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Cover shoot // Photography: Søs Uldall-Ekman // Model: Ella Elvira wearing dress and top by Hilda Henri

Enfants Terribles Art is everything. Play is more.

EDITOR IN CHIEF & ART DIRECTION Céline Hallas Søs Uldall-Ekman ART DIRECTION, ILLUSTRATION & LAYOUT Julie Panton Studio

CONTACT MAIL: hello@enfantsterriblesmag.com WEBSITE: www.enfantsterriblesmag.com FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/enfantsterriblesmag INSTAGRAM: @enfantsterriblesmag

COPYRIGHT None of the content in the Enfants Terribles issues may be used without written permission from Enfants Terribles Publications. This also goes for any content posted via social media. We claim all rights to the name Enfants Terribles Magazine and all written words and photos surrounding the magazine. Allquestions regarding the content of the issues should be directed towards the editorial office of Enfants Terribles. In case you were wondering, that doesn’t mean we don’t want you to pin our content and share our pics for personal use on your blog for inspiration. On the contrary, we would be very honoured if you found our content worthy of sharing. If you do use our pictures on your personal blog or social media, please remember to credit us, link to: enfantsterriblesmag.com or @enfantsterriblesmag #enfantsterriblesmag


Magazine

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Magazine


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Content


EDITOR’S LETTER

9

CONTRIBUTORS

13

ART FEATURE - KIRA GOTTLIEB

15

CREATIVE SPACE

25

LOOKING FOR TENDS

29

EDITORIAL - STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS

41

BOOKS ON ART

47

COLORFUL COPENHAGEN ILLUSTRATION FEAT. STINE MARIA AALYKKE

53 61

EDITORIAL - ART IN HISTORY

63

CHILDREN’S VOICES ON ART

93

STORYTELLERS - LISA AISATO

109

INSTAGRAM FEATURE @ROCKTHATMUSEUMKID

121

EDITORIAL - BEACH AS ART

129

ILLUSTRATION FEAT. KATRINE MARIE NIELSEN

139

EDITORIAL - COLLAGE ENFANTINE

143

ADVERTORIAL - THE STORY OF MARMAR

157

EDITORIAL - THE COLORS OF KEROUAC

171

FAMILY PORTRAIT - THE LIDDIARD FAMILY

185

ADVERTORIAL - TRAVELLING TOGETHERNESS

197

ILLUSTRATION - FEAT. SOOSH

217

DIY - PAINT WITH NATURE

221

EDITORIAL - ZOOM

225

PARENTING COLUMN- COUNTING TO THREE

237

THANKS FOR READING, NOW GO PLAY...

242


www.igloindi.com #igloindi

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TO DO - look at art - be art - make art - show art - art - art art


Dear Readers, Art is everything. Play is more. This is the title of our 13th issue. Art has from the beginning played an essential role in this magazine. This time we decided to go all in and make art our muse. So we played with art, we danced with art and we tried to push the limits of our own lazy imaginations in search for that secret gateway to the place where art and play meet and magic happens.

Every day we forget. We forget what art can do to, for and with us. And we forget that playing is the secret shortcut to our playful soul. Art is food for our starving imagination. Art is how we learn better, faster and deeper. For children, playing is like breathing. They must play in order to stay alive. If they don’t, their special superpower play forces fade away and they become sad miniature adults. It’s much the same when it comes to creativity. Most children draw as a part of their daily routine. They can produce insane amounts of fantastic drawings in a matter of minutes and they have about a thousand new ideas for each hour lived. Every day children explore, play and exercise their imagination and creativity. This is their secret: They know that our imagination is like a muscle, only even more awesome. If you exercise and practise your imagination everyday it becomes stronger, better and you become you and life becomes more fun. Simple as that. Art and play. Together. If you ask us, it doesn’t get much better than this. Time for some imagination work out. Happy reading & Thank you for being here. Søs and Céline

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Grown up busy life is tough and most of the time we’re too preoccupied with everyday tasks (and social media) to do anything even remotely playful, let alone art inspired. We bet a lot of kids feel sad for us weirdo grown ups who say things like: “I don’t know how to draw” or “I get dizzy on the swings” or I can’t play with you now I have to work/cook/pee/read”.


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CONTRIBUTORS REGULARS Céline Hallas Søs Uldall-Ekman Julie Panton Marieke Das Danielle Chassin Josephine Dohlmann

THIS ISSUE

ART Kira Gottlieb Kathrine Marie Nielsen Stine Maria Aalykke Soosh

CHILDREN’S VOICES Hazel Isaac Walker Julia Jackson Joseph Eddie Ethan Ryan

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Monika Elena Marliese Carmona Karla Fuenmayor Kristen Runge Julie A. Martin Stephanie Matthew Heather Rome Maris Boling Lisa Aisato Mille Maria Nybo Steffen-Nielsen Nadia Schnack Merilee Liddiard


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www.theponyplanet.com @theponyplanet

WHEN PUPPETS PLAY WITH ART Interview and edit by Søs Uldall-Ekman Styling Josephine Dohlmann Photography Céline Hallas

Kira Gottlieb is a young Danish artist working with puppets and textile sculptures as a medium for her art. As a kid she loved comicstrips and graphic novels, and would write and draw her own stories. Storytelling and characters have always interested Kira, and today these elements are still very much a part of her creative process. She uses humor and irony alot and likes to create a story around each of her dolls. For this issue on Art and Play we’ve asked Kira to tell us a little bit about her approach to art and the creative process that lies behind making art with puppets.


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ABOUT KIRA Kira Gottlieb. 31. Artist. Lives in Copenhagen.

ON INSPIRATION “Inspiration comes to me in various forms. It can come from reading just a simple word and thinking about its connotation to watching a person stand out in a crowd and imagine what life this person lives. People, who dare to be themselves really fascinates me. Nobody is perfect, but many people today put a huge effort into presenting only a polished and flawless side of themselves. But flaws are the best part, it is


what makes the story, the drama, and keeps it interesting. I guess I through my puppets and creatures, try to enhance the concept of imperfection, where their flaws and weird expressions are what makes them lovable and relatable.”

ANIMAL FASCINATION “Animals, is another fascination of mine - Animals, for what we know, can’t reflect on their own existence. This I find really amusing, and I guess it is also why, I try to humanise my animal puppets by giving them human expressions and personalities.”


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LETTING YOUR MIND WANDER LIBERATES CREATIVE POWERS “I always have various projects going on at the same time. My mind constantly wanders off in different directions. I will start on a project one day, that I might finish that same night, or I’ll decide to combine it with a piece I did 6 months ago or I will spend a whole day fiddling around with something, that will never become anything. This free flowing creative process is both fantastic and at times very frustrating. But the best work and projects I’ve done so far, are the ones I’ve allowed to “grow” over time, and ripe - a little bit like an avocado. Meanwhile, while you allow one project to ripen, other ideas take over, and a few of them eventually ends up as a presentable pieces of work in the form of either a detailed character figure, a three dimensional abstraction that either hangs, stands, sits or is shot on camera and transformed into an animation or an illustration.”

ON CREATIVE SPACE “As I work mostly in 3D, space is fairly important to me. I need room to mess around. A space where I can create a chaos I don’t have to clean up after right away. Good natural light and air is of course also very important for my workflow. But most importantly is privacy. I need to be able to close the door and be by myself when I need to and not be intererupted. When I shut everything and everyone out, I work the best.

3 most important things to you when creating? A good nights sleep. No appointments or sudden intereruptions. Good background music.

3 best sources of inspiration? Learning new things. Meeting new people. Going new places.

Why is art important to you? “Art is for me the essence of human communication, where you can express thoughts, feelings and activate the sense organs, in ways you are not able to verbally. There is so much more to this world, than we think we


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART FEATURE

know - and I feel art can show us glimpses of these other dimensions and teach us new things, make us think differently and ultimately make our lives better.�

Any recommendation for other artist to check out? My top 4 (at the moment) : Erwin Wurm Laurie Andersson Mike Kelley Agnes Martin


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CREATIVE

SPACE by Josephine Dohlmann Photography CĂŠline Hallas Let the creation begin by making room and space for your kids to unfold. Bring out their talent and let their creativeness fly and let loose. Here we bring you our take on making a room for painting, craftsmanship and music. All spaces to embrace the wonderful magic found in the world of art.

Paintings: Husik Mit Navn & Asemota Photo: The Pony Planet Book: Postkort fra Langestrand By Malk De Koijn


Screenwall: Showpiece by Vildfang Photo: Acne Paper Magazine Lamp: Lampadina by Achille Castiglioni for Floss


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Wall Art: Vildfang Drums: George Hennesey Chair: Rex Lounge Chair by Niko Kralj


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Photographer Céline Hallas


Dress RaspberryPlum

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EYES


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FRILLS


Bow Fäfä Shirt Wolf and Rita Skirt Christina Rohde

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FAKE FURS Blue fur Christina Rohde Striped leggings Christina Rohde Yellow Fur Molo Bow Fäfä


GREEN

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Dress Mads Nørgaard Thermosjacket Petit by Sofie Schnoor


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VELVET


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Con

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Photography & Art Julie A Martin

Stream of nsciousness


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — BOOKS

on art by Marieke Das

FROM YOUNG TO OLD[ER] Playing, art is all about sensing and imagining. It starts with the sensing of different materials, seeing colours, shapes. I believe there’s an creative intelligence that’s much harder to measure than the analytical intelligence, but just as useful, and, with today’s problems, maybe more so! Imagination [not fantasy, imagination] is what make us able to imagine what the consequences are of our actions. And it causes you to sympathize, come up with new solutions, understand what the world looked like 100 million years ago, and so so much more. So start of young. Ask kids questions to make them think. What other ways can you come up with on using a fork? What do you think that lady across the street is going to do today? Help them use their imagination. So play with your kids. Imagination is play, is knowledge, is art.


