Page 1

2015

ISSUE

O2 SPRING

SAFETY IN ACTION

SHIFT YOUR WORK Natural can be hazardous

GETTING A HANDLE ON AN UNTAMED SEASON Safe company

AIMING FOR A BIG FAT ZERO

BE BEAR AWARE

Knowledge of body

A REAL PAIN IN THE BACK FRONTLINE FALL 2014

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SAFETY IN ACTION

SPRING 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PUBLISHED BY

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ON AND OFF THE JOB

President & CEO Cameron MacGillivray

Deliberately different

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Manager, Communications Amy Krueger Director, Communications Viola Midegs Editor Terry Bullick, Bullick Communications Design, Production & Project Management Kylie Henry & Katherine Stewart, Studio Forum Inc.

LIFELINES

Where in the world are you? In memoriam: Martin Tribiger High school safety 10 tips for using an ATV Staying fit anywhere

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INTELLIGENT GEAR

Distribution & Editorial Assistance Dana Banks

Contributors Bruce Allan , Jennifer Allford, Lavonne Boutcher, Mike Fisher, Scott Rollans, Anne Georg, Global Mountain Solutions, Des Kilfoil, Laughing Dog Photography, Trevor Millions, Ewan Nicholson, Perpetual Energy Printing McAra Printing, Calgary, Alta.

Frontline is published three times a year. Statements, opinions and viewpoints expressed by the writers of this publication do not necessarily represent the views of Enform.

Light hot

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Shift your work

BE BEAR AWARE

Aiming for a big fat zero

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FIELD NOTES

One tow over the line

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KNOWLEDGE OF BODY

27

ENFORM Q&A

Getting in and out of tight spots

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HOME SAFE

Surviving a bear attack took guts, and teamwork

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SAFE COMPANY

A real pain in the back

Copyright 2015 by Enform. For advertising rates or for consent to reprint or redistribute content in the publication, contact Enform at: communications@enform.ca

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NATURAL CAN BE HAZARDOUS

Getting a handle on an untamed season

To read this publication online go to enform.ca

enform.ca

ON THE COVER

Be Bear Aware photographed by Ewan Nicholson Photography, featuring Enform's Patrick Kearley, program manager , Industry Development.

To learn more about your safety and what Enform is doing to help you protect yourself, follow us on

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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On and off the job

Interesting and entertaining safety

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT

Cameron MacGillivray Enform President & CEO

“Frontline is great. I have never seen anything like it. It’s safety, but interesting and entertaining. . . . Nobody does that!” That was just one of the comments we received after launching the first issue of Frontline earlier this year. Our magazine is deliberately different. We want to show a new side of safety and what it means to you and the people around you. Thinking about safety differently is the first step to avoiding an injury, illness or incident. In this issue of Frontline, we bring you more interesting and entertaining content about working and living safely in Canada’s oilpatch. Be Bear Aware (page 9) gives you insight into the power and destructiveness of bears. While bear attacks on humans are rare, bear encounters are becoming more common as industry and recreation push ever deeper into bear country.

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ENFORM.CA

Being bear smart can help you avoid being bear bait. Just ask Bruce Allan and Greg Armour, who recount their run-in with a bear in the Home Safe column (page 30). Our other major feature story, Getting a Handle on an Untamed Season (page 14), looks at how spring’s arrival affects everything from driving conditions and the risk of robbery to icebergs on the east coast and spring flooding. Spring breakup has its own particular problems. Also check out Aiming For a Big Fat Zero (page 19), which looks at how Perpetual Energy set—and reached—a bold safety goal, and A Real Pain in the Back (page 24) for advice on keeping your back healthy. We will keep bringing you stories that nobody else does—and we welcome your comments about them.


GPS EQUIPMENT

From the latest hightech device to a simply ancient method, here are four surefire ways to figure out where you are and where you’re going.

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GARMIN MONTANA

This mountable hand-held device has a touchscreen, high res images and is loaded with the latest in global positioning systems (GPS). Use in vehicles, on ATVs and bikes and when deep in the woods.

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GOOGLE MAPS

Just download the granddaddy of GPS way-finding on your phone and you will always be able to find your way. As long as you can find an Internet connection.

IN MEMORIAM

LIFELINES

03 WHERE IN THE

WORLD ARE YOU?

STICK & SHADOW

Essentially a sundial, this way-finding technique is not for the novice. Before you put a stick in the ground and read its shadow, you will need to know about the earth's relationship to the sun and how shadows work. But, you don’t need a battery; see compassdude.com for method.

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COMPASS & MAP

A pure and simple method of finding your way. Pick up a compass from MEC (Mountain Equipment Co-op) and hit up the federal government for detailed topographic maps (visit nrcan.ca and search for topographic information) then head out into the Great White North.

LIFELINES WRITTEN BY JENNIFER ALLFORD

IN MEMORIAM MARTIN TRIBIGER

The Frontline team was saddened to learn of Martin Tribiger’s sudden death from natural causes in December. Martin was featured in photos for the Better Driving story in our first issue. He joined Enform in 1995 as journeyman carpenter during the construction of the Nisku location and later became the facility’s program manager. Our condolences to his family and many friends and colleagues at Enform and throughout the industry. PHOTO BY LAUGHING DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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LIFELINES WRITTEN BY JENNIFER ALLFORD

HIGH SCHOOL SAFETY

10 TIPS FOR ATV USE

HIGH SCHOOL SAFETY The very first time you walk onto a golf course, chances are you have no idea how to hit the ball. Well, it’s the same the first time you go to work.

“A new young worker who is all of a sudden put in a place that’s brand new for them may not be at their best,” says Glen McIntosh, manager, WorkSafeBC’s Young Worker program (worksafebc.com).

WorkSafeBC brings information about workplace safety in hazardous industries, including oil and gas, to tens of thousands of B.C. high school students every year.

YOUNG MEN Between the ages of 15 and 24 have a

40%

Young men 15 to 24 have about a 40 per cent higher risk of injuring themselves on the job than the general population of workers. “Those who are new or young often work in some of our most hazardous environments,” McIntosh says. He adds: "We really believe that creating a culture of safety at a really young age is going to benefit workers later on in their careers when they become employers, supervisors and potential owners of companies.” Not to mention helping keep them safe their first day of work.

