with the risk of cut, impact and chemical exposure will require gloves that provide multiple levels of protection.” Effective hand protection requires the gloves to fit the wearer well so they are CSS F.A.T. MAG 23


SAFETY

EYES & FACE

Eye and face protection usually consists of two elements—safety eyewear and face shields. They are used to protect from flying particles, chemical splash or mechanical and natural radiation. Many industries use this type of protection including mining, construction, manufacturing and healthcare. “It’s important that eye and face protection fits the person’s face and offers the correct amount and type of protection,” says Christopher Douglas. “Requirements change from person to person and business to business. Someone doing a job in a cold work area will need different eye protection to someone doing the same exact job in a hot work area. The fogging properties and airflow of the glasses would be different for a start.” Dusty environments may need 24 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“We are dealing with a very vulnerable part of the body and it’s important that the wearer uses the right type of glove. ” Adrian Phillips, managing director, Maxisafe goggles that are fully sealed on the face. Safety goggles provide levels of protection against splash. Normal safety spectacles, as per the Australian standards, are rated against medium impact. They all have different features and benefits that allow the user particular levels of protection. “There’s also a range of different lens colours available,” says Brad Rodgers. “A clear lens will be usually worn inside while a tinted lens will be worn outside in sunny areas. Polarised lenses are available along with other options depending on the type of risk present.” Face shields are generally used to provide impact protection. They are a

critical when avoiding sparks and highspeed particles in the air It can be important to double up on PPE at times. People who work in highrisk environments like grinding, often wear a double layer of protection such as safety glasses underneath a face visor. If a grinding disc breaks at high speed, you need your eyes and face well protected from impact. If you wear prescription spectacles, it’s possible to have the lenses of safety glasses or goggles manufactured to your prescription.

HEARING

Hearing protection should be taken very seriously. While injuries to hands will eventually heal, exposure to elevated noise levels for extended periods can cause permanent irreversible damage. Any workplace where noise levels are above 85 decibels requires some sort of hearing protection. The two main types of hearing protection are earplugs and earmuffs. Earplugs are inserted into the ear canal, earmuffs enclose the ear. Earplugs are a cost-effective and disposable hygienic

PHOTOGRAPHY: PARAMOUNT, MAXISAFE

able to perform their tasks effectively and efficiently. Dexterity and comfort are priorities. Care, maintenance and storage are also important, particularly when gloves are used for chemical protection. The technology behind protective gloves has advanced in recent years, leading to the development of different types of fibres that offer a higher protection, particularly for potential cut injuries. Whereas 20 years ago everyone was given a pair of leather gloves, these days there are specific types of gloves for specific tasks and associated risks. It also needs to be remembered that cut resistant does not mean cut proof. Australian standards follow European standards and apply to different risks associated with the hands. The first and overarching standard is mechanical risk EN 388. That certification means that a glove has been tested for abrasion resistance, cut resistance, tear resistance, puncture resistance, and impact protection. “Other certifications relate to different hazards,” says Adrian Phillips. “EN 407 is for protection against heat and fire hazards. EN 511 is for protection against cold. EN 374 is protection against chemical risks. We are dealing with a very vulnerable part of the body and it’s important that the wearer uses the right type of glove for the right type of job.”


option. Earmuffs offer a reusable level of protection that can bring cost benefits over a long period of time. Once again, selecting the right PPE and using it correctly is essential. “I’ve been onsite where employees have been using earplugs for a long time,” says Christopher Douglas. “I’ll ask them to put their earplugs in, and more often than not, they’re not inserting them correctly. Most people require training on how to roll down the earplug, insert it into the ear and wait for it to expand.” Getting the right amount of noise protection is a bit of a balancing act. It’s not a matter of automatically choosing the highest level of protection. “Choosing a maximum amount of decibel protection can actually become a risk,” says Todd Robertson. “If you’re driving a forklift in a noisy environment, you can’t just cut out all noise as you need to be able to hear what’s happening in order to avoid an injury or hitting somebody.”

RESPIRATORY

Respiratory protection ranges from a simple face mask to a full-face mask

with powered air. The higher the risk, the better level of protection you need. Highly toxic environments require a supplied air system that is not reliant on filtering out contaminants in the air. Respiratory protection only works if it fits properly. In all levels of respiratory PPE, an adequate seal has to be made between the mask and wearer’s face. When working with substances such as asbestos or silica, this is critical. “Respiratory products, as per the Australian standard, require the wearer to be fit-tested to their particular respiratory protection device,” says Brad Rodgers. “This means if the wearer has a beard or facial hair, the correct fit is impossible. The sad fact is that users have to lose the beard or not do the job.” Training in the correct use of respiratory PPE is essential and it should also be cleaned and stored correctly. “We provide kits with reusable airtight containers,” says Adrian Phillips. “After use, you place the PPE in that container. It must be cleaned with alcohol wipes before wearing it again.” Even something as simple as a disposable face mask has properties

that must be understood. Disposable respiratory PPE will generally only protect against physical particles in the air, and there’s a different micron range for each product. A reusable range can have replacement filters that need to be disposed of, cleaned or replaced at regular intervals.

HEAD

When talking about head protection, you’re talking about hard hats. A lot of science goes into how they’re designed and the materials from which they are constructed. And they work. “Many people who have worn a hard hat and had an impact from above know that their hard hat probably saved their life,” says Brad Rodgers. “The harness within a hard hart is designed to act as a shock absorber to reduce the force that’s transferred to the head and neck.” Hard hats are also versatile and allow the wearer to add accessories like cap mounted earmuffs and visors. The components within can be easily replaced should they start to deteriorate. Bump caps, usually made from a molded plastic shell, are designed CSS F.A.T. MAG 25


SAFETY to prevent bump-related injuries in workshop environments.

FOOT

“There are many workplaces with hazards that can be mitigated by appropriate workplace footwear,” says Dr Caleb Wegener, head of product management footwear at UVEX Safety. “In fact, I would say any worker who’s not sitting at a desk could benefit from appropriate workplace footwear.” Footwear should be reviewed regularly to ensure it’s in good condition and is not excessively worn. It’s recommended that footwear be replaced when the tread is worn or cracked, the upper has cracks, the seams are split or the insole or midsole have pronounced deformation. It’s quite common for workers to wear footwear long after it should have been replaced. In the past, work boots were designed to be hard and tough. Often, it would take months to wear them in. Today, boots should offer protection and be comfortable from the first time they are worn. Good work boots should protect the feet without causing cramps, 26 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“The employee is dealing with their own body. They must look after it and be responsible. ” Adrian Phillips, managing director, Maxisafe

blisters, ankle pain or irritation.

HEIGHT SAFETY

Height safety PPE includes ropes, harnesses and lanyards. Anyone working at heights needs to have undertaken a Working At Heights training course. They need to be trained in the correct use of all products, including putting it on, taking it off and inspecting the product before every use. If height PPE is not correctly worn, connected and inspected for wear and tear, the employee is literally putting their life at risk. “There are very strict standards on how often height safety equipment is to be professionally inspected,” says Todd Robertson. “For example, webbing products such as harnesses should be independently inspected every three months and by the user before and after every use. There’s also a minimum

requirement for a certain amount of force to which you must be attached. An anchor point for a single person should be able to hold the weight of a car.” If a harness is required, it must be worn correctly with the applicable lanyards and rope lines. The employer must train employees in the correct use and operation of height safety PPE—but the main responsibility is on the user. “If there’s an accident, the current laws place the responsibility with the employer,” says Adrian Phillips. “However, the employee is dealing with their own body. They must look after it and be responsible.”

EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY

It’s the employer’s responsibility to provide PPE that’s suitable for the nature of the work or hazard and is also certified to appropriate standards, individual sizes and fit requirements. They must provide training to the employees on the correct use, maintenance and storage to ensure overall compliance. It’s the employee’s responsibility to use the PPE provided in the correct way in accordance with the training, and not intentionally damage or misuse it in any way. Any damaged PPE needs to be reported and replaced. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: MAXISAFE

There are three categories of footwear designed to protect workers: l Safety Footwear that contains a toe cap that can protect against an impact of 200J and 15KN of compression l Protective Footwear that contains a toe cap that can protect against an impact of 100J and 10KN of compression l Occupational Footwear that has protective features but does not contain a protective toecap The other qualities of protective footwear are: l Slip resistance l Protection from sharp objects such as nails l Impact injuries on the arch area of the foot l Impact protection for the ankle l Water resistance for working in wet environments l Cut resistance l Antistatic footwear for protection around volatile environments and sensitive equipment l Electrically insulating properties l Protection against hot and cold working environments.


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PROFILE

Michael Domajnko of MBD says building was always in his blood.

28 CSS F.A.T. MAG


Michael Domajnko, the 2020 Master Builders Association’s Residential Young Builder of the Year, places quality and integrity at the centre of everything he does. By Frank Leggett

Building relationships

F

or Michael Domajnko, building and construction is in the blood. Many members of his family in Slovenia were joiners and carpenters, and when his father immigrated to Australia in 1973, he bought those skill sets with him. “Dad started off as a carpenter with his cousin and then opened his own business and became a builder,” says Domajnko, owner and director of Milara Building & Development (MBD). “Even though I did a marketing degree and had a full-time job as an actuary, I knew that eventually I would become a builder.” Domajnko worked weekends and after-hours with his father and eventually became an estimator in order to learn how to calculate and work out costings. In 2017, he opened MBD. “We’re presently coming to an arrangement between partners to make me sole owner of the business,” he says. “It’s going to allow MBD to have much more flexibility in the future.”

PHOTOGRAPHY: EAMON GALLAGHER

INITIAL SUCCESS

Milara Building & Development, located in the eastern suburb of Blackburn in Melbourne, builds custom homes and townhouses. Its first landmark development, a multi-townhouse development on a sloping site had a few challenges. Space constrictions meant a turntable was needed to assist in the parking of cars. There were also design and positioning difficulties on the sloping site that were

overcome by adding a third-storey void with a floating staircase to one of the townhouses. The end result was a cohesive and beautiful set of homes. “My plan was to use that first development as a springboard to be at least nominated for a Master Builders award,” says Domajnko. “At the interview, the judges were pretty impressed with what I had to say and they nominated me for the 2020 Victorian Residential Young Builder of the Year. I was completely surprised when I won it.” Domajnko takes these awards seriously and sees great value in them. “Awards give your business a bit of brand recognition and improves your street credibility,” he says. “If you have a few gongs behind you, then you’re taken more seriously. It’s a great way to highlight a point of difference.”

