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up to 70% reduction in typical LED projects. However, what is not as readily documented is the elimination of mercury from buildings. Most lighting systems, especially fluorescent lamps, contain Mercury vapour. This can be up to 5mg per average 1,200mm T8 tube. Upgrading a typical facility may result in eliminating 50g of mercury from the site. As part of many projects delivered, for example where an environmental system is in place, users need to quantify the resulting waste stream of the installation (packaging, obsolescent fittings/ ballasts and old lamps) as well as forecasting the future waste stream due to ongoing maintenance. With LED lighting, the ongoing waste stream is typically reduced by at least 50% and in some cases as much as 80%. Quality benefits One benefit that may not be directly attributed to LED technology specifically but that can be observed due to the change in lighting is an increase in production quality. This is pervasive in the industrial sector as lighting levels and lighting quality is siginificantly increased. For example, after a recent LED lighting upgrade a manufacturer achieved a reduction of 18% in downstream defects in a manufacturing

process. This was directly attributable to an LED Lighting project in which the lighting levels remained the same but the colour rendition increased and the colour temperature moved up from natural to daylight. A second example, as already mentioned in the occupational section is the perceived increase in productivity due to the reduction in flicker and standarisation in colour rendition and colour temperature across a facility. Conclusion For many organisations LED light is still viewed with trepidation due to its perceived infancy. The reality is that most major lighting manufacturers have quality products. Now it is up to internal decision making processes within an organisation as to when they invest in LED lighting. This requires a robust business case that includes not only the financial benefits but also the other benefits that comes with a step-change technology. For those that need to formalise this process, beginning with a trial that captures the results of each benefit: financial, occupational, environmental and, if able to, the quality improvements can help further justify the business case for implementation of LED lighting projects. te ukaee.org.uk

This article was written by Craig Astfalck (craig@ecopare. co.uk), founder and managing director of Ecopare, a practical energy management company (ecoapare.energy). He is a certified energy auditor and an active general committee member at UKAEE. UKAEE is the UK chapter of the global energy management organisation, the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE), with its HQ in the US. UKAEE covers a range of expertise in the energy management and energy efficiency sectors. It delivers a range of technical focussed seminars and offers excellent networking opportunities for energy and sustainability professionals. It offers continued professional development opportunities for AEE certifications such as Certified Energy Manager, Certified Measurement and Verification Professional and Certified Energy Auditor. Membership to the UKAEE is currently free. For more information on UKAEE or how to join, please visit ukaee.org.uk

theenergyst.com theenergyst.com

It’s the economy, stupid

How often does this happen to you? As a pro-active energy manager you have spoken with myriad potential suppliers, costed out energy reduction projects, decided on the most appropriate technologies to maximise reduction opportunities, calculated the potential financial savings and spent hours or even days writing the proposal – only for it be rejected when you put it forward for approval! The team at Ignite Energy has seen this happen on numerous occasions to even the best energy managers. It has built its reputation on the ability to help create strong business cases to make large projects a reality. Following discussions with the Energy Managers Association, the feedback we received was that board approval remains a constant challenge for many members who are trying to deliver tangible and repeatable savings within their operations. As a result Ignite Energy has been invited to create and present a Level 3 course module called ‘Accounting for Energy’ to assist in helping energy managers build a strong and robust business case for future investments – and most importantly demonstrate how to continually track and deliver successful financial outcomes within your business. Although a well-designed and

effectively delivered energy reduction programme can be translated into benefits for CSR and environmental credentials, it must also stand the most rigorous of all analysis, namely that it make commercial sense for the business to invest. Ignite Energy recognises this vital aspect and our focus is to link all stakeholder benefits so both board and management teams can see the true financial impacts delivered to the bottom line. This includes the ability to manage accruals and budgets on a daily basis to ensure the business can see the financial benefits as and when these are delivered, at any time during the financial year, and turn energy into a truly controllable and accountable cost at site level across a large property portfolio. Our initial courses are scheduled to take place on Wednesday 28 September and Wednesday 9 November with further courses to be run early in 2017 depending on demand. Numbers will be capped at 10 delegates per session, so please book early to avoid disappointment. Venues will confirmed closer to course dates with the first session most likely to be in London. Contact info: Rob@igniteenergy.co.uk T 0845 269 9517 M 07771 864690

Profile for The Energyst

The Energyst  

June/July 2016 - The UK's energy magazine for business

The Energyst  

June/July 2016 - The UK's energy magazine for business

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