HIGHER RISK OF INJURY

10 TIPS FOR USING AN ATV Keep it safe when riding an ATV for work or weekend fun.

Watch your speed

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Different provinces have different rules and regulations. Check out the law in your province. And, take an ATV training course

Always supervise riders under the age of 16 (in some provinces, it’s illegal for riders to be under 16)

Don’t overload. Only carry a passenger on an ATV designed for two people

Check the manufacturer’s guidelines to make sure the ATV is right for the rider’s age

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ENFORM.CA

Inspect your ATV before each ride

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Wear the right gear: certified helmet, goggles, long sleeves, long pants, over-the-ankle boots and gloves

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Stay off paved roads, unless you’re crossing one and it’s permitted by law; only ride on designated trails

Don’t drink or use drugs and ride an ATV or any other vehicle

Always keep both hands and both feet on the ATV


LIFELINES

STAYING FIT ANYWHERE

STAYING FIT ANYWHERE

Stay fit without a gym. All you need is about half an hour, a pair of sweats and a few simple exercises that you can do pretty much anywhere. Lenny Hansen, a certified personal trainer at MacDonald Island Park in Ft. McMurray, suggests rotating through five different exercises: squats, push-ups, burpees, sit-ups and jumping jacks.

SQUATS

With feet shoulder-width apart and arms at sides, slowly bend at knees until upper thighs are parallel to ground.

PUSH-UPS

Straighten legs and raise arms above head.

Lie face down on ground with palms directly under elbows. Lift abs to support spine.

Keep eyes on ground, breathe in and push up, exhaling and squeezing chest muscles. Pause at top; inhale and lower slowly, exhaling.

BURPEES

Stand with feet hip-width apart.

Squat and place arms on ground beside feet.

SIT-UPS

Lie on your back. Bend knees 90˚ with feet flat on floor. Place arms at side.

Tighten abs and thrust feet back into a plank position.

Immediately jump feet back between hands and then stand. Add a jump as you stand to boost your heart rate.

JUMPING JACKS

Exhale and pull up towards knees. Part way up, stop and tense abs. Lower slowly.

“Do rounds of each exercise and play around with it,” Hansen says. Combine a squat with a burpee or a jumping jack. “The more movement you can incorporate within that one exercise the more energy production you’re going to get and the more beneficial the exercise.” At first, rest for a minute or so between sets of squat/burpee combos and over time, reduce the amount you rest.

Stand with feet together and arms at sides. Slightly bend knees and jump up, bringing legs out and arms up.

Land with feet slightly wider than shoulders and your hands slightly bent above your head. Jump up and bring legs in and arms down.

“Studies show you can get more done in 15 or 20 minutes with these exercises in terms of intensity than you can in two hours in a gym,” Hansen says. “You just have to up the intensity of the work out and have no rest in between."

Just push yourself.

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Intelligent Gear

LIGHT HOT

Cutting through darkness in a whole new way

It used to be a flashlight was a flashlight. A tube holding batteries connected to a light and a lens. Not anymore. We’ve picked three handy personal flashlights that are game changers when it comes to cutting through darkness. WRITTEN BY TERRY BULLICK

GOBE 500 SPOT Billed as “the everything light,” the GoBe 500 Spot is small, lightweight and powerful. Its lithium ion battery can be recharged 500 times for about 6,000 hours of use. The light itself has low, medium, high and SOS settings. With 500-lumen capacity, the 20-degree spot beam is ideal for outdoor, diving and standard use. BELLS AND WHISTLES: charge indicator; lanyard; bar

mount; additional mounts and ballistic Velcro hand strap are optional. Order directly from lightandmotion.com for $179 (US); similar models available at MEC stores across Western Canada.

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ENFORM.CA

SureFire 2211 Luminox WristLight

SUREFIRE 2211 LUMINOX WRISTLIGHT The SureFire 2211 Luminox WristLight is something you'd expect on James Bond's wrist. You can almost hear Q telling 007 about its “tactical light output,” 300-lumen high performance LED and pistol/light alignment. The spy-worthy SureFire is also a fave of on-site paramedics and firefighters in the oilpatch. Shawn Guay of 911Supply.ca, says this watch wins the “arms race” for power and ease of use. It’s also impressive arm candy. BELLS AND WHISTLES: battery indicator; continuous

glow hands and markers. Available from 911Supply.ca in Calgary for $885.

FLASHLIGHT APP FOR IPHONE, IPOD AND IPAD Lemondo Entertainment’s app for handheld Apple devices is part novelty and part utility. It’s perfect in a pinch and for when you want to tiptoe in and out of a room without disturbing others. It features four modes: colour, fire, bulb and lighter. BELLS AND WHISTLES: SOS and disco settings, a live map that pinpoints your location, an altimeter and a compass.

Download for $1.19 from the online Apple App Store.


Shift Your Work

BE BEAR AWARE

WRITTEN BY DES KILFOIL PHOTOGRAPHY BY EWAN NICHOLSON

WHILE BEAR ATTACKS ARE RARE, BEAR ENCOUNTERS ARE BECOMING MORE COMMON, IN PART BECAUSE OF INCREASED OIL AND GAS ACTIVITY IN WESTERN CANADA. AS BEARS BECOME MORE ACCUSTOMED TO HUMANS, HUMANS NEED TO BE MORE BEAR AWARE FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Shift Your Work

CONSTANT CRAVING

CONTACT SEEMS INEVITABLE

All three Canadian bear species have one thing in common: their stomachs rule their lives. “Your typical black bear needs to consume between 20,000 and 25,000 calories a day,” explains Lyle Fullerton, a special projects manager with Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development. That’s about 47 Big Macs a day.

No one knows exactly how long a large black bear stalked the seven workers at a Suncor oilsands site just north of Fort McMurray on May 7, 2014.

“So it’s a lot of food that they’re looking for,” he says. Bears are usually shy and avoid people. But that may be changing. “You assume all that noise and change to habitat will deter wildlife,” says Kim Titchener, a Canmore-based consultant who trains oilfield workers about bear safety. “But in fact it attracts them.”

