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THE TRUE COST OF SOLAR ENERGY

(for crystalline PV modules).” GMT research is predicting that FBR capacities will double 2014 production of 26,000 metric tons to 46,000 metric tons this year. This trend will continue for the next two years. Solar energy should be as cheap as grid-supplied electric in just a couple of years. Large commercial facilities with flat roofs or unassigned acreage will save considerable costs. The DOE has passed its milestones while fully expecting to achieve their 2015 deadline for the Nanosolar facility model in California. SERDP is quoted as saying, “This model also demonstrates that U.S.manufactured solar technology and U.S.-generated solar power can provide energy, security and independence to the U.S. military. This range of power plant outputs could be readily constructed at DoD installations nationwide.” Polysilicon from 2015-2018 Supply, demand, cost and pricing expected during this period based on current annual production capacity is 70,000 metric tons coming online in 2015. Another 61,000 metric tons is scheduled to come online in 2016. This

will bring global polysilicon capacity to 437,000 metric tons. This is enough to support 85 GW of crystalline silicon for PV module production. The demand for polysilicon in 2016 is already set at 60 GW of PV. Fluidized bed reactor production costs have an ultimately lower cash floor than the Siemens process. While these prospects for FBR polysilicon are good, there is a lack of newly planned FBR plants set for scaling up and operating before 2018. GMT says this technology will only represent about 15 percent of the market by 2018. Predicted Strong Profits We know through popular solar watchdogs like industry-leading consulting firms that the battle for 19

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Without a doubt, one of the biggest issues monopolizing headlines in 2014 was the energy “crisis:” who was to blame; who had the (right) sol...