New-borns’ vision is pretty non-existent. Smell, hearing and touch are the first senses to work properly, which is a good thing in my case, considering how I looked after given birth. Still weird the smell didn’t put them of. High contrast is a great thing, my kids loved to look at the black and white pictures I drew them. There are more contrast cards out there, but it’s a great idea to give them quality imagery right from the start. Artists included are, among many others, Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, Kazimir Malevich and Takashi Murakami.

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Art for baby


Pantone color book I would love to have had this as a kid. I still do now. The subtle difference in colors, the way they make kids see that a lion can be all yellow and still have contrast. It’s a great piece of art. Or book.

Mix It Up! – Herve Tullet In this book, you HAVE to use your imagination and let the colours MIX IT UP! This wonderful book makes you see books differently [as do the other books by this author, like Press here and Let’s play]. Follow the instructions, and suddenly colours do all kind of weird and lovely things, thanks to your imagination.


Harold and the Purple Crayon – Crockett Johanson

The Day the Crayons Quit – Drew Daywalt, Oliver Jeffers

Little Harold and his purple crayon take a walk in the moonlight. Lovely story on how a crayon can be such a great companion on an adventure. Kae sure to check your kids pockets for purple crayons after reading this. Unless you needed spotted purple underwear. Then don’t.

Another story using crayons. Hope your using the water soluble ones… When Duncan decides to color, he finds letters instead of crayons. They’ve decided to quit. Theyr are tired of being jealous or used. It’s almost like a desperate houswives episode :-) I love the pictures by Oliver Jeffers, and the stroy is wonderfully unique. I hoped it would make my kids treat there art supplies with more attention.


Wreck this Journal – Keri Smith This for the older kids, and their parents. You could say it is already a classic. This journal doesn’t want you to write about your boring life. [just talking about my life, why take it personal if its not true] This book has to be wrecked like Miley would. PAINT IT, THROW IT, SQUASH IT AND SIT ON IT.


If... – Sarah Perry I haven’ t seen this book in real life, but it’s on my wish list. I love the idea of asking ‘what if’ and it’s something i try to do with my kids [ tip; try googling thinker keys!] What if….. zebras had stars and stripes...,If worms had wheels.... This book makes your kids think twice and creep out about the ideas like what if caterpillars was toothpaste… can’t wait to ask and show. What if we all made a book illustrating our questions?

Drawing for the Artistically Undiscovered – John Cassidy and Quentin Blake When you’re my age, and you liked to read since you were a kid, Quentin Blake equals the great stories of Roald Dahl. But he actually made more books, one of which is brilliant in developing your drawing skills. This book is a guide to drawing techniques. Of course the drawings are just really funny and helpful, and the book comes with a sketch pen and two watercolour pencils!


COLORFUL COPENHAGEN - original and personal spaces of Nadia Schnack by Josephine Dohlmann Photography Celine Hallas

W

ith a passion for decor, color and patterns, Nadia Schnack, interior consultant, has created these personal and beautiful rooms for her kids Maggie and David. The two spaces are filled with originality by using wallpaper and color to draw both the eyes and the imagination into another world of art, creation and play.


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — HOME OF NADIA SCHNACK


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — HOME OF NADIA SCHNACK


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Nadia Olive Schnack, creative consultant & Adam Schnack, realtor and owner of Realtor Adam Schnack A/S David Ulrik Schnack, 7 years & Maggie Gaja Schnack 5 years.

Contact www.nadiaoliveschnack.com @nadiaschnack

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Home of


Artwork by Stine Maria Aalykke @yeswecancan • Facebook


ART IN HISTORY

- Cardboard, Paper and Play by Søs Uldall-Ekman

A

rt is a part of our story. A magical timemachine that allows us to peek into worlds that are long gone and to travel in times that are not ours. Art is a part of who you are. Children use art to play and create. They make and believe and imagination becomes reality. Across the world, over thousands of years, artistic souls have created all kinds of fantastic art and creative projects, from hands on the walls of dark caves and unbelievable golden palaces, to breathtaking churches and astonishing galleries. The art these people left for us to see, tells us a story about what mattered to them and how they lived life in their time.


PREHISTORIC ART CUEVA DE LAS MANOS (Spanish for Cave of Hands) is a cave or a series of caves located in the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, 163 km (101 mi) south of the town of Perito Moreno. It is famous for (and gets its name from) the paintings of hands. The art in the cave dates from 13,000 to 9,000 years ago. Several waves of people occupied the cave, and early artwork has been carbon-dated to ca. 9300 BP (about 7300 BC). The age of the paintings was calculated from the remains of bone-made pipes used for spraying the paint on the wall of the cave to create silhouettes of hands. (Source)


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H&M Studio Kids (Grimur Noi)


Monkind Berlin + Tootsa Macginty (Loa Bjørk)

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ANCIENT EGYPT THE BOY PHARAOH TUTANKHAMEN In Ancient Egypt, mummies were adorned with masks that represented the face of the deceased. The mask conveyed a face to the dead person for their trip to the afterlife. Most famous of these is the mask of the boy pharaoh, Tutankhamen (13411323 B.C.) unearthed in the Valley of Kings by Howard Carter’s team in 1922. Now residing in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, the 24.5 pound mask is a golden work of art that has become emblematic of Ancient Egypt. (Source)


ANCIENT GREECE APHRODITE SCULPTURE Greek sculpture from 800 to 300 BCE took early inspiration from Egyptian and Near Eastern monumental art, and over centuries evolved into a uniquely Greek vision of the art form. Greek artists would reach a peak of artistic excellence which captured the human form in a way never before seen and which was much copied. Greek sculptors were particularly concerned with proportion, poise, and the idealised perfection of the human body, and their figures in stone and bronze have become some of the most recognisable pieces of art ever produced by any civilization. (Source)


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Amiki Children (Ella Elvira)


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Nikolia Kid (Malou Hildur)


RENAISSANCE

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART IN HISTORY

THE BIRTH OF VENUS BY SANDRO BOTICELLI The word Renaissance, literally meaning “Rebirth” in French, first appeared in English in the 1830s. The Renaissance was a cultural movement that profoundly affected European intellectual life in the early modern period. Renaissance scholars employed the humanist method in study, and searched for realism and human emotion in art. Completed in 1486, Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus has become one of the most heralded works of the Renaissance and a lasting symbol of feminine grace and beauty. The birth of Venus depicts several gods. Venus, goddess of love, stands demurely on the seashell, being blown to shore by Zephyr, god of the west wind. There, one of the Horae, goddesses of the seasons, is ready with a cape to clothe the newborn deity. The fourth figure carried by Zephyr is meant to be either an Aura (nymphs of the wind) or Chloris, a nymph associated with spring and blossoming flowers like those flowing through the picture. (Sources: here and here)


BAROQUE The Baroque is often thought of as a period of artistic style that used exaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce drama, tension, exuberance, and grandeur in sculpture, painting, architecture, literature, dance, theater, and music. The style began around 1600 in Rome and Italy, and spread to most of Europe. The word “Baroque”, like most periodic or stylistic designations, was invented by later critics rather than practitioners of the arts in the 17th and early 18th centuries. It is a French transliteration of the Portuguese phrase “pérola barroca”, which means “irregular pearl”. Baroque painting often dramatizes scenes using chiaroscuro light effects; this can be seen in works by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Le Nain and La Tour. The Flemish painter Anthony van Dyck developed a graceful but imposing portrait style that was very influential, especially in England. (Source)


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H&M Studio Kids + MarMar + Adidas (Elvis Harald)


Nikolia Kid + Braveling (Loa Bjørk)


ROCOCO

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART IN HISTORY

Rococo is a portmanteau word combining both “rocaille” (French for “shell”) and “barocco”, Italian for Baroque, the art style preceding the Rococo period. Rococo art extensively feature shell-shaped curves and wave-like motifs, particularly in its sumptuous furniture design and interior décor. Rococo art was far from political, as it never carried any serious message; heck, it doesn’t even have a message. Just like critics of cheesy bubblegum pop music feel nostalgic towards older music, most probably, Rococo art critics reminisced about the good old days of great art, such as the Baroque art of Louis XIV’s era or Renaissance art. Ironically, the frivolity of the Rococo style is symptomatic of the indifference of the royalty and aristocracy who were largely silent as their nation slid downwards. It’s also ironic that while the French political dominance was vanishing before their eyes, their dominance became confined mostly in the sphere of art and culture. Rococo art was never characterized as revolutionary or great. (Source)


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ROMANTICISM MARIE ANTOINETTE WITH A ROSE (1783) by Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun. The daughter of a pastelist and a hairdresser, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (1755–1842) painted and befriended Marie Antoinette, escaped the horrors of the French Revolution, and forged a career as one of the 18th-century’s greatest portraitists. Romanticism was a cultural movement that started in Europe. It was somewhat of a reaction to the Industrial Revolution which occurred during the same time period. The Romantic Movement started at the end of the 1700’s and reached its peak in the early 1800s. The characteristics of Romantic art are focused on emotions, feelings, and moods of all kinds including spirituality, imagination, mystery, and fervor. The subject matter varied widely including landscapes, religion, revolution, and peaceful beauty. The brushwork for romantic art became looser and less precise. (Source)

Monnalisa + MarMar + Designers Remix (Malou Hildur)


Morley for kids (Mia Stella)


IMPRESSIONISM

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART IN HISTORY

SOLEIL LEVANT (Impression, Sunrise) by Claude Monet (1872) Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement that originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s. Impressionist painting characteristics include relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. The Impressionists faced harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France. The name of the style derives from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which provoked the critic Louis Leroy to coin the term in a satirical review published in the Parisian newspaper Le Charivari. (Source)


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POST-IMPRESSIONISM VASE WITH TWELVE SUNFLOWERS by Vincent Van Gogh (1888). One of the most influential figures of the Post-Impressionism movement in France, Vincent Van Gogh is also seen as a seminal pioneer of 20th century Expressionism. The Post-Impressionists were dissatisfied with what they felt was the triviality of subject matter and the loss of structure in Impressionist paintings, though they did not agree on the way forward. Working in Arles, Van Gogh completed a series of paintings that exemplify the artistic independence and proto-Expressionist technique that he developed by the late 1880s, which would later strongly influence Henri Matisse (1869–1954) and his circle of Fauvist painters, as well as the German Expressionists. Expressionist artists sought to express the meaning of emotional experience rather than physical reality. Vincent van Gogh relied upon saturated colors and broad brushstrokes to evoke the inner turmoil of the artist. Along with Gauguin, he experimented with new approaches to painting and rejected academic representation, fine finish, and the Impressionists’ fixation on opticality. (Sources here and here)

Colchik + MarMar (Grimur Noi)


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Airfish (Ella Elvira)

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FAUVISME

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WOMAN WITH A HAT (1905) by Henri Matisse. After viewing the boldly coloured canvases of Henri Matisse, André Derain, Albert Marquet, Maurice de Vlaminck, Kees van Dongen, Charles Camoin, and Jean Puy at the Salon d’Automne of 1905, the critic Louis Vauxcelles disparaged the painters as “fauves” (wild beasts), thus giving their movement the name by which it became known, Fauvism. Fauvism is the style of les Fauves (French for “the wild beasts”), a loose group of early twentieth-century modern artists whose works emphasised painterly qualities and strong color over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism. While Fauvism as a style began around 1900 and continued beyond 1910, the movement as such lasted only a few years, 1904–1908, and had three exhibitions. The leaders of the movement were Henri Matisse and André Derain. The paintings of the Fauves were characterized by seemingly wild brush work and strident colors, while their subject matter had a high degree of simplification and abstraction. Fauvism can be classified as an extreme development of Van Gogh’s Post-Impressionism fused with the pointillism of Seurat and other Neo-Impressionist painters, in particular Paul Signac. (Source)


CUBISM MARIE-THÉRÈSE AU BÈRET ROUGE ET COL DE FOURRURE (1937) PICASSO PAR DORA MAAR (1936) Cubism was one of the most influential visual art styles of the early twentieth century. It was created by Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973) and Georges Braque (French, 1882–1963) in Paris between 1907 and 1914. The French art critic Louis Vauxcelles coined the term Cubism after seeing the landscapes Braque had painted in 1908 at L’Estaque in emulation of Cézanne. Vauxcelles called the geometric forms in the highly abstracted works “cubes.” Other influences on early Cubism have been linked to Primitivism and non-Western sources. The stylization and distortion of Picasso’s ground-breaking Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (Museum of Modern Art, New York), painted in 1907, came from African art. Picasso had first seen African art when, in May or June 1907, he visited the ethnographic museum in the Palais du Trocadéro in Paris. The Cubist painters rejected the inherited concept that art should copy nature, or that they should adopt the traditional techniques of perspective, modeling, and foreshortening. They wanted instead to emphasize the two-dimensionality of the canvas. So they reduced and fractured objects into geometric forms, and then realigned these within a shallow, relieflike space. They also used multiple or contrasting vantage points. (Source)


Monnalisa + Bang Bang Cph + Bundgaard + Tootsa MacGinty + Zara Kids (Ella Elvira) (Elvis Harald)

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART IN HISTORY


Bang Bang Cph + MarMar (Elvis Harald)


SURREALISM THE SON OF A MAN (1964) by René Magritte The Son of Man (French: Le fils de l’homme) is a 1964 painting by the Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte. Magritte painted it as a self-portrait. The painting consists of a man in an overcoat and a bowler hat standing in front of a low wall, beyond which is the sea and a cloudy sky. The man’s face is largely obscured by a hovering green apple. About the painting, Magritte said:

Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early 1920s, and is best known for its visual artworks and writings. The aim was to “resolve the previously contradictory conditions of dream and reality”. Artists painted unnerving, illogical scenes with photographic precision, created strange creatures from everyday objects and developed painting techniques that allowed the unconscious to express itself. Surrealist works feature the element of surprise, unexpected juxtapositions and non sequitur; however, many Surrealist artists and writers regard their work as an expression of the philosophical movement first and foremost, with the works being an artifact. Leader André Breton was explicit in his assertion that Surrealism was, above all, a revolutionary movement. (Sources here and here)

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“At least it hides the face partly well, so you have the apparent face, the apple, hiding the visible but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present.”


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ART IN HISTORY

POP ART CAMPBELL’S SOUP CANS (1962) by Andy Warhol POW inspired by Roy Lichtenstein Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the mid1950s in Britain and the late 1950s in the United States. Pop art presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular culture such as advertising and news. Pop art employs aspects of mass culture, such as advertising, comic books and mundane cultural objects. One of its aims is to use images of popular (as opposed to elitist) culture in art, emphasising the banal or kitschy elements of any culture, most often through the use of irony. It is also associated with the artists’ use of mechanical means of reproduction or rendering techniques. Pop art often takes imagery that is currently in use in advertising. Product labeling and logos figure prominently in the imagery chosen by pop artists, seen in the labels of Campbell’s Soup Cans, by Andy Warhol. Roy Fox Lichtenstein (1923-1997) was an American pop artist. During the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody. Inspired by the comic strip, Lichtenstein produced precise compositions that documented while they parodied, often in a tongue-in-cheek manner. Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture, and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s. (Sources here and here)


Bang Bang Cph + Monnalisa + Marmar + Braveling + Rugged Gear (Mia Stella + Ella Elvira)


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


WHAT IS ART AND DO WE NEED IT? Edited by Søs Uldall-Ekman

Children are forever our go to source for inspiration when creating and exploring new worlds, so this time our Voices of Children feature is about Art and what it does to us. Children have all the wisdom in the world, if only you remember to ask.


Hazel, 4, Middletown, New Jersey What springs to mind when you hear the word ART? Awesomeness.

According to you, what is art?

Photo by Heidi Giacalone

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — CHILDREN’S VOICES

Beautifulness.

Why do we have art? ‘Cause we made some at Camp. And ‘cause we want to have art.

Where does art live? A lot of places. Camp. Well, art pretty much lives everywhere.

What happens if we don’t have art? We can make art.

Is art good for us? Yeah.

Do you make art? Yes.

Is it possible to play with art? Yes. You can make it into a toy…and yeah.

What does art do to us? What’s your favourite It makes us happy. type of art? Do we need art?

I have no idea.

Is it important?

What advice would you give to someone making art?

No.

Happiness.

No.


Isaac, 4, Scotland What springs to mind when you hear the word ART? It makes me feel like I want to do art now.

According to you, what is art? What you can do with paint, draw pictures and make things.

Why do we have art? ...because it’s fun!

Where does art live? Houses, castles and windows.

What does art do to us? It makes you look at it and it’s boring *laughs*

Do we need art? Is it important? Yep, because, so you can do fun things!

What happens if we don’t have art? That would be sad because you won’t be able to make things or do things.

Is art good for us? Yeah, it’s important. It makes me feel relaxed.

Do you make art? I do. I can make pictures and toys.

Is it possible to play with art? Yeah!

What’s your favourite type of art? I like making arrows with sparkly paper.

What advice would you give to someone making art? I could draw them some instructions!


Photo by Heidi Giacalone

Walker, 7, Middletown, New Jersey What springs to mind when you hear the word ART? People

According to you, what is art? Beautiful stuff that people make

Why do we have art? To make the world a prettier place

Is it possible to play with art?

Where does art live?

Yes. You cut it out and then you play with it!

In your mind

What’s your favourite What does art do to us? type of art? Gives you imagination

Animal art. Every animal.

Do we need art?

What advice would you No. Because we could sur- give to someone making vive without art. art? Is it important? Sort of

What happens if we don’t have art? You just carry on with life.

Is art good for us? Yeah. It gives you more ideas.

Do you make art? Yes.

Do what your imagination tells you to do.

Draw what the word art means to you or something that involves what we just talked about, like your own artwork. This is our old dog named Connor and our neighbor’s dog named Tommy and I drew them playing together. I decided to draw this because I miss my old dog.


What happens if we don’t have art? We wouldn’t be as happy because even a simple drawing is art.

Is art good for us?

What springs to mind when you hear the word ART? Paintings and happiness!

According to you what is art? Happiness, creation, nature and technique in one.

Why do we have art? Because you can let your mind go and everything is possible with art.

Where does art live? In a sea of fantasy and creation.

What does art do to us? It makes us emotional, maybe happy, but art can also make us sad.

Do we need art? Is it important? Art is everything around us so yes, it is important.

Do you make art? Yes, almost every day!

Is it possible to play with art? Yes, some artworks are edible, or you can climb on them, run around them, play with them and have fun!

What’s your favourite type of art? Fantasy or happy paintings.

What advice would you give to someone making art? Try to put some of you in it.

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — CHILDREN’S VOICES

Julia Dolfing, 9, Haarlem, the Netherlands

Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn’t. Some art works can be kind of depressing, but some make you really happy.


Photo by Heidi Giacalone

Jackson, 9, Middletown, New Jersey What springs to mind when you hear the word ART? Happiness

According to you, what is art? Cool creations

Why do we have art? To make people happy

Where does art live? Everywhere

What does art do to us? It makes us better people

Do we need art?

it but I guess sometimes it would be important.

What happens if we don’t have art? I don’t know.

Is art good for us? Yes.

Do you make art? Yes.

Is it possible to play with art? Yes.

What’s your favourite type of art?

Tough question. I mean, I don’t think we would NEED it, but yes, it can be helpful sometimes.

I have no idea.

Is it important?

Make it as awesome as you can.

Again, you wouldn’t need

What advice would you give to someone making art?


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — CHILDREN’S VOICES


Joseph, 7, England What springs to mind when you hear the word “art”? I see art pictures in my brain.

According to you, what is art? Art is painting, drawing and having fun.