None of the workers knew it was there until it attacked Lorna Weafer, an instrument technician who has just walked out of the washroom. Her co-workers frantically tried for nearly an hour to save her, using air horns, fire extinguishers and a water cannon. But the bear kept coming back, and eventually killed the 36-year-old woman.

New research suggests bears like rehabilitated wellsites, for example, because the new green spaces provide berries and other delicacies. Meanwhile pipeline corridors, says Titchener, become wildlife corridors—more like a walk in a park for bears than a slog through the bush.

Weafer’s death sent an aftershock through the oil and gas industry, reminding workers and employers that while the risk of a bear attack is remote, it is real and can be fatal.

And thanks to people, hungry bears are finding more “human” food in the bush. Not just leftover lunches thrown from pickups, or garbage improperly disposed of at work camps and industrial sites. They also like the hard stuff.

“We have far more people out in bear country,” says Mark Boyce, a biology professor at the University of Alberta. “But the oilpatch is out in bear country. It seems inevitable that there will be more contact.”

“Lubricating grease, gasoline, diesel fuel, corrosion inhibitors like WD-40,” says Fullerton. “All of these things are found around industrial sites and bears are attracted there. They’re always looking for a new food source.

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“Bears are incredibly intelligent,” he adds. “We actually heard of a bear that learned how to open pick-up truck doors and get into the cab. I think in one night that bear was into a half-dozen different trucks.”

CANADA IS BEAR COUNTRY: IT HAS THREE SPECIES OF BEARS AND MORE OF THE ANIMALS THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.

BLACK They’re everywhere. Some 380,000 of them roam the woods and backcountry of all Canadian provinces and territories.

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GRIZZLY

POLAR

At least 20,000 in western Alberta, British

At least half the planet’s 25,000 polar bears

Columbia, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

live around and on the icy waters of the

Grizzlies use aliases: Brown on the West Coast

Canadian Arctic.

Measuring up: Males can reach two metres (more

and Kodiak in Alaska.

Measuring up: Some males stand three metres

than six feet) and weigh up to 135 kilos (300 pounds).

Measuring up: Males can stand 2.5 metres (eight

(nearly 10 feet) high and weigh more than 700

Appetite for: Mainly grasses, roots, berries

feet) high and weigh 365 kilograms (800 pounds).

kilograms (1,600 pounds).

and insects, fish and mammals. And black bears

Appetite for: Whatever they like, including seeds,

Appetite for: Mostly seals, along with the odd

never turn up their noses at garbage and

berries, roots, grasses, fungi, insects, fish and

walrus and whale carcass.

decomposing carcasses.

animals (dead, alive or rotting).

ENFORM.CA


ARE YOU BEAR SMART OR BEAR BAIT?

IF YOU REMEMBER ANYTHING, REMEMBER THIS:

WHY WAIT FOR A BEAR ATTACK? ACT NOW AND AVOID THE UNPLEASANT SMELL OF BEAR BREATH, OR THE DISTURBING SOUND OF A BEAR CHASING YOU. Whether you’re hauling water in a work camp, working along a cutline or planning a weekend camping trip, the best way to prevent a bear attack is simple: avoid the bear.

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SIGN LANGUAGE: Learn to recognize paw prints, scat, diggings and other bear signs. GET THE GEAR: Bear spray, air horns and other scarebear products. And learn how to use them BEFORE you need them.

Statistically, the chances of a bear encounter are low if you do the right thing, says consultant Kim Titchener. "Let bears know you’re out there, make lots of noise, and just be aware of your surroundings.”

HIKE IN GROUPS: Bears naturally fear humans, more so a gang of them. MAKE SOME NOISE: Better to talk loudly now than scream in fear and pain later. KEEP IT CLEAN: Garbage is a calling card for bears, and they will drop by. Seal anything with an odour (wastewater, unwashed cooking utensils, feminine hygiene products, cosmetics) in bear-proof containers. HANG IT HIGH: Keep food in a cache out of a bear’s reach.

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Western Canada is home to some 20,00 grizzly bears.

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Being aware of bear tracks, scats and other signs can help you avoid contact with the animal.

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A bear spray harness keeps the deterrent in easy and immediate reach.

TENT TECHNIQUE: Just you and your sleeping bag inside. No snacks, no toothpaste, nothing else. Think “bull in a china shop” with a hungry bear in your tent, and you’re the china.

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FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Shift Your Work

DESPITE THE BEST-LAID PLANS AND PRECAUTIONS, PEOPLE WORKING OR PLAYING IN BEAR COUNTRY MAY RUN INTO A BEAR. Usually it’s “defensive” situation: the bear is defending food, territory or cubs and wants you out of there. The other possibility is you’ve stumbled into a “predatory” situation and you’re in some deep scat. Defensive and predatory situations demand totally different reactions. Your life depends on it.

WHEN NOT TO POKE THE BEAR

WHEN TO POKE THE BEAR

If you run into a bear it's usually a “defensive” situation: the bear is defending food, territory or cubs and wants you out of there.

If a bear notices you and continues to approach, even hesitantly, you are in bad trouble. Scientists call this “non-defensive” or “predatory” behavior. Bears call it going for lunch.

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FACING A DEFENSIVE ATTACK:

FACING A PREDATORY ATTACK:

Think “submissive”. Don’t run. Don’t make any sudden movements. Don’t stare or make threatening gestures.

Don’t run, as much as you’d like to.

Talk quietly to the bear. Try to sound more calm than you feel. Back away slowly without turning away. Grab your bear spray, air horn, bangers or other deterrent. If the bear charges, use them. Don’t panic. Even if you’re knocked over, it may be a bluff charge. Remember the bear sees you as a threat, not lunch. Play dead by lying quiet and still, face down on the ground. Clasp your hands around your neck to protect it. If the bear flips you, roll back over on your stomach to protect your face and vital organs.

