__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 42

42

BATTERY TECHNOLOGY

Why UPS needs to be Li-ion ready Centiel sales and marketing director Mike Elms provides an insight into lithium-ion battery technology and predicts that it will become mainstream for UPS applications in the future

D

evelopments in UPS technology have focused heavily on improving efficiency, reliability and availability. Increases in operating efficiencies while in online double conversion mode have primarily been achieved by the introduction of transformerless technology in the 1990s. The removal of the bulky transformer, with the associated significant reductions in size, footprint and weight, led to the innovation of the modular concept. This in turn reduced the important mean time to repair (MTTR) figure, thereby significantly increasing availability. Development in UPS design now realises efficiency figures of 97+%, and the evolution of several generations of MCP June 2018

modular UPS systems has increased availability from 99.9995% to 99.9999999%. Downtime has been reduced from seconds to milliseconds. Of course, a UPS system does not just comprise of the UPS units themselves but also includes the vital DC source needed to convert and provide outpower power in the event of a mains supply failure. This DC source has predominantly remained the battery: a simple chemical device used to store energy until it is required. For the UPS world, the traditional ‘go to’ battery has been the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) block. VRLA has been around for a long time for many good reasons: the technology is old but proven, it is robust, price competitive, the batteries are

recyclable and, as a result, has been the backup of choice for the vast majority of UPS systems (note that batteries for UPS systems have been specifically designed for the unique characteristics of the

80%

The fall in the price of Li-ion batteries since 2010 application and therefore the correct battery type must always be used). Like any industry, there are always improvements in technology and a change in battery type is coming. In the not-so-distant future, UPS systems will be supported by

lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology. Li-ion batteries have their origins in the early 1970s but the commercial success was really driven by Sony with its handheld video camera of the early 1990s. Continued growth and development has been driven by laptops, then mobile phones because we all want our electronics to be smaller, cheaper, more powerful and operate for longer periods. While critical IT power protection solutions and handheld electronics both share the common goals of demanding more power, occupying less space, longer run times and a justifiable price point, the batteries supporting consumer electronics are not the same as those for data centres. Interestingly, the adoption missioncriticalpower.uk

Profile for The Energyst

Mission Critical Power  

June 2018

Mission Critical Power  

June 2018

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded