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00809-0100-4686 English Rev. FA

Installation and Operation Manual ProPlate Flowmeter Mass ProPlate Flowmeter Model 1195 Integral Orifice 速


Table of Contents SECTION 1 Introduction

Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 How to Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Installation Flowchart and Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

SECTION 2 Hardware Installation

Model 1195 Integral Orifice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Bypass Manifold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Remote Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Straight Pipe Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Gaskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Wetleg Seal Liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Transmitter Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 ProPlate/ Mass ProPlate Flowmeter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Receiving and Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 ProPlate/ Mass ProPlate Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Structural Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Functional Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Straight Run Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Access Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Process Flange Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Housing Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Terminal Side of Electronics Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Circuit Side of Electronics Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 ProPlate Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Model 1195 Integral Orifice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Model 1195 Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 ProPlate Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Mass ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15

1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Mass ProPlate Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remote Mounting connections only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valves and Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impulse Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tools Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supplies Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Instrument Manifolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Location for the Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liquid Service up to 450°F (232°C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (See page 2-25 for liquid service above 450°F.) . . . . . . . Recommended Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alternate Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gas Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recommended Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alternate Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steam or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C) . . . . . . . . Horizontal Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vertical Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mounting Brackets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mounting Bolts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolt Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SECTION 3 Field Wiring and Electrical Considerations

2

2-15 2-15 2-16 2-16 2-17 2-17 2-18 2-18 2-20 2-20 2-22 2-22 2-22 2-22 2-24 2-24 2-24 2-24 2-24 2-24 2-25 2-25 2-25 2-26 2-26 2-26 2-26 2-26

Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wiring Diagrams (Field Hook-Up) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Supply (4–20mA electronics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hazardous Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grounding the Signal Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grounding the ProPlate Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Access Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Process Flange Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terminal Side of the Electronics Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Circuit Side of the Electronics Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exterior of the Electronics Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cover Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Load Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hazardous Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Installation Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-2 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-5 3-6


Table of Contents Field Wiring (Power and Signal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Install Electrical Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field Wiring Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ground the Electronics Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-6 3-7 3-7 3-7

SECTION 4 Commissioning

Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Commissioning Direct Mount ProPlates/ Mass ProPlates . . . . . . . 4-2 Liquid Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Gas Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Steam Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 Remote Mount Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Commissioning Remote Mounted Flowmeters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Valve Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Zero the Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Check for System Leaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 5-Valve Manifolds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 “Calibrate Out” Temperature Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Zero or Wet Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Commissioning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Liquid Service below 450°F (232°C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 For 5-valve manifolds only: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Gas Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 For 5-valve manifolds only: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Steam Service or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C). . . . . . 4-10 For 5-valve manifolds only: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10

SECTION 5 Electronics Functions

ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Commissioning the Flowmeter on the Bench . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Failure Mode Alarm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Failure Mode Alarm vs. Saturation Output Values . . . . . 5-2 Alarm and Saturation Values for Flowmeters Set to Burst Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 Alarm Level Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 Flowmeter Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 Commissioning the ProPlate with a HART-Based Communicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Setting the Loop to Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Wiring Diagrams (Bench Hook-up) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Wiring Diagrams (Field Hook-up) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Review Configuration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Check Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Process Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Sensor Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Basic Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Set Process Variable Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Set Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Rerange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 LCD Meter Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Detailed Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Local Span and Zero Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Diagnostics and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loop Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calibration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deciding Which Trim Procedure to Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sensor Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog Output Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saving, Recalling, and Cloning Configuration Data . . . Burst Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multidrop Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bench Configuration and Calibration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Write Protect and Failure Mode Alarm Jumpers. . . . . . . . . . Failure Mode Alarm vs. Saturation Output Values. . . . . . . .

SECTION 6 Using the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software

4

5-13 5-13 5-13 5-14 5-16 5-17 5-18 5-20 5-21 5-21 5-22 5-22 5-24 5-24 5-25 5-25 5-26

Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Install the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software . . . . . . 6-1 Minimum Equipment and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Connect a Personal Computer to a Mass ProPlate . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Menu Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Menu Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Procedure Outlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Bench Configuration (Standard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Bench Calibration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Field Calibration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Automatic Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Engineering Assistant (EA) Software Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Screen Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Status Bar Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Hot Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Path Name Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Cancel Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Fast Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12


Table of Contents Setup Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Gas Configuration) . . . . . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Steam Configuration) . . . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Liquid Configuration) . . . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Configuration) Gross versus Detail Characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Flowchart) . . . Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Procedure) . . . Detail Characterization Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gross Characterization Method #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gross Characterization Method #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup Device Info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setup EA Default Units U.S. Units SI/Metric Units . . Transmitter Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter HART Output Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Change Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Change Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter HART Output Burst Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter HART Output Communication Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Device Info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Send Config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter Recv Config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Range Limits Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Sensor Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sensor Trim Procedure (For Bench Calibration) . . . . . . Sensor Trim Procedure (For Field Calibration) . . . . . . . Recall Factory Trim Settings Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Analog Output Range Values . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Analog Output Trim... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Change Passwords... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Medium Level Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Enable/Disable Security... . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Process Temperature Mode . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Read Outputs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Device Info Module Info... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Device Info Identification Info... . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Test Calculation... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Loop Test... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Master Reset... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnostics Error Info... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-12 6-12 6-16 6-20 6-23 6-23 6-24 6-26 6-27 6-27 6-28 6-31 6-32 6-33 6-33 6-34 6-34 6-34 6-34 6-35 6-35 6-36 6-37 6-37 6-38 6-39 6-39 6-40 6-40 6-40 6-40 6-41 6-43 6-44 6-45 6-46 6-47 6-48 6-48 6-48 6-49 6-50 6-50 6-51 6-51 6-52 6-54 6-54 6-54

5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Miscellaneous EA Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View Toolbar... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View Status Bar... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-55 6-55 6-55 6-55

SECTION 7 LCD Meter Options

ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LCD Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing the Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . For use with Shrouded Electronics Board . . . . . . . . . . . . For use with Non-Shrouded Electronics Board . . . . . . . . Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FAIL MODULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FAIL ELECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FAIL CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warnings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FPRES LIMIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P/T LIMIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CURR FIXED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CURR SATURD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LOOP TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XMTR INFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZERO PASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZERO FAIL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPAN PASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPAN FAIL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LOCAL DSBLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WRITE PROTCT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7-1 7-1 7-1 7-2 7-2 7-2 7-4 7-4 7-4 7-4 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-5 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6 7-6

SECTION 8 Maintenance

General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Return of Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orifice Plate Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orifice Plate Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orifice Plate Reinstallation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8-1 8-1 8-1 8-2 8-2

SECTION 9 Troubleshooting

Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remove the Flowmeter from Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remove the Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remove the Electronics Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remove the Sensor Module from the Electronics Board . . . . . . . . . Attach the Sensor Module to the Electronics Housing Block . . . . . Attach the Electronics Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Install the Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Returning Rosemount Products and/or Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RTD Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing an RTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9-1 9-2 9-3 9-3 9-4 9-5 9-6 9-7 9-7 9-8 9-8

6


Table of Contents

SECTION 10 Specifications and Reference Data

Model 1195 Integral Orifice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Ordering Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Functional Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Service and Flow Range. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Operating Process Temperature Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Maximum Working Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Physical Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Materials of Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Assembly Process Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2 Bore Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2 Available Pipe Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Transmitter Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Transmitter Fill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Orifice Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Torque Values of Standard Bolts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4 Straight Pipe Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4 ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Ordering Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Functional Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Pipe Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 4–20mA Load Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Temperature Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Turn-on Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Humidity Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Time Response (Electronics Only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Vibration Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Power Supply Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 RFI Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) . . . . . . . . 10-7 Static Pressure Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Mounting Position Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Physical Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Electrical Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Process-Wetted Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Non-Wetted Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Approvals Pending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9 Hazardous Locations Certifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9 Mass ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10 Ordering Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10

7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Functional Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pipe Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Absolute/Gage Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature Sensor Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Load Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turn-on-Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Humidity Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performance Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Differential Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Static Pressure Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Absolute/Gage Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Process Temperature Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Process-Wetted Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Wetted Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Approvals Pending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hazardous Locations Certifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

APPENDIX A HART Communicator

8

10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-12 10-13 10-13 10-13

ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 Connections and hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 Communicator Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Action Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Alphanumeric and Shift Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Data Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Fast Key Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Fast Key Sequence Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Fast Key Sequence Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Menus and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Online Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9 Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9 Mass ProPlate Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12 Safety Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13 Connections and hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15 Communicator Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17 Action Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18 ON/OFF Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18 Directional Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18 HOT Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18


Table of Contents Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19 Alphanumeric and Shift Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19 Data Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19 Fast Key Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 Fast Key Sequence Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 Fast Key Sequence Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 Menus and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 Online Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21 Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21

APPENDIX B Process Configuration Data Sheets

Model 1195 Integral Orifice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 ProPlate Flow meter Model P95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3

APPENDIX C Calculation Data Sheets

Calculation Data Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1

APPENDIX D Approval Drawings

Approvals Pending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1

APPENDIX E Spare Parts

9


Product Manual Installation and Operation Manual ProPlate Flowmeter Mass ProPlate Flowmeter Model 1195 Integral Orifice ®

®

NOTICE Read this manual before working with the product. For personal and system safety, and for optimum product performance, make sure you thoroughly understand the contents before installing, using, or maintaining this product. Within the United States, Rosemount Inc. has two toll-free assistance numbers: Customer Central Technical support, quoting, and order-related questions. 1-800-999-9307 (7:00 am to 7:00 pm CST) North American Response Center Equipment service needs. 1-800-654-7768 (24 hours—includes Canada) Outside of the United States, contact your local Rosemount representative.

The products described in this document are NOT designed for nuclear-qualified applications. Using non-nuclear qualified products in applications that require nuclearqualified hardware or products may cause inaccurate readings. For information on Rosemount nuclear-qualified products, contact your local Rosemount Sales Representative. This device is intended for use in temperature monitoring applications and should not be used in control and safety applications.

Rosemount and the Rosemount logotype are registered trademarks of Rosemount Inc., Annubar and Pak-Lok are registered trademarks of Dieterich Standard Inc. Mass ProPlate, ProPlate and Annubar are registered trademarks of Dieterich Standard Inc. Monel is a registered trademark of International Nickel Co. Teflon is a registered trademark of E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co. Hastelloy C and Hastelloy C-276 are registered trademarks of Cabot Corp HART is a registered trademark of the HART Communication Foundation All other marks are the property of their respective owners COVER PHOTO: 848-848C004


Section 1

Introduction The Model 1195 Integral Flow Orifice Assembly is a primary flow element. It is designed to create a differential pressure proportional to flow in a 1/2 in. (15 mm), 1 in. (25 mm), or 1 1/2 in. (40 mm) process pipe. ProPlate® and Mass ProPlate® are integrated flow meters combining the 1195 Integral Orifice with either a 3051CD Smart DP Transmitter or 3095MV MultiVariable Mass Flow Transmitter and RTD Temperature Measurement. For the Model 1195, this process is measured by a secondary element, such as one of the Rosemount differential pressure transmitters listed in Table 1-1. The Model 1195, ProPlate and Mass ProPlate measure flow rates ranging from 0.001 GPM (0.004 /min) to 95 GPM (360 /min) in clean liquids, or from 0.25 ft3/hr (0.007 m3/hr) to 22,000 ft3/hr (623 m3/hr) in clean gas or steam. O

O

NOTE This device is designed to measure forward flow.

Table 1-1. Rosemount Transmitters for use with the Model 1195.

Model 1151DP Differential Pressure Transmitter Model 1151DP Square Root Flow Transmitter Model 1151HP High Pressure Differential Transmitter Model 1151 Low-Power Pressure Transmitter Model 1151DP Smart Pressure Transmitter Model 3051C Smart Differential Pressure Transmitter Model 2024D Differential Pressure Transmitter Model 3095 MV™ Multivariable™ Mass Flow Transmitter

SAFETY MESSAGES

Procedures and instructions in this manual may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Refer to the safety messages, listed at the beginning of each section, before performing any operations.

HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL

This product manual provides installation, configuration, calibration, troubleshooting, and maintenance instructions for the Model 1195, ProPlate, and Mass ProPlate Mass Flowmeter. This section contains an explanation of each section of the manual, a flowchart for using the manual, and an installation checklist. Section 2: Hardware Installation explains initial inspection, operating limitations, and in what location and orientation to install the Model 1195, ProPlate, or Mass ProPlate models for liquid, gas or steam service. Also explains how to install the remote mounted Model 1195, ProPlate, and Mass ProPlate electronics for liquid, gas or steam service. Section 3: Field Wiring and Electrical Considerations provides electrical considerations and field wiring diagrams to wire the ProPlate and Mass ProPlate.

1-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Section 4: Commissioning describes how to commission direct mounted and remote mounted ProPlates and Mass ProPlates after installation. Section 5: Electronics Functions provides information for commissioning the electronics, including operation of the software functions, configuration parameters, and on-line variables of the ProPlate or Mass ProPlate. Section 6: Using the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software describes how to use the configuration software, including installing the software onto a PC, establishing communications with the Mass ProPlate, configuring the Mass ProPlate, creating a configuration file, and calibrating the Mass ProPlate. This section also explains the configuration software menus. Section 7: LCD Meter Options provides information about installation options on ProPlate and Mass ProPlate. Section 8: Maintenance explains maintenance on the primary flow element. Section 9: Troubleshooting provides troubleshooting techniques for common operating problems associated with ProPlate and Mass ProPlate and provides information on how to wire your integral or remote RTD and maintenance for integral RTDs. Section 10: Specifications and Reference Data provides specification and reference data for the Model 1195, ProPlate, and Mass ProPlate. Appendix A: HART Communicator contains a communicator overview, a HART communicator menu tree for the ProPlate and Mass ProPlate, and a table of diagnostic messages associated with the communicator. Appendix B: Process Configuration Data Sheets shows forms used to identify important physical specifications about the process and the Model 1195, ProPlate, or Mass ProPlate. Appendix C: Calculation Data Sheets shows examples of calculation data sheets that can be generated and shipped directly to the customer once a completed Process Configuration Data Sheet has been submitted to Dieterich Standard, Inc. or Rosemount Inc. for the Model 1195, ProPlate, or Mass ProPlate. Appendix D: Approval Drawings illustrates Factory Mutual (FM) and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) certified drawings. Appendix E: Spare Parts contains a table of spare parts available for ordering.

INSTALLATION FLOWCHART AND CHECKLIST

1-2

Figure 1-1 shows an installation flowchart to provide guidance through the installation process. Following the figure, an installation checklist has been provided to verify that all critical steps have been taken in the installation process. The checklist numbers are indicated in the flowchart.


Figure 1-1. Installation Chart

Start

Unpack the transmitter

Review Product Manual

Review Section 2 to verify proper locations

Steps 1,2

Yes Hazardous Location?

Review Appendix D

Step 3

No Verify model indication on tag

Step 4

Yes

Bench Configure?

Review Section 5: Electronics Functions

No

Steps 5-8 Yes Remote Mounted Electronics?

Steps 5-8

Install hardware according to Section 2.

No

Install flowmeter according to Section 2. Install electronics according to Section 3.

Step 9

Wire flowmeter according to Section 3.

Steps 10-13 Remote Mounted Electronics?

Yes

Commission flowmeter according to Section 4.

No Commission flowmeter according to Section 4.

Steps 10-13

Finish

1-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate The following list is a summary of the steps required to complete a flowmeter installation. If this is an entirely new installation, begin with step 1. 1. Determine where the flow meter is to be placed within the piping system. 2. Establish the proper orientation as determined by the intended service for the flowmeter. 3. Review Appendix D: Approval Drawings if the flowmeter is located in a hazardous location. 4. Confirm the flow meter configuration. 5. Remove appropriate length for the meter section from the piping. 6. Insure process connections match the meter section to be installed. 7. Connect the meter section to process connections and orient the transmitter per flow diagrams in “Hardware Installation� on page 2-8. 8. Tighten process connections. 9. Wire the flow meter electronics. 10. Supply power to the flowmeter. 11. Perform a trim for mounting effects. 12. Check for leaks. 13. Commission the flow meter.

1-4


Section 2 MODEL 1195 INTEGRAL ORIFICE

Hardware Installation The orifice assembly installs directly into the customer’s process piping with threaded, welded, or flanged connections. The transmitter may be mounted directly to the orifice assembly or mounted remotely using optional remote connectors. Available options allow the user to have the Model 1195 sized for specific operating conditions and laboratory flow calibrated for improved accuracy. Appendix C: Calculation Data Sheets shows the Calculation Data Sheet that specifies the physical parameters of the orifice from a detailed sizing calculation. The calculation should be retained for future reference.

Figure 2-1. ProPlate Mounting Orientation (305 Manifold Shown)

Mounting

The flow measurement’s accuracy depends to a great extent on proper installation of the transmitter and orifice assembly. Mounting the transmitter close to the process and using a minimum of piping ensures the greatest accuracy. Keep in mind, however, the need for easy access, safety of personnel, practical field calibration, and a suitable transmitter environment. In general, install the transmitter so as to minimize vibration, shock, and temperature fluctuation.

2-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate If the orifice assembly has socket-weld end connections, the customer must machine the corresponding ends of the process pipe to the appropriate outside diameter for a slip-in fit. Dimensions for this procedure are listed in Section 10: Specifications and Reference Data. Use welding procedures qualified per AWS, API, ASME, or other appropriate industry code when installing assemblies with socket-weld or beveled pipe end connections. Bypass Manifold A differential pressure transmitter, such as the Model 3051C, can be mounted directly to the orifice assembly with a bypass manifold, or mounted indirectly using customer-supplied pressure piping. Installation of a 3-valve bypass manifold between the orifice and transmitter to allow transmitter servicing without process flow interruption is recommended.

Mounting a differential pressure transmitter or a 3-valve bypass manifold directly to the orifice assembly can damage the process piping if vibration is present. Use a transmitter support bracket if this condition exists.

Remote Connectors Transmitters remotely connected to the orifice require two pairs of pressure connection adaptors and bolts. One pair is supplied with the transmitter and the other is provided with the orifice assembly. Connections for the pressure piping are tapped for ×–14 NPT. Any remote pressure piping must be supplied by the customer. Straight Pipe Lengths Associated piping optionally supplied with the orifice assembly measures approximately 20 pipe diameters upstream and 10 diameters downstream. Flow must enter the orifice assembly at the upstream end. These straight lengths minimize the effects of upstream and downstream piping disturbances. If the disturbance is severe, or if the piping is not supplied with the orifice assembly, refer to Figure 2-2 for the minimum required straight runs of pipe for specific upstream disturbance situations. Gaskets The customer must provide gaskets between the orifice assembly flange and the mating process flange. These gaskets must be compatible with the process temperature, pressure, and corrosion factors. Make sure that the process flanges are compatible with the orifice assembly flanges. Wetleg Seal Liquid In cases where the process fluid cannot come into direct contact with the transmitter, use a suitable seal liquid in the transmitter lines. If the process fluid is steam, then water is the only suitable seal liquid. For other process fluids, your sales representative can help determine the proper seal liquid where a wetleg installation is desired.

2-2


U

U

D

B) SINGLE 90° BEND

A) REDUCER

U

U

D

D

D) TWO OR MORE 90° BENDS IN DIFFERENT PLANES

C) TWO OR MORE 90° BENDS IN THE SAME PLANES

U

D

D

U

E) EXPANDER

D

$   $     

F) GLOBE/GATE VALVE FULLY OPEN

7KHIROORZLQJFKDUWJLYHVWKHXSVWUHDP 8 DQGGRZQVWUHDP ' OHQJWKVLQFRQIRUPDQFHZLWK,62UHTXLUHGIRUWKHDERYHLQVWDOODWLRQV7KH

â?¤ RIXVLQJLQVWDOODWLRQW\SH%DERYH

OHQJWKVDUHJLYHQLQWHUPVRISLSHGLDPHWHUV)RUH[DPSOHIRUDRQHLQOLQHVL]HZLWKDEHWDUDWLR

⍝

WKHVWUDLJKWOHQJWKRIXSVWUHDPSLSLQJUHTXLUHGLV

⍝ 

LQDQGGRZQVWUHDP

LQ

On downstream (D outlet side)

On Upstream (U inlet side of the primary device)

Orifice Bore ⍟ Pipe Bore b

A Reducer (2 d to d over a length of 1.5 d to 3 d)

B Single 90° bend or tee (flow from one branch only)

C Two or more 90° bends in the same plane

D Two or more 90° bends in different planes

E Expander (0.5 d to d over a length of d to 2 d)

<0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75

5 5 5 5 5 5 6 8 9 11 14 22

10 10 10 12 14 14 14 16 18 22 28 36

14 14 16 16 18 18 20 22 26 32 36 42

34 34 34 36 36 38 40 44 48 54 62 70

16 16 16 16 16 17 18 20 22 25 30 38

F Globe G All fittings valve fully Gate valve included in this open fully open table 18 18 18 18 20 20 22 24 26 28 32 36

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 14 16 20 24

4 4 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8

Figure 2-2. Pipe Length Requirements for Installation.

2-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate The transmitter cannot be mounted directly on the orifice body when a seal liquid is used. Pressure lines and the optional pressure connectors are required in this case. Figure 2-3 illustrates some typical installations of remote connection adapters.

Exceeding the pressure or temperature ratings of the orifice assembly or the transmitter can cause severe personal injury or equipment damage. Follow the pressure and temperature limits specifications in Section 10: Specifications and Reference Data.

Transmitter Orientation

The high pressure port on the upstream side of the orifice assembly must be connected to the high pressure side of the differential transmitter. Position the transmitter drain and vent plugs so that trapped gases can be periodically vented and condensate can be drained. Before tightening the assembly bolts, make sure that the side of the orifice plate labeled “INLET” faces upstream.

Loose bolts and fitting sags can cause leakage. Ensure all bolts and fittings on the orifice assembly, such as transmitter body, pressure connector, drain, vent are tight before applying pressure to the process piping and orifice/transmitter assembly.

Tighten the two body bolts to a torque of 60 ft.-lb. Tighten the four transmitter, manifold, or connection adaptor bolts to a torque of 38 ft.-lb.

PROPLATE/ MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section describes the orientation and location for installing the ProPlate flowmeter. Read it thoroughly before any installation is performed.

Safety Messages

Instructions and procedures in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Please refer to the following safety messages before performing any operation in this section.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury:

2-4

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.


REMOTE MOUNT

GAS

GAS

LIQUID OR STEAM

                                                  

LIQUID OR STEAM

DIRECT MOUNT

                        

LIQUID OR STEAM

GAS

Figure 2-3. Liquid/Steam/Gas Application Mounting.

2-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: â&#x20AC;˘

Receiving and Inspection

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

ProPlate/Mass ProPlate flowmeters are available in different models and with different options, so it is important to inspect and know which model you have before beginning installation. Upon receipt of the shipment, check the packing list against the material received and the purchase order. All items are tagged with a model number, serial number, and customer tag number. Report any damage to the carrier.

ProPlate/ Mass ProPlate Configurations

The ProPlate/Mass ProPlate is available in a variety of mounting configurations and has two methods of electronic mounting: integral mount (or, direct mount) and remote mount. An integrally-mounted ProPlate/Mass ProPlate may be shipped with the electronics already bolted directly to the sensor.

Figure 2-4. ProPlate Mounting Configuration Examples: A (Integral Mount) and B (Remote Mount).

                         

A

B

The ProPlate/Mass ProPlate may be purchased as a flow calibrated unit for enhanced accuracy and turndown, or as a non-flow calibrated unit. The flow calibrated units are identified by the model callout. NOTE Replacing the electronics may affect performance.

Structural Limitations

Exceeding the ProPlate structural limitations may cause the sensor to fail.

Structural limitations can be found in Table 10-1 on page 10-2.

2-6


Functional Limitations

The ProPlate/Mass ProPlate best produces accurate and repeatable flow measurement under the following conditions: â&#x20AC;˘ The maximum differential pressure is not exceeded. â&#x20AC;˘ The ProPlate is not used for two-phase flow or for steam service below saturation temperature. Install the ProPlate in the correct location within the piping branch to prevent measurement inaccuracies caused by flow disturbances.

Straight Run Requirements

Use Figure 2-2 to determine the proper ProPlate straight run requirements. NOTES If longer lengths of straight run are available, position the ProPlate where 80% of the run is upstream of the ProPlate and 20% is downstream. Straightening vanes may be used to reduce the required straight run length and will improve performance.

Environmental Considerations

Location of the ProPlate/Mass ProPlate in pulsating flow will cause a noisy signal. Vibration can also distort the output signal and compromise the structural limits of the flowmeter. Mount the ProPlate in a secure run of pipe as far as possible from pulsation sources such as check valves, reciprocating compressors or pumps, and control valves. Mount the transmitter to minimize ambient temperature changes. Section 15: Specifications and Reference Data lists the temperature operating limits. Mount the transmitter to avoid vibration and mechanical shock; also avoid external contact with corrosive materials. See Section 10: Specifications and Reference Data for environmental considerations. Access Requirements When choosing an installation location and position, take into account the need for access to the ProPlate. Process Flange Orientation The process flanges must be oriented so that process connections can be made. In addition, consider the possible need for a testing or calibration input. Drain/ vent valves must be oriented so that the process fluid is directed away from technicians when the valves are used. Housing Rotation The electronics housing may be rotated to improve field access to the two compartments. To rotate the housing less than 90 degrees, release the housing rotation set screw and turn the housing not more than 90 degrees from the orientations shown in Figure 2-11. To rotate the housing greater than 90 degrees, consult factory. Rotating the housing greater than 90 degrees without performing the disassembly procedure may damage the Mass ProPlate sensor module.

2-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Terminal Side of Electronics Housing Wiring connections are made through the conduit openings on the top side of the housing. The field terminal side is marked on the electronics housing. Mount the Mass ProPlate so that the terminal side is accessible. A 0.75-in. clearance is required for cover removal. Install a conduit plug on the unused side of the conduit opening. Circuit Side of Electronics Housing The circuit compartment should not routinely need to be opened when the unit is in service; however, provide 0.75-in. clearance if possible to allow access.

ProPlate Orientation Proper venting or draining must be considered when selecting a ProPlate location. For liquid service, mount the side drain/vent valve upward; this allows gases to vent. For gas service, mount the drain/vent valve down to allow any accumulated liquid to drain. In steam service, fill lines with water to prevent contact of the live steam with the electronics; condensate chambers are not needed because the volumetric displacement of the electronics is negligible.

Hardware Installation

Safety Messages Instructions and procedures in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Please refer to the following safety messages before performing any operation in this section.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

2-8

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.


MODEL 1195 INTEGRAL ORIFICE

This section provides hardware installation instructions for the Model 1195 Integral Orifice Assembly. If remote mounting of the electronics is required, use this section for hardware installation. Then, see Section 5: Electronics Functions for electronics installation. â&#x20AC;˘ The direct mount maximum service temperature is 450°F (232°C). â&#x20AC;˘ The electronics must be remote mounted when service temperatures exceed 450°F (232°C).

Model 1195 Configurations

The Model 1195 series comes pre-assembled and requires only installation into a service pipe. General installation instructions are as follows. 1. Remove appropriate length of process pipe for meter section. 2. Insure process connections match the meter section to be installed. 3. Connect the meter assembly to the process connection and orient the transmitter as shown in the installation diagram. 4. Tighten the process connections. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Model 1195 with the transmitter below to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter assembly. Figure 2-5 illustrates the recommended location for the Model 1195 when used with liquid service.

Figure 2-5. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Model 1195 with the transmitter above as shown in Figure 2-6. This orientation will prevent condensate from becoming entrapped in the meter assembly.

2-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 2-6. Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Model 1195 with the transmitter below to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter section. Figure 2-7 illustrates the recommended location for the Model 1195 when used with steam service. Figure 2-7. Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe The Model 1195 can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-8. The transmitter should always be remote mounted below the meter assembly.

2-10


Figure 2-8. Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe The Model 1195 can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-9. The transmitter should always be remote mounted above the meter assembly. Figure 2-9. Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe The Model 1195 can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-10. The transmitter should always be remote mounted below the meter assembly.

2-11


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 2-10. Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section provides hardware installation instructions for the Threaded, Welded, and Flanged ProPlate models used in either a horizontal or vertical pipe. If remote mounting of the electronics is required, use this section for hardware installation. Then, see Section 5: Electronics Functions for electronics installation. â&#x20AC;˘ The direct mount maximum service temperature is 450°F (232°C). â&#x20AC;˘ The electronics must be remote mounted when service temperatures exceed 450°F (232°C).

ProPlate Configurations

The ProPlate flowmeter series comes pre-assembled and requires only installation into a service pipe. General installation instructions are as follows. 1. Remove appropriate length of process pipe for meter section. 2. Insure process connections match the meter section to be installed. 3. Connect the meter assembly to the process connection and orient the transmitter as shown in the installation diagram. 4. Tighten the process connections. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the ProPlate with the transmitter facing down to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter assembly. Figure 2-11 illustrates the recommended location for the ProPlate when used with liquid service.

2-12


Figure 2-11. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the ProPlate with the transmitter facing up as shown in Figure 2-12. This orientation will prevent condensate from becoming entrapped in the meter assembly. Figure 2-12. Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the ProPlate with the transmitter facing down to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter section. Figure 2-13 illustrates the recommended location for the ProPlate when used with steam service. Figure 2-13. Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

2-13


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe The ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-14. The transmitter should always be remote mounted below the meter assembly. Figure 2-14. Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe The ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-15. The transmitter should always be remote mounted above the meter assembly. Figure 2-15. Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe The ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-16. The transmitter should always be remote mounted below the meter assembly.

2-14


Figure 2-16. Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section provides hardware installation instructions for the Threaded, Welded, and Flanged Mass ProPlate models used in either a horizontal or vertical pipe. If remote mounting of the electronics is required, use this section for hardware installation. Then, see â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remote Mounting connections onlyâ&#x20AC;? on page 2-18 for electronics installation. â&#x20AC;˘ The direct mount maximum service temperature is 450°F (232°C). â&#x20AC;˘ The electronics must be remote mounted when service temperatures exceed 450°F (232°C).

Mass ProPlate Configurations

The Mass ProPlate series comes pre-assembled and requires only installation into a service pipe. General installation instructions are as follows. 1. Remove appropriate length of process pipe for meter section. 2. Insure process connections match the meter section to be installed. 3. Connect the meter assembly to the process connection and orient the transmitter as shown in the installation diagram. 4. Tighten the process connections. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Mass ProPlate with the transmitter facing down to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter assembly. Figure 2-17 illustrates the recommended location for the Mass ProPlate when used with liquid service.

2-15


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 2-17. Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Mass ProPlate with the transmitter facing up as shown in Figure 2-18. This orientation will prevent condensate from becoming entrapped in the meter assembly. Figure 2-18. Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe Install the Mass ProPlate with the transmitter facing down to prevent air from becoming entrapped within the meter section. Figure 2-19 illustrates the recommended location for the Mass ProPlate when used with steam service.

2-16


Figure 2-19. Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe The Mass ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-20. The transmitter should always be remote mounted below the meter assembly. Figure 2-20. Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe The Mass ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-21. The transmitter should always be remote mounted above the meter assembly.

2-17


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 2-21. Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe The Mass ProPlate can be installed anywhere around the circumference of the pipe, as shown in Figure 2-22. â&#x20AC;˘ Mass ProPlate electronics must be remote mounted when used with steam service in a vertical pipe. See Section 5: Electronics Functions for instructions. Figure 2-22. Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe.

           

REMOTE MOUNTING CONNECTIONS ONLY

This section provides remote mounting installation instructions for the ProPlate electronics for liquid, gas or steam service in either horizontal or vertical pipes. Figures 2-23 through 2-25 illustrate how the ProPlate sensor should be aligned for a specific service and pipe orientation prior to remote mounting.

2-18


Figure 2-23. Liquid Service: A (Horizontal Pipe) and B (Vertical Pipe).

A

Figure 2-24. Gas Service: A (Horizontal Pipe) and B (Vertical Pipe).

A

Figure 2-25. Steam Service: A (Horizontal Pipe) and B (Vertical Pipe).

A

B                        

B                         

B                       

The ProPlate/Mass ProPlate process connections on the electronics flange are 1/4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;18 NPT. Flange adapter unions with 1/2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14 NPT connections are supplied as standard with the remote mounted ProPlate/Mass ProPlate. The threads are Class 2; use your plant-approved lubricant or sealant when making the process connections. The process connections on the electronics flange are on 21/8-inch (54 mm) centers to allow direct mounting to a three-valve or five-valve manifold. Rotate one or both of the flange adapters to attain connection centers of 2 inches (51 mm), 21/8 inches (54 mm), or 21/4 inches (57 mm).

Install and tighten all four flange bolts before applying pressure, or process leakage will result. When properly installed, the flange bolts will protrude through the top of the module housing. Do not attempt to loosen or remove the flange bolts while the ProPlate/Mass ProPlate is in service.

2-19


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Perform the following procedure to install adapters to the 1195 Integral Orifice process connections: 1. Place non-threaded side facing 1195 process connections. This will leave thread side facing transmitter. 2. Install and tighten bolts and tighten bolts and nuts. Refer to “Mounting Bolts” on page 2-26 for torque specifications.

Failure to install proper flange adapter O-rings can cause process leaks, which can result in death or serious injury. The flange adapters require a unique O-ring, as shown below. O-ring Flange Adapter Unique O-ring Grooves

When compressed, Teflon® (PTFE) O-rings tend to cold flow, which aids in their sealing capabilities. Whenever you remove flanges or adapters, visually inspect the Teflon O-rings. Replace them if there are any signs of damage, such as nicks or cuts. If they are undamaged, you may reuse them. If the you replace the O-rings, re-torque the flange bolts after installation to compensate for cold flow. Refer to the process sensor body reassembly procedure in Section 9: Troubleshooting.

Valves and Fittings

Throughout the remote mounting process: • Use only valves and fittings rated for the service pipeline design pressure and temperature as specified in Section 10: Specifications and Reference Data. • Use a pipe thread sealant compound that is rated for use at the service temperature and pressure for all valves and fittings. • Verify that all connections are tight and that all instrument valves are fully closed. • Verify that the meter assembly is properly oriented for the intended type of service: liquid, gas or steam (see Figures 2-23, 2-24, and 2-25).

Impulse Piping

2-20

A remote mounted electronics is connected to the sensor by means of impulse piping. Temperatures in excess of 450°F at the electronics will damage electronics components; impulse piping allows service flow temperatures to decrease to a point where the electronics is no longer vulnerable.


Each service uses a different impulse piping arrangement to maintain a single phase of fluid in the piping and ProPlate electronics. For example, liquid applications must maintain a liquid state and allow any air or gas formation to travel up and away from the ProPlate electronics, and gas applications must maintain a gaseous state and allow the formation of liquids to drain down and away from the ProPlate electronics. The piping used to connect the sensor probe and electronics must be rated for continuous operation at the pipeline-designed pressure and temperature. A minimum of one-half inch (½-in., 12mm) O.D. stainless steel tubing with a wall thickness of at least 0.035" is recommended. Threaded pipe fittings are not recommended because they create voids where air can become entrapped and have more possibilities for leakage. The following restrictions and recommendations apply to impulse piping location. 1. Impulse piping that runs horizontally must slope at least one inch per foot (83mm/m). • It must slope downwards (toward the ProPlate electronics) for liquid and steam applications. • It must slope up (away from the ProPlate electronics) for gas applications. 2. For applications where the pipeline temperature is below 450°F (232°C), the impulse piping should be as short as possible to minimize flow temperature changes. Insulation may be required. 3. For applications where pipeline temperature is above 450°F (232°C), the impulse piping should have a minimum length of one foot (0.3048 m) for every 100°F (38°C) over 450°F (232°C), which is the maximum operating ProPlate electronics temperature. Impulse piping must be uninsulated to reduce fluid temperature. All threaded connections should be checked after the system comes up to temperature, because connections may be loosened by the expansion and contraction caused by temperature changes. 4. Outdoor installations for liquid, saturated gas, or steam service may require insulation and heat tracing to prevent freezing. 5. For installations where the ProPlate electronics are more than six feet (1.8m) from the sensor probe, the high and low impulse piping must be run together to maintain equal temperature. They must be supported to prevent sagging and vibration. 6. Run impulse piping in protected areas or against walls or ceilings. If the impulse piping is run across the floor, ensure that it is protected with coverings or kick plates. Do not locate the impulse piping near high temperature piping or equipment. 7. Use an appropriate pipe sealing compound rated for the service temperature on all threaded connections. When making threaded connections between stainless steel fittings, Loctite PST Sealant is recommended.

2-21


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Equipment Required

Proper remote mount installation of the ProPlate electronics requires the following tools and equipment.

Tools Required

Tools required include the following: 1. Open end or combination wrenches (spanners) to fit the pipe fittings and bolts: 9/16-in., 5/8-in., 7/8-in. 2. Adjustable wrench: 15-in. (1½-in. jaw). 3. Nut driver: 3/8-in. for vent/drain valves (or 3/8-in. wrench). 4. Phillip’s screwdriver: #1. 5. Standard screwdrivers: 6-in., and 1/8-in. wide. 6. Pipe wrench: 14-in. 7. Wire cutters/strippers.

Supplies Required

Supplies required include the following: 1. ½-in. Tubing (recommended) or ½-in. pipe to hook up the ProPlate electronics to the sensor probe. The length required depends upon the distance between the electronics and the sensor. 2. Fittings including, but not limited to: a. Two tube or pipe tees (for steam or high temperature liquid) b. Six tube/pipe fittings (for tube) 3. Pipe compound or teflon tape (where local piping codes allow).

INSTRUMENT MANIFOLDS

An instrument manifold is recommended for all installations. A manifold allows an operator to equalize the pressures prior to the zero calibration of the ProPlate electronics as well as to isolate the electronics from the rest of the system without disconnecting the impulse piping. Although a 3-valve manifold can be used, a 5-valve manifold is recommended. Figure 2-26 identifies the valves on a 5-valve and a 3-valve manifold. 5-valve manifolds provide a positive method of indicating a partially closed or faulty equalizer valve. A closed for faulty equalizer valve will block the DP signal and create errors that may not be detectable otherwise. Figure 2-26 shows the DP manifold assembly and identifies the valves on both types of manifolds, and Table 2-1 provides a description of the valves. The labels for each valve will be used to identify the proper valve in the procedures to follow. NOTE Some recently-designed instrument manifolds have a single valve actuator, but cannot perform all of the functions available on standard 5-valve units. Check with the manufacturer to verify the functions that a particular manifold can perform. In place of a manifold, individual valves may be arranged so as to provide the necessary isolation and equalization functions.

2-22


NOTE The ProPlate should be shipped with the instrument manifold already bolted to the electronics.

Figure 2-26. Valve Identification for 5-Valve and 3-Valve Manifolds.

To PH To PL

To PH To PL

MV

MH

MH

ME

ML

MEH

ML

MEL

$   B     

DVL

DVH

5-Valve Manifold

Table 2-1. Description of Impulse Piping Valves and Components.

$   B         

3-Valve Manifold

Name

Description

Purpose

PH PL

Primary Sensorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Primary Sensorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Isolates the flowmeter sensor from the impulse piping system

Drain/Vent valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Drain/Vent valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Drains (for gas service) or vents (for liquid or steam service) the DP electronics chambers

BH BL

Blowdownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Blowdownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows pipeline pressure to blow and clear sediment from impulse piping

VH VL

Vent Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Vent Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows venting of collected gases from impulse piping in liquid applications

DH DL

Drain Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Drain Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows draining of collect condensate from impulse piping in gas applications

Impulse Piping Valves

DVH DVL

Components 1 2 3 4

ProPlate Electronics ProPlate Manifold Vent Chamber Condensate Chamber

Reads Differential Pressure Isolates and equalizes ProPlate electronics Collects gases in liquid applications Collects condensate in gas applications

Numbers 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 in the components section of Table 2-1 are used in Figures 2-27 through 2-32.

2-23


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

LOCATION FOR THE ELECTRONICS

The location for the electronics depends upon the service to be used.

Liquid Service up to 450°F (232°C)

(See page 2-25 for liquid service above 450°F.) The electronics may be installed in one of two ways, depending on the space limitations of the installation site. Refer to Figures 2-27 and 2-28 to help you determine which installation variation to use. Recommended Location The recommended installation mounts the electronics below the primary sensor to ensure that air will not be introduced into the impulse piping or the electronics. Figure 2-27 illustrates the recommended electronics location for use in either a horizontal or vertical pipe.

Figure 2-27. Recommended Electronics Installation for Liquid Service up to 450°F (232°C).

                        

Alternate Location When it is impossible to mount the ProPlate electronics below the pipeline, mount the ProPlate electronics above the pipeline using the arrangement shown in Figure 2-28. The alternate installation requires periodic maintenance to assure that air is vented from the chambers. The alternate location can be used with horizontal pipes only, as shown in Figure 2-28. Figure 2-28. Alternate Electronics Installation for Liquid Service up to 450°F (232°C).

           

Gas Service

2-24

The electronics may be installed in one of two ways, depending on the space limitations of the installation site. Refer to Figures 2-29 and 2-30 to help you determine which installation variation to use.


Recommended Location The recommended installation mounts the ProPlate electronics above the process piping to prevent condensable liquids from collecting in the impulse piping and DP cell. Figure 2-29 illustrates the recommended electronics location for use in a horizontal or vertical pipe. Figure 2-29. Recommended Electronics Installation for Gas Service: A (horizontal pipe) and B (vertical pipe).

A

B

                        

Alternate Location When it is impractical or impossible to mount the ProPlate electronics above the process piping, the electronics can be mounted below the process piping as shown in Figure 2-30. This alternate installation requires periodic maintenance to assure that condensate from saturated gas applications is drained from the chambers. Figure 2-30 illustrates the alternate location for use in either a horizontal or vertical pipe. Figure 2-30. Alternate Electronics Installation for Gas Service.

           

Steam or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C) For steam service (at any temperature) or liquid service at temperatures above 450°F (232°C), the ProPlate electronics must be installed below the process piping. NOTE Steam (or hot water) must not enter the electronics. Fill the system of impulse piping and ProPlate electronics with cool water before pressurizing the system. 2-25


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Horizontal Pipes For horizontal steam process piping, the electronics are mounted below, as shown in Figure 2-31. Route impulse piping down to the ProPlate electronics. Fill the system with cool water. Figure 2-31. Electronics Installation for Steam or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C) in a Horizontal Pipe.

           

Vertical Pipes For steam service in a vertical pipe, mount the electronics below the proplate Figure 2-32. Electronics Installation for Steam or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C) in a Vertical Pipe.

           

Mounting Brackets

Optional mounting brackets available with the Mass ProPlate facilitate mounting to a panel, wall, or 2-inch pipe. The bracket option for use with the Coplanar flange is 316 SST with 316 SST bolts. Figure 2-33 shows bracket dimensions and mounting configurations for this option. When installing the transmitter to one of the mounting brackets, torque the bolts to 125 in-lb (169 n-m).

MOUNTING BOLTS

The following guidelines have been established to ensure a tight flange, adapter, or manifold seal.

Bolt Installation

Only use bolts supplied with the ProPlate/Mass ProPlate or sold by Rosemount Inc. as spare parts for the ProPlate/Mass ProPlate. Use the following bolt installation procedure:

2-26


1. Finger-tighten the bolts. 2. Torque the bolts to the initial torque value using a cross-pattern (see Table for torque values). 3. Torque the bolts to the final torque value using the same cross-pattern.

Failure to install proper flange adapter O-rings can cause process leaks, which can result in death or serious injury. There are two styles of Rosemount flange adapters, each requiring a unique O-ring, as shown below. Each flange adapter is distinguished by its unique groove. O-ring Flange Adapter Unique O-ring Grooves

Use only the O-ring designed to seal with the corresponding flange adapter. Refer to the factory for the correct part numbers of the flange adapters and O-rings designed for the Mass ProPlate Flowmeter.

Table 2-2. Values

Bolt Installation Torque Bolt Material

Initial Torque Value

Final Torque Value

Carbon Steel (CS) Stainless Steel (SST)

300 in-lb (34 N-m) 150 in-lb (17 N-m)

650 in-lb (73 N-m) 300 in-lb (34 N-m)

The Mass ProPlate is shipped with the Coplanar flange installed with four 1.75-inch flange bolts. The following bolts also are supplied to facilitate other mounting configurations: â&#x20AC;˘ Four 2.25-inch manifold/flange bolts for mounting the Coplanar flange on a three-valve manifold. In this configuration, the 1.75-inch bolts may be used to mount the flange adapters to the process connection side of the manifold. â&#x20AC;˘ (Optional) If flange adapters are ordered, four 2.88-inch flange/adapter bolts for mounting the flange adapters to the Coplanar flange. Figure 2-33 shows the optional mounting bracket and mounting configurations. Figure 10-6 on page 10-16 shows mounting bolts and bolting configuration for the Mass ProPlate with the Coplanar flange. Stainless steel bolts supplied by Rosemount Inc. are coated with a lubricant to ease installation. Carbon steel bolts do not require lubrication. Do not apply additional lubricant when installing either type of bolt. Bolts supplied by Rosemount Inc. are identified by the following head markings: Carbon Steel Head Markings (CS)

Stainless Steel Head Markings (SST)

B7M

316

316 R

B8M

STM

316

SW 316

2-27


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 2-33. Optional Mounting Bracket and Mounting Configurations.