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

MBD was a young business at the time of that first development and they

“Awards give your business a bit of brand recognition and improves your street credibility.” Michael Domajnko, owner, Milara Building & Development

were still establishing relationships with teams of tradies. While most worked out very well, there were a few individuals who didn’t fit in with their business ethos. “You learn your lesson and move on,” says Domajnko. “Building trusted relationships with skilled, professional tradies is one of the most important and enjoyable parts of my job.” MBD is seeing its brand recognition grow due to its completion of seven projects across the eastern suburbs of Melbourne.

COVID IMPACT

Like many businesses, COVID-19 and the lockdown had an impact on Domajnko’s company and he was forced to make a few changes. “During COVID, jobs were often delayed and cashflow took a real hit,” he says. “I instituted many more progress payments in a job instead of the typical five- or six-day progress payment.” There were trade limitations on sites and clients were reluctant to make decisions when choosing products. Tiles were a real case in point. “Our clients always want to pick their tiles,” says Domajnko. “Normally, they simply walk into a showroom and chose from their stock. During COVID, people didn’t want to go to showrooms or be in close proximity to people. And no-one is willing to choose tiles from the internet.” These days, he finds that tile CSS F.A.T. MAG 29


PROFILE

Landing one job at a time and ensuring he does it well is central to Domajnko’s approach.

stocks are sometimes low due to lack of freight but everyone can visit showrooms without fear.

ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

Domajnko was also a finalist for Entrepreneur of the Year in the Australian Small Business Champion Awards in 2020. After scaling back the business last year and working through some personal issues, he’s now looking to the future and raring to go. “We have a couple of pretty cool projects coming up,” he says. “One’s an extension renovation project on a little pocket-rocket townhouse in Yarraville. Some clients walked past that job, liked what they saw and then approached us to price their job. We’re looking to team up with a developer 30 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“Building trusted relationships with skilled, professional tradies is one of the most important and enjoyable parts of my job.” Michael Domajnko, owner, Milara Building & Development to do 10 townhouses in Dandenong. That’s going to take care of the next 12 or 18 months.” Passionate about his work, Domajnko ensures that consistent quality and integrity are his

benchmarks. He compiles blogs, posts on social media and produces video content to educate and inform his clients. His goal is to improve the perception of the building industry. He’s also started coaching other builders and tradies in order to improve and expand their businesses. His advice for new business owners is to take your time, land one project and do it well. Actually doing the job will help you get your systems in place and allow you to grow the business. “It really helps to set yourself up with a coach,” says Domajnko. “They can teach you many lessons so you don’t have to learn through trial and error. Network with other builders, go to networking conferences, ask how they got there and what lessons they learnt. I wish I had done a lot more of that.” 


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LIFESTYLE

Driving DEWALT

Team 18 owner Charlie Schwerkolt wants to take DEWALT® Racing to the top of the Supercars championship ladder. With Scott Pye behind the wheel and a solid support team in place, all the ingredients are there for more podium appearances in 2021. By Shane Conroy

32 CSS F.A.T. MAG

PHOTOGRAPHY: SUPPLIED

®


CSS F.A.T. MAG 33


LIFESTYLE

A

s a teenaged Charlie Schwerkolt tore around the track at Oakleigh Go-Kart Club, he never dreamed that a few decades later he would own his own Supercars racing team. Even as he watched racing legends like Peter Brock and Allan Moffat battle it out at Sandown—just a short distance from his childhood home— the young Schwerkolt could not have imagined that he’d one day return to the track as the founder and owner of Team 18. Schwerkolt’s own driving career was somewhat short lived. A top-five finish at a national go-karting championship in his teens wasn’t enough to keep him in the sport. Instead, he took the opportunity to join his father’s forklift business. He began as an apprentice mechanic in the mid 70s. By the late 80s, Schwerkolt had taken over Waverley

34 CSS F.A.T. MAG

“To start the team from scratch, we had to build solid foundations and that is a massive job.” Charlie Schwerkolt, owner, Team 18

Forklifts from his father. He has since built the company into a major national forklift rental company.

A CHANCE ENCOUNTER

But the racetrack would eventually lure Schwerkolt back. It was a chance encounter with Australian motorsport icon Dick Johnson that was the catalyst for Schwerkolt’s entry into professional racing. “Many years ago I used to go to motorsport events with a group of mates,” he says. “One year we

chartered a little plane out to Winton. There were a couple of spare seats on the plane, and we heard that Dick Johnson was looking for a ride back. So I found myself sitting next to Dick Johnson on this little charter plane.” By the time the plane landed, Schwerkolt had closed his first sponsorship deal with Dick Johnson Racing. A few years later he purchased an ownership stake in the team, and took up a role as CEO and managing director of Dick Johnson Racing. With Schwerkolt at the helm, Dick Johnson Racing took out the 2010 Supercars championship. And despite ending his relationship with the team following the 2010 campaign, he looks back on that achievement fondly. “Supercars is a very exciting, very demanding high-performance environment, and our job is to win,” he says. “It’s a major milestone to win a championship, and the 2010 win was one of the most exciting championship finishes in the history of the sport.”