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Don’t play dead, or you could be. You must fight back as if your life depends on it. Because it does. You must appear dominant and intimidate the bear. Get aggressive. Shout loudly. Stomp your feet, wave your arms and hands. Don’t turn away. Stare the bear in the eye. Make yourself look big. If the bear closes in, use your bear spray, air horn or other deterrent. If you didn’t bring any of these, there’s no time now to reflect on your own stupidity—grab a stick, a rock, anything for a weapon and fight for your life.

Don’t move until you’re sure the bear has left the area.

You’ll likely be knocked to the ground. Keep fighting back. Keep using the bear spray, aiming at the animal’s eyes, nose and mouth. Stay on your back, kicking, punching and hitting with a rock, belt knife or empty pepper spray can.

Remember: most people survive bear attacks.

If the bear retreats, calm down but stay alert until it leaves the area.

ENFORM.CA


A NEW AWARENESS Much has changed in recent years in the relationship between people and bears. Despite occasional attacks, even fatal ones, many people think bears deserve respect and conservation. Wildlife officers were criticized in 2011 for shooting 145 “problem” bears in the oilsands region, after checks showed that humans leaving garbage behind often caused the problems. “I’ve seen a wide shift in attitudes towards bears, “ says Lyle Fullerton of Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development. “And I think that frontier mentality of ‘shoot, shovel and shut up’ has passed by. At least I hope so. People appreciate bears.” That includes people in oilpatch lunchrooms and boardrooms. Fullerton says corporate policy manuals are being rewritten to make bear safety training mandatory. Companies are also spending more money on bear-proofing and training. And the law is tougher. Alberta’s Occupational Health and Safety rules, for example, now require oil and gas company employees to report bear encounters and respond to them. Failure to do that can get you fired. Those changes, and the tragic death of Suncor worker Lorna Weafer, now have many frontline workers thinking of bear spray the same way they regard hard-hats and steel-toed boots: basic safety equipment. “I’m absolutely amazed at the change and how fast it’s happening,” says bear safety trainer Kim Titchener.

BEAR KNOWLEDGE 1

Learn more about bears at these links:

Play dead when facing a bear on the defensive. When a bear is on the offensive be dominant

Enform’s Bear Awareness: enform.ca/training/ bear-awareness-a.aspx

Seen a bear? Provincial wildlife officers in western Canada want to hear about it. Give them a call at:

BearSmart: esrd.ab.ca and search for bear smart

Alberta Fish and Wildlife 1-800-642-3800

Bear Safety & More: bearsafety.com

Sakatchewan TIPS line 1-800-667-7561

and intimidating. 2

A range of scare bear products: various brands of bear spray, two harness styles, air horn, whistle, bear bell and flare and banger kit.

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A blast from an air horn can a send a bear in the opposite direction.

Parks Canada: pc.gc.ca and search for bears and humans

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CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE BEAR KIND

British Columbia RAPP line 1-877-952-7277

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FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Natural Can Be Hazardous WRITTEN BY MIKE FISHER

ON AN UNTAMED SEASON Spring breakup is inevitable. It is also unruly and uncertain— and its annual arrival is always difficult to pinpoint. Frontline offers a variety of forecasts, predictions and observations

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ENFORM.CA

The winter of 2014/2015 may have been unusually warm in Western Canada, but spring breakup in the oil and gas industry remains as a much a mystery as ever. It may have happened weeks ago. It could be happening right now. What’s certain is that warmer winter temperatures are a double-edged sword: they may cut the bite of wind and chill, but they can lead to freezing rain, unexpected runoff and early road bans. Meteorologists, river hydrologists, market analysts, and transportation and petroleum services experts suggest whenever spring arrives this year, it will be messy. Keep your rubber boots handy.


SIGNS OF SPRING

ROBBERS & ROBINS

Robins are a telltale sign spring has arrived in Canada. Theft is a telltale sign spring has arrived in the oilpatch. The rise in activity at Alberta’s oilfields over the past five years brought with it an increased risk of theft. Million of dollars worth of equipment, including trucks, are pilfered each year. Even as activity slows due to lower energy prices, theft remains a threat. “Back in the day, oilfield theft was really bad,” said Mark Salkeld, president and CEO of the Petroleum Services Association of Canada (PSAC). “We’d do a complete inspection, weld the doors shut, bring in trucking companies and stack the equipment tight together so that it was as near to impossible to get into. I’d grind the doors, do my repair job and weld them shut when I had to go.” Those practices are still sound. Salkeld says companies may take equipment protection even further given that a downturn in energy prices could see many operations shut down beyond spring breakup. “You might bring it back to a trucker’s yard or your own yard and rack it behind a secure fence,” he says. “Sometimes with the cost of trucking equipment, it’s better just to rack in the field. Also, you’d like to arrange with your area manager or a local person to drive by and have a look at it every few days and check for fresh tire tracks or whatever. Ideally, you want to come back to a safe and secure site.”

BOB DYLAN SANG YOU DON’T NEED A WEATHERMAN TO KNOW WHICH WAY THE WIND BLOWS. But in the oilpatch, it’s always good to know which way the water flows.

W H I C H WAY T H E WAT E R F LO W S

Updates from Alberta’s River Forecast Centre can be invaluable. The centre tracks and reports river conditions and runoff across the province (see Environment.Alberta.ca for details).

“It’s too early for us to tell what the weather will be like at breakup,” says Bernard Trevor, the centre’s acting manager. “Closer to breakup, we monitor the forecasted temperatures closely to see if we’ll get a gradual or a sudden snowmelt."

The River Forecast Centre also looks at conditions that develop through the winter, such as overall snowpack, ice thickness and degree days of cooling, to give an indication of how breakup will progress.

In northern Alberta, where ice bridges are the wintertime link to remote areas, the timing of river breakup can be a concern. River-ice observation reports for the Peace and Athabasca Rivers, near the communities of Peace River and Fort McMurray, are used to help determine when ice bridges are no longer passable.