PANEL MOUNTING 











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2-28



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Section 3 SAFETY MESSAGES

Field Wiring and Electrical Considerations Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

The unused conduit opening on the electronics housing must be plugged and sealed to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

For intrinsically safe installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with ANSI/ISA-RP12.6, and Rosemount drawings 03031-1019 or 03031-1024. For ALL installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with local or national installation codes such as the NEC NFPA 70.

PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section provides electrical considerations and ProPlate field wiring instructions.

Wiring Diagrams (Field Hook-Up)

The following diagram illustrates wiring loops for a field hook-up with a HART-based communicator. Refer to Appendix A HART Communicator for an overview of HART communication operations.

3-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 3-1. Field Hook-up (4–20 mA Flowmeters)

CAUTION Do not use inductive-based transient protectors.

RL ˜ 250 V Curre

Power Supply

Signal point may be grounded at any point or left ungrounded.

Electrical Considerations

The signal terminals are located in a compartment of the electronics housing separate from the ProPlate electronics. Connections for the HART-based communicator are located below the signal terminals. The Model 272 Field Calibrator can be connected at the signal terminals to provide power to the electronics temporarily for calibration or diagnostic purposes. Otherwise, the calibrator may be attached to the test connections on the terminal block of the electronics for indication purposes. Figure 3-2 illustrates power supply load limitations for the ProPlate.

Figure 3-2. Power Supply Load Limitations.

V P K 2  G D R /

Operating Region

$         

Voltage (V dc) Communication requires a minimum loop resistance of 250 ohms. (1) For CSA approval, power supply must not exceed 42.4 V.

Power Supply (4–20mA electronics)

The dc power supply should provide power with less than 2 percent ripple. The total resistance load is the sum of the resistance of the signal leads and the load resistance of the controller, indicator, and related pieces. Note that the resistance of intrinsic safety barriers, if used, must be included. NOTE A minimum loop resistance of 250 ohms is required to communicate with a HART-based communicator. With 250 ohms of loop resistance, the ProPlate will require a minimum of 15.5 volts to output 20 mA. If a single power supply is used to power more than one ProPlate, the power supply used, and circuitry common to the ProPlates, should not have more than 20 ohms of impedance at 1200Hz.

3-2

%   +         


Wiring

To make connections, remove the housing cover on the side marked FIELD TERMINALS. Do not remove the instrument covers in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive. All power to the ProPlate is supplied over the signal wiring. Connect the lead that originates at the positive side of the power supply to the terminal marked “+” and the lead that originates at the negative side of the power supply to the terminal marked “–.” Avoid contact with the leads and terminals. Inductive-based transient protectors, including the Model 470, can adversely affect the output of the ProPlate. Do not use the Model 470 for transient protection with the ProPlate. If transient protection is desired, install the Transient Protection Terminal Block. Consult the factory for instructions.

Hazardous Locations

The ProPlate has an explosion-proof housing and circuitry suitable for intrinsically safe and non-incendive operation. Individual ProPlate models are clearly marked with a tag indicating the certifications they carry. See Section : Specifications and Reference Data for specific approval categories. NOTE Signal wiring does not require shielding; however, twisted pairs provide the best results. In order to ensure communication, wiring should be 24AWG or larger and shorter than 5,000 feet (1500 meters) in length. Do not connect the powered signal wiring to the test terminals. Power may damage the test diode in the test connection. Plug and seal unused conduit connections on the electronics housing to avoid moisture accumulation in the terminal side of the housing. Excess moisture accumulation may damage the ProPlate electronics. If the connections are not sealed, the ProPlate electronics should be remote mounted with the electrical housing positioned downward for drainage. Wiring should be installed with a drip loop, and the bottom of the drip loop should be lower then the conduit connections and the housing.

Grounding the Signal Wiring

Do not run signal wiring in conduit or open trays with power wiring, or near heavy electrical equipment. Signal wiring may be grounded at any one point on the signal loop, or it may be left ungrounded. The negative terminal of the power supply is a recommended grounding point.

Grounding the ProPlate Case

The ProPlate should always be grounded in accordance with national and local electrical codes. The most effective ProPlate case grounding method is a direct connection to an earth ground with minimal impedance. Methods for grounding the ProPlate case include: • Internal Ground Connection: Inside the FIELD TERMINALS side of the electronics housing is the Internal Ground Connection screw, which is identified by a ground symbol: . NOTE Grounding the electronics case via threaded conduit connection may not provide sufficient ground. 3-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Environmental Considerations

Mount the ProPlate to minimize ambient temperature changes. Section : Specifications and Reference Data lists the ProPlate temperature operating limits. Mount the ProPlate electronics to avoid vibration and mechanical shock, and to avoid external contact with corrosive materials.

Access Requirements

When choosing an installation location and position, consider the need for access to the ProPlate.

Process Flange Orientation

Orient the process flanges on a remote mounted ProPlate so that process connections can be made. For safety reasons, orient the drain/vent valves so that process fluid is directed away from technicians when the valves are used. In addition, consider the possible need for a testing or calibration input.

Housing Rotation

The electronics housing may be rotated up to 90 degrees (left or right) to improve field access to the two compartments or to better view the optional LCD meter. To rotate the housing, release the housing rotation set screw and turn the housing not more than 90 degrees. NOTE Do not rotate the housing greater than 90 degrees. Rotating the housing greater than 90 degrees will damage the sensor module and void the warranty.

Terminal Side of the Electronics Housing

Wiring connections are made through the conduit openings on the top side of the housing. The field terminal side is marked on the electronics housing. Mount the ProPlate so that the terminal side is accessible. A 0.75â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; clearance is required for cover removal. Use a conduit plug on the unused side of the conduit opening.

Circuit Side of the Electronics Housing

The circuit compartment should not routinely need to be opened when the unit is in service; however, provide 0.75-in. clearance if possible to allow access. A 3-in. clearance is required for cover removal if a meter is installed.

Exterior of the Electronics Housing

The integral span and zero push-buttons are located under the certifications plate on the top of the ProPlate. The plate will be blank if no certifications are ordered.

Cover Installations

Always install the electronics housing covers metal-to-metal to ensure a proper seal.

3-4


MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section provides electrical considerations and ProPlate field wiring instructions.

Electrical Considerations

The signal terminals are located in a compartment of the electronics housing separate from the electronics. Figure 3-3 illustrates power supply load limitations for the Mass ProPlate.

Power Supply

The dc power supply should provide power with less than 2% ripple. The total resistance load is the sum of the resistance of the signal leads and the load resistance of the controller, indicator, and related pieces. Note that the resistance of intrinsic safety barriers, if used, must be included. NOTE A loop resistance between 250-1100 ohms inclusive is required to communicate with a personal computer. With 250 ohms of loop resistance, a power supply voltage of at least 16.5 V dc is required.(1) If a single power supply is used to power more than one Mass ProPlate, the power supply used, and circuitry common to the Mass ProPlates, should not have more than 20 ohms of impedance at 1200 Hz.

Figure 3-3. Mass ProPlate Power Supply Load Limitations.

Load Limitations Loop resistance is determined by the voltage level of the external power supply, as described below: Max. Loop Resistance = Power Supply Voltage–11.0 0.022

4–20 mA dc 2000

V P K 2  G D R /

Operating Region 0 11.0

35

42.4 V(1)

55

Power Supply Voltage V dc HART protocol communication requires a loop resistance value between 250–1100 ohms, inclusive. (1) For CSA approval, power supply must not exceed 42.4 V dc.

HAZARDOUS LOCATIONS

The Mass ProPlate has an explosion-proof housing and circuitry suitable for intrinsically safe and non-incendive operation. Individual Mass ProPlates are clearly marked with a tag indicating the certifications they carry. See Section : Specifications and Reference Data for specific approval categories.

(1)

Quick troubleshooting check: There must be at least 11.0 V DC across the Mass ProPlate electronics terminals.

3-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Field Installation Equipment

The following equipment and tools are not provided with the Mass ProPlate. Be sure to review this list before field wiring the Mass ProPlate. • Installation tools • Field wire between the power supply and the Mass ProPlate • Barriers or seals required for hazardous locations • Power supply • Tie wraps

Field Wiring (Power and Signal)

Make field wiring connections (see Figure 3-4). These connections provide both power and signal wiring. NOTES Do not run field wiring in conduit or open trays with other power wiring, or near heavy electrical equipment. Field wiring need not be shielded, but twisted pairs provide the best results. To ensure communication, wiring should be 24 AWG or larger and less than 5,000 feet (1,500 meters) in length. For connections in ambient temperatures above 140°F (60°C), use wiring rated for at least 194°F (90°C). Incorrect field wiring connections may damage the Mass ProPlate electronics. Do not connect field wiring to the “TEST +” terminals. 1. Remove the cover on the side marked FIELD TERMINALS on the electronics housing. 2. Connect the lead that originates at the positive side of the power supply to the terminal marked “+ SIG.” Be sure to include loop resistance. 3. Connect the lead that originates at the negative side of the power supply to the terminal marked “-.” 4. Plug and seal unused conduit connections on the electronics housing to avoid moisture accumulation in the terminal side of the housing. NOTE If the conduit connections are not sealed, mount the electronics with the electrical housing positioned downward to drainage. Conduit should be installed with a drip loop, and the bottom of the drip loop should be lower than the conduit connections or the electronics housing.

3-6


Figure 3-4. Field Wiring Connections. 11009 > RL > 2509

User-Provided Power Supply

Signal loop may be grounded at any point or left ungrounded

(see step 7.b)

PREVIOUS TERMINAL BLOCK

11009 > RL > 2509

User-Provided Power Supply

Signal loop may be grounded at any point or left ungrounded

(see step 7.b)

IMPROVED TERMINAL BLOCK

Install Electrical Grounds

Install field wiring ground (optional), and ground the electronics case (required). Field Wiring Ground 1. Field wiring may be grounded at any one point on the signal loop, or it may be left ungrounded. The negative terminal of the power supply is a recommended grounding point. Ground the Electronics Case 2. The electronics case should always be grounded in accordance with national and local electrical codes. The most effective electronics case grounding method is a direct connection to the earth ground with minimal impedance. Methods for grounding the electronics case include: Internal Ground Connection: Inside the FIELD TERMINALS side of the electronics housing is the Internal Ground Connection screw. This screw is identified by a ground symbol: .

3-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE The transient protection terminal block does not provide transient protection unless the electronics case is properly grounded. Use the above guidelines to ground the electronics case. Do not run the transient protection ground wire with field wiring as the ground wire may carry excessive current if a lightening strike occurs. Grounding the electronics case using a threaded conduit connection may not provide sufficient ground. 3. Replace the cover.

3-8


Section 4

Commissioning Commissioning is the process of testing the assembly or flowmeter to ensure that it operates accurately and safely. If you are using a direct mount ProPlate/Mass ProPlate assembly with a 3051, refer to the information and instructions in “Commissioning Direct Mount ProPlates/ Mass ProPlates” on page 4-2. If you are using a remote mount ProPlate/Mass ProPlate flowmeter assembly, refer to the information and instructions in “Remote Mount Commissioning” on page 4-4. This section provides instructions for commissioning direct mounted ProPlate models in horizontal or vertical pipes. NOTE The commissioning process differs between direct mounted and remote mounted ProPlate flowmeters. See “Remote Mount Commissioning” on page 4-4 for instructions.

SAFETY MESSAGES

Instructions and procedures in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Please refer to the following safety messages before performing any operation in this section.

If the line is pressurized, serious injury or death could occur by opening valves.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

4-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

COMMISSIONING DIRECT MOUNT PROPLATES/ MASS PROPLATES

The commissioning process differs according to the service used. The following sections provide commissioning instructions for each type of service.

Liquid Service

This section provides instructions for commissioning direct mounted ProPlate models used for liquid service in horizontal or vertical pipes. Figure 4-1 identifies the valves used during the commissioning process.

Figure 4-1. Valve Identification for Direct Mounted ProPlates in Liquid Service.

'UDLQ9HQW

0(

9DOYHV 0+

0/

           

Use the following procedure to commission the ProPlate. 1. Open the high and low manifold valves MH and ML. 2. Open the equalizer valve ME. 3. Open the drain/vent valves on the electronics; bleed until no air is apparent in the liquid. 4. Close both drain/vent valves DVL and DVH. 5. Close the high and low manifold valves MH and ML. 6. Check the ProPlate zero by noting the electronics outputâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this is called a wet zero. If the signal reads outside of the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA, air is probably still in the system; repeat step 2, and trim zero if necessary. 7. Open the high and low manifold valves ML and MH. 8. Close equalizer valve ME. The system is now operational.

Gas Service

This section provides instructions for commissioning direct mounted ProPlate models used for gas service in horizontal or vertical pipes. Figure 4-2 identifies the valves used during the commissioning process.

4-2


Figure 4-2. Valve Identification for Direct Mounted ProPlates in Gas Service. 0/

'UDLQ9DOYHV

           

0+ 0(

Use the following procedure to commission the ProPlate. 1. Ensure that the pipe is pressurized. 2. Open the drain valves DVL and DVH on the electronics to ensure that no liquid is present. 3. Open equalization valve ME. 4. Open both high and low side main valves MH and ML. 5. Close drain valves DVL and DVH. 6. Check the electronics for the 4 mA signal. Trim zero if necessary. 7. Close the equalizer valve ME. The system is now operational.

Steam Service

This section provides instructions for commissioning direct mounted ProPlate models used for steam service in horizontal pipes. Steam service in vertical lines must be remote mounted. Refer to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remote Mount Commissioningâ&#x20AC;? on page 4-4. Figure 4-3 identifies the valves used during the commissioning process.

Figure 4-3. Valve Identification for Direct Mounted ProPlates in Steam Service.

'UDLQ9HQW 9DOYHV

0( 0+

0/

           

Use the following procedure to commission the ProPlate.

4-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate 1. Install the ProPlate meter assembly. 2. Check the electronics for a dry zero of 4 mA with no water loss. 3. Fill the manifold and the transmitter with water. 4. Open the high and low main valves MH and ML and equalizer valve ME to allow the assembly to equalize. 5. Close both MH and ML. 6. Check the ProPlate zero by noting the electronics output. If the signal reads outside of the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA, air is probably still in the system; repeat this procedure from step 2, and trim sensor if necessary. 7. Open MH and ML. 8. Close equalizer valve ME. The system is now operational. 9. Line can now be pressurized.

Do not open the ME valve when steam line is pressurized because the water legs could be removed.

10. For periodic maintenance check the wet zero. Close lowside ML, open ME and MH.

REMOTE MOUNT COMMISSIONING

Commissioning is the process of testing the ProPlate to ensure that it operates accurately and safely.

COMMISSIONING REMOTE MOUNTED FLOWMETERS

This section contains four procedures to follow in preparation for commissioning a remote mounted ProPlate: 1. Identify the location and purpose of manifold valves. 2. Zero the electronics. 3. Check for system leaks. 4. Perform a zero calibration.

Valve Identification

4-4

Before beginning the ProPlate commissioning process, you should become familiar with the location and purpose of the various valves involved. Figure 4-4 identifies the location of valves for both 5-valve and 3-valve manifolds, and Table 4-1 identifies the purpose of those valves.


Figure 4-4. Valve Identification: A (5-Valve Manifold) and B (3-Valve Manifold).

To PH To PL

To PH To PL

MV

MH

MH

ME

ML

MEH

MEL

5-Valve Manifold

Name

$   B      $   B         

DVL

DVH

Table 4-1. Description of Impulse Piping Valves and Components

ML

Description

3-Valve Manifold

Purpose Impulse Piping Valves

3+ 3/ '9+ '9/ %+ %/ 9+ 9/ '+ '/

Zero the Electronics

Primary Sensorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Primary Sensorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Isolates the flowmeter sensor from the impulse piping system

Drain/Vent valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Drain/Vent valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Drains (gases) or vents (liquids) the DP electronics chambers

Blowdownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Blowdownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows pipeline pressure to blow and clear sediment from impulse piping

Vent Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Vent Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows venting of collected gases from impulse piping in liquid applications

Drain Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;High Pressure Drain Valveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Low Pressure

Allows draining of collect condensate from impulse piping in gas applications

Before the ProPlate electronics are exposed to line pressure, check the â&#x20AC;&#x153;zeroâ&#x20AC;? calibration (or, â&#x20AC;&#x153;dryâ&#x20AC;? zero) by using the following procedure. 1. Open first the equalizer valve(s) MEL and MEH or ME. 2. Close valves MH and ML. 3. Read the ProPlate output. It should read within the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA. If the output is outside of this range, trim zero as described in Section 5: Electronics Functions.

Check for System Leaks

Check the system for leaks after installation is complete. A leak in a differential pressure instrument system can produce a difference in pressure that is larger than the signal itself. Before the system is filled and/or commissioned, it is a simple matter to use compressed air or another inert, compressed gas to check for leaks. The gas pressure must be below the maximum allowed, but at least equal to the normal operating pressure in order to reveal potential leaks. A typical pressure used is 100 psig (690 kPa).

4-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Before pressurizing the system, check for leaks by doing the following: 1. Open equalizer valve(s) MEH, MEL or ME to prevent overpressuring the DP. 2. Close valves PH, PL (unless the piping system is also being pressure-checked), MV, DVH, DVL. • If present, also close valves BH and BL or DH and DL. 3. Open valves MH and ML. 4. Install all appropriate tapped plugs. 5. Install a current meter to read the signal, if necessary. Apply pressure at a convenient point on either the high or low side of the system. Use a suitable leak detection solution and apply to all of the impulse piping, valves, manifold, and connections. A leak is indicated by a continuous stream of bubbles. 5-Valve Manifolds If a 5-valve manifold is installed, the equalizer valves can be tested by performing the following after system leaks are repaired and the system is stable: 1. Close equalizer valves MEH and MEL. 2. Open vent valve MV. There should be no leakage from the manifold vent. 3. Close vent valve MV. 4. Open equalizer valves MEH and MEL. 5. Bleed off the air and remove the source fitting. 6. Return the system to the original configuration. Use extreme care when bleeding high temperature fluids. Bleed piping may need to be installed.

“Calibrate Out” Temperature Effects

Do not begin this procedure until the system leak check has been completed and all leaks have been fixed. The ProPlate’s proportional output-to-flow ratio makes a true “zero” calibration critical for producing accurate measurements. The “zero” calibration procedure is affected by static pressure and ambient temperature, but these effects can be removed by calibrating them “out.” The effect of static pressure is calibrated out by exposing the ProPlate electronics to the line pressure and performing a “zero” or wet calibration, as described below. In order to calibrate out the effect of ambient temperature, two aspects should be taken into consideration:

4-6


1. The electronics should be located in a place where the ambient temperature does not change rapidly or vary by more than 10 to 15°F (26 to 29°C). 2. When commissioning the electronics, the flowing fluid (condensate/water for steam service) could bring the sensor to a temperature significantly different than the temperature during normal operations. In this situation, perform another “zero” calibration at least 60 minutes after the ProPlate has been commissioned. The sensor temperature can be monitored using a HART-based communicator, as described in the following “Zero or Wet Calibration” section. Although the above effects are relatively small, they significantly affect the accuracy of the ProPlate when used with low flows. Periodic “zero” calibration and/or commissioning is recommended to maintain the accuracy of ProPlate. The frequency of this type of maintenance should be established for each individual application. Zero or Wet Calibration Follow this procedure to obtain a true zero at static or “pipe” pressure: 1. Close low side valve ML to prevent generating differential pressure. 2. Open equalizer valves: • For 5-valve manifolds, open valves MEH and MEL. • For 3-valve manifolds, open valves ME and high side MH.

Do not open the ME Valve when steam line is pressurized, as the water legs can be removed.

COMMISSIONING

Complete the following tasks before beginning the commissioning procedure: 1. Power the ProPlate, if required. 2. Connect an appropriate readout instrument so the differential pressure signal can be monitored. 3. Identify the manifold equalizer valves by their ME prefix. • 5-valve manifolds have two equalizer valves, MEH and MEL. • 3-valve manifolds have one equalizer valve, ME. 4. Close all valves before commissioning the system. See Figure 2-26 on page 2-19 through Figure 2-32 on page 2-23 for valve identification while following the procedures given below.

4-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Liquid Service below 450°F (232°C)

Refer to Figure 2-27 and Figure 2-28 on page 2-21 for electronics location and valve identification for liquid service at temperatures of 450°F (232°C) or less. See page 4-10 to commission a remote mounted ProPlate for liquid service above 450°F (232°C). 1. Ensure that primary instrument valves PH and PL are closed. 2. Open valves ME, ML, and MH. • For 5-valve manifolds, open valves MEH and MEL. 3. Slowly open valve PL and then PH, which are the primary instrument valves. 4. Open drain/vent valves DVL and DVH to bleed air out of system. Bleed until no air is apparent in the liquid. 5. Close valves DVL and DVH. NOTE For the alternate electronics location shown in Figure 2-28 on page 2-21, open vent valves VH and VL and bleed until no air is apparent in the liquid. 6. Slowly open vent valve MV to bleed out any entrapped air in manifold. Bleed until no air is apparent in the liquid. 7. Close vent valve MV. 8. Gently tap the electronics body, valve manifold, and impulse piping with a small wrench to dislodge any remaining entrapped air. 9. Repeat steps 2, 2A, and 3. 10. Close valve PH. 11. Check the ProPlate zero by noting the electronics output — this is called a wet zero. The electronics should indicate a zero DP (Differential Pressure) signal. If the signal reads outside the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA, air is probably still in the system; repeat the procedure from step 2. Trim zero if necessary. 12. Close equalizer valve(s). • For 3-valve manifolds, close valve ME. • For 5-valve manifolds, close valves MEH and MEL. 13. Slowly open valve PH. The system is now operational. For 5-valve manifolds only: 14. Open valve MV. If valve MV is leaking, valves MEH and/or MEL are not fully closed or require repair. This must be done before taking any readings.

4-8


Gas Service

Follow this procedure for commissioning a remote mounted ProPlate for gas service. Refer to Figure 2-29 and Figure 2-30 on page 2-22 for electronics location and valve identification. 1. For an impulse piping arrangement as shown in Figure 2-29 on page 2-21 (vertical pipe) only, open primary instrument valves PH and PL. 2. Open drain valves DH and DL slowly to allow the condensate to drain. 3. Close valves DH and DL. 4. Ensure that primary instrument valves PH and PL closed. 5. Open valves ME, ML and MH. • For 5-valve manifolds, open valves MEH and MEL. 6. Slowly open valve PL, the primary high pressure instrument valve. 7. Check electronics zero by noting the electronics reading. The electronics should indicate a “zero” DP signal. If the signal reads outside of the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA, condensate may be in the DP electronics or system; repeat the procedure from step 1 to remove any condensate. A signal outside the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA can also be caused by system leaks; check for leaks in system. 8. Close equalizer valve(s). • For 3-valve manifolds, close valve ME. • For 5-valve manifolds, close valves MEH and MEL. 9. Slowly open valve PH. The system is now operational. For 5-valve manifolds only: 10. Open valve MV. If valve MV is leaking, valves MEH and/or MEL are not fully closed or require repair. This must be done before taking any readings.

4-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Steam Service or Liquid Service above 450°F (232°C)

Follow this procedure for commissioning a remote mounted ProPlate for steam service or for liquid service at a temperature above 450°F (232°C). Refer to Figure 2-31 and Figure 2-32 on page 2-23 for electronics location and valve identification. 1. Ensure that primary instrument valves PH and PL closed; ME, ML and MH are closed; and DVL and DVH are closed. • For 5-valve manifolds, ensure that valves MEH and MEL are closed. 2. Fill tees with water on each side until water overflows. 3. Open valves MH, ML and equalizer valve ME. • For 5-valve manifolds, open equalizer valves MEH and MEL. 4. Open valves DVL and DVH. 5. Tap manifold until no air bubbles are visible. 6. Close both valves DVL and DVH. 7. Refill tees with water. 8. Gently tap electronics body, valve manifold, and impulse piping with a small wrench to dislodge any remaining entrapped air. 9. Check ProPlate zero by noting the electronics output — this is called a wet zero. The electronics should indicate a “zero” DP signal. If the signal reads outside of the range 3.98 mA to 4.02 mA, air is probably still in the system; repeat this procedure from step 2. Trim zero if necessary. 10. Close equalizer valve ME. • For 5-valve manifolds, close equalizer valves MEH and MEL. 11. Replace plugs in tees. 12. Slowly open valves PH and PL. The system is now operational. For 5-valve manifolds only: 13. Open valve MV. If valve MV is leaking, valves MEH and/or MEL are not fully closed or require repair. This must be done before taking any readings.

4-10


Section 5

Electronics Functions

PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section describes using the HART Communicator.

Safety Messages

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

The unused conduit opening on the electronics housing must be plugged and sealed to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

For intrinsically safe installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with ANSI/ISA-RP12.6, and Rosemount drawings 03031-1019 or 03031-1024. For ALL installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with local or national installation codes such as the NEC NFPA 70.

This section contains information on commissioning and operating ProPlate flowmeters. Tasks that should be performed on the bench prior to installation (setting flowmeter jumpers) and software functions are explained in this section. For your convenience, HART communicator fast key sequences are listed for each software function. If you are unfamiliar with the communicator or how to follow fast key sequences, please refer to Appendix A: HART Communicator for communicator operations.

5-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Commissioning the Flowmeter on the Bench

Commissioning consists of testing the flowmeter, testing the loop, and verifying flowmeter configuration data. You may commission ProPlate flowmeters either before or after installation. Commissioning the flowmeter on the bench before installation ensures that all flowmeter components are in good working order and acquaints you with the operation of the device. To avoid exposing the flowmeter electronics to the plant environment after installation, set the failure mode and flowmeter security jumpers during the commissioning stage on the bench.

Failure Mode Alarm

As part of normal operation, the ProPlate continuously monitors its own operation. This automatic diagnostic routine is a timed series of checks repeated continuously. If the diagnostic routine detects a failure, the flowmeter drives its output either below or above specific values depending on the position of the failure mode jumper. • For 4–20 mA flowmeters factory-configured for standard operation, the flowmeter drives its output either below 3.75 mA or above 21.75 mA. • For 4–20 mA flowmeters factory-configured for NAMUR-compliant operation, the flowmeter drives its output either below 3.6 mA or above 22.5 mA. The failure mode alarm jumper is located on the front of the electronics board inside of the electronics housing cover. The position of this jumper determines whether the output is driven high or low when a failure is detected (see Figure Figure 5-1 on page 5-4). If the alarm jumper is not installed the flowmeter will operate normally, and the default alarm condition will be high. NOTE The failure mode alarm jumper pins occupy one row of a ten-pin socket that also is used to attach the optional LCD meter. In order to function appropriately, the jumper must be positioned correctly, as shown in Figure 5-1 on page 5-4. Failure Mode Alarm vs. Saturation Output Values The failure mode alarm output levels differ from the output values that occur when applied pressure is outside the range points. When pressure is outside the range points, the analog output continues to track the input pressure until reaching the saturation value listed below; the output does not exceed the listed saturation value regardless of the applied pressure. For example, with standard alarm and saturation levels and pressures outside the 4–20 range points, the output saturates at 3.9 mA or 20.8 mA. When the flowmeter diagnostics detect a failure, the analog output is set to a specific alarm value that differs from the saturation value to allow for proper troubleshooting.

Table 5-1. Analog Output: Standard Alarm Values vs. Saturation Values.

5-2

Level

4–20 mA Saturation Value

Low

3.9 mA

4–20 mA Alarm Value ˆ

3.75 mA


Table 5-2. Analog Output: NAMUR-Compliant Alarm Values vs. Saturation Values.

Level

4–20 mA Saturation Value

High

20.8 mA

Level

4–20 mA Saturation Value

Low

3.8 mA

High

20.5 mA

4–20 mA Alarm Value ˜

21.75 mA

4–20 mA Alarm Value ˆ ˜

3.6 mA

22.5 mA

NOTE You can alter the actual flowmeter mA output values from the values listed above by performing an analog output trim (see page 5-20).

NOTE When a flowmeter is in an alarm condition, the hand-held HART communicator indicates the analog output the flowmeter would drive if the alarm condition did not exist. Alarm and Saturation Values for Flowmeters Set to Burst Mode Saturation and alarm conditions operate differently when a flowmeter is set to burst mode operation: Alarm Condition (Hi or Lo): 1. Analog output switches to alarm level (see Table 5-1). 2. Primary variable (flow pressure) is burst with a status bit set. 3. Percent of range follows primary variable (flow pressure). 4. Secondary variable (DP pressure) and Tertiary variable (temperature) are burst with a status bit set. (Note that during alarm conditions, the burst primary variable, secondary variable, or percent of range, or temperature may not be valid depending on the error type – refer to the HART protocol for details.) Saturation: 1. Analog output switches to saturation level (see Table 5-1). 2. Primary variable (flow pressure) is burst normally. 3. Secondary variable (D.P. pressure) and tertiary variable (temperature) are burst normally.

5-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Alarm Level Verification Flowmeters with electronics board revision 5.3 or later (shrouded design) have increased functionality that allows verification testing of alarm current levels. If you repair or replace the flowmeter electronics board, sensor module or LCD meter, verify the flowmeter alarm level before you return the flowmeter to service. This feature is also useful in testing the reaction of your control system to a flowmeter in an alarm state. To verify the flowmeter alarm levels, perform a loop test (see <Bold>Loop Test on page -13).

Flowmeter Security

You can prevent changes to the flowmeter configuration data with the write protection jumper. Position the jumper on the flowmeter circuit board in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONâ&#x20AC;? position to prevent accidental or deliberate change of configuration data. Figure 5-1 shows the jumper positions for 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA flowmeters. For flowmeters with an optional LCD meter, see â&#x20AC;&#x153;LCD Meterâ&#x20AC;? in Installation Options. If the flowmeter write protection jumper is in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONâ&#x20AC;? position, the flowmeter will not accept any â&#x20AC;&#x153;writesâ&#x20AC;? to its memory. Configuration changes (such as digital trim and reranging) cannot take place when the flowmeter security is on. To reposition the jumper, perform the following procedure. 1. If the flowmeter is installed, secure the loop, and remove power. 2. Remove the housing cover opposite the field terminal side. Do not remove the flowmeter covers in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive. 3. Reposition the jumper. See Figure 5-1 for the ON and OFF jumper positions. Previous circuit boards carried a two-pin or three-pin jumper assembly on the connector side of the board (see Figure 5-1). To activate security using a two-pin version, install the jumper. To activate security with the three-pin assembly, move the jumper to the ON pin position. 4. Reattach the flowmeter cover. Flowmeter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements. NOTE If the security jumper is not installed, the flowmeter will continue to operate in the security OFF configuration.

Figure 5-1. 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA Flowmeter Electronics Boards

Improved Electronics Board

2)) 21

+, /2

Alarm Security

5-4

&   $      $    


Commissioning the ProPlate with a HART-Based Communicator

Before placing the ProPlate into operation, you should commission the instrument using a HART-based communicator. To commission on the bench, connect the flowmeter and the communicator as shown in Figure 5-1. Make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or nonincendive field wiring practices before connecting a communicator in an explosive atmosphere. Connect the communicator leads at any termination point in the signal loop. It is most convenient to connect them to the terminals labeled “COMM” on the terminal block. Connecting across the “TEST” terminals will prevent successful communication. For 4–20 mA flowmeters, you will need a power supply capable of providing 10.5 to 55 V dc at the flowmeter, and a meter to measure output current. To enable communication, a resistance of at least 250 ohms must be present between the communicator loop connection and the power supply. Do not use inductive-based transient protectors with the ProPlate. Setting the Loop to Manual Whenever you are preparing to send or request data that would disrupt the loop or change the output of the flowmeter, you must set your process application loop to manual. The HART Communicator Model 275 will prompt you to set the loop to manual when necessary. Keep in mind that acknowledging this prompt does not set the loop to manual. The prompt is only a reminder; you have to set the loop to manual yourself, as a separate operation. Wiring Diagrams (Bench Hook-up) Connect the bench equipment as shown in Figure 5-1 and turn on the HART-based communicator by pressing the 212)) key. The communicator will search for a HART-compatible device and will indicate when the connection is made. If the communicator fails to connect, it will indicate that no device was found. If this occurs, refer to Section 9: Troubleshooting.

Figure 5-2. Bench Hook-up (4-20 mA Flowmeters)

Current Meter

24 V dc Supply

RL˜ 250 V

%   *         

5-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Wiring Diagrams (Field Hook-up) The following diagrams illustrate wiring loops for a field hook-up with a HART-based communicator. Figure 5-3. Field Hook-up (4-20 mA Flowmeters) RLÂ&#x2DC; 250 V &XUUHQW 0HWHU

Power Supply

6LJQDOSRLQWPD\EHJURXQGHGDWDQ\ SRLQWRUOHIWXQJURXQGHG

&$87,21 'RQRWXVHLQGXFWLYHEDVHGWUDQVLHQWSURWHFWRUV

Review Configuration Data HART Comm.

1, 5

NOTE Information and procedures in this section that make use of HART Communicator fast key sequences assume that the flowmeter and communicator are connected, powered, and operating correctly. If you are not familiar with the HART Communicator or fast-key sequences, refer to Appendix A: HART Communicator. Before you place the flowmeter into operation, it is recommended that you review the flowmeter configuration data that was set at the factory. You should review the following configuration data: Flowmeter Model, Type, Tag, Range, Date, Descriptor, Message, Minimum and Maximum Sensor Limits, Minimum Span, Units, 4 and 20 mA points, Output (linear or square root), Damping, Alarm Setting (high, low), Security Setting (on, off), Local Keys (enabled, disabled), Integral Meter, Sensor Fill, Isolator Material, Flange (type, material), O-Ring Material, Drain/Vent, Remote Seal (type, fill fluid, isolator material, number), Flowmeter S/N, Address, and Sensor S/N.

Check Output

5-6

Before performing other flowmeter on-line operations, review the digital output parameters to ensure that the flowmeter is operating properly and is configured to the appropriate process variables.

%   +         


Process Variables HART Comm.

1, 2

The process variables for the ProPlate provide the flowmeter output, and are continuously updated. The process variable menu displays the following process variables: • Flow Pressure • Percent of Range • Analog Output • DP Pressure • Sensor Temperature The flow pressure reading in both Engineering Units and Percent of Range will continue to track with pressures outside of the defined range from the lower to the upper range limit of the sensor module.(1) Sensor Temperature HART Comm.

1, 1, 5

The ProPlate contains a temperature sensor just above its pressure sensor in the sensor module. When reading this temperature, keep in mind that this is not a process temperature reading.

BASIC SETUP

Set Process Variable Units HART Comm.

1, 3

The PV Unit command sets the process variable units to allow you to monitor your process using the appropriate units of measure. Select from the following engineering units: • in H20 • in H20 at 4°C

• bar (1)

• mbar

• in Hg

• g/cm2

• ft H20

• kg/cm2

• mm H20 • mm H20 at 4°C

• Pa (1)

• kPa

• mm Hg

• torr

• psi

• atm

(1)

Not available with previous ProPlate flowmeters.

(1)

Previous versions of the software will track with pressure up to 105% of span, and remain there as pressure increases.

5-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Set Output HART Comm.

1, 3, 5

Activate the flowmeter square root output option to make the analog output proportional to flow. To avoid the extremely high gain that results as the input approaches zero, the ProPlate automatically switches to a linear output in order to ensure a more stable output near zero. The transition from linear to square root output is smooth, with no step change or discontinuity in output (see Figure 5-4). The transition from linear to square root is not adjustable. It occurs at 0.8% of ranged pressure input. In earlier software, the transition point occurred at 4% of ranged pressure input, or 20% of full scale flow output. From 0 percent to 0.6 percent of the ranged pressure input, the slope of the curve is unity (y = x). This allows accurate calibration near zero. Greater slopes would cause large changes in output for small changes at input. From 0.6 percent to 0.8 percent, the slope of the curve equals 42 (y = 42x) to achieve continuous transition from linear to square root at the transition point. Figure 5-4. Square Root Output Transition Point

5-8


Rerange The Range Values command sets the 4 and 20 mA points (lower and upper range values). Setting the range values to the limits of expected readings maximizes flowmeter performance; the flowmeter is most accurate when operated within the expected pressure ranges for your application. In practice, you may reset the flowmeter range values as often as necessary to reflect changing process conditions. NOTE Regardless of the range points, the ProPlate will measure and report all readings within the digital limits of the sensor. For example, if the 4 and 20 mA points are set to 0 and 10 in H20, and the flowmeter detects a pressure of 25 in H20, it digitally outputs the 25 in H20 reading and a 250% percent of span reading. However, there may be up to Âą5.0% error associated with output outside of the range points. You may use one of three methods to rerange the flowmeter. Each method is unique; examine all three closely before deciding which method to use. The calculation used to rerange the ProPlate output is as follows: New DP Range =

Q HZ 4P D [

(  )



2OG'35DQJH

RO G4P D [

For instance, if the ProPlate is currently setup as follows: ProPlate Information Model: ProPlate Serial#: 222222.2 Max Flow @ 20 mA: 15 GPM Max DP @ 20 mA: 30 in H2O And then you want to rerange 20 mA to 20 gpm, the calculation is as follows: New DP Range 

= (  ) 

 LQ+ 2 

LQ+ 2 

The ProPlate can now be reranged to the following new settings: 4 mA = 0 in H2O 20 mA = 53.3 in H20

5-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Rerange with a Communicator Only HART Comm.

1, 2, 3, 1, 1

Reranging using only the communicator is the easiest and most popular way to rerange the flowmeter. This method changes the values of the analog 4 and 20 mA points independently without a pressure input. NOTE Changing the lower or upper range point results in similar changes to the span. To rerange using only the communicator enter the fast-key sequence above, select 1 Keypad input, and follow the on-line instructions. Or enter the values directly from the HOME screen. NOTE If the flowmeter security jumper is in the “ON” position, you will not be able to make adjustments to the zero and span. Refer to Figure 5-1 on page 5-4 for the appropriate placement of the flowmeter security jumper. Rerange with a Pressure Input Source and a Communicator HART Comm.

1, 2, 3, 1, 2

Reranging using the communicator and a pressure source or process pressure is a way of reranging the flowmeter when specific 4 and 20 mA points are not known. This method changes the values of the analog 4 and 20 mA points. NOTE When you set the 4 mA point the span is maintained; when you set the 20 mA point the span changes. If you set the lower range point to a value that causes the upper range point to exceed the sensor limit, the upper range point is automatically set to the sensor limit, and the span is adjusted accordingly. To rerange using the communicator and a pressure source or process pressure enter the fast-key sequence above, select 2 Apply values, and follow the on-line instructions. NOTE If the flowmeter security jumper is in the “ON” position, you will not be able to make adjustments to the zero and span. Refer to Figure 5-1 on page 5-4 for the appropriate placement of the flowmeter security jumper.

5-10


Rerange with a Pressure Input Source and the Local Zero and Span Buttons Reranging using the local zero and span adjustments (see Figure 5-5 on page -12), and a pressure source is a way of reranging the flowmeter when specific 4 and 20 mA points are not known and a communicator is not available. NOTE When you set the 4 mA point the span is maintained; when you set the 20 mA point the span changes. If you set the lower range point to a value that causes the upper range point to exceed the sensor limit, the upper range point is automatically set to the sensor limit, and the span is adjusted accordingly. To rerange the flowmeter using the span and zero buttons, perform the following procedure. 1. Loosen the screw holding the certifications label on top of the flowmeter housing, and rotate the label to expose the zero and span buttons (see Figure 5-5 on page -12). 2. Using a pressure source with an accuracy three to ten times the desired calibrated accuracy, apply a pressure equivalent to the lower range value to the high side of the flowmeter. 3. To set the 4 mA point, press and hold the zero button for at least two seconds, then verify that the output is 4 mA. If a meter is installed, it will display ZERO PASS. NOTE The zero and span adjustments on previous versions of the flowmeter are screws instead of buttons. To activate the zero or span adjustment loosen the screw until it pops up. 4. Apply a pressure equivalent to the upper range value to the high side of the flowmeter. 5. To set the 20 mA point, press and hold the span button for at least two seconds, then verify that the output is 20 mA. If a meter is installed, it will display SPAN PASS. NOTE If the flowmeter security jumper is in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONâ&#x20AC;? position, or if the local zero and span adjustments are disabled through the software, you will not be able to make adjustments to the zero and span using the local buttons. Refer to Figure 5-1 on page 5-4 for the proper placement of the flowmeter security jumper. Or refer to <Bold>Local Span and Zero Control on page -12 for instructions on how to enable the span and zero buttons.

5-11


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 5-5. Local Zero and Span Adjustments

Span and Zero Adjustment Buttons

$   '         

After you rerange the flowmeter using the span and zero adjustments, it is possible to disable the adjustments to prevent further reranging. Refer to “Local Span and Zero Control” below for more information. Damping HART Comm.

1, 3, 6

The PV damp command changes the response time of the flowmeter to smooth variations in output readings caused by rapid changes in input. Determine the appropriate damping setting based on the necessary response time, signal stability, and other requirements of the of loop dynamics of your system. The default damping value is 1.6 seconds, and can be reset to any value between 0 and 25.6 seconds. LCD Meter Options HART Comm.

1, 4, 3, 4

The Meter Options command allows you to customize the LCD meter for use in your application. You can configure the meter to display the following information: • Engineering Units • Percent of Range • User-Configurable LCD Scale • Alternating between any two of the above

Detailed Setup

Local Span and Zero Control HART Comm.

1, 4, 4, 1, 7

The Local keys command allows software control over the use of the local span and zero adjustments. To enable or disable the span and zero adjustment buttons on your flowmeter, perform the fast key sequence at left.

5-12


NOTE Disabling the local keys does not disable all flowmeter configuration changes. With the local keys disabled, you can still make changes to the flowmeter configuration using a HART Communicator.

Diagnostics and Service

The diagnostics and service functions listed here are primarily for use after you install the flowmeter in the field. The transmitter test feature is designed to verify that the flowmeter is operating properly, and can be performed either on the bench or in the field. The loop test feature is designed to verify proper loop wiring and flowmeter output, and should only be performed after you install the flowmeter. Transmitter Test HART Comm.

1, 2, 1, 1

The transmitter test command initiates a more extensive diagnostics routine than that performed continuously by the flowmeter. The flowmeter test routine can quickly identify potential electronics problems. If the transmitter test detects a problem, messages to indicate the source of the problem are displayed on the communicator screen. Loop Test HART Comm.

1, 2, 2

The Loop Test command verifies the output of the flowmeter, the integrity of the loop, and the operations of any recorders or similar devices installed in the loop. To initiate a loop test, perform the following procedure:

5-13


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate 1. Connect a reference meter to the flowmeter. To do so, either connect the meter to the test terminals on the flowmeter terminal block, or shunt the power to the flowmeter through the meter at some point in the loop. 2. From the HOME screen, Select 1 Device Setup, 2 Diagnostics and Service, 2 Loop Test, to prepare to perform a loop test. 3. Select “OK” after you set the control loop to manual (see <Bold>Setting the Loop to Manual on page -5). 4. The communicator displays the loop test menu. 5. Select a discrete milliamp level for the flowmeter to output. At the “Choose analog output” prompt, select 1 4mA, 2 20mA, or select 3 other to manually input a value. 6. If you are performing a loop test to verify the output of a flowmeter, enter a value between 4 and 20 mA. If you are performing a loop test to verify the flowmeter alarm levels, enter the milliamp value at which the flowmeter should enter an alarm state (see Tables 5-1 and 5-2 on page -2). 7. Check the electrical current meter installed in the test loop to verify that it reads the value you commanded the flowmeter to output. If the readings match, the flowmeter and the loop are configured and functioning properly. If the readings do not match, there may be a fault in the wiring, the flowmeter may require an output trim, or the electrical current meter may be malfunctioning. After completing the test procedure, the display returns to the loop test screen and allows you to choose another output value or to exit loop testing.

Calibration

Calibrating a smart flowmeter is different from calibrating an analog flowmeter. The one-step calibration process of an analog flowmeter is done in three steps with a smart flowmeter: • Rerange – sets the 4 and 20 mA points at the desired pressures; • Sensor Trim – Adjusts the position of the factory characterization curve to optimize the flowmeter performance over a specified pressure range or to adjust for mounting effects; • Analog Output Trim – Adjusts the analog output to match the plant standard or the control loop. To understand the calibration of a ProPlate smart flowmeter, it is necessary to understand that smart flowmeters operate differently than analog flowmeters. A smart flowmeter uses a microprocessor that contains information about the sensor’s specific characteristics in response to pressure and temperature inputs; each sensor varies slightly. A smart flowmeter compensates for these sensor variations. The process of generating the sensor performance profile is called factory characterization, and it enables a smart flowmeter to maintain higher performance specifications than analog flowmeters.

5-14


It is also important to understand the difference between the trim and the rerange functions of smart flowmeters. Reranging sets the flowmeter analog output to the selected upper and lower range points, and can be done with or without an applied pressure. Reranging does not change the factory characterization curve stored in the microprocessor. In contrast, sensor trimming requires an accurate pressure input, and adds additional compensation that adjusts the position of the factory characterization curve. NOTE Sensor trimming adjusts the position of the factory characterization curve. It is possible to degrade the performance of the flowmeter if the sensor trim is done improperly or with equipment that does not meet the accuracy requirements. If you have questions about the calibration process or the trim procedure, contact your local Dieterich Standard representative or contact Dieterich Standard Inc. at (303)530-9600.

Bench Calibration Tasks 1. Set output configuration parameters: a) Set the transmitter range points. b) Set the Output Units. c) Set the Output Type. d) Set the Damping Value. 2. Optional: Perform a Full Sensor Trim -- Accurate pressure source required. 3. Optional: Perform an Analog Output Trim -- Accurate multimeter required.

Field Calibration Tasks 1) Reconfigure parameters if necessary. 2) Zero Trim the transmitter to compensate for mounting position effects or static pressure effects.

5-15


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Calibration Overview Complete calibration of the ProPlate flowmeter involves the following tasks: Configure the Analog Output Parameters • Set Process Variable Units (page 5-7) • Set Output Type (page 5-9) • Rerange (page 5-9) • Set Damping (page 5-12) Calibrate the Sensor • Full Trim (page 5-18) • Zero Trim (page 5-19) Calibrate the 4–20 mA Output • 4–20 mA Output Trim (page 5-20) or • 4–20 mA Output Trim Using Other Scale (page 5-20) Figure 5-6 illustrates the ProPlate flowmeter data flow. This data flow can be summarized in four major steps: 1. A change in pressure is measured by a change in the sensor output (Sensor Signal). 2. The sensor signal is converted to a digital format that can be understood by the microprocessor (Analog-to-Digital Signal Conversion). 3. Corrections are performed in the microprocessor to obtain a digital representation of the process input (Digital PV). 4. The Digital PV is converted to an analog value (Digital-to-Analog Signal Conversion). Figure 5-6 also identifies the approximate flowmeter location for each calibration task. Note that the data flows from left to right, and a parameter change affects all values to the right of the changed parameter. Not all calibration procedures should be performed for each ProPlate flowmeter. In addition, some procedures are appropriate for bench calibration, but should not be performed during field calibration. Figure 5-6 identifies the recommended calibration procedures for each type of ProPlate flowmeter for both bench and field calibration.

5-16


Figure 5-6. Flowmeter Data Flow with Calibration Options (Flowmeter Ranged 0 to 100 in H2O) Flowmeter Electronics Module

100 in H2O

Input Pressure

Input Device

Digital-to-Analog Signal Conversion

HART Communications

Sensor

Microprocessor Digital PV

20.00 mA

Analog Output

Sensor Signal

Analog-to-Digital Signal Conversion

Output Device

NOTES 1)Value on PV line should equal the input pressure 2)Value on AO line should equal the output device reading ProPlate: FT-4001 Process Variables 1Flow Press 2% rnge100.00 3AO20.00 mA 4Press0.00 inH2O 5Snsr Temp23.0째C

Deciding Which Trim Procedure to Use To decide which trim procedure to use, you must first determine whether the analog-to-digital section or the digital-to-analog section of the flowmeter electronics is in need of calibration. To do so, refer to Figure 5-6 and perform the following procedure: 1. Connect a pressure source, a HART communicator, and a digital readout device to the flowmeter. 2. Establish communication between the flowmeter and the communicator. 3. Apply pressure equal to the upper range point pressure (100 in H20, for example). 4. Compare the applied pressure to the Secondary Variable (Press) line on the Communicator Process Variables Menu. If the Press reading on the communicator does not match the applied pressure, and you are confident that your test equipment is accurate, perform a sensor trim. 5. Compare the Analog Output (AO) line on the communicator on-line menu to the digital readout device. If the AO reading on the communicator does not match the digital readout device, and you are confident that your test equipment is accurate, perform an output trim.

5-17


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Sensor Trim You can trim the sensor using either the full trim or the zero trim function. The trim functions vary in complexity, and their use is application-dependent. Both trim functions alter the interpretation of the input signal. A zero trim is a single-point adjustment. It is useful for compensating for mounting position effects, and is most effective when performed with the flowmeter installed in its final mounting position. Since this correction maintains the slope of the characterization curve, it should not be used in place of a full trim over the full sensor range. When performing a zero trim, ensure that the equalizing valve is open and all wet legs are filled to the correct levels. A full trim is a two-point sensor calibration where two end-point pressures are applied, and all output is linearized between them. You should always adjust the low trim value first to establish the correct offset. Adjustment of the high trim value provides a slope correction to the characterization curve based on the low trim value. The factory-established characterization curve is not changed by this procedure. The trim values allow you to optimize performance over your specified measuring range at the calibration temperature. Zero Trim HART Comm.

1, 2, 3, 3, 1

To calibrate the sensor with a HART Communicator using the zero trim function, perform the following procedure. 1. Vent the flowmeter and attach a communicator to the measurement loop. 2. From the communicator main menu select 1 Device setup, 2 Diagnostics and service, 3 Calibration, 3 Sensor trim, 1 Zero trim to prepare to adjust the zero trim. NOTE The flowmeter must be within 3% of true zero (zero based) in order to calibrate using the zero trim function. 3. Follow the commands provided by the communicator to complete the adjustment of the zero trim. Full Trim HART Comm.

1, 2, 3, 3

Model 268

F4, F4, F3, F2, F1

To calibrate the sensor with a HART communicator using the full trim function, perform the following procedure. 1. Assemble and power the entire calibration system including a flowmeter, HART communicator, power supply, pressure input source, and readout device (see Figure 5-7).

5-18


NOTE Use a pressure input source that is at least three times more accurate than the flowmeter, and allow the input pressure to stabilize for 10 seconds before entering any values. 2. From the communicator main menu select 1 Device setup, 2 Diagnostics and service, 3 Calibration, 3 Sensor trim, 2 Lower sensor trim to prepare to adjust the lower trim point. NOTE Select pressure input values so that the low and high values are equal to or outside the 4 and 20 mA points. Do not attempt to obtain reverse output by reversing the high and low points. The flowmeter allows approximately a 5% URL deviation from the characterized curve established at the factory. 3. Follow the commands provided by the communicator to complete the adjustment of the lower value. 4. Repeat the procedure for the upper value, replacing 2 Lower sensor trim with 3 Upper sensor trim in Step 2. Figure 5-7. Digital Trim Connection. Drawing (4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA Flowmeters). Dead Weight Tester Calibration Standard for Sensor Trim Only 250 W Minimum Loop Resistance 24 V dc Power Supply

ProPlate

HART-based Communicator

NOTE 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA wiring shown.

$   $         

Precision Meter

5-19


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Analog Output Trim The Analog Output Trim commands allow you to adjust the current output at the 4 and 20 mA points to match the plant standards. This command adjusts the digital to analog signal conversion (see Figure 5-6 on page 5-17). Digital to Analog Trim HART Comm.



1, 2, 3, 2, 1

To perform a digital-to-analog trim with a HART communicator, perform the following procedure. 1. From the HOME screen, select 1 Device setup, 2 Diag/Service, 3 Calibration, 4 D/A trim. Select “OK” after you set the control loop to manual (see <Bold>Setting the Loop to Manual on page -5). 2. Connect an accurate reference ammeter to the flowmeter at the “Connect reference meter” prompt. To do so, connect the positive lead to the positive terminal and the negative lead to the test terminal in the flowmeter terminal compartment, or shunt the flowmeter power through the reference meter at some point. 3. Select “OK” after connecting the reference meter. 4. Select “OK” at the “Setting fld dev output to 4 mA” prompt. 5. The flowmeter outputs 4.00 mA. 6. Record the actual value from the reference meter, and enter it at the “Enter meter value” prompt. 7. The communicator prompts you to verify whether or not the output value equals the value on the reference meter. 8. Select 1 Yes if the reference meter value equals the flowmeter output value, or 2 No if it does not. 9. If you select 1 Yes, proceed to Step 7. 10. If you select 2 No, repeat Step 5. 11. Select “OK” at the “Setting fld dev output to 20 mA” prompt, and repeat Steps 5 and 6 until the reference meter value equals the flowmeter output value. 12. Select “OK” after you return the control loop to automatic control. Digital to Analog Trim Using Other Scale HART Comm.

1, 2, 3, 2, 2

The Scaled D/A Trim command matches the 4 and 20 mA points to a user-selectable reference scale other than 4 and 20 mA (1 to 5 volts if measuring across a 250 ohm load, or 0 to 100 percent if measuring from a DCS, for example). To perform a scaled D/A trim, connect an accurate reference meter to the flowmeter and trim the output signal to scale as outlined in the Output Trim procedure.

5-20


NOTE Use a precision resistor for optimum accuracy. If you add a resistor to the loop, ensure that the power supply is sufficient to power the flowmeter to a 20 mA output with the additional loop resistance.

Advanced Functions

Saving, Recalling, and Cloning Configuration Data HART Comm.

left arrow, 1, 2

Use the cloning feature of the Model 275 HART Communicator if you need to configure several ProPlate flowmeters similarly. The cloning process involves configuring a flowmeter, saving the configuration data, then sending a copy of the data to a separate flowmeter. There are a number of possible procedures to use when saving, recalling, and cloning configuration data. For complete instructions refer to the HART Communicator manual, p/n 00275-8026-0001. One common method is as follows: 1. Completely configure the first flowmeter. 2. Save the configuration data: a. Select )6DYH from the communicator Home/On-line screen. b. Ensure that the location to which the data will be saved is set to Module. If it is not, select 1 Location to set the save location to module. c. Select 2 Name to name the configuration data. The default is the flowmeter tag number. d. Ensure that the data type is set to standard. If it is not, select 3 Data Type to set the data type to standard. e. Select )6DYH. 3. Connect and power the receiving flowmeter and communicator. 4. Select the back arrow from the Home/On-line screen. The HART Communicator menu appears. 5. Select 1 Off-line, 2 Saved Configuration, 1 Module Contents to reach the Module Contents menu. 6. Use the down arrow to scroll through the list of configurations in the memory module, and use the right arrow to select the configuration you wish to retrieve. 7. Select 1 Edit. 8. Select 1 Mark All. 9. Select )6DYH 10. Use the down arrow to scroll through the list of configurations in the memory module, and use the right arrow to select the configuration again. 11. Select 3 Send to download the configuration to the flowmeter. When finished, the communicator informs you of the status. To on figure another flowmeter, repeat Steps 3 through 10. NOTE The flowmeter receiving the cloned data must have the same or a newer version of software than the original flowmeter. 5-21


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Burst Mode HART Comm.

1, 4, 3, 3, 3

When configured for burst mode, the ProPlate provides faster digital communication from the flowmeter to the control system by eliminating the time required for the control system to request information from the flowmeter. Burst mode is compatible with use of the analog signal. Because HART protocol features simultaneous digital and analog data transmission, the analog value can drive other equipment in the loop while the control system is receiving the digital information. Burst mode applies only to the transmission of dynamic data (pressure and temperature in engineering units, pressure in percent of range, and/or analog output), and does not affect the way other flowmeter data is accessed. Access to information other than dynamic flowmeter data is obtained through the normal poll/response method of HART communication. A HART-based communicator or the control system may request any of the information that is normally available while the flowmeter is in burst mode. Between each message sent by the flowmeter, a short pause allows the HART-based communicator or a control system to initiate a request. The flowmeter will receive the request, process the response message, and then continue â&#x20AC;&#x153;burstingâ&#x20AC;? the data approximately three times per second. Multidrop Communication Multidropping transmitters refers to the connection of several transmitters to a single communications transmission line. Communication between the host and the flowmeters takes place digitally with the analog output of the flowmeters deactivated. With the HART smart communications protocol, up to 15 transmitters can be connected on a single twisted pair of wires or over leased phone lines. This feature can greatly reduce wiring costs. The application of a multidrop installation requires consideration of the update rate necessary from each transmitter, the combination of transmitter models, and the length of the transmission line. Multidrop installations are not recommended where intrinsic safety is a requirement. Communication with the transmitters can be accomplished with commercially available Bell 202 modems and a host implementing the HART protocol. Each transmitter is identified by a unique address (1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;15) and responds to the commands defined in the HART protocol. HART-based communicators can test, configure, and format a multidropped flowmeter the same way as a transmitter in a standard point-to-point installation. Figure 5-8 on page -23 shows a typical multidrop network. This figure is not intended as an installation diagram. Contact Dieterich Standard product support with specific requirements for multidrop applications.

5-22


Figure 5-8. Typical Multidrop Network.

RS-232-C

Bell 202 Modem

%   $     

Power Supply

$         

NOTE The ProPlate is set to address 0 at the factory, allowing it to operate in the standard point-to-point manner with a 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA output signal. To activate multidrop communication, the flowmeter address must be changed to a number from 1 to 15. This change deactivates the 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA analog output, sending it to 4 mA. It also disables the failure mode alarm signal, which is controlled by the upscale/downscale jumper position. Failure signals in multidropped flowmeters are communicated through HART messages. Changing a Flowmeter Address HART Comm.

1, 4, 3, 3, 1

To change the address of a multidropped flowmeter, follow these fast key sequences. To activate multidrop communication, the flowmeter address must be changed to a number from 1 to 15, and each flowmeter in a multidropped loop must have a unique address. Polling a Multidropped Loop HART Comm.

Left Arrow, 4, 1 (note)

Polling a multidropped loop determines the model, address, and number of flowmeters on the given loop.

5-23


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE The HART Communicator Model 275 requires you to use the Utility Menu to perform an auto poll. This menu is available from the Main Menu of the HART Communicator. Press the left arrow to move from the On-line Menu to the Main Menu. Press 4 from the Main Menu to access the Utility Menu.

MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER Safety Messages

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

The unused conduit opening on the electronics housing must be plugged and sealed to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

For explosion-proof installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with Rosemount drawing 03095-1025 or 03095-1024. For intrinsically safe installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with ANSI/ISA-RP12.6, and Rosemount drawings 03095-1020 or 03095-102s1. For ALL installations, wiring connections must be made in accordance with local or national installation codes such as the NEC NFPA 70.

5-24


Bench Configuration and Calibration

The Mass ProPlate can be configured on the bench prior to mounting in the field by using a personal computer and the Engineering Assistant (EA) Software. All Mass ProPlate models have been configured using the EA software at the factory using the process conditions given at the time that the order was placed. The EA software provides advanced configuration capabilities, including flow parameters such as AIChE fluid, meter tube bore, differential producer bore, and differential producer material After bench configuration, the Mass ProPlate may be bench calibrated. These procedures include absolute and differential pressure sensor offset (zero) and slope (span) trim. For information concerning Mass ProPlate bench configuration and bench calibration, see Section 6: Using the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software.

Write Protect and Failure Mode Alarm Jumpers

Configuration data can be protected by moving the write-protect jumper which, when installed, prevents any changes to the Mass ProPlate configuration memory. The Mass ProPlate is designed to automatically check its own operation at timed intervals. If the diagnostic routine detects a failure in the Mass ProPlate, the Mass ProPlate drives its output either below 3.75 mA or above 21.75 mA, depending on the position of the failure mode jumper. Both of these jumpers are located on the electronics board just inside the electronics housing cover. (See Figure 9-1.) To avoid exposing the Mass ProPlate electronics to the plant environment after installation, set these jumpers during the commissioning stage on the bench. The Mass ProPlate is shipped from the factory with the write-protect jumper set to “OFF,” and the alarm jumper set to “High.”

Figure 5-9. Write Protect and Alarm Jumpers.

SECURITY

2)) 21

< <

> HI > LO ALARM

NOTE Security jumper not installed = Not Write Protected. Alarm jumper not installed = High Alarm. OUTPUT ELECTRONICS BOARD

5-25


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Failure Mode Alarm vs. Saturation Output Values

The failure mode alarm output levels differ from the output values that occur when applied pressure is outside the range points. When pressure is outside the range points, the analog output continues to track the input pressure until reaching the saturation value listed bWrite Protect and Alarm Jumpers. elow; the output does not exceed the listed saturation value regardless of the applied pressure. For example, for pressures outside the 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 range points, the output saturates at 3.9 mA or 20.8 mA. When the transmitter diagnostics detect a failure, the analog output is set to a specific alarm value that differs from the saturation value to allow for proper troubleshooting. Level

4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA Saturation Value

4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA Alarm Value

Low

3.9 mA

3.75 mA

High

20.8 mA

21.75 mA

NOTE The preceding output values can be altered by an analog output trim procedure. Use the following steps to change the jumper settings: 1. If the transmitter is installed, secure the loop and remove power. 2. Remove the housing cover opposite the field terminal side. 3. Locate the jumper on the output electronics board (see Figure 5-9), then move the jumper to the desired setting. 4. Reattach the transmitter cover. To avoid condensation, metal to metal contact is preferred. 5. If the transmitter is installed, reapply power.

5-26


Section 6

Using the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software This section explains how to use the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant (EA) Software with the Mass ProPlate Mass Flowmeter, and is divided into four sub-sections: • Install the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software (see page 6-1). • Establish communications between a personal computer and a Mass ProPlate (see page 6-5). • Procedure Outlines (see page 6-8). • Engineering Assistant Software Screens (see page 6-10).

SAFETY MESSAGES

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

The unused conduit opening on the electronics housing must be plugged and sealed to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Failure to follow these installation guidelines could result in death or serious injury: •

INSTALL THE MASS PROPLATE ENGINEERING ASSISTANT SOFTWARE

Make sure only qualified personnel perform the installation.

The Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software package is available with or without the HART modem and connecting cables. The complete Engineering Assistant package contains two 3.5-in. floppy disks, one HART modem, and a set of cables for connecting the computer to the Mass ProPlate (see Figure 6-1 on page 6-5).

6-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

MINIMUM EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE

• DOS-based 386 computer or above • 640K base RAM with 8 MB extended • Mouse or other pointing device • Color computer display • Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software, HART modem, set of modem cables • MS DOS® 3.1 or higher • Microsoft® Windows® 3.1, Windows for Workgroups 3.11, or Windows 95 NOTE The EA software does not work with Windows NT, Windows 98, or Windows 2000. The EA software does not work with revision 4.04.9. of Phoenix BIOS. We do not recommend installing the Engineering Assistant on computers that use this BIOS.

INSTALLATION PROCEDURE

This procedure assumes that both DOS and Windows are already installed. NOTE In this manual,UHWXUQ indicates to press the return or enter key. 1. Power on the computer. 2. After completion of boot-up procedures, verify that the computer is in Microsoft Windows. If the computer is at the DOS prompt (for example, C:\), type win UHWXUQ to open Windows. 3. Insert the floppy disk containing the Engineering Assistant Software into the personal computer disk drive. 4. Select File, then select Run to display the Run window. Depending on the disk drive, enter either a: setup or b: setup, then select OK to display the following screen:

6-2


            

5. If desired, change the file location, then select the Install button,

            

6. Decide which serial port will be assigned as the HART communications port, then select continue.

6-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE This screen defines the HART communications port as either COM1 or COM 2. The HART communications port must be different than the mouse port. 7. After installing files, the installation program then prompts for CONFIG.SYS choices.

            

8. When finished, the installation program requests that the user reboot their computer.

            

9. Push the computer reset button to reboot the computer, or press CTL-ALT-DEL.

6-4


Figure 6-1. Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Equipment 9-Pin to Comm Port Connector

Laptop Computer (not included)

  9 0         

Disks Containing Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software

HART Modem

CONNECT A PERSONAL COMPUTER TO A MASS PROPLATE

Mini-Grabber Cable

Figure 6-2 illustrates how to connect a computer to a Mass ProPlate. 1. Connect the computer to the Mass ProPlate. See Warning above, as well as Figure 6-1 on page 6-5 and Figure 6-2 on page 6-6. a. Connect one end of the 9-pin to 9-pin cable to the HART communications port on the personal computer. b. Connect the 9-pin HART modem cable to the 9-pin communications port on the computer. c. Open the cover above the side marked Field Terminals, and connect the mini-grabbers to the two Mass ProPlate terminals marked COMM as shown in Figure 6-2 on page 6-6. 2. Power on the computer. 3. Type win and press UHWXUQ at the DOS prompt. 4. Double click on the EA icon. 5. If password security is enabled, the Engineering Assistant Privileges Screen appears: 6. Enter a password and press UHWXUQ.

6-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Symptom No Communication between the Engineering Assistant Software and the Mass ProPlate

Corrective Action LOOP WIRING • HART protocol communication requires a loop resistance value between 250–1100 ohms, inclusive. • Check for adequate voltage to the transmitter. (If the computer is connected and 250 ohms resistance is properly in the loop, a power supply voltage of at least 16.5 V dc is required.) • Check for intermittent shorts, open circuits, and multiple grounds. • Check for capacitance across the load resistor. Capacitance should be less than 0.1 microfarad. ENGINEERING ASSISTANT (EA) INSTALLATION • Verify that the install program modified the CONFIG.SYS file. • Verify computer reboot followed EA installation. • Verify correct COMM port selected (see page 6-4). • Verify laptop computer is not in low energy mode (certain laptops disable all COMM ports in low energy mode). • Did you install EA software onto Windows NT platform? • Check if HART driver is loaded and installed.

Figure 6-2. Connecting a Personal Computer to a Mass ProPlate

IMPROVED TERMINAL BLOCK

  9 0         

Mass ProPlate 1100 > R > 250 9

Modem

IMPROVED TERMINAL BLOCK d:\cad\3095\30311006 s03 Jan 23 1997 15:27:05

6-6

User-Provided Power Supply (see pages 2-14 and 18)

D   D    


MENU STRUCTURE

Figure 6-3 illustrates the complete menu structure for the Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Software.

Figure 6-3. Engineering Assistant Menu Structure. 0DVV3UR3ODWH(QJLQHHULQJ$VVLVWDQWÂą8QWLWOHG

File

Setup

Transmitter

Maintenance

Diagnostics

View

Help

About Engineering Assistant Toolbar Status Bar

Read Outputs... Device Info Test Calculation... Loop Test...

Module Info... Identification Info...

Transmitter Master Reset Error Info...

Privileges... Sensor Trim... Analog Output... Change Passwords... Enable/Disable Security... Process Temperature Mode

Connect... Disconnect HART Output Units... Damping... Device Info... Send Config... Recv Config

Range Values... Output Trim...

Burst Mode... Communication Configuration...

Compensated Flow... Units... Damping... Device Info... EA Default Units U.S. Units SI/Metric Units New Config Ctrl + N Open Config... Ctrl + O Save Config Ctrl + S Save Config As... 1 filename.mfl Exit

6-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Menu Categories

The Mass ProPlate menu bar identifies seven menu categories: File The File category contains screens for reading and writing Mass ProPlate configuration files. Setup The Setup category contains Mass ProPlate screens which are only available when the Engineering Assistant is “disconnected.” These screens also determine the contents of a configuration file, and are used to define a Compensated Flow measurement solution. Transmitter Except for “Disconnect” and “Recv Config,” any changes made in this series of screens occurs immediately to the connected transmitter. Maintenance The Maintenance screens perform typical transmitter maintenance functions, including set the analog output, set range values, output trim, and sensor trim. Any changes made in this series of screens occurs immediately to the connected transmitter. Diagnostics The Diagnostic screens provide troubleshooting and diagnostic screens. View The View selections determine whether the toolbar and the status bar are displayed. Help The Help selection identifies the current EA software revision.

PROCEDURE OUTLINES Bench Configuration (Standard)

These procedures only outline the major steps for each procedure. Refer to the individual screen explanations for additional information. 1. (If needed) Select Transmitter, Disconnect to switch to disconnect mode. 2. (Optional) If a configuration file is already created, select File, Open Config to retrieve those configuration settings. 3. Select Setup, Units..., then verify the units parameters. 4. Select Setup, Damping..., then verify the damping parameters. 5. Select Setup, Device Info..., then fill in the device information screen. 6. Select Setup, Compensated Flow..., then follow the series of three flow configuration screens, filling in the information for your flow application. When finished, the following screen is displayed:

6-8


       

7. Select File to save your configuration to disk. 8. Select Transmitter, Connect to connect to a transmitter. 9. Select Transmitter, Send Config to sent the configuration.

Bench Calibration Procedure

After a transmitter is bench configured, the transmitter can be bench calibrated. 1. Select Maintenance, Analog Output, Range Values... a. Select Assign Variables, then verify the process variable output order. b. Set the range values and units. 2. Select Maintenance, Sensor Trim..., then perform sensor trim procedures: a. Trim SP Offset (zero). b. Trim SP Slope (span). c. Trim DP Offset (zero). d. Trim DP Slope (span). e. Trim PT Offset (zero). f. Trim PT Slope (span). 3. Select Maintenance, Analog Output, Output Trim..., then perform the output trim procedures.

Field Calibration Procedure

To correct for mounting position effects, field calibrate the Mass ProPlate after installation: 1. Establish communications (see page 6-5). 2. Perform a Trim DP Offset (zero). 3. (Optional) If a barometer that is three times as accurate as the Mass ProPlate AP sensor is available, perform an SP Offset (zero).

6-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Automatic Error Messages

Whenever the EA sends a command to a transmitter, the EA checks for error conditions in the transmitter. If an error is found, an error message is displayed. To acknowledge the error, select OK. If the error is non-critical, select the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ignore status on next 50 commandsâ&#x20AC;? box, then select OK.

ENGINEERING ASSISTANT (EA) SOFTWARE SCREENS

This section illustrates each major Mass ProPlate EA screen, and provides information about using the screen.

Screen Components

The following figure illustrates basic screen components:

Tool bar Connect... Disconnect HART Output Units... Damping... Device Info... Send Config... Recv Config

Menu Bar

Burst Mode... Communication Configuration...

Status Bar

Menus        

The EA software uses standard Windows elements and tools, including scroll bars, minimize button, maximize button, window border, mouse pointer, and buttons. It is beyond the scope of this manual to discuss basic Windows terminology and techniques. For additional information concerning Windows, refer to Microsoft Windows documentation.

6-10


Status Bar Codes

The status bar provides up to four status items: • The first field in the status bar is a message field. • Tag: Indicates if a configuration file (filename.MFL) was loaded into the EA memory. Other options include the following: (Uploaded Data) indicates that the current configuration information was uploaded from a transmitter. (Blank) indicates configuration information has not been loaded in from a transmitter or from a configuration file. • Security: Indicates security status: disabled, low, high, medium, or off-line. • HART field indicates communication status: Idle or Busy.

Hot Keys

An underline character in a menu selection indicates the Hot Key for that selection. Press the character to select that menu item.

Path Name Convention

In this section, each heading also identifies the path name. For example, consider the following heading: Maintenance Analog Output Range Values... This indicates that the menu is found under the Maintenance, Analog Output, Range Values... path. This menu can be accessed in multiple ways. Three examples are shown: • Select Maintenance, select Analog Output, select Range Values... • Press Alt-M, A, R. • Press Alt-M, use the arrow keys to highlight Analog Output and press UHWXUQ, use the arrow keys to highlight Range Values and press UHWXUQ. Procedure Convention Rather than explaining all of the possible ways to access a particular screen, procedures in this manual use the term “Select” to indicate there are multiple ways to select an option. For example, the first step in the Sensor Trim procedure is illustrated below. 1. Select Maintenance, Sensor Trim to display the Sensor Trim Select screen.

Cancel Buttons

All EA screens that allow data entry or transmitter action contain a Cancel button. Select Cancel to exit the screen without making any changes.

Fast Keys

Certain menu selections have fast keys assigned, and they are indicated in the menu structure. For example, pressing Ctrl + O is the fast way to open a configuration file.

6-11


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Toolbar

Another fast way to access EA screens is the tool bar (see Figure 6-4 on page 6-12). Simply click on the icon to access the screen.

Figure 6-4. Mass ProPlate Engineering Assistant Toolbar.

New Config

Setup Screens

Set Range Values

Compensated Flow

Open Config

Save Config

Receive Config

Privileges

Connect

Sensor Trim

Send Config

About

The setup screens are used to define a compensated flow solution, and to create flow configuration files for sending to a transmitter. These screens are only available when the EA is not connected to a transmitter. • If the fluid is a gas, use the procedure starting below. • If the fluid is steam, use the procedure starting on page 6-16. • If the fluid is a liquid, use the procedure starting on page 6-20. • If the fluid is natural gas, use the procedure starting on page 6-23. NOTE If the Setup menu selections are grayed out, the EA is currently connected with a Mass ProPlate transmitter. Select Transmitter, Disconnect to disconnect the EA from a Mass ProPlate, which will then enable the Setup menu selections. Setup Compensated Flow (Gas Configuration) The Compensated Flow selection allows you to configure the Mass ProPlate to measure flow of a particular fluid. The following screens illustrate how to define a gas configuration.

6-12

            


Figure 6-5. Flow Setup Screen.

            

1. Select the Gas radio button. 2. Select â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pick from databaseâ&#x20AC;? radio button and select a Fluid Name from the database picklist (see Table 6-1 on page 6-24 for database options), or Select â&#x20AC;&#x153;Customâ&#x20AC;? radio button and enter your own fluid name. 3. Select 1195 Integral Orifice. 4. Select Next. Acetic Acid Acetone Acetonitrile Acetylene Acrylonitrile Air Allyl Alcohol Ammonia Argon Benzene Benzaldehyde Benzyl Alcohol Biphenyl Carbon Dioxide Carbon Monoxide Carbon Tetrachloride Chlorine Chlorotrifluoroethylene Chloroprene Cycloheptane Cyclohexane Cyclopentane Cyclopentene

Cyclopropane Divinyl Ether Ethane Ethanol Ethylamine Ethylbenzene Ethylene Ethylene GlycolEthylene Oxide Fluorene Furan Heliumâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 Hydrazine Hydrogen Hydrogen Chloride Hydrogen Cyanide Hydrogen Peroxide Hydrogen Sulfide Isobutane Isobutene Isobutyl benzene Isopentane Isoprene

Isopropanol Methane Methanol Methyl Acrylate Methyl Ethyl Ketone Methyl Vinyl Ether mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Chloronitrobenzene mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dichlorobenzene Neon Neopentane Nitric Acid Nitric Oxide Nitrobenzene Nitroethane Nitrogen Nitromethane Nitrous Oxide nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butanol nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butyraldehyde nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butyronitrile nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Decane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dodecane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Heptadecane

n-Heptane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Hexane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Octane nâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Pentane Oxygen Pentafluorothane Phenol Propane Propadiene Pyrene Propylene Styrene Sulfer Dioxide Toluene Trichloroethylene Vinyl Acetate Vinyl Chloride Vinyl Cyclohexane Water 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Decene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Decanal 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Decanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dodecene

1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dodecanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Heptanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Heptene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Hexene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Hexadecanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Octanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Octene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Nonanal 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Nonanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Pentadecanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Pentanol 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Pentene 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Undecanol 1,2,4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Trichlorobenzene 1,1,2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Trichloroethane 1,1,2,2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Tetrafluoroethane 1,2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butadiene 1,3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Butadiene 1,3,5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Trichlorobenzene 1,4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dioxane 1,4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Hexadiene 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Methylâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Pentene 2,2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dimethylbutane

6-13


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE This manual does not contain instructions regarding the Calibrated Mass ProPlate Primary Element. For information concerning this option, call Rosemount Customer Central at 1-800-999-9307. Figure 6-6. Flow Setup Screen (Gas Configuration).

            

5. Define Primary Element Information. a. Enter the Primary Element minimum diameter. The Primary Element minimum is the bore size. See Figure 6-6. b. Enter Primary Element Material. c. Enter Meter Tube Diameter (pipe ID) and units at reference temperature. This is the B.D. in Figure 6-6. d. Enter Meter Tube Material. NOTE To be in compliance with appropriate national or international standards, beta ratios and differential producer diameters should be within the limits as listed in the standards.The EA software will alert the operator if a primary element value exceeds these limits. However, the EA will not stop the operator from proceeding with a flow configuration because of this type of exception. 6. Enter Operating Conditions.

6-14


a. Enter Operating Pressure Range and Units. b. Enter Operating Temperature Range and Units. 7. (Optional) If desired, modify standard pressure and/or temperature conditions. (These values only apply if flow units are set to: StdCuft/s, StdCuft/min, StdCuft/h, StdCuft/d, StdCum/h, or StdCum/d.) 8. Select Next. 9. If you selected an AIChE database fluid, this screen is already populated with AIChE data. If desired, this data may be edited. However, if a change is made to either a density or viscosity value, the EA considers the fluid to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Custom Fluid.â&#x20AC;? If you entered a custom fluid, fill in the compressibility/density column, the viscosity column, the molecular weight, the isentropic exponent, and the standard density. Figure 6-7. Compressibility and Viscosity Table (Gas Configuration).

NOTE Table values automatically convert if a different unit of measure is selected. All data fields can be edited.             

10. Select Flow Units. 11. Select Finished.

6-15


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate 

Figure 6-8. Flow Setup Complete Screen.

            

12. This screen offers three options. • File saves the flow information to a configuration file, which can be sent by selecting Transmitter, Send Config... as explained on page 6-39. (recommended). • Connect switches to the Connect screen so that the flow configuration can be sent to a transmitter. • Return switches to the EA. NOTE File is recommended because it provides you with an electronic record of your flow configuration.

NOTE If you selected custom fluid, or made density or viscosity changes to an AIChE fluid, be sure to save your information to a configuration file so that you can modify the flow configuration information at a later date. Although you can read a flow configuration from a transmitter, it is NOT possible to retrieve custom density, custom viscosity, or custom primary element information. Therefore, be sure to save custom fluid configurations to a unique file. Setup Compensated Flow (Steam Configuration) The Compensated Flow selection allows you to configure the Mass ProPlate to measure steam flow. The following screens illustrate how to define a steam configuration.

6-16




Figure 6-9. Flow Setup Screen.

            

1. Select Gas radio button. 2. Select Steam radio button. 3. Select 1195 Integral Orifice. 4. Select Next. Figure 6-10. Steam Selection Screen.

            

5. Select type of steam measurement: DP, Pressure, and Temperature compensated steam measurement (Saturated and/or Superheated steam) or DP and Pressure compensated steam measurement (Saturated Steam Only) NOTE DP, Pressure, and Temperature is the most common option. With this option, the Mass ProPlate will compensate for both saturated and superheated steam. 6-17


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE DP and Pressure should be selected ONLY if the steam being measured is always saturated. With this option, the density of the saturated steam is based on the actual static pressure measurement. This option also requires that the Mass ProPlate is set to fixed temperature mode. With this option, saturated steam density is calculated based on ASME steam tables, and dynamic temperature compensation is not performed. If dynamic temperature compensation is desired, select the DP, Pressure, and Temperature option. 6. Select Next. Figure 6-11. Steam Setup Screen.

NOTE The Operating Temperature Range selection is not displayed if â&#x20AC;&#x153;DP and Pressureâ&#x20AC;? is selected.

            

7. Define Primary Element Information a. Enter the Primary Element minimum diameter. This is the bore size. See Figure 6-11. b. Enter Primary Element Material. c. Enter Meter Tube Diameter (pipe ID) and units at reference temperature. This is dimension B.D. in Figure 6-11. d. Enter Meter Tube Material. 8. Enter Operating Conditions.

6-18


a. Enter Operating Pressure Range and Units. b. Enter Operating Temperature Range and Units. The operating temperature range points must be equal to or greater than the saturation temperature at the given operating pressures.

NOTE Step 8b is not part of the “DP and Pressure” configuration

9. (Optional) If desired, modify standard pressure and/or temperature conditions. 10. Select Next. 11. The Steam Setup screen is automatically populated with steam data based on the ASME steam equations. If desired, all data fields can be edited. However, if a change is made to either a density or viscosity value, the EA considers the fluid to be “Custom Fluid.” 

Figure 6-12. Compressibility and Viscosity Table (Steam Configuration).

NOTE Table values automatically convert if a different unit of measure is selected.

            

12. Select Flow Units. 13. Select Finished. Figure 6-13. Flow Setup Complete Screen.

            

6-19


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate 14. This screen offers three options. • File saves the flow information to a configuration file, which can be sent by selecting Transmitter, Send Config... as explained on page 6-39. (recommended). • Connect switches to the Connect screen so that the flow configuration can be sent to a transmitter. • Return switches to the EA. NOTE File is recommended because it provides you with an electronic record of your flow configuration.

NOTE If you selected custom fluid, or made density or viscosity changes to an AIChE fluid, be sure to save your information to a configuration file so that you can modify the flow configuration information at a later date. Although you can read a flow configuration from a transmitter, it is NOT possible to retrieve custom density, custom viscosity, or custom primary element information. Therefore, be sure to save custom fluid configurations to a unique file. Setup Compensated Flow (Liquid Configuration) The Compensated Flow selection enters the user into the procedure for configuring the Mass ProPlate to measure flow of a particular fluid. The following screens illustrate how to define a liquid configuration. Figure 6-14. Flow Setup Screen (Liquid Configuration).

            

6-20






Figure 6-15. Flow Setup Screen (Liquid Configuration).

            

1. Select Liquid. 2. Select “Pick from database” radio button and select a Fluid Name from the database picklist (see Table 6-1 on page 6-24 for database options), or Select “Custom” radio button and enter your own fluid name. 3. Select 1195 Integral Orifice. 4. Select Next. 5. Define Primary Element Information

6-21


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate a. Enter Primary Element minimum diameter. This is the bore size. See Figure 6-15. b. Enter Primary Element Material. c. Enter Meter Tube Diameter (pipe ID) and units at reference temperature. This is dimension B.D. in Figure 6-15. d. Enter Meter Tube Material. 6. Enter Operating Temperature Range and Units. 7. (Optional) If desired, modify standard temperature conditions. 8. Select Next. 9. If you selected your own fluid name, fill in the density column and the viscosity column. If you used an AIChE database fluid, this table is already populated with AIChE data. However, if a change is made to either a density or viscosity value, the EA considers the fluid to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Custom Fluid.â&#x20AC;? Figure 6-16. Compressibility and Viscosity Table (Liquid Configuration).

NOTE Table values automatically convert if a different unit of measure is selected.             

10. Select Flow Units. 11. Select Finished.

6-22




Figure 6-17. Flow Setup Complete Screen.

            

12. This screen offers three options. â&#x20AC;˘ File saves the flow information to a configuration file, which can be sent by selecting Transmitter, Send Config... as explained on page 6-39. (recommended). Connect switches to the Connect screen so that the flow configuration can be sent to a transmitter. Return switches to the EA. NOTE File is recommended because it provides you with an electronic record of your flow configuration.

NOTE If you selected custom fluid, or made density or viscosity changes to an AIChE fluid, be sure to save your information to a configuration file so that you can modify the flow configuration information at a later date. Although you can read a flow configuration from a transmitter, it is NOT possible to retrieve custom density, custom viscosity, or custom primary element information. Therefore, be sure to save custom fluid configurations to a unique file. Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Configuration) Gross versus Detail Characterization The Engineering Assistant calculates the natural gas compressibility factor using either gross or detail characterization methods. Gross characterization is a simplified method that is acceptable for a narrow range of pressure, temperature, and gas composition. Detail characterization covers all pressure, temperature, and gas composition ranges for which A.G.A. computes compressibility factors. Table 6-1 identifies the acceptable ranges for both of these characterization methods.

6-23


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE A.G.A. Report No. 8 specifies that it is only valid for the gas phase. The Detail Characterization method allows water, n-Hexane, n-Heptane, n-Octone, n-Nonane, and n-Decane to be present up to the dew point. When entering these component values, be sure that these components have not reached their respective dew points.

Table 6-1. Acceptable Ranges: Gross vs. Detail Characterization Methods.

Gross Method

Engineering Assistant Variable Pressure

Detail Method

0–1200 psia (1)

0–20,000 psia (1)

(1)

–200 to 400°F (1)

Temperature

32 to 130 °F

Specific Gravity

0.554–0.87

0.07–1.52

Heating Value

477–1150 BTU/SCF

0–1800 BTU/SCF

Mole % Nitrogen

0–50.0

0–100

Mole % Carbon Dioxide

0–30.0

0–100

Mole % Hydrogen Sulfide

0–0.02

0–100

Mole % Water

0–0.05

0–Dew Point

Mole % Helium

0–0.2

0–3.0

Mole % Methane

45.0–100

0–100

Mole % Ethane

0–10.0

0–100

Mole % Propane

0–4.0

0–12

Mole % i-Butane

0–1.0

0–6 (2)

Mole % n-Butane

0–1.0

0–6 (2)

Mole % i-Pentane

0–0.3

0–4 (3)

Mole % n-Pentane

0–0.3

0–4 (3)

Mole % n-Hexane

0–0.2

0–Dew Point

Mole % n-Heptane

0–0.2

0–Dew Point

Mole % n-Octane

0–0.2

0–Dew Point

Mole % n-Nonane

0–0.2

0–Dew Point

Mole % n-Decane

0–0.2

0–Dew Point

Mole % Oxygen

0

0–21.0

Mole % Carbon Monoxide

0–3.0

0–3.0

Mole % Hydrogen

0–10.0

0–100

Mole % Argon

0

0–1.0

127( 5HIHUHQFHFRQGLWLRQVDUHSVLDDQGƒ)IRU*URVV0HWKRG

(1) The Mass ProPlate sensor operating limits may limit the pressure and temperature range. (2) The summation of i-Butane and n-Butane cannot exceed 6 percent. (3) The summation of i-Pentane and n-Pentane cannot exceed 4 percent.

Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Flowchart) Table 6-18 on page 6-25 illustrates a flowchart identifying which Engineering Assistant Screens are used to define a natural gas flow configuration.

6-24


Figure 6-18. Natural Gas Flowchart.

Main Flow Screen (page 6-26)

Natural Gas Selection Screen (page 6-26)

Detail Characterization Screen (page 6-27)

Gross #1 Characterization Screen (page 6-28)

Gross #2 Characterization Screen (page 6-29)

Primary Element Definition Screen (page 6-29)

Compressibility & Viscosity Screen (page 6-30)

Flow Setup Complete Screen (page 6-31)

6-25


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Setup Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Procedure) 1. Select Gas. 2. Select Natural Gas. 3. Select 1195 Integral Orifice. 4. Select Next. Figure 6-19. Flow Setup Screen (Natural Gas Configuration).

            

5. Select the desired characterization method, then select Next. • If the Detail Method is selected, turn to page 6-27. • If the Gross 1 Method is selected, turn to page 6-27. • If the Gross 2 Method is selected, turn to page 6-28. Figure 6-20. Flow Setup Screen (Natural Gas Applications).

            

6-26


Detail Characterization Method The AGA8 Detail method allows entry of up to 21 different gas composition mole percentages as illustrated in Table 6-21. identifies the valid range for each variable. 6. Enter a Mole% value into each of the desired Natural Gas component fields. • When entering numbers into the natural gas screen, the Total Mole % field indicates the sum of all percentages entered. The Total Mole % field must add up to 100.0000 percent for the Engineering Assistant to accept the new values. • To zero all 21 fields, select clear. • The normalize button provides a method to automatically modify all non-zero values so that they add up to 100.0000. 

Figure 6-21. Natural Gas Setup Screen (Detail Characterization).

            

7. After all the desired mole @ are entered, Select Next. For additional information concerning the Detail Characterization Method, refer to the A.G.A. Report No.8/API MPMS Chapter 14.2, Second Printing, July 1994. Gross Characterization Method #1 The gross characterization method 1 requires the entry of real gas specific gravity, heating value, and CO2 mole percent, and also allows entry of H2 mole percent and CO mole percent. H2 and CO are typically zero for natural gas applications. The valid ranges for gross characterization method 1 components are: Real gas relative density (specific gravity) at 60°F, 14.73 psia 0.554–0.87. 6-27


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Volumetric Gross Dry Heating Value at 60°F, 14.73 psia 477–1150 BTU/SCF. CO2 (carbon dioxide) mole percent 0–30 percent. H2 (hydrogen) mole percent (optional) 0–10 percent. CO (carbon monoxide) mole percent (optional) 0–3 percent. 8. Enter a value into each of the desired Natural Gas component fields. 

Figure 6-22. Natural Gas Setup Screen (Gross Characterization Method 1).

            

9. After all the percentages are entered, Select Next. Gross Characterization Method #2 The gross characterization method 2 requires the entry of real gas specific gravity, value, CO2 mole percent, and N2 mole percent, also allows entry of H2 mole percent and CO mole percent. H2 and CO are typically zero for natural gas applications. The valid ranges for gross characterization method 2 components are: Real gas relative density (specific gravity) at 60°F, 14.73 psia 0.554–0.87. CO2 (carbon dioxide) mole percent 0–30 percent. N2 (hydrogen) mole percent 0–50 percent. H2 (hydrogen) mole percent (optional) 0–10 percent. 6-28


CO (carbon monoxide) mole percent (optional) 0â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 percent. 10. Enter a value into each of the desired Natural Gas component fields. 

Figure 6-23. Natural Gas Setup Screen (Gross Characterization Method 2).

            

11. After all the percentages are entered, Select Next. Figure 6-24. Natural Gas Setup Screen.

            

6-29


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE To comply with A.G.A. Report No. 3, the primary element must be “Orifice, Flange Taps, AGA 3.” 12. Define Primary Element Information: a. Enter the Primary Element minimum diameter. The Primary Element minimum is the bore size. See Figure 6-24. b. Enter Primary Element Material. c. Enter Meter Tube Diameter (pipe ID) and units at reference temperature. This is dimension B.D. in Figure 6-24. d. Enter Meter Tube Material. 13. Enter Operating Conditions. a. Enter Operating Pressure Range and Units. b. Enter Operating Temperature Range and Units. The operating temperature range points must be equal to or greater than the saturation temperature at the given operating pressures. 14. (Optional) If desired, modify standard pressure and/or temperature conditions. 15. Select Next. 16. The displayed values are calculated per A.G.A. 8. If desired, all data fields can be edited. However, if a change is made to either a density or viscosity value, the EA considers the fluid to be “Custom Fluid.” Data fields should conform to density or compressibility factor information as published by A.G.A. 8. (A.G.A. 3 recommends viscosity values of 6.9 ⫻ 10-6 pounds mass per foot-second or 0.010268 centipoise. Another available reference is the Gas Orifice Flow Program published by the Gas Research Institute. Figure 6-25. Compressibility and Viscosity Table (Steam Configuration).

NOTE Table values automatically convert if a different unit of measure is selected.          

6-30


17. Select Flow Units. 18. Select Finished. Figure 6-26. Flow Setup Complete Screen.

            

19. This screen provides you three options. • File saves the flow information to a configuration file, which can be sent by selecting Transmitter, Send Config... as explained on page 4-39. (recommended). • Connect switches to the Connect screen so that the flow configuration can be sent to a transmitter. • Return switches to the EA. NOTE File is recommended because it provides you with an electronic record of your flow configuration.

NOTE If you selected custom fluid, or made density or viscosity changes to an AIChE fluid, be sure to save your information to a configuration file so that you can modify the flow configuration information at a later date. Although you can read a flow configuration from a transmitter, it is NOT possible to retrieve custom density, custom viscosity, or custom primary element information. Therefore, be sure to save custom fluid configurations to a unique file. Setup Units This screen sets the units for the five process variables: Differential Pressure, Absolute Pressure, Gage Pressure, Process Temperature, and the Flow units.

6-31


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

NOTE Since the Compensated Flow procedure automatically includes these settings as the units for either a configuration file, or as the units sent to the transmitter during a send configuration operation, be sure that this screen is set correctly before performing the Compensated Flow procedure.

Figure 6-27. Units Screen.

            

Setup Damping This screen sets the damping for four process variables: Differential Pressure, Absolute Pressure, Gage Pressure, and Process Temperature. NOTE Since the Compensated Flow procedure automatically includes these settings as the damping parameters for either a configuration file, or as the damping values sent to the transmitter, be sure that this screen is set correctly before performing the Compensated Flow procedure. Figure 6-28. Damping Screen.

            

6-32


Setup Device Info This screen sets the device information for a transmitter. NOTE Since the Compensated Flow procedure automatically includes these settings as the device information for either a configuration file, or as the device information sent to the transmitter, be sure that this screen is set correctly before performing the Compensated Flow procedure.

Figure 6-29. Device Info Screen.

            

Setup

EA Default Units U.S. Units SI/Metric Units

These menu selections set the default units for the EA as either U.S. Units, or SI/Metric units. The selected units will be automatically selected during the next time you restart the EA software, or the next time you select File, New Config. This selection does not change the units for a flow configuration that has already been saved to a file or sent to a transmitter. Figure 6-30. Device Info Screen.             

6-33


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Transmitter Screens

Transmitter Disconnect If the Setup menu selections are grayed out, this indicates that the EA is currently on-line with a Mass ProPlate transmitter. Use this selection to disconnect the EA from a Mass ProPlate, which will then enable the Setup menu selections. Transmitter HART Output Connect The connect screen provides two functions: to change the address for the connected Mass ProPlate transmitter, and to change the Mass ProPlate that the EA is connected to during multidrop applications. 

Figure 6-31. Connect Screen.

            

When this screen is accessed, it always appears as illustrated in Figure 6-31: the address is 0, and there are no devices on-line. Change Address Use the following procedure to change the Mass ProPlate address. 1. Select Transmitter, HART Output, Connect to display the Connect screen. 2. Select Transmitters Online. 3. Select Poll. The EA searches for all connected Mass ProPlate transmitters, then displays found transmitters in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmitters Onlineâ&#x20AC;? box. Devices are identified by the software tag and description entered in the Device Information screen (see Figure 4-19 on page 4-21). 4. Select the desired device from the Mass ProPlate models identified in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmitters Onlineâ&#x20AC;? window. 5. Select the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Change Addressâ&#x20AC;? radio button (an 6. Enter old address. 7. Enter new address, then select OK. 6-34

appears).


Change Connection During multidrop applications, the Mass ProPlate EA is connected to one device at a time. Use the following procedure to change this connection pointer. 1. Select Transmitter, HART Output, Connect to display the Connect screen 2. Select Transmitters Online. 3. Select Poll. The EA searches for all connected Mass ProPlate transmitters, then displays found transmitters in the “Devices Online” box. Devices are identified by address and software tag. 4. Select the desired device from the Mass ProPlates identified in the “Transmitters Online” window and select OK. The Mass ProPlate EA is now connected to the device selected in Step 4. If security is enabled, the EA displays the Privileges screen. 5. Enter a password for the new device, then select OK. Transmitter HART Output Burst Mode When the Mass ProPlate is configured for burst mode, it provides faster digital communications from the transmitter to the control system by eliminating the time required for the control system to request information from the transmitter. Burst mode is compatible with use of the analog signal. Because HART protocol features simultaneous digital and analog data transmission, the analog value can drive other equipment in the loop while the control system is receiving the digital information. Burst mode applies only to the transmission of burst data (see Figure 6-25 on page 6-30), and does not affect the way other transmitter data is accessed. Access to information other than burst data is obtained through the normal poll/response method of HART communication. The EA or the control system may request any of the information that is normally available while the transmitter is in burst mode. Between each burst message sent by the transmitter, a short pause allows the EA or control system to initiate a request. The transmitter will receive the request, process the response message, and then continue “bursting” the data approximately three times per second. Burst mode is not compatible with multidropping more than one transmitter because there is no method to discriminate the data communications from multiple field devices.

6-35


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 6-32. Connect Screen.

NOTE Dynamic Variables and Current (HART Cmd 3) required if connection to a HART Tri-Loop.

            

Transmitter HART Output Communication Configuration The communication configuration screen sets the number of response preambles for transmitter to EA communication. The valid range for this setting is 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 preambles. The default setting is five. Typically, this value if left at five. Increase this value only if the transmitter is installed in an electrically noisy environment. Figure 6-33. Communication Configuration Screen.

            

6-36


Transmitter Units This screen sets the units for the five process variables: Differential Pressure, Absolute Pressure, Gage Pressure, Process Temperature, and the Flow units. Modifying the information on this screen and selecting OK immediately changes the connected transmitter. Figure 6-34. Units Screen.

            

Transmitter Damping This screen sets the damping for four process variables: Differential Pressure, Absolute Pressure, Gage Pressure, and Process Temperature Modifying the information on this screen and selecting OK immediately changes the connected transmitter. NOTE The transmitter sets the damping value to the nearest acceptable value. An information message is provided to the operator indicating the new damping values.

6-37


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 6-35. Transmitter Damping Screen.

            

Transmitter Device Info This screen sets the device information for a transmitter. Modifying the information on this screen and selecting OK immediately changes the connected transmitter. Figure 6-36. Device Info Screen.

            

6-38


Transmitter Send Config This screen allows sending three different types of configuration data to a transmitter. • Flow Configuration information only. • Transmitter Specific information only. • Both Flow Configuration and Transmitter Specific information. Figure 6-37 identifies the contents for each type of file. An “X” in the corresponding box indicates that the listed information will be overwritten in the transmitter. NOTE When the Transmitter Specific Information is sent to a transmitter, all previous transmitter information will be overwritten. Figure 6-37. Send Config Screen.

            

Transmitter Recv Config This screen receives the configuration information from a transmitter.

6-39


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Range Limits Note This screen verifies your 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA range values when you send a new flow configuration to a transmitter. It shows the current values and allows you to either confirm or change them. If you select Change, the Range Values screen appears (see page 6-45). Figure 6-38. Range Limits Note.

            

Maintenance Screens

Maintenance Privileges This screen allows changing password security levels. For information concerning passwords, see page 6-47.

Figure 6-39. Privileges Screen.

            

Maintenance Sensor Trim The sensor trim screens are used during bench and field calibration of the Mass ProPlate. In addition to the EA Software, the following equipment is required for a sensor trim procedure: â&#x20AC;˘ Mass ProPlate â&#x20AC;˘ Dead-weight tester â&#x20AC;˘ Power supply and load resistor â&#x20AC;˘ Vacuum pump or a barometer that is at least 3 times as accurate as the Mass ProPlate AP sensor. A barometer is preferred. Table 6-2 identifies the LRL and URL for the Mass ProPlate.

6-40


Table 6-2. Mass ProPlate Sensor Limits.

Sensor

LRL

URL

DP Range 2

ÂąLQ+ DWÂ&#x192;)

LQ+ DWÂ&#x192;)

DP Range 3

ÂąLQ+ DWÂ&#x192;)

LQ+ DWÂ&#x192;)

AP Range 3 / GP Range C

SVLDSVLJ

SVLDSVLJ

AP Range 4 / GP Range D

SVLDSVLJ

SVLDSVLJ

ÂąÂ&#x192;) ÂąÂ&#x192;&

Â&#x192;) Â&#x192;&

PT

Sensor Trim Procedure (For Bench Calibration) 1. Trim Absolute Pressure Offset (zero). a. Select Maintenance, Sensor Trim to display the Sensor Trim screen. 

Figure 6-40. Sensor Trim Screen.

            

b. Select Absolute Press then select Offset & Slope Trim. Set Offset Trim Point and units, set Slope Trim Point and units, then select Trim to display the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sensor Offset Trimâ&#x20AC;? screen. Figure 6-41. Sensor Offset Trim Screen.

            

6-41


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate c. If using a vacuum pump, pull a vacuum to both the low and high sides of the transmitter, wait for the measured value to stabilize, then select OK. OR If using a barometer, select OK to display the Sensor Slope Trim screen (Figure 6-42 on page 6-42). Figure 6-42. Sensor Slope Trim Screen.

            

2. Trim Absolute Pressure Slope (span). a. Using the dead-weight tester, apply the desired high pressure to both the low and high sides of the transmitter. b. Wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok. 3. Trim Differential Pressure Offset (zero) a. Select Differential Press and Offset & Slope Trim, set Offset Trim Point and units, set Slope Trim Point and units, then select Trim to display the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sensor Offset Trimâ&#x20AC;? screen. b. Using the dead-weight tester, apply the desired low pressure value to the high side of the transmitter.

            

6-42


NOTE If zero is the desired low value, do not use the dead weight tester. Instead, enter zero as the trim value, select the units, then select Ok. c. Wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok to display the Sensor Slope Trim Screen. 4. Trim Differential Pressure Slope (span). a. Using the dead-weight tester, apply the desired high pressure to the high side of the transmitter. b. Wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok.

            

5. Trim Process Temperature Offset (zero). a. Select Process Temp then select Offset & Slope Trim. Set Offset Trim Point and units, set Slope Trim Point and units, then select Trim to display the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sensor Offset Trimâ&#x20AC;? screen. b. Insert the RTD probe into an ice bath, wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok to display the Sensor Slope Trim screen. 6. Trim Process Temperature Slope (span). a. Insert the RTD probe into a hot oil bath. b. Wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok. Sensor Trim Procedure (For Field Calibration) To correct mounting position effects, field calibrate the Mass ProPlate after installation: 1. Establish communications (see page 6-5). 2. Perform a Trim DP Offset (zero).

6-43


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate a. Select Maintenance, Sensor Trim to display the Sensor Trim Select screen. b. Select Differential Press then select Offset Trim. Enter the low pressure value as the Offset Trim Point, set the units, then select Trim to display the “Sensor Offset Trim” screen. c. Wait for the Measured Value to stabilize, then select Ok. 3. (Optional) If a barometer that is at least 3 times as accurate as the Mass ProPlate AP sensor is available, perform an SP Offset (zero). a. Select Maintenance, Sensor Trim to display the Sensor Trim Select screen. b. Select Absolute Press then select Offset Trim. Enter the barometric pressure reading as the Offset Trim Point, set the units, then select Trim to display the “Sensor Offset Trim” screen. c. Select OK. Recall Factory Trim Settings Procedure Use the following procedure to change trim settings to the factory installed settings. 1. Establish communications (see page 6-5). 2. Enter a valid password. 3. Select the desired sensor (DP, SP, PT) and Recall Factory Trim Settings, then select Trim. 4. Repeat step 3 above for each of the other sensors.

6-44


Maintenance Analog Output Range Values The Range Values screen sets the range values for the primary variable, and also allows for reassigning the process variable output order. Setting the range points involves redefining the pressure points corresponding to the transmitter 4 and 20 mA setpoints. NOTE The Primary Variable (Figure 6-44) is also assigned as the 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 mA analog output. The top half of this screen provides information on the primary variable, while the bottom half allows setting the range values. 1. Select Assign Variables, then verify that the variable order is correct (see Figure 6-44). 2. Fill in the Range Values (4 mA Value and 20 mA Value), select the Units, then select Set Range. NOTE Range values must be within the lower range limit, the upper range limit, and the minimum span as indicated in the top portion of the Set Range Values screen. The 4 and 20 mA range values cannot equal one another. Figure 6-43. Range Values Screen.

            

6-45


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 6-44. Assign Variables Screen.

NOTE This screen determines the order of HART Burst Command 3 Variables. This information is required if connecting to a HART Tri-Loop.

            

Maintenance Analog Output Trim... This screen allows the user to adjust the transmitter digital to analog converter at the end points of the transmitter output scale to compensate for component aging effects. This function also allows the user to enter the endpoints and the meter readings in an alternative scale. For example, endpoints using a 500 ohm resistor with a voltmeter would be 2 and 10 volts. Fill in the upper and lower analog output trim points according to the units in the measuring device, then select Start Trim. Continue to follow the instructions as prompted by the EA.

6-46


Figure 6-45. Analog Output Trim Screen.

            

            

            

Maintenance Change Passwords... Figure 6-46 illustrates the Change Passwords screen. Security must be enabled (see page 6-48) before you can gain access to this screen. NOTE When shipped from the factory, all passwords are blank. Press UHWXUQ when the login screen appears, and System Administrator access is granted.

6-47


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Before filling in this screen, consider the following issues concerning EA passwords: • If a password is left blank, pressing UHWXUQ at the login screen accesses that password level. • If passwords are identical, the higher level access is granted. • Passwords are up to 8 characters in length. Once a password is entered, the title bar indicates current password access. Each password level allows access to specific functions. Medium Level Passwords Provides full access except the operator cannot change passwords, or enable or disable security. System administrator Provides full access for the system administrator. NOTE Be sure to record passwords in a safe location. If the System Administrator password is lost or forgotten, consult the factory.

Figure 6-46. Change Password.

            

Maintenance Enable/Disable Security... This selection allows enabling or disabling security. You must have System Administrator authority to enable or disable security. NOTE When shipped from the factory, all passwords are blank. Press UHWXUQ when the login screen appears and System Administrator access is granted.

6-48


Figure 6-47. Enable/Disable Security Screen.

            

Maintenance Process Temperature Mode This selection specifies the process temperature (PT) mode. It allows you to enable or disable PT input or to specify automatic backup mode. To enable process temperature input, select Normal PT Mode. In this mode, the transmitter uses the external RTD for automatic PT measurement. In the event of an RTD failure, the transmitter goes into alarm condition. To disable process temperature input, select Fixed PT Mode, enter the desired fixed value, then select OK. Use the Backup PT Mode selection to specify a value to be used for temperature in the event the RTD fails or is disconnected. Upon failure, the transmitter will use this backup value and set a HART status bit for PT alarm, but will not go into alarm condition. The transmitter returns to automatic temperature sensor readings when the fail condition no longer exists. NOTE The fixed and backup process temperature ranges are wider than the actual process temperature range: Process Temperature Range: –40 to 1200°F (–40 to 649°C) Fixed or Backup Temperature Range: –459 to 3500°F (–273 to 1927°C)

6-49


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 6-48. Process Temperature (PT) Mode Screen.

            

Diagnostics Screens

Diagnostics Read Outputs... This selection displays the current process variable values as illustrated in Figure 6-49. This screen continuously updates with current data. To exit this screen, select Ok.

Figure 6-49. Read Outputs Screen.

             

6-50


Diagnostics Device Info Module Info... This selection displays module information as illustrated in Figure 6-50. This is a read-only screen. Figure 6-50. Module Information Screen.

            

Diagnostics Device Info Identification Info... This selection displays transmitter identification numbers as well as current software and hardware revision levels. To exit this screen, select OK.

6-51


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 6-51. Identification Info Screen.

            

Diagnostics Test Calculation... The test calculations screen provides a method to view the Mass ProPlate mass flow calculations for the current process variables. Optionally, the system administrator can enter process variable values, and then view the calculation results. NOTE Since the test calculation procedure actually changes flow and output values during the test, the control loops should be put into manual mode for the duration of the test.

NOTE The test calculation results displayed by this screen are calculated in the attached transmitter, not the EA. In addition, the calculation update time for this screen is not indicative of the actual transmitter update rate. (The Mass ProPlate sensor update rate is nine times per second.)

6-52


1. Select Diagnostics, Test Calculation to display the Test Calculation screen. The initial values indicate current process variable readings. 2. (Optional) Enter values and units for Differential Pressure, Static Pressure, and Process Temperature process variables and units. 3. Select the Calculate button. After a short delay, the results box is populated with calculation results. 4. If desired, the Mass Flow Rate, Density, and Viscosity results can be displayed in different units. 5. When finished with your test calculations, select Exit. Figure 6-52. Test Calculation Screen.

            

6-53


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Diagnostics Loop Test... The loop test screen provides a method to test the transmitter analog output. 1. Select the desired current (4 mA, 20 mA, or Other). 2. Select Set Current. 3. The analog output field will state the actual transmitter analog output. 4. Select Close. This step returns the transmitter to normal operation. Figure 6-53. Loop Test Screen.

            

Diagnostics Master Reset... The transmitter master reset selection reinitializes the transmitter microprocessor. This is the equivalent of removing and then reapplying power to the transmitter. NOTE This procedure does not return the transmitter to factory trim settings (see page 6-41). Diagnostics Error Info... The transmitter Error Info selection identifies the current error status for the Mass ProPlate transmitter at the time of command invocation. This screen is not actively updated.

6-54


If there are additional errors not displayed on the original screen, the Error Info button will be enabled. Select Error Info to view the additional errors. Figure 6-54. Error Info Screen.

             

            

MISCELLANEOUS EA SELECTIONS

View Toolbar... This selection toggles the toolbar on and off. View Status Bar... This selection toggles the status bar on and off. Help This selection identifies the current EA software revision.

6-55


Section 7

LCD Meter Options

PROPLATE FLOWMETER

Options available with the ProPlate can ease installation and enhance the security of control systems. These options include the integral zero and span adjustments, LCD meters, mounting brackets, custom configurations, optional bolt materials, and the transient protection terminal block.

SAFETY MESSAGES

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions could result in death or serious injury: •

Do not remove the transmitter cover in explosive atmospheres when the circuit is alive.

Before connecting a HART-based communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Verify that the operating atmosphere of the transmitter is consistent with the appropriate hazardous locations certifications.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Electrical shock can result in death or serious injury. •

LCD METER

Avoid contact with the leads and the terminals.

The LCD meter provides local indication of the output, and abbreviated diagnostic messages governing flowmeter operation. The meter is located on the electronics module side of the flowmeter, maintaining direct access to the signal terminals. An extended cover is required to accommodate the meter. The meter features a two-line display that accommodates five digits for reporting the process variable on the top line, and six characters for displaying engineering units on the bottom line(1). And in addition to units of pressure, the new LCD meter is capable of displaying flow and volume units. The meter uses both lines to display diagnostic messages. You can configure the meter to display the following information: • Engineering Units • Percent of Range • Alternating between any two of the above (1)

Previous versions differ slightly.

7-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 7-1. Exploded View of the ProPlate with Optional LCD Meter.

Interconnecting Pins

Jumpers (top and bottom) LCD Meter Extended Cover $   $         

Installing the Meter For flowmeters ordered with the LCD meter, the meter is shipped installed. Installing the meter on an existing ProPlate flowmeter requires a small instrument screwdriver and the meter kit. The kits vary depending on the version of flowmeter electronics. Examine the following numbers carefully to ensure you are installing the correct kit. For use with Shrouded Electronics Board Meter Kits Option M5: P/N 03031-0193-0101 Option M6: P/N 03031-0193-0111 For use with Non-Shrouded Electronics Board Meter Kits Option M5: P/N 03031-0193-0001 Option M6: P/N 03031-0193-0011 The meter kit includes: • one LCD meter assembly • one extended cover with cover O-ring installed • two nylon standoffs • two captive screws • one ten -pin interconnection header Use the following procedure and Figure 7-1 to install the LCD meter. If the meter is an upgrade from a previous version, upgrade the electronics board before attempting to install the meter. 1. If the flowmeter is installed in a loop, secure the loop and disconnect power. 2. Remove the flowmeter cover opposite the field terminal side. Do not remove the instrument covers in explosive environments when the circuit is alive. 3. Remove the failure mode and alarm jumpers from the electronics module, and insert them in their new positions above and below the meter readout on the meter assembly. 7-2


NOTE On previous versions, remove only the alarm jumper. 4. Insert the interconnection header in the ten-pin(1) socket exposed by removal of the jumpers. 5. Remove the two captive screws from the electronics module. To do so, loosen the screws to release the module, then pull out the screws until they are stopped by the captive thread inside of the circuit board standoffs. Continue loosening the screws and remove them. 6. Rotate the electronics housing up to 90 degrees (left or right) to improve field access to the two compartments or to better view the optional LCD meter. To rotate the housing, release the housing rotation set screw and turn the housing not more than 90 degrees from the orientation shown in Figure 7-2. To rotate the housing greater than 90 degrees, follow Steps 1–6 of the disassembly procedure in Section 9: Troubleshooting. NOTE Do not rotate the housing greater than 90 degrees without first following the disassembly procedure in Section 9: Troubleshooting. Rotating the housing greater than 90 degrees will damage the sensor module and void the Rosemount warranty. 7. Decide which direction to orient the meter. Insert the long meter screws into the two holes on the meter assembly that coincide with the holes on the electronics module. You can install the meter in 90-degree increments for easy viewing. Position one of the four connectors on the back of the meter assembly to accept the interconnection header. 8. Attach the meter assembly to the electronics module by threading the screws into the captive threads and attaching the meter assembly to the interconnection pins. Tighten the screws to secure the meter assembly and electronics board in place. 9. Attach the extended cover, and tighten. Flowmeter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion proof requirements and to achieve the proper environmental seal. Note the following LCD temperature limits: 2SHUDWLQJ –4 to 175°F (–20 to 80°C) 6WRUDJH –40 to 185°F (–40 to 85°C) NOTE Electronics board revision 5.3 or later (all shrouded designs) have increased functionality that allows verification testing of alarm current levels. If you repair or replace the flowmeter electronics board, sensor module or LCD meter, it is recommended that you verify the flowmeter alarm level before you return the flowmeter to service (see Alarm Level Verification on page 5-3).