THE REAL DEAL

Schwerkolt still owns the 2010 championship car, but he’s too busy with Team 18 to spend too much time looking back. He started the team in 2016 with a single car, and added a second car—under the DEWALT® Racing banner—in 2020. “Last year was very positive,” he says. “We had three podiums in the DEWALT® car, the DEWALT® car finished the championship in overall ninth, and the Irwin car finished 10th. To get both cars in the top 10 is something I’m really proud of. There were only two other teams that did that, and they’ve both been around a lot longer than Team 18.” But Schwerkolt is looking to improve on that in 2021. With Scott Pye behind the wheel of the DEWALT® car again, he wants to push the team further up the championship ladder this year. “To start the team from scratch, we had to build solid foundations and that is a massive job. If you want solid foundations, you have to find solid

people, and that takes time. Today I’ll say we have one of the best team cultures in pit lane.” Schwerkolt says DEWALT® car driver Scott Pye will be a key ingredient of the team’s success in 2021. “We needed the right person to represent the brand, and we looked hard and wide. Scott is very good at speaking and doing everything right for all the sponsors on the car. And he can certainly drive. He’s known for his passing moves and is exciting to watch. For him to win a British Formula Ford Championship is no mean feat. He has the skills to take us all the way. He’s the real deal.”

PODIUM BOUND

Naming rights sponsor DEWALT® is also right behind Pye and the team in 2021. “We’re looking forward to seeing Scott push the boundaries on the racetrack as well as some more podiums,” says Daniel Keyes, brand director at Stanley Black & Decker—DEWALT®’s parent company.

Schwerkolt says car driver Scott Pye is key to the team’s success in 2021.

“We were delighted to take the opportunity of naming rights sponsor on the Team 18 second car. DEWALT® is dedicated to bringing the most advanced tools to professional trades people. The DEWALT® Racing sponsorship alignment with Team 18 will give DEWALT® the chance to activate on and around the track, and at our retailers in the lead up to the race events which will allow us to engage with our end user.” As for Schwerkolt, he’s happy to record a win at any track. But there are a few tracks that a top-of-the-podium finish would hold extra personal significance. “Of course the iconic track is Bathurst. I also love going down to Tassie. That track has a couple of very tight corners and then a drag strip, so it’s about who’s got the best breaks and the most horsepower to win there. But growing up near Sandown, a win there would be pretty special.” 

CSS F.A.T. MAG 35


LEGAL MATTERS

Mandatory trades registration is being introduced for the Victorian building industry. Carpenters are up first, starting in 2022… this is what you need to know now. By Meg Crawford

Tick of approval

What’s in place now There’s already a registration regime in place, overseen by the Victorian Building Authority (VBA). Right now, you must be registered with the VBA to perform domestic building work directly for an owner costing more than $10,000 (including labour and materials); or provide more than one type of building work (such as plastering and painting) costing more than $10,000 (including 36 CSS F.A.T. MAG

labour and materials). This applies now to carpenters carrying out work worth more than $10,000 directly for clients, who are required to hold Domestic Builder registration— Limited to Carpentry (DB-L C). How will it change? The proposed changes have two main features—registration and licensing. In terms of registration, if a carpenter subcontracts to a builder they’ll need to be registered (it is yet to be determined whether this will be irrespective of the cost of the work). Second, if a carpenter is an employee (rather than a subby), the carpenter will need to be licensed. The VBA will oversee registration and licensing. When do the changes come into operation? Owing to COVID-19’s impact, it’s expected that the changes will only come

into effect early 2022. But, it’s not set in stone just yet. A lot of the finer details (like penalties for non-compliance and cost) are still uncertain. In fact, the Victorian Government has yet to issue a regulatory impact statement and the draft regulations for public comment. The expectation is that they will be released in the third quarter of this year for public consultation, after which there’ll be an opportunity for industry participants and the public to give feedback online. It starts with carpenters— who’s next? It’s anticipated that the regime will extend to other trades (including bricklaying and block-laying, waterproofing, wall and floor tiling, concreting, painting and decorating, plastering, roof tiling, glazing, excavating, landscaping and demolition trades) in the following years.

PHOTO: HANS SLEGERS

R

ecently, the state government made some changes to the trades registration regime for the Victorian building industry. Specifically, it introduced the Building Amendment (Registration of Building Trades and Other Matters) Act 2018 (Vic), which provides for registration and licensing of trades. The first trade to go through this process will be carpentry, and it’s expected that others will follow.


How do you go about getting registered or licensed? Unfortunately, that’s still up in the air too. Thankfully, industry participants like Master Builders Victoria (MBV) have been busy behind the scenes, consulting with government and advising about the different models that could be used. What is clear though, is that there will be time to bed down the changes. “A transition period is definitely planned,” says Ingrid Mountford, MBAV’s careers and registration manager. “The idea is that people will have time to go through the process and undertake any steps that are required in order to allow them to continue and keep working. The changes won’t suddenly come in and stop people from working in 2022. “However, what is possible is that people might need to do a little bit of top-up training, potentially, depending on whether they’re a qualified carpenter or not. That’s only potentially though.