Continued on page 20

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Natural Can Be Hazardous

THE SPRING ARRIVAL OF ICEBERGS OFF THE COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR IS A MAJESTIC DISPLAY OF NATURE’S BEAUTY. KNOWN AS ICEBERG ALLEY, THE AREA IS ON THE DOORSTEP OF CANADA’S OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS OPERATIONS. SO ICEBERG SEASON PUTS OFFSHORE OPERATORS ON HIGH ALERT

DODGING DANGER IN ICEBERG ALLEY Many eyes are on constant watch each spring

“ICEBERGS POSE A THREAT TO THE FACILITIES OUT THERE EXPLORING, DEVELOPING OR PRODUCING OIL AND GAS BUT ALSO TO THE SUPPORT INFRASTRUCTURE SUCH AS STANDBY VESSELS AND SUPPLY VESSELS,” says Paul Barnes, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers’ Atlantic Canada and Arctic manager.

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The threat level changes every year. Hundreds of icebergs can appear one year and none the next. But when they do show up, keeping them at bay requires many eyes on constant watch.

“THE PEOPLE ON VESSELS AND PLATFORMS ARE WATCHING FOR ICE, AIRPLANES ARE FLYING OVER AND MAPPING THE ICE, AND WE HAVE SATELLITE SHOTS OF WHERE THE ICE IS THROUGH ENVIRONMENT CANADA,” says Dan Chicoyne, chief safety officer with the CanadaNewfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board, the offshore regulator that oversees and approves operators’ safety plans.


WRITTEN BY LAVONNE BOUTCHER

ICE MANAGEMENT IS A SOPHISTICATED AND HIGHLY COORDINATED EFFORT THAT MAINLY FOCUSES ON TWO THINGS: detection and deflection

DETECTION Detection is used to predict an iceberg's path before it becomes a problem; industry assesses icebergs with: 1

Aircraft surveillance 2

Detection equipment on support vessels 3

Computer analysis, trajectory modelling and satellite imagery to find out where icebergs are and where they’re going,

Sometimes deflection isn’t an option. Drilling rigs and floating production, storage and offloading vessels are designed to quickly disconnect from their subsea systems and move out of the path of an approaching iceberg. This happens well in advance in safe, controlled conditions.

Deflection kicks in when ‘bergs get too close; industry forces an iceberg off its course with:

Hibernia’s stationary platform has a gravity base structure with a 15-metre thick ice wall and is built to withstand the impact of a six million tonne-iceberg. A typical iceberg weighs about 300,000 tonnes.

Water cannons: blasting it with high-pressure water jets

DEFLECTION 1

Floating tow rope: lassoing it with a large rope and towing it away 2

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Prop wash: creating a wash or current with a supply vessel’s powerful propellers 4

Ice net: putting a net around it and towing it away.

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

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Natural Can Be Hazardous

TRUCK TRAFFIC

WINTER PAVEMENT F R O M WA R M TO WA R M E R

In the winter, clearing trunk roads, secondary roads or ice roads does more than remove slippery snow and ice.

Spring breakup in 2015 looks challenging due to difficult winter weather conditions, says Rodney Bantle, the senior vice president of Truck Transportation at Gibsons in Calgary. The company is one of the largest truck haulers of energy products in North America with a fleet of more than 3,100 trucks and trailers.

Clearing also allows the deeper penetration of frost, creating a strong surface that can support the weight of heavy transporters and equipment as well as any paved highway.

“It has been far from a normal winter, weatherwise, with large temperature swings leading to freeze-thaw conditions and periods of heavy snow and freezing rain,” he says. “Temporary road bans were implemented in many areas during the winter, which is uncharacteristic.”

During the spring thaw, truck traffic is often banned from these roads because they can’t hold up to heavy use (in terms of both volume and weight). For much of the oil and gas industry, spring breakup also means a spring break because activities temporarily stop when people and equipment can't get to and from sites.

Bantle expects many roads will be significantly degraded. “This may cause bans to be placed on roads earlier and the allowable weights on the roads may also be decreased to preserve the infrastructure.” Meteorologist Darr Maqbool of Darr Maqbool & Associates has worked closely with oil and gas producers in the province for two decades.

SPRING DRIVING TIPS

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ASSESS

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ENFORM.CA

He says many roads and communities will be affected. "Alberta has well over a hundred townships and a great number are in remote areas where trunk roads, secondary roads or ice roads over muskeg have to be used for the transport of heavy machinery and equipment required in the oil and gas industry,” he says. “Which bodes the all important and tough question: how deep is the frost level and how long will the ground stay frozen?” Added to the road condition equation is rainfall, which can turn thawing roads into sloppy bogs.

RODNEY BANTLE, THE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF TRUCK TRANSPORTATION WITH GIBSONS IN CALGARY, SHARES THESE TIPS FOR SPRINGTIME ROAD TRIPS.

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PLAN

INSPECT

SUSTAIN

Assess conditions

Work with your

Conduct proper trip

Companies can

constantly.

supervisor or prime

inspections and

develop thorough

contractor to decide

make repairs when

and comprehensive

when to go or when

necessary.

journey management

to wait, and to plan

and hazard

for changing road

assessment

conditions.

program.


Safe Company WRITTEN BY SCOTT ROLLANS PHOTOS COURTESY OF

PERPETUAL ENERGY

AIMING FOR A

BIG FAT ZERO

Perpetual Energy sets an ‘impossible’ safety goal

THE BIGGEST GOAL AT THE FIELD LEVEL, IS MAKING SURE THAT YOU, YOUR PARTNER, AND EVERYBODY WORKING WITH YOU GOES HOME SAFE EVERY NIGHT

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

19


Safe Company

AIMING FOR

PERPETUAL ENERGY

BIG FAT ZERO

FUNNY THING ABOUT PERSONAL SAFETY: WE ALL THINK WE’RE EXPERTS. AND WE ALL RESENT IT IF SOME KNOW-IT-ALL SUGGESTS OTHERWISE

W H AT A DIFFERENCE A DECADE MAKES

‘Yeah, I think I’ll chop a finger off at ten o’clock home in one piece.”

So, when Perpetual told its staff in 2009 that it was bringing in a “triple-zero” safety policy (zero injuries, zero accidents, zero spills), the company wasn’t surprised by the pushback. “Everybody said, ‘this is crazy,’ ” McCullagh laughs. “There’s no such thing as zero incidents! It’s impossible!”