Why do we have art? Because it’s a fun thing to do.

Where does art live? In houses, in shops, in the gallery.

What does art do to us? It makes you feel happy.

Do we need art? Is it important?

Is it possible to play with art?

Yes.

You can play when you make something.

What happens if we don’t have art?

What’s your favourite type of art?

If we don’t have art it would be boring.

When I made a clay dinosaur.

Is art good for us?

What advice would you give to someone making art?

Art is good for us.

Do you make art? Lots.

Have fun when you make art.


Eddie, 9, England What spring to mind when you hear the word “art”? Drawing, creating.

According to you, what is art? When you are making something using colour, building.

Why do we have art? So people can learn from it.

In art halls, galleries and everywhere because you can make art everywhere.

What does art do to us? Makes us happy.

Do we need art? Is it important? Yes it is important to add pictures to words.

What happens if we don’t have art? The world wouldn’t be beautiful.

Is art good for us? Yes it is good for us to be creative.

Do you make art? Yes I do.

Is it possible to play with art? Yes you play with the ideas and mix it up and stuff.

What’s your favourite type of art? Clay modelling.

What advice would you give to someone making art? Be creative with your ideas and do what you want.

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — CHILDREN’S VOICES

Where does art live?


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


Ethan, 14, England

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — CHILDREN’S VOICES

What spring to mind when you hear the word “art”?

What happens if we don’t have art? The world would be dull.

I think of what I’m going to draw.

Is art good for us?

According to you, what is art?

Yes because it can help us to express things, words can’t.

Art is an expression of imagination and creativity.

Why do we have art? To express ideas.

Do you make art? Yes, mostly drawing.

Is it possible to play with art?

In your mind.

Yes you can play with art through experimentation.

What does art do to us?

What’s your favourite type of art?

It inspires us.

Surreal art.

Where does art live?

Do we need art? Is it important? Yes, it’s a good way to relieve stress. It can be important to challenge controversial topics.

What advice would you give to someone making art? Don’t be anxious about the details, just have fun.


Ryan, 12, England What spring to mind when you hear the word “art”? I think about the horse I drew.

According to you, what is art? It’s something that involves using a pencil. Art is fun.

What happens if we don’t have art? We lose our way of expressing ourselves.

Is art good for us? Yes

Do you make art? Yes I do.

Why do we have art?

Is it possible to play with art?

We have art to express things that are close to us.

You can play by experimenting with ideas and materials.

Where does art live?

What’s your favourite type of art?

On a page from our hearts.

What does art do to us? Art helps us to feel happy or sad, it can help us to feel proud.

Do we need art? Is it important? I think we do, art brings different ideas to life.

I see cooking as and art and I love it but I like drawing too.

What advice would you give to someone making art? Don’t let people to tell you that your art is wrong – there is no wrong art.


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


by Søs Uldall-Ekman

The “STORYTELLER” feature is about finding people who are eminent at telling stories, wether it be in images, art, movement, music or words. We want to learn what sparked the interest in telling stories and share inspiration that may lead us all to to tell our own stories. In this issue of Enfants Terribles Magazine we share with you the alluring work of illustrator and children’s book author Lisa Aisato, who creates odd, different and fun stories with a hint of poetic darkness.


LISA

AISATO Website • Webshop • Facebook

ABOUT LISA AISATO Lisa Aisato (35). Illustrator and author. Lives in Fredrikstad, Norway with her husband Einar, daughter Aurora (5) and son Alfred (3).


MOONLIGHT AND MAGIC

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — STORYTELLERS

Who told you stories when you were a child? “My father, but especially my mother told me a lot of stories. But mostly we read. My mother said that you can read anything to children as long as you feel like you can talk about it and help them understand. She worked with books an literature most of her life, so we had loads of books. She always made it so magical. I remember once we walked in the mountains and when we finally came to the cabin it was late. We had dinner and after that we all looked forward to an hour of her reading to us before we went to sleep. But when we finally sat down with the book they cut the power in the cabin. They often do that at night to save power. I remember we were so sad, but my mother said that we could take all the pillows and sit on the floor by the window. There she could read in the light from the moon. J.R.R Tolkien has never been more magical!”

WHEN ALL YOU WANT TO DO IS DRAW How did it begin? “I have always loved to draw, and children’s books and literature has been a major part of my life. My mother grew up without anyone reading to her, so when she had children of her own she wanted to give them everything she didn’t get as a child. She read a lot to me and my sister. And when she read, we drew. For hours and hours. So when I started school I was the best at drawing in my class, and I got a lot of attention for my drawings. I drew and painted all the time. While watching tv. While listening to music or stories on my tape player and during math classes at school. I just wanted to draw! When I was 13 I wrote in an essay that I wanted to become an illustrator. I started art school and thought it would be easy, but It wasn’t. So many of the students were brilliant and I lost my confidence. A teacher once told me that I would never become an artist because I wasn’t innovative enough. After three years of art school I didn’t know how to make money from my art, so I started working in a small shop. I wanted to work there because there was no costumers, so I could sit behind the desk and draw all day.”


LOVE GIVES YOU WINGS How did you come to publishing your work? “Then I fell in love. I met my husband! I was so much in love that I made a book about us. I gave it to him on his 30th birthday. I later sent it to a publisher and they said they wanted to publish it as a Valentine’s Day book. When I finally had my foot inside that door I just stayed and gave them all of my ideas and showed them all of the drawings that I had made behind the desk in the shop. I showed them a drawing of me and my great grandmother and told them about a story that I had written about her. The story was about a little girl that had one great grandmother in Gambia and one in Norway. The story was about my childhood and it became my first children’s book. I quit my day job, and since 2008 I have written and illustrated about 30 books.


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


LET THE PENCIL LEAD THE WAY “My favorite thing to do is just to let my pencil take me where it wants to. I am always very eager to see where it goes. I work very intuitively. I might have an idea of what a person should look like or which colors to use, but often I just let my hand and heart decide. I feel like I am thinking with my hand, not with my head.”

THE ODD AND THE DIFFERENT “I think my favorite thing to draw and paint is odd and unusual looking people or animals. For me it’s a bit boring to make “perfect” bodies and flawless faces. I like my characters different. Not necessary ugly or bad looking, just different. Like the old and wrinkly great grandmother that loves watching boxing on a small tv, the red-headed, pale girl with all the freckles that wants to become a bird, the gentle, feminine boy with a head like an egg, the strange Asian looking little girl in the big bee costume or the little black girl in a red dress with a big Afro holding on to a strange looking lost fish!”


WHEN MELANCHOLIA AND FUN GO HAND IN HAND “I like to tell funny and/or melancholic stories. Stories that makes you feel something inside. Whether it’s sadness, laughter, happiness or melancholy. And if one of my books make you and your child talk about what you feel, that would be the best. I want to make books that can be read on different levels. The straight story that’s in the text, the story that you can read from the pictures and the story you can read between the lines.”

It seems your books and illustrations have a poetic darkness about them, can you tell us a little bit more about this? “I like contrasts. I like the light and the dark together. If I draw something cute I want something dark to go with it. I love being grotesque, but I need to balance it in my children’s books. I get nauseous if everything is nice and cute. As an illustrator I have to do it sometimes, but in my own books I can bring in the dark and I love that. Generally when things in life is just pink, sweet, nice, blond, clean, happy and cute there is something dark lurking underneath...”

WHERE THE STORIES GROW FROM “All of my own books (the ones that I have written myself) has started with a drawing or a painting. I create a lot of paintings and some of them makes me really curious. I get so curious that I have to write stories about them. Some of those stories become books. When I start working on the actual book the story always changes a lot, and I make the illustrations while I find my way in the story. It takes a lot of time and I have to scrap many illustrations along the way. But I love working that way even if it can be frustrating.”

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — STORYTELLERS

POETIC DARKNESS


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — STORYTELLERS

ARE STORIES STILL IMPORTANT?

“Yes they are! When I was a child I loved living in other worlds. I loved being in the life of Pippi, Bilbo or Mathilda. I still do. It makes you understand that there are different ways to live your life, that there are different realities and different people. Stories told through books make your life so much more magical and colorful. And I’m certain it makes you a more creative person. I also think it makes you better at tolerating those who think differently or live their lives in a different way from yours. And it gives you a getaway. I still listen to Harry Potter, Game of thrones or The lord of the rings sometimes, even if I have read those books so many times. I just miss those worlds and I need to be back there every now and then, even if it’s just for a few hours.”

PERSONAL FAVORITES What was your favorite book growing up? “I think I had a few favorite books. I loved a beautiful children’s book called “Ofelias shadow theater” written by Michael Ende. I also loved “George’s marvellous medicine” and “The witches” by Roald Dahl. And of course a lot of Astrid Lindgren’s books. Especially “The brothers Lionheart” and “Ronja Robber’s daughter”. And “The lord of the rings” by JRR Tolkien.”

​​What’s your favorite now? “That’s a difficult question. There are so many. I love some of the best by Knut Hamsun. “Mysteries” is my favorite I think.


I also just finished a book called “The bird tribunal” by Norwegian author Agnes Ravatn. I loved that one.”

What makes a good children’s book? “A book that makes you feel something in your heart perhaps. A book that touches the children in some way. A book that makes them question themselves, other people, or the world we live in in some way. Or a book that just really makes them laugh!”

INSPIRATION Who do you go to for inspiration?

“My favorite illustrator is Rebecca Dautremer. I love her work and her books. I also really like Norwegian illustrator Svein Nyhus.”


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ART BEFORE DISHES


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

@enfantsterriblesmag

E S

Follow us on Instagram


#ROCKTHATMUSEUMKID @ROCKTHATMUSEUMKID • Facebook

Interview and edit by Søs Uldall-Ekman

I

nstagram is a daily inspiration to many of us. We know nothing better than stumbling upon a new visuel universe that invites us in and tells us new stories from all over the world. For this art inspired issue we share with you the fun and inspiring profile of @rockthatmuseumkid, a profile that has formed a little community around art experiences that includes the children in new and fun ways.. The perfect match for this issue. This is the story of #rockthatmuseumkid.


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

The profile @rockthatmuseumkid, is run by Mille Maria a playful. art-loving soul from Copenhagen, Denmark. Mille Maria works as a Communications manager at the beautiful Ordrupgaard museum, just outside of Copenhagen and surrounds herself with art all day long.

ABOUT MILLE MARIA Mille Maria. 34. Communications Manager at Ordrupgaard Museum. Lives in Copenhagen, Denmark, with her boyfriend Jonas and their two little girls (Olivia 5, Isabella 3,5).

What is your personal background? “I love art! I have done so

ever since I was a little girl. I grew up very close to Louisiana Museum of Modern Art north of Copenhagen, and I spent a lot of time there growing up. I have a Master’s degree in Art History and English Literature, and I always knew I wanted to work in the art world – I just HAD to be around art on a daily basis! I’m now the Communications Manager at the beautiful art museum Ordrupgaard, just outside Copenhagen. I love what I do, and it’s so wonderful to be close to so much beauty every day. At Ordrupgaard we have everything from Monet and Manet to Olafur Eliasson and Jeppe Hein.”

What inspires you on a daily basis? “I always get inspired by art. I’m simple that way J


I scroll through Instagram or Facebook - where I follow lots and lots of art profiles – and I screenshot everything I find interesting. At the end of the day, I look through my camera roll and I feel refreshed and inspired by all the beauty that’s out there.”

KID + ART = BEST COMBO What story are you telling? I’m showing parents and sceptics alike that kids and art is a great combo.

How did Rockthatmuseumkid begin? “@RTMK began when I was on maternity leave in 2014. We visited many, many museums and galleries,

and I noticed how people stared and whispered. Some came up to me and complemented me on my courage – bringing a baby into a museum. As it never occurred to me NOT to bring a baby into a museum, I was puzzled at first, but after a while I realized that the kids/art-combo is something feared by parents across the globe. So I decided to start an Instagram-profile to show that kids and art go very well together – and tell parents not to be afraid of bringing their young ones to galleries and museums. Everyone will benefit – kids and parents alike.”


What are the benefits of working with this project? “I get to look at hundreds of new pictures from people all over the world using my hashtag #rockthatmuseumkid. There are so many beautiful pictures, and I feel so inspired every time I flips through it.”

What are the challenges of working with this project? “My only challenge is time. I’m a busy working mom, and I don’t post at RTMK as often as I would like to! However, I do get to combine my two great passions – my kids and great art – so maybe it’s not so bad afterall.”


“I hope to inspire more parents to expose their young ones to art. Kids are so good at looking at art. They are open to all art has to offer, their minds are creative and their fantasy is great! Ask them to tell you what’s in a Pollock painting, and they tell you great stories about trolls and trees and sunlight - my 3-year-old daughter did.”

What are the ambitions for the project? “I hope at some point to have the time to write something about kids and art. I would like to use RTMK as inspiration. It might be an art book, or maybe more theoretical. I haven’t decided yet.”

How many have joined in on the fun? Do you have a community feeling surrounding it? “RTMK has 12.000 followers at this point. And there’s SUCH a community feeling about it! J Museums from all over the world have joined in - from LACMA (huge museum in L.A.) to Louisiana – and are using the hashtag and reposting

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

What do you hope to achieve with it?


pictures from RTMK. As for parents, we have pictures from Japan and Korea, to all over America, Europe and Australia. People are really loving the hashtag – which is pretty great!”

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

How often do you go to museums? “Well, it helps to work at one I go to museums and galleries every weekend – sometimes with kids, and sometimes without. My friends and family are nice enough to accompany me. I post pics from my personal museum adventures at the Instagram profile @missmillemaria where I have 15.000 followers.”

How often do you bring your kids? “I bring my kids very often – they like it very much. It’s more fun to bring them – they have a great way to judge an exhibition on how kid-friendly it is. My oldest will say something like: “I didn’t like this exhibition – you weren’t even allowed to climb the sculptures!” “

Best tip for sharing museum and art experiences with your little ones? “Talk about the art, about what you see. Make up stories, and let your kids tell you what they see, and what they think.”

Best tip for getting kids to stand still in a museum? “Promise them candy. Lots of candy ;)”

What is there to benefit from rocking museums accompanied by your kids? “The shared experience, the opportunity to be around your little ones AND be around art. What’s not to like?”


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BEACH AS ART Photography: Stephanie Matthew​ Styling: Heather Rome​ ​with Rainey's Closet​ ​ Hair and grooming: Maris Boling


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — BEACH AS ART


Dress: Nellystella​ Wings: Modern Queen Kids​


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — BEACH AS ART

Dress: Dolly by Le Petit Tom Adagio​ Collar: Tutu du Monde​


Dress: Tutu du Monde​ Cape: Tutu du Monde​ ​

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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


Dresses: Tutu du Monde​ & Dolly by Le Petit Tom Adagio​ Cape: Tutu du Monde​ ​ Mask: Tutu du Monde​ Collar: Tutu du Monde​

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Artwork by Katrine Marie Nielsen @katrinemarienielsen


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Collage Enfantine Art Work Julie Panton Studio Styling Julie Panton & Josephine Dohlmann Photography CĂŠline Hallas

Hat Popelin


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Deerhead Softheads Sweater(Knitting Recipe) Knit by TrineP Shirt Mads Nørgaard Suspenders Vildfang Trousers Quenotte Shoes Angulus


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Shirt Quenotte Romper jamesvincentdesignco Shoes Angulus


Sweatshirt Lisqa Dungaree What Mother Made Shoes Angulus

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Sweater (Knitting Recipe) Knitting for Olive Jumpsuit LÜELÜTT Unicorn head Softheads Collar (Knitting Recipe) Knit by Trine P Rufflesuit (Knitting Recipe) PetiteKnit Tights Bravleling Shoes Angulus


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Top Lisqa Collar Dyrebar Suspenders Lacey Lane Skirt Four’eMki


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Dress Louis*Louise Jacket What Mother Made Tights MP Denmark Socks Wolf & Rita Shoes Angulus


Bowties, Shirt and Dungaree What Mother Made Socks Bobo Choses Shoes Angulus

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Hairbow, Shirt & Dungaree What Mother Made Cardigan (Knitting Recipe) PetiteKnit Shoes Angulus


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Fox Mask H&M Sweater (Knitting Recipe) PetiteKnit Rappit Cape Tortoise & the Hare Trousers What Mother Made


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Body and trousers Lisqa Collar Vildfang


Doghead Softheads Collar Wolf & Rita Dress Dyrebar Tights RaspberryPlum Shoes Angulus

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Kimono Dyrebar Body Lisqa Bloomers Tortoise & the Hare Tights MP Denmark Shoes Angulus


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Shirt Quenotte Suspenders Lacey Lane Sweater Shirley Bredahl Shirt and shorts Lacey Lane Tights MP Denmark Shoes Angulus


advertorial


Marmar Copenhagen

COOL, CLASSIC AND PLAYFUL​​ Interview and edit by Søs Uldall-Ekman

T

HE STORY OF feature is about sharing the personal story behind children’s fashion brands that inspire us. Behind each label lies a dream, which took shape in the mind of creative souls who devoted themselves to making clothes for children. We aim to give you personal insight and to make it possible for you to know the story behind the different children’s fashion labels, when buying clothes for your little ones. This time we place the spotlight on the Danish children’s wear label MarMar Copenhagen and ask founder and designer Marlene Anine Holmboe to tell the story on how MarMar Copenhagen came to be and what she values most when making clothes for kids.


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IF YOU CAN’T FIND WHAT YOU WANT - MAKE WHAT YOU WANT Marlene studied design at the Danish School of Design, majoring in fashion. During her studies she had her children and spent years in an unavailing search for simple and classic children’s fashion with a touch of refined elegance and high level craftsmanship. She recognised a gap in the market and decided to start a brand of her own, one rooted in the Danish design tradition of strong aesthetics and functionality. Starting with two small collections a year, with basic Modal and brown Leopard even from the very first season.

IT’S ABOUT MAKING AN EFFORT “MarMar Copenhagen, to me, is about making an effort. An effort to offer the best possible collections I can create and produce, with equal amounts respect for the people helping me make the clothes and the people that will wear it. I think it’s important to make an effort and to ensure our kids can wear something


TEAM MARMAR “The name MarMar is a wordplay on the names of my siblings and myself, all of our names starting with Mar. The company has been a very heartfelt and personal endeavor from the get go. MarMar Copenhagen was founded by me, Marlene Holmboe, and is still designed by me. I have a fabulous team that helps me make my ideas become realities and makes sure everything runs smoothly. Our team consist of mostly women, and a few men, aged between 25 and 60 and of course with different backgrounds fitting the different areas, from design, pattern making, sourcing and production, as well as finances and ever important customer services. We are a team that compliment and support each other very well and certainly know how to laugh together.

A PASSION FOR FASHION “Design has been my passion and what I´ve focusing on every since … well forever. Having designed for both women and children, I must say I´m fond of both and today MarMar Copenhagen also offer a range for women. I launched my label after becoming a mother myself, noticing a gap in the market for high quality, softly coloured basics and fashion seasonals.”

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE —THE STORY OF MARMAR COPENHAGEN

nice which works, makes them feel at ease and lets them express themselves. I´m convinced it makes a difference, whenever you do your best – in all of life´s aspects. I always insist on maintaining the classic in keeping with the times, to secure a modern and up-todate design that incorporates all the current trends. My vision is that MarMar’s clothing can be used across seasons in tandem with my newest designs. I want to create cool, classic and playful clothing, that children feel comfortable in, combining a unique look with good quality, and in colours that always makes it easy to put together the perfect outfit for any occasion.”


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE STORY OF MARMAR COPENHAGEN

PARTY AND PLAY “Most important to me when working with fashion is creating clothes that make sense. We want to make items you can use for many different occasions and in a quality that ensures, that the clothes can even be passed on once the child grows out of it. Clothes you just grow fonder of and that are special to you. All our collections are built on the thought of a child´s complete wardrobe, with a multitude of combinations, multiple basics and special pieces, chosen for their originality, with the natural eclectic mix it entails. This has made it very easy to achieve the perfect balance for both party and play. Designing for children offers a freedom of being able to play with colours and making up my own unique trend universe, paired with great attention to the functionality children´s wear command, which I thoroughly enjoy. How do you want the children to feel when the see and wear your designs? I want children to feel intrigued, cool and comfortable when wearing MarMar. The clothes should appeal both to their eye and feel great when they wear them.”

WHERE THE MARMAR MAGIC HAPPENS “MarMar Copenhagen is designed in house, in Copenhagen. The clothes are then manufactured in Europe, Turkey, India and China. You can buy MarMar Copenhagen all over Europe, in the US, the Middle East as well as the Far East and even in Australia. It makes me very proud, the collections have such a broad appeal.”

THE LEOPARD PRINT “Our leopard leggings have been part of MarMar Copenhagen DNA since day 1. Now it´s a classic, but back then in 2007, it definitely started out as one of the quirky touches defining MarMar Copenhagen. and the way you can Teaming something different up with the classic, for a cool look, you do not see everywhere else. At the first fair I went to, several people stopped


by and complimented my collection, recommended I take out the Leopard leggings – but luckily I believed in the Leopard leggings as a defining touch and to this day they remain one of our most popular styles.”

SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENT Responsible production and respect for the environment seems to matter a great deal to you, can you please tell us a little about how you choose to work with this? “I care deeply for treating the world around me with respect and ultimately giving more back than you take, both environmentally and in every other way. When it comes to my business, it has always been my


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ambition for it to make sense in every aspect – for my team, our production partners, our stockists, the end-consumers, the environment and for my family and me personally.”

NEVER OUT OF STOCK

A TOUCH OF GRANDEUR “Our AW16 collections bears the title A Touch of Grandeur and it’s a true treasure chest of magnificent items and inspiring combinations - both classic and brand new. Inspired by grandness and offering grand pieces. The inspiration for this collection came from Northern Californian nature. From cool lumberjacks, over flora and fauna of the old woods to majestic mountains mirroring in placid lakes. I contrasted the

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE STORY OF MARMAR COPENHAGEN

“One of the ways it makes sense in every part of the chain is with our basic range, that we call NOOS. NOOS means Never Out Of Stock and it means we have clothes that are always available. Allowing shops carrying MarMar Copenhagen, to only buy what they need, when they need it. For our production places to have continuous work and for customers to build a base of trusted favourites. Our NOOS programs are in classic colours and in fits and qualities, that make them last longer, often longer than the child actually fits it. Making it possible to pass it down and for more than one child to enjoy them. High quality really makes sense – and even more so, as it is not so much a com­mercial statement, as it is something that is experienced by our consumers. Colours are even coordinated across seasons, so the MarMar customer is able to wear the newest items with wardrobe favourites already acquired. Our NOOS range has grown over the past years and now include our basic Modal, Modal Stripes, Leopard in classic brown and grey, Thermo, Technical Outerwear, Socks and Tights and others classics, as Denim and white Shirts, amongst others. The challenge lies in that we really need to monitor our inventory closely, to ensure there is always enough, but never too much.”


nature feel with a playful twist inspired by playing dress-up at my Grandmother´s house and took notes from the ultimate Granny Chic icon Iris Apfel and her personal, quirky way of dressing. Every item in her wardrobe is carefully selected and has a unique story to tell - just like I want every item in this MarMar Copenhagen collection to have.”

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE STORY OF MARMAR COPENHAGEN

CIRCUS AS PART OF THE MARMAR DNA “Among the things, that inspire me the most, are classic films and old photos, because trends always return and I strive to design items with cross seasonal appeal. For me it´s about looking back and then taking the styles to a new place. And of course always with a hint of circus … the circus offers a sense of humour, that appeals to children and grown-ups alike. The circus´ dating all the way back to the medieval and onwards has been part of the MarMar Copenhagen DNA from the beginning and is a constant inspiration to me.”

WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS “It´s a continuous joy working with MarMar Copenhagen and seeing so many of the things I dreamed of, when starting out, becoming realities. It makes me so proud that our basic Modal is favoured by so many new parents. I´ll be more than happy, if things keep progressing internationally, as they have so far. Also I would love my Teen and Women´s lines to grow even further”

LINKS Facebook Instagram www.marmar.dk Shops all over and our shop in shop concepts in Tinderbox, Illum and Magasin


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The colors of Kerouac By Monika Elena​

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“The empty blue sky of space says ‘All this comes back to me, then goes again, and comes back again, then goes again, and I don’t care, it still belongs to me” — Jack Kerouac


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE COLORS OF KEROUAC


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE COLORS OF KEROUAC


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — THE COLORS OF KEROUAC


The Liddiard Family Interview with Merilee Liddiard by Danielle Chassin

M

erilee is the founder of Mer Mag and she LOVES to play. That’s why we thought she’d be the perfect match for this issue’s Family Portrait. Merilee plays creatively. No lonely cardboard box is safe – sh’e’ll grab some duct tape and before you know it, she’ll have turned it into a playful mask or interlocking castle. Obsessed with all things kids and playful, you’ll find her creating, celebrating, playing, reading, doing and wearing anything and all things that inspire her. And when she’s not dreaming up new uses for toilet paper rolls, you can find her illustrating for kids young and old.


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EARLY LIFE Where did you grow up and what is your background? How did your childhood influence your art and pursuit of a creative life? I grew up in Fort Collins, Colorado in a very creative, fun loving family. There we nine kids so we had to learn to be thrifty and creative. We quickly learned that if we couldn’t purchase what we wanted, we would just find a way make what was in our heads. My favorite quote explains how I feel about my childhood and what I now aim to create in my home for my kids: “[I]n this Emi-

ly was perfectly correct: home was, and has always been, something sacred for the Dickinsons. Nothing untoward could ever happen to us there, nothing that could make us lose faith in the goodness and nobility of humankind, nor lose faith in the future. Nothing could expose us to the storm outside, it was our private and fantastic kingdom, and we inhabited it naturally, like fairies do in tales, or those rebellious and passionate being in novels.” - Lavinia Dickinson on the Dickinson home in the novel The Sister by Emily Dickinson

What did you study in school? Knowing always that I wanted to be an artist


and live a creative life, I went on to study illustration at BYU (Brigham Young University) where I received a BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree).

FAMILY How did you meet your partner? I met Jon in school. We had similar visions for a creative family life. He was a stage actor who also had a passion for the arts and I fell in love with him and his vision of our future. We married and then set off to NYC where I worked at the most amazing chocolate shop, Mariebelles, storyboarded

How many children do you have and what are each of them like? We now have three head strong, creative and independent kids: Atticus 10, Oliver 7 (almost 8), and Amelia who turns 4 next week. Atticus is very linear thinking, he loves puzzles, solving problems, exploring and adventuring. He never really wants to be home he would prefer to be out and about and loves to travel. He currently wants to be a movie director and a screen writer. Oliver is my little dreamer. He’s always off in in his own world, loves to draw (and is sort of a perfectionist about it). He asks

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — FAMILY PORTRAIT

for Maybelline and Revlon, and then worked for an illustration agency.


the most interesting questions and is a passionate little soul. He aims to be a toy maker and a “lost boy”.

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — FAMILY PORTRAIT

Amelia is full of life, loves to make people laugh and is a friend to everyone. She’ll often start up discussions with pretty much everyone and anyone we meet - pulling her introverted mama out of her “let’s just get in and out” modus operandi. Dance is her favorite thing right now and loves to show us her new moves each day.


What is your favourite thing to do as a family? We love to travel as a family. We haven’t done much exotic travel together but aim to. But for us, even road trips across country make us so happy. We also love creative traditions. The fall and winter holidays is a very fun time in our home.

ART What is art? “What is art?” Wow isn’t that the age old question? Well for me it’s something creative, from one’s soul, a story, a drawing, a song, a poem, a doll even - something that speaks to you and to others. Something that gives life more depth and beauty. Something I can’t live without.


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Do your children enjoy art-making? What have your children taught you about art and play? Amelia is in thick of early creative exploration and I love it. We do a lot creative things together. But as my boys are getting older I find that I’m really starting to enjoy seeing where they want to take things. Atticus had a lot of hands on creative exploration as a toddler/preschooler but he’s not as into that now. He loves to read and is taking piano and singing lessons which is lots of fun. Oliver likes to draw but it’s sort of a means to an end. Something to transport his imaginations onto a page.

Do you make art as a family or individually? Or both? I’m constantly drawing and creative so my kids are always around it and are often pulled into my creative projects. To them it’s just our way of life. I’m a bit early childhood art lover.

How are art and life connected for you? I’m not really concerned with whether or not my kids choose “art” as a hobby or a career path, but I do feel like the beginnings of a creative and artful life assist so much in problem solving, thinking outside of the box, confidence, and general wellbeing.


CIRCLE OF LIFE AND ART What did you want to be when you were a child? I realize this isn’t typical for all creatives, but I always knew I wanted to be an artist. I was also always tinkering with things and loved to create things out of cereal boxes and tin cans. Using my hands to make something magical has always been a constant for me. What I didn’t know was that I’d be doing crafts as a living alongside my art. So that was sort of a fun career surprise for me. I love encouraging other families to be creative in their own lives and some of my greatest joys are seeing others reach and be creative based on something I did.


WORK + CREATIVITY You are inspired by magic and imagination, does art-making help you manifest these? Yes I’m so inspired by magic and imagination and also by making things with my own hands There is something so satisfying - so life giving - from making something that wasn’t there before. And making something out of living nature or from nothing, that was supposed to be trash - well that’s a true joy as well.

Does working with children fuel your own magic and imagination? I’m so inspired by children. I’m inspired by their imaginations, the beautiful way they see the world and their undying optimism. It’s a time that is so ripe for play, creativity, wonder, exploration and simple happiness. If I can tap into any of that, I feel very happy indeed.


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TRAVELLING TOGETHERNESS THE FAROE ISLANDS - a family adventure guide by Søs Uldall-Ekman


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WHERE TIME IS A GIFT AND GREEN IS MORE THAN A COLOUR Never heard of the Faroe Islands before? Not surprising. This magical place has been a wellkept secret for a very long time, but I’m here to share it with you. I was actually born in this faraway place 37 years ago, but my parents moved to the very much flatter and less dramatic lands of Denmark, when I was just a baby. Ever since The Faroe Islands have been my green dream and my home away from home. Growing up, we would go visit family in the Faroes every summer and thus, some of my fondest memories of childhood play is mixed with the scent of wet, sweet-smelling, green grass and rock-climbing adventures. I wanted to share this unique place with my own children, so this summer we travelled to The Faroe Islands as tourists for the first time, to take in this special, green feeling together. Sharing this guide to The Faroe Islands with you, I may of course, be tainted by my history with these islands, but from the heart, let me say, that this place is truly a perfect destination for families living busy everyday lives in the city. Time is one of the most precious things we can give each other today and travelling to the middle of the Atlantic ocean provided us with a place and place for doing just this. The Faroes Islands is a place, where time stands still long enough for us to take in the now and enjoy it together. A green grassed hidden gem, situated right in the heart of the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic. A unique, modern day adventure for your family. Don’t take my word for it - just go!

TIMETRAVELLING IN TOGETHERNESS Wether you travel to this small archipelago by plane or boat it is sure to take your breath away, when the green mountains turn up in the middle of nowhere. 18 of these small islands are inhabited, most of them connected by bridges or tunnels, but there are still a few you have to travel by boat or ferry to reach, which


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

mostly adds to the adventure feel. Technicolored housed and unbelievably green, sweet-smelling grass, combined with steep mountains and deep blue ocean and closer to the sky than you’ve ever felt. Once you’ve visited this place, green will never be just a color, but an unforgettable feeling of calm and togetherness. For parents, visiting The Faroe Islands will sometimes feel like stepping in to a time warp, that let’s you travel to times where the speed of daily life was a lot slower. Together you’ll go from feeling like you’re back in the 18th century walking amidst the grass-roofed houses and then you’ll step inside one of the old bright coloured houses, which then again turns out to be a gateway straight back to your childhood with a strong 70s, 80s and 90s vibe, depending on which door you choose. You’ll find yourself reminiscing on childhood and play and if you let it sink in, it might just inspire you and your children to rediscover the time and need for playing in and with nature together.


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

FOUR SEASONS IN ONE DAY The weather in the islands is so called maritime, and to put it mildly, very changeable. Writing a guide to travelling to this fantastic spot without preparing you for this fact, would be a sin. To be honest, it rains a whole lot, but the reward of unbelievably beautiful landscapes, that you get for enduring the wetness together, makes the travel to this unique spot well worth it. The weather very much sets the tempo for living in the Faroes and it will also set the tempo for your travels. Waiting on the weather is part of living in the Faroe Islands and getting bored while you wait is just what will set you free from the normal everyday stressful living. You have to be creative and figure out new things to do while you wait and if you involve the whole family in the proces, a feeling of togetherness will grow from boredom and as you know, necessity is the mother of invention and kids are experts on coming up with new games in situations like this.

HAVING A PLAN B It’s the Gulf Stream that encircles the islands that is the boss of the weather in the islands, which pretty much means that you have to be prepared to live out all four seasons sometimes within just a day’s time. It never gets really, really cold (average winter temperature is 3,5 degrees celsius), but then again it never really gets warm either (summertime average is a low 12 degrees celsius). It’s a good idea to pack layered outfits, including wellies and rainwear. The changeable weather also means that activities should always come with a plan b, in case you get rained out. Most trips can be done in rainy weather, but if the fog or wind is ruling that particular day, it’s nice to have a back up plan. That being said, the weather can change within a quarter of an hour, so try to confer with local people, who listen to the local radio because they are always a lot more updated than your phone’s weather report will ever be. People in the Faroe Islands are very much used to this and if you know it from the beginning you can plan your way out of bad weather and enjoy other sights while you wait for the sun to join you.


FRIENDLY PEOPLE, FISH AND SHEEP The population is of 49,469 (August 2016) and almost 20.000 of those people live in the metropolitan area surrounding the capital Tórshavn. Visiting the capital Tòrshavn you’ll be right back in the present but with a very unique, urban and Nordic vibe. There’s about 1100 km of coastline for you to explore and at no time are you more then a 10 minute drive away from the ocean. Faroese people in general are very warm and welcoming towards strangers. Don’t be afraid of asking for advise, help or directions. Most Faroese like sharing the history of their village or island and they love meeting new people too. All you have to do is reach out and I can promise you, that your stay is sure to get even more interesting. Not to worry if you don’t master the Faroese tongue either, which by the way has deep roots in the Old Norse language. English is widely spoken, especially among the younger generations and they’ll always find a way of helping you get what you need. Alongside with the 49,469 Faroese people lives about 80,000 Faroese sheep. Actually, the name Faroe itself is thought to mean “sheep islands”, and the animal is depicted on the Faroe Islands’ historic coat of arms and is a traditional part of the landscape since the first inhabitants arrived to the islands more than a thousand years ago. Most of the sheep run on the islands, eating the delicious green grass in the village outskirts, so you have to be alert to this if you’re driving around the islands. The fishing industry is the most important source of income for the Faroes. Fish products account for over 97% of the export volume. Make sure that you try eating the fresh fish when you visit, it’s unbelievably tasty and the Faroes are also reknown for their fantastic salmon.

GETTING THERE Even though the Faroe Islands are remotely located in the North Atlantic Ocean, reaching the islands is much easier than most people think. BY AIR The Faroe Islands’ national airline, Atlantic Airways,


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offers year-round direct flights from Denmark, Scotland, Iceland and Norway, with flights usually lasting no longer than 2 hours. Occasionally there are direct flights to other destinations, such as Barcelona and Mallorca. Frequency of departures varies according to season. The airport in Vàgar is modern and easy to travel to and from. BY SEA Smyril Line’s ferry, Norrøna, sails to the Faroe Islands from Hirtshals in the north of Denmark and from Seyðisfjørður in Iceland. Frequency of departures varies according to season. But a trip across the Atlantic ocean in summertime is sure to be a unique and unforgettable memory.

GETTING AROUND Once you’re up in the Faroes, getting around the 18 islands is a piece of cake. Renting a car provides freedom and room for those unforgettable, spontaneous adventures. Most islands are connected by an excellent infrastructure of roads, bridges and subsea tunnels, making it effortless to travel by car. If you’re the type of per-


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

son who enjoys driving, then a roadtrip in the Faroes is a must. Our driver (the father) got quite the thrill out of crusing on the roads and through the tunnels up here, so thumbs up to this solutions if you like driving. More information on driving in the Faroe Islands and rental companies here. Public transport around the islands is efficient and wallet-friendly as ferries are government-subsidized and can cost as little as DKK 15. If you purchase multi-day transport passes (DKK 500), they can be used on all buses and ferries, with the exception of the one to Mykines. Additionally, you can catch a free bus that travels around Tórshavn, including to the historic village of Kirjubøur. If you have the time to travel according to the pace of the timetables, you won’t even need to rent a car. Most children enjoy riding the bus and love the little ferries and the scenery that will pass you by will include more waterfalls than you can count and views to keep you dreaming for years on. A combination of renting a car and us-


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ing the very good public transportations, which consists of busses and ferries, is also a good option. It will free the drivers mind to take in the magnificent landscapes as well and actually getting around the islands with public transportations is both simple and fairly priced. More information on buses and ferries here.

WHERE TO STAY Hotels in various shapes and sizes are found on most islands in the Faroe Islands, ranging from luxurious 4-star hotels to comfortable and simple lodgings. The vast majority of hotels are located in the capital, Tórshavn, but other locations include Runavík, Skálavík, Vágar Airport, Klaksvík, Vágur, Tvøroyri and Viðareiði. You can reach most places within an hours drive from Tòrshavn so spending a few days in the capital and doing some shopping and sights there is recommendable. Airbnb could also be a good solution, if you’re looking for an authentic experience and more of the nature and slow living that makes this place so spe-


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WHERE TO EAT Dried fish and fermented lamb, sheep head and fresh salmon, burgers and pizza – Faroese cuisine has it all and more! One of the great joys of travelling to new places is experiencing the country’s food culture. Yes getting the children to try on new foods can be difficult, but if you mix and match and have a plan that involves both new and familiar foods, then horisons are about to be broadened. Traditional Faroese dishes more often than not include meat, fish and potatoes. Go to Barbara’s for tasty food inspired and made by local produce. These main ingredients are prepared and served in a variety of ways. I promise you’ll never forget the first time you try fresh Faroese fish. It’s beyond delicious and even the kids ask for seconds. Eating sushi in the Faroes is also a must. Restaurant Etika serves the freshest sushi we’ve ever tried and in a modern and inspiring decor, that makes urban dwellers feel very much at home in the middle of the Atlantic. For some oldschool fastfood go try the fish’n chips at City Burger. Arguably the best way to really experience any culture is to integrate with the locals. And what better way to do this than over a delicious, traditional meal? The Faroese phrase “heimablídni” translates directly as “home

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

cial. Ideally combining the two is a solution most families would adhere to, since not having to cook breakfast for a few days is good for all parents and the delicious brunch that Hotel Føroyar serves, will leave your little ones very happy and ready for a whole day of adventure. Camping is also an option that should suit families accustomed to this way of travelling very well. More information on camping in the Faroes here.