And we’re certainly hoping that there’ll be good recognition for people who’ve built their skills over many years and are working in a really competent way to be able to transition into this new system.” What if I already do work over 10K and have registration? Again, it’s a matter of watching this space, but it’s anticipated that if you already have registration, you won’t need to register again under the new regime. “It’s likely that you’ll already be equipped to do this work—it’s not 100 per cent confirmed, but it’s highly likely that that will be the case,” Mountford notes. What should I do in the meantime? First, keep an eye on MBV’s and the VBA’s webpages for further developments. Next, especially if you don’t have registration already under the existing scheme, you may want to consider applying, given that it’s likely to

roll over under the new regime. “Get in, ahead of the pack, and go through the process of becoming registered now,” Mountford recommends. “And if you need some upskilling, there are specific units of competency you can undertake.” Is it a good thing? Subject to some important qualifications, from MBAV’s perspective, it is. “It’s intended to be part of a recipe for increasing consumer confidence. That’s really important to the industry. We want people to value the industry and trust the people in it. So, we feel that—provided this is done in a reasonable way, which includes having people who are already really skilled and qualified to do the work getting the recognition that they deserve— it will build consumer confidence. It will also raise the profile of the trades involved, placing them on a more equal footing with those other trades that are already licensed, like plumbing.”  CSS F.A.T. MAG 37


ADVERTORIAL

SAFER STRAPPING

W

ith various industry segments wanting to reduce workplace injury on worksites, companies are always on the lookout for innovative products to help employees remain safe at work. A product that has caused many injuries on various worksites in the past, is 19mm Metal Strapping, which is primarily used to strap bundles of large items/products in place. It may be useful to hold a bundle together, but when tensioned up and then cut, that strapping can unleash its fury on those around it. That is not the only problem with metal strapping as disposal after use presents problems of its own. It is a dangerous task, wrestling with lengths of sharpedged strapping while you try to fold or wrap it into a small disposable bundle. It is an exercise fraught with great danger. CSS and its Members, owners of the Impact-A range of products, have been

selling a safer alternative to the dreaded steel strapping for many years now. Impact-A Poly Woven Strapping Systems are rapidly becoming a safe, secure and easy to use replacement. Our 20mm Strapping and Buckle combination is rated to 1100kg breaking strain and provides a perfect foil against cuts and scratches that are sometimes associated with the use of the alternative. Poly Woven strapping, when cut under load, does not have the recoil of metal strapping, it is easily disposed of, is reusable, and there is a small potential for being cut while using it. The material used in your seat belt is a remarkably similar product to re Impact-A Poly Woven Strapping, and we know how strong and safe that is to use. There are literally hundreds of applications, across a broad range of industry segments, where the product can be used with great confidence, especially when performance and safety

are required. (Transport, construction, distribution, industrial engineering, farming and infrastructure for example.) In some industry segments some sites have banned metal strapping citing the dangers of handling and disposal for their reasoning. Poly Woven strapping does not kink and create weak spots. The buckles and strapping are reusable -if handled correctly when installing or releasing. There is no rust. The system is rated at 1100kg breaking strain. Get yourself started with a Strapping Starter Kit which includes 62mtrs of strapping, 100 buckles and tensioning tools, all stored in a sturdy toolbox. Larger 250mtr and 500mtr rolls and buckets of buckles are also available to purchase separately.  Impact-A Poly Woven Strapping is the industry’s safer alternative to steel strapping. Click on the QR code below for a demo and more information.

POLY WOVEN Strapping

the safer alternative to steel strapping IT’s Safer

IT’s Stronger

• Rolls are up to 1/4 the weight of Steel Strapping • No sharp edges to cut your hands on

• Tested and rated to 1100kg breaking strain (steel rates at only 904kg)

Scan the QR code to watch this video

It lasts longer • Buckles and Strapping won’t rust • Strapping is usable even if folded or tied in a knot !

POLY WOVEN STRAPPING A SAFER OPTION TO STEEL

STARTER KIT

POLY WOVEN STRAPPING POLY WOVEN STRAPPING A SAFER OPTION TO STEEL

A SAFER OPTION TO STEEL

STARTER KIT KIT INCLUDES:

• • • • • • RATED TO 1100KG BREAKING Code: 10028

1 x 62m x 20mm coil 100 x heavy duty buckles 1 x ratchet tensioner 1 x tool box 1 x manual tensioner Instruction sheet

STRAIN

www.constructionsupply.com.au Impact-A brand is owned

and distributed by CSS

STARTER KIT POLY WOVEN STRAPPING A SAFER OPTION TO STEEL

STARTER KIT KIT INCLUDES:

• • • • • • RATED TO 1100KG

1 x 62m x 20mm coil 100 x heavy duty buckles 1 x ratchet tensioner 1 x tool box 1 x manual tensioner Instruction sheet

BREAKING STRAIN

Code: 10028

www.constructionsupply.com.au Impact-A brand is owned

RATED TO 1100KG BREAKING Code: 10028

and distributed by

CSS

STRAIN

KIT INCLUDES:

• • • • • •

1 x 62m x 20mm coil 100 x heavy duty buckles 1 x ratchet tensioner 1 x tool box 1 x manual tensioner Instruction sheet

RATED TO 1100KG BREAKING Code: 10028

STRAIN

KIT INCLUDES:

• • • • • •

1 x 62m x 20mm coil 100 x heavy duty buckles 1 x ratchet tensioner 1 x tool box 1 x manual tensioner Instruction sheet

www.constructionsupply.com.au Impact-A brand is owned and distributed

by CSS

www.constructionsupply.com.au Impact-A brand is owned and distributed

by CSS

Strapping is easily lifting 550kg

Rated to 1100kg breaking strain

Get started with an Impact-A starter kit

38 CSS F.A.T. MAG

Won’t cut hands, and is easily disposed of


ADVERTORIAL

THE CUTTING WHEEL OF CHOICE

F

lexovit is Australia’s favourite cutting wheel of choice and remains dedicated to delivering local solutions to customers through continual improvement in safety, innovation and performance. Flexovit pressed its 1st abrasive wheel in Victoria, Australia on 25th September 1978. During 2020 the Campbellfield Plants unstacking robot cell (SR1) reached another productivity milestone passing 20 MILLION wheels. The revolutionary robot cell was installed at the plant in 2018, with its main purpose to remove current manual handing tasks, reducing the risk of work-related injuries for employees while delivering sustainable productivity gains and launching their manufacturing facility into the 21st century. Campbellfield’s Robot cell consists of

two robots pictured above with vision systems, advanced positional detection and recovery abilities. The first robot strips the Teflon separator from the wheels and stacks it in a removable trolley that is later transferred to the press. The second robot picks up the wheels and the aluminium baking plate, separates the wheels then presents them on a conveyor belt for the operator to check before packing into tubs or boxes. With a strong Dutch heritage and unparalleled abrasive technology, Flexovit are able to continually innovate and bring

new solutions to the market, proud to have been doing this for over 60 years, and are looking forward to what the next 60 years will bring. Part of Saint-Gobain, the world leader in the habitat and construction market, Flexovit provides high-performance abrasives solutions for Industrial, Trade, Mining, Automotive, Aviation and the DIY markets. Igor Giglio, CEO Australia & New Zealand, says Saint Gobain are proud to be serving and supporting CSS members with a local Aussie-made solution. 

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21/4/21MAG 10:07 am CSS F.A.T. 39


ADVERTORIAL

SEAL OF APPROVAL

B

ostik Australia’s new Seal N Flex range is a compact portfolio of high-end and high-quality sealants. These new generation sealants tick all the boxes in the application field: offering perfect adhesion without using a primer on common building materials and very easy to apply and tool. Once cured, the sealants are bubble-free, highly elastic, and weather/UV resistant thus ensuring a

durable, long-lasting bond. Seal N Flex One Plus is a low modulus, highly elastic, bubble-free polyurethane sealant. It is suitable for the general sealing of construction and expansion joints. Seal N Flex One Plus is a solventfree, non-staining formula and provides excellent weather and UV resistance. Seal N Flex Premium is a high modulus, high-performance polyurethane sealant and adhesive. It is suitable for sealing

construction and expansion joints, as well as joints in pedestrian walkways. This dual-purpose product can also act as a multipurpose elastic adhesive. Seal N Flex Façade is a low modulus sealant based on hybrid (SPUR) technology. It is 100% non-bubbling, will adhere to damp substrates without the aid of a primer, is extreme weather/ UV resistant, free from isocyanate and solvent and easy to tool. 

A SIMPLE SOLUTION FOR TEMPORARY HAND RAILS

Safety Boot A re-usable, cost effective base for constructing free-standing temporary guardrails. - Complies with requirements of AS/NZ4994.1:2009 and AS1657-2013 - Easy set up and take down - Can be used on most base materials

40 CSS F.A.T. MAG

Scan the QR code to watch video


ADVERTORIAL

MORE POWER AND PERFORMANCE

C

ordless innovation is more than just bigger batteries. It’s about creating battery technology and motor engineering that work together for optimum performance. With Makita’s 40V Max Heavy Duty Brushless platform the higher battery output is a genuine solution for high demand industrial

applications. The XGT tools and batteries have been designed to be highly durable with innovative smart technology and high output batteries. l High Durability - XGT is durable and built to perform. Reliable tools are a must for all professional applications, none more so than high demand industrial applications.

l Smart Technology - XGT tools and batteries have been designed with innovative smart technology. This unique communication process is the foundation for advanced technology, pushing the batteries and tools further than ever before. l High Battery Output - XGT is a genuine solution for high demand industrial applications. A combination of innovative tool design and higher output batteries for high demand applications. Need even more power? Makita brings 40Vx2 technology to the jobsite. Two batteries mean more power! Without leaving the 40V XGT platform you can get more power and runtime utilising 2x 40V Max XGT batteries. Makita-built brushless motors, along with two 40V max XGT Batteries, deliver the power and performance required for heavy-load applications. By using two 40V max XGT Batteries, you get 80V of power within one system. The increased power and performance allow XGT Cordless Equipment and Tools to rival corded tools and petrol equipment. 

CSS F.A.T. MAG 41


DON’T JUST WATERPROOF,

FUTURE PROOF.

LIQUID APPLIED TORCH APPLIED SHEET MEMBRANE

Fosroc offers your project a complete waterproofing solution. Combined with our concrete repair mortars, grouts, sealants, industrial flooring, protective coatings and surface treatments, we can provide you with a tailored construction solution.

Fosroc. Future proof.* Fosroc and the Fosroc logo are trade marks of Fosroc International Limited, used under license.