“By the following year we were down to just over one. The year after that, just under one. And, in 2012 we were at zero.”

THIS IS OUR PROGRAM

3 2 1

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Inc. “No one wakes up in the morning and says,

Six years later, triple zero no longer seems like a pipe dream—and McCullagh is happy to recite the evidence. “In 2009, we had a recordable injury frequency of 3.65—that means, out of every 100 workers in a year, just about four of them had an injury that required medical attention.

4

2010

manager for Calgary-based Perpetual Energy

today.’ Everyone thinks they’re going to go to work and come

Perpetual’s recordable injury frequency per 100 workers

2009

personally,” says Michael McCullagh, safety

Management responded with calm persistence. “We told them, this is our goal,” he says. “We may not get there in the first year, but this is our goal and we’re going to keep on it."

REACHING ZERO

0

“All safety is personal, but people take it very

2011

2012


NO FINGER POINTING

W E ’ R E L E A D I N G T H E WAY

Perpetual’s triple-zero project began when president and CEO Sue Riddell Rose asked Jeff Green, the vice president of Corporate and Engineering Services, to look at the company’s safety record. Green assembled some of his senior field management—they dubbed themselves “the group of eight”—to tackle the problem. McCullagh, who was at the table, says everyone agreed about one thing: “We just weren’t hitting the ball out of the park.” Their first step was to do a better job of sharing data with foremen and frontline workers. “There was some tracking being done,” he says, “but the information wasn’t given out to the people who had their hands on the controls and were able to do something about it.” Those early numbers came as a bit of a shock to folks on the worksites— including Scott Nazaruk, production foreman at Perpetual’s Ansell operation near Edson. “Unfortunately, that’s usually the case, right?” says Nazaruk. “Out in the field, we think we’re doing great. Then you see the statistics, and you’re kind of mortified.” Nazaruk was more than willing to give triple-zero a try. “The biggest goal that we talk about at the field level, is making sure that you, and your partner next to you, and everybody working with you goes home safe every night.” Before long, frontline workers had taken full ownership of the concept, Nazaruk says proudly. “This is our program. We’re leading the way. We own safety. We’ve taken control of the program, and it works.” A key pillar to Perpetual’s triple-zero program is hazard assessment— training workers to recognize and report hazards, and ensuring consistent follow-through from management. “Field workers are so much more aware of the hazards that are around them, and they’re taking steps to eliminate them before they even get to the job,” says Nazaruk.

WE'RE LEADING THE WAY

Waren Gircyzc, production foreman at Vegreville, says his workers never hesitate before filing a hazard ID report. “Now that they’ve been doing it, and they’re seeing the results from it, they believe in it. They don’t have to think twice about wanting to do it. Safety is just a standard part of their day.” Gircyzc also credits Perpetual for sharing hazard awareness throughout its operations, through an internal website. “These hazard lists are available to everybody—all the foremen have access and can look at it anytime.” By pointing out potential hazards before the fact—rather than looking for human error after the fact—hazard assessment takes emotion out of the equation, McCullagh says. “People don’t think you’re pointing the finger at them—that they’re doing something wrong.” On the contrary he says, “All safety issues are management issues. Nine times out of 10, you either haven’t got a standard developed, or the standard you developed is inadequate, or you haven’t trained your employees on it.” With triple zero, Perpetual’s whole culture changed, McCullagh says. “Now, when things occur, it isn’t, ‘Well, what stupid idiot did that?’ Now we say, ‘What failed in the management system that allowed this to occur?' " Best of all, he says, a healthier workforce means a healthier company— with a healthier bottom line. “Once you have adequate standards that the employees have been competently trained on, your injuries go to zero. Your loss goes to zero. And you’ve got a much happier, more dedicated workforce.” Meanwhile, Perpetual’s WCB premiums have plummeted to $30,000 from $500,000. If triple zero has been a steep challenge, McCullagh’s not complaining. “It’s been very, very rewarding over the last six years—probably the most rewarding time in my career.”

WE OWN SAFETY FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

21


Field notes

ONE TOW OVER THE LINE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Check for hazards around you. If you’re near a road or traffic, place warning devices at least 30 metres (100 feet) in front of you and 30 metres behind you.

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The vehicle doing the towing needs to be heavier than or roughly the same weight as the vehicle being towed. Check the vehicle weight (GVW) on the plate on the driver’s door. Remember to add the load on both vehicles.

Do not use tow straps, chains or cables that can become killer metal missiles. Do not use a web sling.

Use recovery straps with proper loops, not hooks (think deadly metal missile).

Check the strap strength: it needs a minimum breaking strength (MBS) of two to three times more than the weight of the stuck vehicle. A three-inch wide strap will usually have an MBS of 13,500 kilograms (30,000 pounds).

Check the strap length: it needs to be at least six metres (20 feet) including the loops. Make sure it’s in good condition: no cuts or broken stitches.

Use tow hooks, hitch receivers and shackles rated to loads that are more than the strap's MBS. The recovery strap should always be the weakest link and snap first. Ask yourself again: are you sure you can’t get a tow truck?

If the answer is still no, attach the recovery strap securely to a load-rated component ONLY. For example, loop onto tow hooks, an engineered recovery device or a shackle with a pin-in hitch receiver.

The working load limit (WLL) of the shackle needs to be more than the tow strap’s MBS; frame-mounted receivers need to be rated to the required weight.


WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TOW

You know the feeling—you’re going along the road just fine. And then you’re not. You slip. You slide. You come to a complete slurping, sucking halt and realize you’re stuck up to your axle in muck (or water, sand or snow). The only way out is with a tow. The best way to get back on the road is with a tow truck. Not an option? These tips can help. WRITTEN BY TERRY BULLICK

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Position the pulling vehicle facing forward and within 10o of straight with the stuck vehicle. Ideally, pull the struck vehicle from the front. Make sure the pulling vehicle has a clear, straight path in front of it.

Lay out the recovery strap between the two vehicles and loop the strap onto a tow hook bolted to the vehicle frame or put the loop on a shackle that’s properly pinned to a framemounted hitch.

If using a threaded shackle, hand tighten the pin and then turn it back one quarter turn for ease of release later.