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hospitality”, and all across the islands you can enjoy authentic and intimate dining experiences in people’s homes. In addition to being served traditional homemade Faroese food, you will also hear interesting stories that relate to that particular part of the country or village. These underground restaurants, with rates sometimes as little as DKK 330 (approx. €45) per person, offer you the opportunity to sample new food, often dissimilar to the food usually served in restaurants, in personal environments that give you a proper taste of Faroese culture. Sometimes a perfect stranger is the best dinner host. More on dining with locals here.


TO DO LIST A list of things to do that will make your stay as a family unforgettable:

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

• Climb rocks all the time, whenever you can. However, be careful after rain, the rocks get slippery. • Go to the harbours and explore colors, sounds, smells and textures together. • Turn on the Faroese radio and listen to the strange sounds and local music. • Play at the giant playground in Grasagarði in Torshavn • Hike upwards in the mountains and jump over creeks in the green grass (and get wet doing so). • Get bored and play cards when it rains. • Go to the art museum in Torshavn and make up stories about the paintings. The best story wins choice of dinner. • Visit second hand shops for cheap and fabulous handknitted wollen sweaters and hats. • Jump in puddles. • Lie in grass and look up. • Visit the shop of Marjun Heima, to see the traditional outfits worn for special occasions. • Visit the knitted rock • Play by the waterfalls. • Pick bouquets and make wreaths. • Shop trendy and beautiful modern knitwear at Gudrun and Gudrun • Count how many different types of grass you can find. Smell them to see, if they smell different from one another. • Go fishing with a local. • Spend the day exploring the island of Sandoy and see the world’s largest mailbox in Skopun and the giant knitted stone in Sand, which takes yarnbombing to a whole new level. • Tell the story of Kòpakonan. • Pet at least a dusin sheep. • Go to a concert or a festival. • Listen to Eivør when travelling around the islands. • Participate in the national celebrations of Sct Olai (Ólavsøka) on the 28th and 29th of July.


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advertorial OUR TOP 5 MUST SEE’S TÓRSHAVN OLD TOWN Tinganes is one of the world’s oldest courts dating from approximately 825. Travel back in time as you stroll around Tinganes and Tórshavn’s oldest part called Reyn, with its narrow lanes and small houses with grass roofs.

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — TRAVEL: FAROE ISLANDS WITH KIDS

VISIT FANTASTIC GJÓGV The idyllic village of Gjógv is known for its magnificent scenery and special natural harbour. The surrounding landscape offers many memorable walking trips. PICTURESQUE SAKSUN Saksun is surrounded by high mountains and in the fjord at the foot of the village, lies a lagoon. A walk from the village out to the sea is strikingly beautiful, but beware high and low tide times. UNFORGETTABLE VIÐAREIÐI FANTASTIC VESTMANNA BIRD CLIFFS Sail into deep grottoes through narrow straits, close to the almost 700 metre high sheer cliffs, where thousands of sea birds such as puffins, guillemots and fulmars breed every summer. KÓPAKONAN – THE SEAL WOMAN The legend of Kópakonan, literally meaning “the Seal Woman”, is one of the best-known folktales in the Faroe Islands. Visit the statue of her in Mikladalur. The trip there goes by bus and ferry and is an adventure in itself.

FAROESE FUN FACTS Here is a list of interesting things you probably don’t know about the Faroe Islands: Tinganes, where parliament met for the first time in year 825, is thought to be one of the oldest parliamentary meeting places in the world still in use. During the Second World War, the British military occupied the Faroe Islands. Approximately 170 marriages took place between British soldiers and Faroese women.


Faroese company Bakkafrost is the eighth largest salmon farming company in the world. The Faroe Islands is one of the world’s leading nations in producing sustainable electricity with over 50% of the nation’s electricity deriving from renewable energy sources Many houses in the Faroe Islands have grass roofs. Sheep – not mowing machines – are used for mowing the grass! The Prime Minister’s phone number is in the phone book. People population: 50,000. Sheep population: 70,000. There is no prison in the Faroe Islands. Prisoners being

ELVIS: Wollen blue shirt GUÐRUN & GUÐRUN Socks + hat + butterfly + trousers Marjun Heima Short wellies Viking ELLA: Wollen red shirt òvitar by GUÐRUN & GUÐRUN Skirt + apron + socks + cape Marjun Heima Boots Bundgaard


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held for more than a year and a half are sent to prisons in Denmark. There are a total of three traffic lights in the Faroe Islands – all located in Tórshavn. The population of the Faroe Islands consists of 80 different nationalities. There are only two international fast-food outlets in the Faroe Islands: Burger King and Sunset Boulevard. There are approximately 110 different species of birds in the Faroe Islands. Many think the national bird is the puffin. It’s in fact the oystercatcher. In the capital, Tórshavn, transport with city buses is free of charge.


ELLA Turtleneck + Dress: Gro Company Handwoven wool hat + Blue wollen kneesocks Marjun Heima Wellies Bundgaard Scarf Vintage russian wollen scarf

USEFUL LINKS VISIT FAROE ISLANDS WWW.FAROEISLANDS.COM LONELY PLANET Faroe islands ATLANTIC AIRWAYS SMYRIL LINE VISIT TORSHAVN EXCURSIONS


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

Artwork by Soosh

@vskafandre


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


Paint with Nature Created for you by Josephine Dohlmann

• Photos Celine Hallas


Take the nature inside and explore all it’s ways to unfold. Make your own paint brushes with leafs, pine, flowers or mos and have a great time creating your own little masterpiece.

WHAT YOU NEED • Sticks • Leafs, flowers etc. • Thread • Paint • Paper

Collect your findings in nature and gently brush of any dirty. You are also going to need some thread. Attach the item that you wish to paint with to the stick by using your thread. Use your new paintbrushes to have fun making art with nature.


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

Cartoon eyes crop top Cfanny ​Faux leather moto vest ​Uniktread Wonder woman leggings PrettyGuide All other clothing is wardrobe stylist’s own


ZOOM Photography: Marliese Carmona Hair and Makeup: Karla Fuenmayor Wardrobe Styling: Kristen Runge Model: Beatrice Taveras


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ZOOM


Ikat Fringe short Flowers by Zoe Unicorn crop top KKWFlus Raincoat PrimeXchange Bubble umbrella Totes Kids All other clothing is wardrobe stylist’s own


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

Girls star tank Flowers by Zoe ​ Extreme 80s Blue Unicorn fanny pack All other clothing is wardrobe stylist’s own Roller skates are photographer’s own


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — ZOOM


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ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE


ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — INSTAGRAM FEATURE

CREATIVE PROCESS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

This is awesome This is tricky This is shit I am shit This might be ok This is awesome


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Counting to 3 - a parenting column by Marieke Das

W

hen it comes to art and play everybody in our house sometimes needs to count to 3. Or 10. Not just me.

Pinterest Stresssssss Have you heard of Pinterest stress? Where women [mostly] feel the need to copy the most complicated Pinterest finds in real life? It’s a real thing obviously. I don’t suffer from it though, I suffer from sharing-withthe-kids-stress. You see, I love playing with art materials, I’d love for those materials to stay neat, and I also love structure.


So the pencils go on the left, next to the brushes, and the water goes on the right, that kind of thing. You know, the OCD kind of thing. Everyone does that right? Except [my] kids?

ENFANTS TERRIBLES MAGAZINE — COUNTING TO THREE

Because my kids don’t. They mess up my system. The deconstruct. They ruin. They annoy. Being an old [yes literally, but I might be old as well] art academy student and a teacher it’s hard for me to just let them go ahead and play with the stuff. That’s exactly the thing you should do, I guess. I should know, having learned a thing or 2 about pedagogically correct behaviour. Let them interact, experiment with MY stuff. Noooooooo! What if they ruin MY brushes? And don’t they want to know all the possibilities charcoal has? I want them to know! I can’t wait to tell. So I take over. And I can’t stop myself. 10 minutes later I’m the only one in the room and I have no idea I’m talking to myself until after I finish.

Deconstructionism On the other hand, you cannot imagine the joy I felt when my son FINALLY started to draw. He has these absolutely lovely, Quentin Blake-kind of drawings, and I want to frame them all. My girl has been drawing tons ever since she was old enough to hold a pencil. Her motor skills have always been outstanding. It’s just hard to share my still perfect pointed brushes. For all of you who are just as uptight as I am, I have found a way the boy doesn’t have to feel less capable because of his [lack of] fine motor skills, and I don’t have to worry about my art supplies. It’s making land art, or nature art. If you follow people


using hashtags like #facethefoliage on Instagram you’ll find wonderful, fine pieces of art using nature. Well, I’m more of a…. Construction worker when it comes to making things outside. I throw everything around or on a pile and make mess as I go along. Out in the open it’s just easier to follow the kids, instead of leading. I guess I’m not doing bad. If we get out more, I don’t have to worry about them touching my beautiful new watercolour set. It’s win-win. The message; take the little destructionists outside.


“Art is neve only aband – Leonar


er finished, doned.� rdo da Vinci


Photo: Céline Hallas Dress Fäfä, ​Vest Wolf and Rita T-Shirt​: Mallow, Dungarees: H&M


“

Terrible children. One who acts unconventionally.

French expression traditionally referring to a child who is terrifyingly candid by saying embarrassing things to adults, especially parents.

However, the expression has drawn multiple usage in careers of art, fashion, music, and other creative arts. In these careers, it implies a successful "genius" who is very unorthodox, striking, and in some cases, offensive or rebellious. Classically, one who "thumbs their nose" at the establishment or challenges it.

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Enfants Terribles #13 – Art is everything. Play is more.  

What is art? Do we need art? These are the questions we ask ourselves and our dear readers in this wildly creative issue. We played with ar...

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