ADVERTORIAL

WHY NITOSEAL® PU IS THE BEST SEALANT FOR THE JOB

W

hen you’re looking for performance and productivity gains on site, consider the Nitoseal® PU range of elastomeric joint sealants. Available from Fosroc in a facade grade Nitoseal® PU250 and a trafficable grade Nitoseal® PU400, the range provides enhanced performance while helping to get the job done faster with less clean-up. Compared with other polyurethane sealants in the market, Nitoseal® PU: l offers gunning up to three times faster, especially in colder climates l produces much less stringing during application, which means time savings on clean-up. Nitoseal® PU cures by reacting on exposure to atmospheric moisture. It forms a waterproof and durable seal, acting as a barrier to rain, wind and dust. It’s ideal for exterior applications.

FAST FACTS

Nitoseal® PU250 ✔ Seals moving or static joints in building facades ✔ Weather resistant ✔ Excellent primerless adhesion to most substrates ✔ Flexible, one-component, elastomeric polyurethane sealant technology ✔ Low odour Nitoseal® PU400 ✔ Suitable for trafficable floors, metal and concrete water retaining structures and metal framed buildings

✔ Tough, abrasion resistant and chemical resistant ✔ Weather resistant, waterproof and durable seal ✔ Suitable for immersed applications when used with appropriate primer ✔ High bond strength ✔ One component, polyurethane sealant technology ✔ Fast skinning and fast curing ✔ Low odour ✔ Approved for potable water Visit fosroc.com.au to find the right products for your next job.

DRIPS? LEAKS? NEED A TRAY? GENERAL PURPOSE | HEAVY DUTY | METAL | AUSTRALIAN MADE

FIND THE RIGHT TRAY FOR YOUR APPLICATION GENERAL PURPOSE DRIP TRAYS • Polyethylene construction • Tough UV-stabilised poly resistant to wide range of substances • Variety of shapes and sizes available (including pouring tray) • Made in Australia

IN STOCK NATIONALLY

HEAVY DUTY DRIP TRAYS

• Choose from heavy duty polyethylene or galvanised steel • All trays include data plates with operator information • Variety of shapes and sizes available • Steel trays include integral grounding connector for earthing • Made in Australia

METAL TRAYS IDEAL FOR USE WITH CLASS 3 FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

AUSTRALIAN MADE = SUPPLY CONFIDENCE FM_Jul_Global Spill 2021.indd 1

7/05/2021 9:41:49 AM

CSS F.A.T. MAG 43


PUZZLES

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© Lovatts Puzzles

Brought to you by

ACROSS 1. Spread 5. Mammal, humpback ... 9. Use loom 12. Suffered 16. Spiny desert succulents 17. Dock 18. Greedy 20. Polar sea feature (4,3) 22. Introduces to solid food 23. Last-minute news (4,5) 24. Reworked (text) 26. Nil 27. Cabaret frontman 28. Pacified by medication 31. Writer, ... Dahl 32. Disinclined 34. Culminate in (4,2) 36. Hoo-ha 37. Varies 40. Argentina’s ... Peron 42. Hunger pains 43. Eloquent 45. Freed from blame 47. Construct 49. Embarked on 50. Secretly 52. European coins 54. Chopped 55. 1996 Oscarwinner, ... Sarandon 56. Smidgen 58. Open sore 59. Cougars 60. Short back & sides 61. San Francisco’s Golden ... Bridge 62. Moroccan capital 63. Remove rind from 64. Hoity-toity (2-2-2) 67. Common-walled suburban house 68. Neither ... nor that 69. Baby bird of prey 72. Cremation vase 74. Small carved figure 78. Affirmative vote 79. ... Baba & The 40 Thieves 80. Metal pen-point 81. Unprincipled man 82. Peace prize 85. Necklace components 87. Of vision 88. Geometric design style, Art ... 90. Without liability cover 91. Furtive glance 92. Walks with muffled tread 93. Pleasant

sanctuary 94. Bellows instrument 95. Verbal 96. Glove 97. Ann Miller or Gene Kelly (3,6) 100. Cheque butt 102. Wobbly 103. Music platters 104. Choose (government) 106. Dominate, rule the ... 108. Cantonese lunch, yum ... 109. Caviar 110. Wears, ... on 112. Biologicallyinteractive community 116. Pouch-like body part 118. Most timid 120. Locks 121. Cry of disgust 123. Hire agreements 125. Lout 126. Dive 127. Roadway border 128. Egypt, formerly United ... Republic 129. Oozes 130. Arrant 131. Stereo unit (2-2) 132. wDonations 134. Clutch 136. Sherwood Forest’s ... Hood 139. Fiendish 141. Coffin stands 142. Drawback 144. Imbue 146. Friendly word on meeting 147. Troubled 148. Gesture of assent 149. Separate entities 151. Anti-terrorist group (1,1,1) 152. Defray 155. Turn sharply 158. Barber’s honing leather 159. Yuletide fir (9,4) 162. Harvests 164. Funeral vehicle 165. Satire (4-2) 166. Undermined (efforts) 170. King’s time on throne 171. Tenor, ... Domingo 172. Presume 173. Stadium 174. Stomach parasites 175. Royal family name 176. Hayseed 177. Guitar sound 178. Put clothes on

DOWN 1. Waste matter 2. Covetous 3. Fruit confection on a stick (6-5) 4. Temporary relief 5. Money cases 6. In current state (2,2) 7. Repeat 8. Agnostics 9. Trounce, ... the floor with 10. Curving lines 11. Occurrence 12. Came to light 13. Trampled-on 14. Supply of new weapons 15. Destroyed (hopes) 19. Stupefy 21. Wine, ... spumante 25. Excavate mud 26. Admiral Horatio ... 29. Slake (thirst) 30. Lobbed 33. Computer displays (4-4) 35. Beaded counting frames 36. Noisy timepiece (5,5) 38. Tel Aviv natives 39. Withdraw to safe place 41. Lopsided 42. In itself, ... se 44. Hollywood is there, ... Angeles 46. Tasteless 48. Rental occupant 49. Scold 51. Land depression 53. Get up late (5,2) 55. Humans, homo ... 57. CD brand (1,1,1) 60. Yank 65. Insistently 66. Conned 70. Greek storyteller 71. Post receptacles 73. Drugs 75. 13-19 year-old 76. Oddly 77. You (archaic) 78. Truants 83. Fractures 84. Favours one leg 85. Author of The Power of One, ... Courtenay 86. Idolise 89. Porridge flake 91. Dance, ... de deux 92. Generating plant (5,7) 96. Folk tales 98. Powered by battery or mains (1,1/1,1) 99. Different

101. Batman’s alterego, ... Wayne 103. Court compensation 105. Game hunter 107. Loyalty 111. Achieve 112. Upsurge 113. Public drains 114. Nike symbol 115. Transcendental 117. Even though 119. Outflow 120. Shysters 122. Lamp fuel 124. Fire powder 132. Record players 133. Mi, ..., soh 134. Specks of sand 135. Poster girls (3-3) 137. Unhealthy 138. Car’s registration sign 140. Alliance 141. Carefree 143. Expressions of contempt 145. Non-drinkers 150. Puerile 153. 1920s extroverted woman 154. Supreme joy 156. Hoeing 157. Carrot-top 158. Woe 160. Apple Inc. device 161. Those people 163. Monopoly street, The ... 166. Under the weather 167. Mixing dish 168. Substance 169. Scientific information

Sudoku 

Sudoku 

CSS F.A.S.T. MAG 45


SOLUTIONS

Brought to you by

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TOP WORDS 1116 © Lovatts Puzzles


Drilling Tapping Reaming Countersinking Hole Cutting

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CSS STORE LOCATIONS CSS member stores are recognised by their ‘Proud Member of CSS sign’ displayed on their building. Be rest assured that the business displaying the sign is a trusted distributor of quality products that are backed by exceptional knowledge, service and support.

These stores might all be independent traders, but due to their alliance with the CSS group, they work as a collective and can offer a national distribution opportunity for customers who require it.

If you need a national supply arrangement for your business, contact your nearest CSS member store. AG & Trade

WA

QLD

Ross’s Diesel Service

Dowdens Industrial Products

Centenary Power Tools

Broome Bolt Supplies

Urenco Supplies

Banks Bolts & Fasteners

CFI

VIP Industrial Supplies

Brisbane Fasteners & Engineering Supplies

Emerald Industrial Supplies

Dalby General Steel

Desco Workplace Supplies

Flexistrut

THE

WORKPLACE

WA Bolts

L&T Venables

Warren Electrical Service

CQ Fasteners

DJ’s Steel & Concrete

The Bolt Place Bundaberg

The Tradesman’s Toolbox TRADESMAN’S toolbox

SUPPLIES

Jim’s First

Mount Isa Mining Supplies

Fraser Coast Bolts

Tradefix Fasteners

Wasps Industrial Supplies

Mandurah Bolt Supplies

NSW

Multi-Fix W.A.

Brands Building & Industrial Supplies Ortons

NT QLD

WA

Pilbara Tools & Fasteners

SA

Resources Trading

NSW VIC Flexistrut

A G M Construction Supplies

Hallam Bolts (Bolts & Moore)

Bayswater Bolts (Bolts & Moore)

Impact-A Fasteners & Construction Supplies

Kencor Sales

ACT

TAS

Melbourne Bolt Co

Northwest Belts & Bearings

FASTENERS & CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES

Complete Construction Supplies

Building Component Sales

No.1 Roofing & Building Supplies

CFS

Omer Tools Pty Ltd

Concrete Product Technology

Impact-A Kencor Sales Construction Supply Specialists

JA Smith Solutions

Tamworth Tools & Fasteners

Klenall Industrial and Safety

The Bolt Barn

Maddison Safety

The Tool Store

MD Steel Fabrication

Towers Engineering & Fabrication

Ultimate Fasteners Shepparton & Wodonga Mid Coast Fasteners

Ferntree Gully Bolts (Bolts & Moore)

Independent Fastening Systems

SA LM Trade Supplies

Visit Us At: constructionsupply.com.au

VEK Tools

yousta

NT TJ&H Agencies

Sullivans Mining & Hardware

Switched-On Electrical Supplies

Flexistrut

VIC

Able Air & Power Tools

Mektronics Australia

NT Fasteners

Build Tech Supplies

TAS Rapid Supply

Profile for Engage Media

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FATMAG JULY-SEPT 2021  

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