Never tie the strap onto the vehicle, slip the strap over a ball hitch, or attach it to anything other than a tow hook or framemounted hitch.

Only use one recovery strap (never two in parallel)—for options see Enform’s Vehicle Recovery and Towing Guidelines (Glovebox Version).

Drape a heavy coat or blanket over the middle of the strap to dampen any backlash if it snaps or releases.

DRIVING A COMPANY VEHICLE? Know your company’s policy on towing

and being towed. For more towing details, a checklist and how to tow with a winch, see Enform’s Vehicle Recovery and Towing Guidelines (Glovebox Version) at enform.ca.

Both drivers need to make a plan and agree on hand signals; those in the Winter 2014 issue of Frontline are a good example. Keep bystanders a safe distance away.

Have the towing vehicle accelerate slowly (to about 10 to 12 km/h). Once the slack is taken up, and if the stuck vehicle is facing the same direction as the towing vehicle, its can also accelerate slowly in low gear. Neither vehicle should spin its tires.

Slow and steady is best. If after three attempts the struck vehicle is still stuck, it’s time to stop and find a tow truck. Only remove straps when both vehicles are fully stopped and secured.

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

23


Knowledge of body WRITTEN BY ANNE GEORG AND TERRY BULLICK

A REAL PAIN IN THE BACK If you use your back to do it, you can end up with back pain from doing it. Here’s how you can avoid—and manage—back pain. Bending, lifting, sitting, turning, twisting. If you use your back to do it, you can end up with back pain from doing it. Back pain is pain we share. Eighty-five per cent of us will feel its ache and burn at least once in our lives. For about five to 15 per cent of us, that pain will become chronic, coming and going with little reason and no warning. Only a tiny percentage of our back pain is due to anything serious medically, such as a tumour or ruptured disc. Good back health usually comes down to two things: preventing back pain and managing back pain.

ONLY A FRACTION OF BACK PAIN IS SERIOUS

but you’ll want to get professional health care if:

Your intermittent back pain doesn’t go away

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ENFORM.CA

You experience severe pain that gets worse over several weeks

The pain makes you feel sick.

.


GET THE RIGHT KIND OF PHYSICAL

You might work long hours pulling and pushing, torquing and lifting heavy equipment. You’re always on the go, running around and up and down equipment all day. Being active at work doesn’t always mean you’re doing the right activities. An Ontario study found physical labour doesn’t usually make you more fit or help prevent lower back pain. So as appealing as it is to plant as yourself on a couch after an exhausting shift, you’ll feel better if you’ve active. Walk, cycle, swim, stretch—keep moving. Your back (and the rest of you) will be healthier for it. “You can avoid and even reverse back pain if you have overall good health, sleep well, are alert and physically fit,” says Geoff Schneider of Calgary’s Evidence Sport and Spinal Therapy. He recommends yoga and pilates for keeping core strength. His other advice: follow your company’s health and safety policies, and avoid drugs and alcohol when working and on rotation. Back pain is pain we share. Eighty-five per cent of us will feel its ache at least once in our lives. For about five to 15 per cent of us, that pain will become chronic, coming and going with little reason and no warning. The most common causes of temporary back pain are: Poor posture—sitting or standing Lifting something too heavy or the wrong way Being in an awkward position for too long, like bending forward Sudden over exertion.

SIT THIS WAY

If you’re a desk jockey at work, give your back a break by: Keeping things within reach; excessive movement can lead to upper back and neck pain Placing screen at work surfaces at the right height; when these are too high or too low, upper back and neck pain can set in Having a chair that supports your lower back in a slightly arched position and has armrests, which take stress from your upper body and arms Using an armrest whenever possible to reduce stress on your upper body and neck Taking your wallet and other stuff out of your back pockets Checking your chair: you want your feet to rest flat on the floor and to have two fingers of space between the inside of your knees and the front of the seat Leaning back: reclining slightly transfers weight to the chair’s backrest and takes pressure off your spine. A lumbar support device also helps.

FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

25


Knowledge of body

SMART LIFTING ESSENTIALS

Basic posture can prevent one of the greatest risks of back pain on the job—improper lifting. These simple rules from Workers Compensation Board Alberta’s Back to Basic guide can help keep your back healthy: Place your feet shoulder-width apart for good balance Bend your knees and engage your leg muscles Keep the load close to the centre of your body Lift gradually and smoothly, don’t jerk— and engage your core muscles for balance and back support Pivot with your feet, don’t twist your back while lifting Coordinate your lift when working with a partner. The more you lift heavy loads, the greater the risk of hurting you back. “Smart lifting is essential,” says Geoff Schneider of Calgary’s Evidence Sport and Spinal Therapy. He recommends using a lifting aid, or having an ergonomist look at how you’re lifting things.

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S I T S M A RT E R

Sitting has been called the new tobacco because both have many health risks. If the bulk of your working day is spent on your butt, you can end with upper back and neck pain. Or worse. Sitting is also linked to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, arthritis and some cancers. Counter the effects of sitting by: Being active away from the job Taking regular breaks while working: stand up, move, stretch (backwards, supporting your lower back with your hands), lift your arms, slowly move your neck from side to side Creating a better sitting area (see Sit This Way) Moving around in your chair. Cross and uncross your legs. Shift from side to side. Slide forward and back. Stand while speaking on the telephone. These movements keep muscles and discs limber. 3 ST E P S F O R B AC K PA I N R E C OV E RY

Do a small amount of activity and gradually increase. Walking and gentle stretches are good starts. Be more active as you can. Do as many of your normal activities as possible. Go slow and take breaks as needed. The more you can keep moving, the less chance your back pain will become chronic. As the pain goes away, try building core (stomach and back muscles) strength. This will reduce stress on your back and future back pain.

Talk to your health and safety coordinator for advice about avoiding or managing back pain in you job.


Enform Q & A

GETTING IN AND OUT OF TIGHT SPOTS

FROM SCALING REFINERY WALLS FOR REPAIRS TO HANGING OFF CLIFFS TO PLANT EQUIPMENT FOR SEISMIC EXPLORATION, OIL AND GAS WORKERS CAN FIND THEMSELVES IN SOME HARROWING PLACES. Ben Firth helps some of them get in and out of inconvenient and dangerous spots. A former professional mountain climber, Firth is cofounder of Global Mountain Solutions, a hazard management and rescue company in Canmore, Alberta. Frontline asked him about his work in the industry.

BEN FIRTH INTERVIEWED BY JENNIFER ALLFORD PHOTOS COURTESY OF GLOBAL MOUNTAIN SOLUTIONS FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

27


Enform Q & A

OIL AND GAS COMPANIES ARE VERY PROACTIVE ON HAZARD MANAGEMENT AND MAY IDENTIFY HAZARDS THEMSELVES

Q

Q

WHAT IS YOUR TYPICAL DAY ON THE JOB?

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TIGHT SPOTS YOU’VE HELPED OIL AND GAS WORKERS GET INTO AND OUT OF?

A

A

It changes with every project. Typically we work in the seismic exploration sector and we help access difficult-to-reach locations, whether it’s on mountains and glaciers, in canyons or getting across rivers. We get people to places beyond where vehicles can go. Other times we’re helping guys working at heights, hanging off ropes outside buildings, inside refineries or entering confined spaces. A lot of the industrial site work we do for oil and gas companies is rope access—using ropes to gain height to perform everything from nondestructive testing to welding an installation. Rope access is much cheaper and more efficient to get to hard-to-reach locations compared to other traditional methods such as scaffolding. And rope access is highly regulated and safe.

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ENFORM.CA

Typical tight spots on a seismic job would be down a steep rock face, where we’re moving a person with a variety of techniques, whether it’s ropes or rappelling. We’ll also climb over a mountain and plant geophones and seismic equipment and move seismic workers into that terrain. That could be everything from cliffs to crevasses and we’re really guiding and moving people safely around that terrain.

GETTING IN AND OUT OF TIGHT SPOTS


Q

Q

Q

HOW DO YOU PREPARE PEOPLE FOR THESE PLACES?

WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT YOUR JOB?

HOW OFTEN DO YOU HAVE TO RESCUE PEOPLE?

A

A

A

Before we take them anywhere, we create an overall risk assessment for the work site. We examine the location and determine if direct supervision is needed from one of our specialists. Then we give workers general awareness training on the site and cover any hazards.

Working with people on the ground. It’s awesome to bring people to the difficult terrain. That’s why we do this work, we like bringing people to those environments.

Ninety-nine per cent of our job is to help reach locations, but on occasion, we have been called in to respond to an emergency. We do that in a variety of ways. On a cliff face, we may use a helicopter with fixed lines hanging below it. We do anything and everything depending on what we deem to be the most acceptable option.

Their attention definitely gets hyper-focused and that’s why we’re there. The guys we work with are blown away by the environment.

A lot of what you do in a rescue is calm a person so they’re comfortable. It’s like calming anyone panicking in a difficult situation. On a rescue, they might not be injured but might be stranded on a cliff face or they’ve stumbled into terrain they probably shouldn’t be in. A lot of what we do is help people in terrain they shouldn’t be in. They’re not hurt, but they’re extremely scared and concerned.

Oil and gas companies are very proactive on hazard management and may identify hazards themselves. That’s when we get called in to manage the hazards to the level of risk that they’re willing to accept. We have rescue services available at all our jobs. If we can't depend on ourselves to get us out of difficult spots, who can we depend on? Specialized skills and tools are needed for the outside chance that one of our people or a regular worker gets hurt in a tight spot.

IT’S AWESOME TO BRING PEOPLE TO THE DIFFICULT TERRAIN. THAT’S WHY WE DO THIS WORK FRONTLINE SPRING 2015

29


HOME SAFE

WRITTEN BY LAVONNE BOUTCHER

SURVIVING A BEAR ENCOUNTER TOOK GUTS & TEAMWORK

MAIN PHOTO BY TREVOR MILLIONS INSET PHOTOS BY BRUCE ALLAN

What started as a relaxing morning jog along a hiking trail in June 2014 ended with a dramatic standoff with a black bear for two oilfield construction workers. “It was pretty tense,” says Bruce Allan who, along with longtime friend Greg Armour, was in Fort McMurray working on a scaffolding project for Syncrude. “I knew enough about bear awareness to stop, not make eye contact, back up and move slowly away.” Nothing worked. The bear kept coming. The situation escalated when the animal cornered them and came so close that Armour could have touched it. “We weren’t sure we were going to get out,” he recalls. Fearing the bear might attack at any moment, Allan picked up a rock to defend himself. “Things changed when I picked up the rock, because I had to mentally prepare myself to actually throw it.” They realized the bear wasn’t going away, so they waited for the right moment to escape. It came about 12 minutes into the encounter when the bear climbed a tree. They quickly slipped out of its sight and sprinted back to their vehicle. Allan captured the frightening confrontation on video and posted it on YouTube (see Pawzing Workout Resuming Workout at YouTube.com). It’s had more than 1.8 million views.

Greg Armour (left) and Bruce Allan credit their safety to working together, staying calm and relying on their gut instincts during a bear encounter near Fort McMurray. After the bear climbed a tree, the two high-tailed it back to their vechicle. 30

ENFORM.CA

Allan and Armour credit working together, staying calm and relying on their gut instincts for getting them out safely. “We were able to help protect each other and rely on each other to keep doing the right things to get us out of the situation,” Armour says. Both men had basic safety knowledge to draw on but weren’t carrying bear spray, bells or other deterrents. They’ve since purchased bear spray. And while the incident hasn’t kept them out of the woods, they now always have their guards up and neither of them will ever go alone. “It took the innocence of the trails away from me. You have to be prepared now when you go out into the wilderness,” Allan says.


Profile for Energy Safety Canada

Frontline - Safety In Action: Spring 2015  

As the leading resource for the oil and gas industry’s safety performance, we at Enform take our role seriously. And, we truly value the man...

Frontline - Safety In Action: Spring 2015  

As the leading resource for the oil and gas industry’s safety performance, we at Enform take our role seriously. And, we truly value the man...

Profile for enform
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