(1)

Previous versions of the meter use a six-pin connector.

7-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure 7-2. ProPlate Electronics with Optional LCD Meter.

Diagnostic Messages

In addition to the output, the LCD meter displays abbreviated operation, error, and warning messages for troubleshooting the flowmeter. Messages appear according to their priority, with normal operating messages appearing last. To determine the cause of a message, use a Model 275 HART Communicator to further interrogate the flowmeter. A description of each LCD diagnostic message follows. Error Error messages appear on the LCD meter display to inform you of serious problems effecting the operation of the flowmeter. The meter displays an error message until the error condition is corrected, and the analog output is driven to the specified alarm level. No other flowmeter information is displayed during an alarm condition. FAIL The flowmeter CPU board and the sensor module are incompatible. If you encounter this message, contact Dieterich Standard Inc. at 303-530-9600 if you need assistance. FAIL MODULE The sensor module is disconnected or is malfunctioning. Verify that the sensor module ribbon cable is connected to the back of the electronics board. If the ribbon cable is properly connected, there is a problem within the sensor module. Possible sources of problems include: • Pressure or temperature updates are not being received in the sensor module • A non-volatile memory fault that will effect flowmeter operation has been detected in the module by the memory verification routine Some non-volatile memory faults are user-repairable. Use a Model 275 HART Communicator to diagnose the error and determine if it is repairable. Any error message that ends in “FACTORY” is not repairable. In cases of non user-repairable errors, you must replace the sensor module. See Remove the Flowmeter from Service on page 9-2, or contact Dieterich Standard Inc. at 303-530-9600 if you need assistance.

7-4


FAIL ELECT The flowmeter electronics board is malfunctioning due to an internal fault. Some of the FAIL ELECT errors are user-repairable. Use a Model 275 HART Communicator to diagnose the error and determine if it is repairable. Any error message that ends in “FACTORY” is not repairable. In cases of non user-repairable errors, you must replace the electronics board. See Remove the Electronics Board on page 9-3, or contact Rosemount Customer Central at 800-999-9307 if you need assistance. FAIL CONFIG A memory fault has been detected in a location that could effect flowmeter operation, and is user-accessible. To correct this problem, use a Model 275 HART Communicator to interrogate and reconfigure the appropriate portion of the flowmeter memory. Contact Dieterich Standard Inc. at 303-530-9600 if you need assistance. Warnings Warnings appear on the LCD meter display to alert you of user-repairable problems with the flowmeter, or current flowmeter operations. Warnings appear alternately with other flowmeter information until the warning condition is corrected or the flowmeter completes the operation that warrants the warning message. NOTE The warning messages on previous versions of the LCD meter may vary slightly from those listed here, but they represent the same warning. FPRES LIMIT The process variable read by the flowmeter is outside of sensor range limits. P/T LIMIT The secondary or tertiary temperature variable read by the electronics is outside of flowmeter range. CURR FIXED The flowmeter is in multidrop mode. The analog output is not tracking pressure changes. CURR SATURD The pressure read by the module is outside of the specified range, and the analog output has been driven to saturation levels (see the tables on page 5-2). LOOP TEST A loop test is in progress. During a loop test or 4–20 mA trim, the analog output is set to a fixed value. The meter display alternates between the current selected in milliamps and “LOOP TEST.”

7-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate XMTR INFO A non-volatile memory fault has been detected in the flowmeter memory by the memory verification routine. The memory fault is in a location containing flowmeter information. To correct this problem, use a Model 275 HART Communicator to interrogate and reconfigure the appropriate portion of the flowmeter memory. This warning does not effect the flowmeter operation. Contact Dieterich Standard Inc. at 303-530-9600 if you need assistance. Operation Normal operation messages appear on the LCD meter to confirm actions or inform you of flowmeter status. Operation messages are displayed with other flowmeter information, and warrant no action to correct or alter the flowmeter settings. ZERO PASS The zero value, set with the local zero adjustment button, has been accepted by the flowmeter, and the output should change to 4 mA. ZERO FAIL The zero value, set with the local zero adjustment button, exceeds the maximum rangedown allowed for a particular range, or the pressure sensed by the flowmeter exceeds the sensor limits. SPAN PASS The span value, set with the local span adjustment button, has been accepted by the flowmeter, and the output should change to 20 mA. SPAN FAIL The span value, set with the local span adjustment button, exceeds the maximum rangedown allowed for a particular range, or the pressure sensed by the flowmeter exceeds the sensor limits. LOCAL DSBLD This message appears during reranging with the integral zero and span buttons and indicates that the flowmeter local zero and span adjustments have been disabled. The adjustments may have been disabled by the flowmeter security jumper on the flowmeter circuit board or through software commands from the Model 275. Refer to Flowmeter Security on page 5-3 for information on the position of the security jumper. WRITE PROTCT This message appears if you attempt to change the flowmeter configuration data while the security jumper is in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONâ&#x20AC;? position. See Flowmeter Security on page 5-3 for more information about the security jumper.

7-6


Section 8 GENERAL

Maintenance Troubleshooting is limited to determining the cause of failure. If the plate or gaskets are damaged or worn, replace them.

Use only procedures and new parts specifically referenced in this manual to ensure specification performance and certification compliance. Unauthorized procedures or parts can render the instrument dangerous to life, limb, or property.

RETURN OF MATERIALS

To expedite the return process, call the Rosemount National Response Center using our 800-654-RSMT (7768) toll-free number. This center, available 24 hours a day, will assist you with any needed information or materials. The center will ask for product model and serial numbers, and will provide a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number. The center will also ask for the name of the process material the product was last exposed to.

Exposure to hazardous substances can cause severe injury or death. If a hazardous substance is identified, a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), required by law to be available to people exposed to specific hazardous substances, must be included with the returned goods.

The National Response Center will detail the additional information and procedures necessary to return goods exposed to hazardous substances.

ORIFICE PLATE REMOVAL

The orifice plate shown in Figure 8-1 should be periodically removed from the orifice assembly and cleaned. Inspection frequency depends on the specific service application of the orifice plate. The gaskets must be replaced each time the plate is serviced. Make sure that the process flow is off and that you have the proper replacement gaskets before beginning maintenance operations.

Standard plant safety procedures must be followed when removing the orifice assembly or plate from service. Do not substitute lesser strength bolts for the ones provided with the assembly.

Loosen and withdraw the assembly bolts shown in Figure 8-1 until they are clear of the plate. Loosen the four bolts connecting the transmitter to the assembly to gain additional clearance. Handle the plate carefully while it is outside of the assembly.

8-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

ORIFICE PLATE INSPECTION

Carefully inspect the orifice plate for signs of wear, paying close attention to the inlet edge of the plate. There should be no nicks, scratches, or other signs of abrasion on the edge, and the sharp-edged corners should not reflect light. Replace the plate if these signs are present. Carefully remove any accumulated process material on the upstream side of the plate. Inspect the process piping and remove any process buildup while the orifice plate is out of the assembly. Remove the transmitter or remote connectors and clean any process deposits from the pressure tap holes.

ORIFICE PLATE REINSTALLATION

Before reinstalling the plate, replace the old gaskets with new ones. Reinsert the plate, ensuring that the side labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;INLETâ&#x20AC;? faces upstream, and replace all corroded or damaged bolts. Refer to the Installation section of this manual for comments on seal liquid and transmitter orientation. Gradually and uniformly retighten the two assembly and four transmitter (or connection adaptor) bolts to the torque specified. Refer to the installation instructions in Section 2: Hardware Installation.

Figure 8-1. Orifice Plate Removal.



Orifice Plate

Using faulty bolts can cause process leaks. Replace bolts if they show any sign of corrosion or thread damage.

8-2

           


Section 9 SAFETY MESSAGES

Troubleshooting Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions can result in death or serious injury. •

Do not remove the instrument cover in explosive environments when the circuit is alive.

Both transmitter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Before connecting a communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or non-incendive field wiring practices.

Electrical shock can result in death or serious injury. •

Avoid contact with the leads and the terminals.

Table 9-1 provides summarized troubleshooting suggestions for the most common ProPlate operating problems. If you suspect a malfunction despite the absence of any diagnostic messages on the communicator display, follow the procedures described below to verify that the ProPlate hardware and process connections are in good working order. Always approach the most likely and easiest-to-check conditions first.

9-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

REMOVE THE FLOWMETER FROM SERVICE

NOTE Once you have determined a that flowmeter is inoperable, remove it from service. Be aware of the following: • Isolate and vent the process from the flowmeter before removing the flowmeter from service. • Remove all electrical leads and conduit. • Do not detach the process flange or the electronics without consulting the factory.

Symptom

Possible Cause

Questionable accuracy or erroneous flow signal

Improper installation

Corrective Action • Is the ProPlate flow arrow pointed in the direction of the flow? • Verify that the cross reservoirs are perfectly level with one another. • Is there sufficient straight run upstream and downstream of the ProPlate?

System leaks

Check for leaks in instrument piping. Repair and seal all leaks.

Contamination/plugging

Remove the ProPlate and check for contamination.

Closed valve

Verify that both ProPlate (PH & PL) or (MH & ML) valves are open. Verify that vent, equalizer, and line valves are properly positioned per the “start up procedure.”

ProPlate calibration

Is the ProPlate calibration too high or low for the flow rate?

ProPlate connections (remote mount only)

Verify that the high side of the ProPlate electronics is connected to the high side of the ProPlate. Check the same for the low side.

Entrapped air (liquid applications)

Are there uneven water legs caused by air entrapment in the instrument connections? If so, bleed air.

Operating conditions

Are the operating conditions in compliance with those given at the time the flowmeter was purchased? Check the flow calc and the fluid parameters for accuracy. Double-check pipe inside diameter for proper ProPlate sizing.

Spiking flow signal

Two-phase flow

The ProPlate is a head measurement device and will not accurately measure a two-phase flow.

Spiking flow signal (Stream Service)

Improper insulation (Vertical pipes only) Excessive vibration

Added insulation may be required to ensure that a phase change occurs at the cross reservoirs. Check the impulse piping for vibration.

Milliamp reading is zero

• • • •

Check if power polarity is reversed Verify voltage across terminals (should be 10–55V dc) Check for bad diode in terminal block Replace electronics terminal block

ProPlate electronics not in communication

• • • •

Check power supply voltage at electronics (10.5V minimum) Check load resistance (250 ohms minimum) Check if unit is addressed properly Replace electronics board

Milliamp reading is low or high

• • • •

Check pressure variable reading for saturation Check if output is in alarm condition Perform 4–20 mA output trim Replace electronics board

No response to changes in applied flow

• • • • • •

Check test equipment Check impulse piping for blockage Check for disabled span adjustment Check electronics security jumper Verify calibration settings (4 and 20 mA points) Contact factory for replacement

Low reading/high reading

• • • •

Check impulse piping for blockage Check test equipment Perform full sensor trim (if software revision is 35 or higher) Contact factory for replacement

Erratic reading for pressure variable

• • • •

Check impulse piping for blockage Check damping Check for EMF interference Contact factory for replacement

9-2


REMOVE THE TERMINAL BLOCK

Electrical connections are located on the terminal block in the compartment labeled â&#x20AC;&#x153;FIELD TERMINALS.â&#x20AC;? Loosen the two small screws located at the 9 o'clock and 4 o'clock positions, and pull the entire terminal block out to remove it

REMOVE THE ELECTRONICS BOARD

The flowmeter electronics board is located in the compartment opposite the terminal side. To remove the electronics board perform the following procedure: 1. Remove the housing cover opposite the field terminal side.

2. Loosen the two captive screws that anchor the board to the housing. The electronics board is electrostatically sensitive; observe handling precautions for static-sensitive components. NOTE If you are disassembling a flowmeter with a LCD meter, loosen the two captive screws that are visible on the right and left sides of the meter display. The two screws anchor the LCD meter to the electronics board and the electronics board to the housing.

3. Slowly pull the electronics board out of the housing. With the two captive screws free of the flowmeter housing, only the sensor module ribbon cable holds the board to the housing.

9-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

4. Disconnect the sensor module ribbon cable to release the electronics board from the flowmeter.

REMOVE THE SENSOR MODULE FROM THE ELECTRONICS BOARD

1. Carefully tuck the cable connector completely inside the internal shroud. IMPORTANT Do not remove the housing until after the cable connector is completely inside the internal shroud. The shroud protects the cable from damage that can occur when the housing is rotated. 2. Loosen the housing rotation set screw with a 9/64-inch hex wrench; back off one full turn. IMPORTANT To prevent damage to the sensor module ribbon cable, disconnect it from the electronics board before you remove the sensor module from the electrical housing. 3. Unscrew the housing from the module. Make sure the shroud and sensor cable do not catch on the housing.

9-4


IMPORTANT Make sure the sensor ribbon cable and internal shroud remain completely free of the housing as you rotate it. Damage can occur to the cable if the internal shroud and sensor cable become hung-up and rotate with the housing.

ATTACH THE SENSOR MODULE TO THE ELECTRONICS HOUSING BLOCK

1. Inspect all cover and housing (non-process-wetted) o-rings and replace if necessary. Lightly grease them with silicone lubricant to ensure a good seal. 2. Carefully tuck the cable connector completely inside the internal shroud. To do so, turn the shroud and cable counterclockwise one rotation to tighten the cable. 3. Lower the electronics housing onto the module; guide the internal shroud and cable through the housing and into the external shroud. 4. Turn the housing clockwise to fasten it to the module. IMPORTANT To prevent damage to the cable connector, watch the cable and shroud as you attach the housing to the module. Make sure the cable connector does not slip out of the internal shroud and begin to rotate with the housing. Reinsert the cable connector into the shroud if it escapes before the housing is fully fastened. 5. Thread the housing completely onto the sensor module. To comply with explosion-proof requirements, the housing must be no more than one full turn from flush with the sensor module. 6. Tighten the housing rotation set screw using a 9/64-inch hex wrench. NOTE Electronics board revision 5.3.163 or later (all shrouded designs) have increased functionality that allows verification testing of alarm current levels. If you repair or replace the electronics board, sensor module or LCD meter, it is recommended that you verify the transmitter alarm level before you return the electronics to service.

9-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

ATTACH THE ELECTRONICS BOARD

1. Remove the cable connector from its position inside of the internal shroud, and attach it to the electronics board.

2. Insert the electronics board into the housing, making sure that the posts from the electronics housing properly engage the receptacles on the electronics board. 3. Tighten the captive mounting screws.

4. Replace the electronics housing cover. The flowmeter covers must be engaged metal-to-metal to ensure proper seal and to meet explosion-proof requirements. NOTE Electronics board revision 5.3.163 or later (all shrouded designs) have increased functionality that allows verification testing of alarm current levels. If you repair or replace the flowmeter electronics board, sensor module or LCD meter, it is recommended that you verify the flowmeter alarm level before you return the flowmeter to service (see Write Protect and Failure Mode Alarm Jumpers on page 5-21).

9-6


INSTALL THE TERMINAL BLOCK

RETURNING ROSEMOUNT PRODUCTS AND/OR MATERIALS

Gently slide the terminal block into place, making sure the posts from the electronics housing properly engage the receptacles on the terminal block. Tighten the captive screws, and replace the electronics housing cover. The flowmeter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

To expedite the return process outside of the United States, call Rosemount Customer Central at (800) 999-9307. Within the United States, call the Rosemount National Response Center using the 1-800-654-RSMT (7768) toll-free number. This center, available 24 hours a day, will assist you with any needed information or materials. The center will ask for product model and serial numbers, and will provide a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number. The center will also ask for the name of the process material that the product was last exposed to.

Individuals who handle products exposed to a hazardous substance can avoid injury if they are informed of and understand the hazard. If the product being returned was exposed to a hazardous substance as defined by OSHA, a copy of the required Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous substance identified must be included with the returned goods.

9-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

RTD TROUBLESHOOTING

To test the 4 wire RTD (refer to Figure 9-1): 1. Disconnect power from the electronics. 2. Remove the Temperature Terminal Housing cover. 3. Disconnect the RTD lead wires from the terminal block. 4. Separate the wires so that the un-insulated ends are not touching anything. 5. Check that the resistance measured between the 2 red wires is the same as the resistance measured between the 2 white wires within +/- 0.1 ohms. Take note of the resistance value measured between the 2 white wires for use in step 6. 6. Measure the resistance between one red wire and one white wire. Subtract the resistance measured in step 5 from the resistance measured in this step. Refer to table 14-1 to determine if this resistance matches the temperature that the RTD is in contact with. 7. Check the resistance between any wire and the RTD head or sheath. An acceptable resistance is 200 K ohms or greater. 8. If any of the above measurements are not within the acceptable range as stated above, contact Dieterich Standard, Inc. (303) 530-9600 for a replacement RTD. 9. To return the RTD to service, connect the lead wires as shown in Figure 9-1. 10. Replace the Temperature Terminal Housing cover. 11. Re-connect power to the electronics.

Figure 9-1. Temperature Terminal Housing            

Replacing an RTD

If an RTD needs to be replaced, proceed as follows: 1. Disconnect power from the electronics. 2. Remove the Temperature Terminal Housing cover. 3. Disconnect the RTD lead wires from the terminal block.

Take care not to damage the RTD lead wires or insulation.

4. Use a 7/16 inch deep socket and a pair of vise grip pliers to remove the RTD from the thermowell. It is necessary to feed the wires through the socket to avoid damaging the lead wires. Grip the socket with the vise grip pliers and turn the socket to remove the RTD. 9-8


5. Install the new RTD using the socket and pliers as in step 4 above. 6. Connect the RTD lead wires to the terminal block (see Figure 9-1). 7. Replace the Temperature Terminal Housing cover. 8. Re-connect power to the electronics. Table 9-1. Resistance vs. Temperature IEC 751 Platinum 100, Alpha = 0.00385 RTD °F

Ohms

°F

Ohms

°F

Ohms

°F

Ohms

°C

Ohms

°C

Ohms

°C

Ohms

°C

Ohms

–330

18.04

60

106.07

450

187.65

840

263.80

–200

18.52

20

107.79

240

190.47

460

267.56

–320

20.44

70

108.23

460

189.67

850

265.68

–190

22.83

30

111.67

250

194.10

470

270.93

–310

22.83

80

110.38

470

191.68

860

267.56

–180

27.10

40

115.54

260

197.71

480

274.29

–300

25.20

90

112.53

480

193.70

870

269.44

–170

31.34

50

119.40

270

201.31

490

277.64

–290

27.57

100

114.68

490

195.71

880

271.31

–160

35.54

60

123.24

280

204.90

500

280.98

–280

29.93

110

116.83

500

197.71

890

273.17

–150

39.72

70

127.08

290

208.48

510

284.30

–270

32.27

120

118.97

510

199.71

900

275.04

–140

43.88

80

130.90

300

212.05

520

287.62

–260

34.61

130

121.11

520

201.71

910

276.90

–130

48.00

90

134.71

310

215.61

530

290.92

–250

36.94

140

123.24

530

203.71

920

278.75

–120

52.11

100

138.51

320

219.15

540

294.21

–240

39.26

150

125.37

540

205.70

930

280.61

–110

56.19

110

142.29

330

222.68

550

297.49

–230

41.57

160

127.50

550

207.69

940

282.46

–100

60.26

120

146.07

340

226.21

560

300.74

–220

43.88

170

129.62

560

209.67

950

284.30

–90

64.30

130

149.83

350

229.72

570

304.01

–210

46.17

180

131.74

570

211.66

960

286.14

–80

68.33

140

153.58

360

233.21

580

307.25

–200

48.46

190

133.86

580

213.63

970

287.98

–70

72.33

150

157.33

370

236.70

590

310.49

–190

50.74

200

135.97

590

215.61

980

289.82

–60

76.33

160

161.05

380

240.18

600

313.71

–180

53.02

210

138.08

600

217.58

990

291.65

–50

80.31

170

164.77

390

243.64

610

316.92

–170

55.29

220

140.19

610

219.55

1000

293.48

–40

84.27

180

168.48

400

247.09

620

320.12

–160

57.55

230

142.29

620

221.51

1010

295.30

–30

88.22

190

172.17

410

250.53

630

323.30

–150

59.81

240

144.39

630

223.47

1020

297.12

–20

92.16

200

175.86

420

253.96

640

326.48

–140

62.06

250

146.49

640

225.42

1030

298.94

–10

96.09

210

179.53

430

257.38

650

329.64

–130

64.30

260

148.58

650

227.38

1040

300.75

0

100.00

220

183.17

440

260.78

660

332.79

–120

66.54

270

150.67

660

229.33

1050

302.56

10

103.90

230

186.84

450

264.18

–110

68.77

280

152.75

670

231.27

1060

304.37

–100

71.00

290

154.83

680

233.21

1070

306.17

–90

73.22

300

156.91

690

235.15

1080

307.97

–80

75.44

310

158.98

700

237.09

1090

309.77

–70

77.66

320

161.05

710

239.02

1100

311.56

–60

79.86

330

163.12

720

240.95

1110

313.35

–50

82.07

340

165.18

730

242.87

1120

315.14

–40

84.27

350

167.24

740

244.79

1130

316.92

–30

86.47

360

169.30

750

246.71

1140

318.70

–20

88.66

370

171.35

760

248.62

1150

320.47

–10

90.85

380

173.40

770

250.53

1160

322.24

0

93.03

390

175.45

780

252.44

1170

324.01

10

95.21

400

177.49

790

254.34

1180

325.77

20

97.39

410

179.53

800

256.24

1190

327.53

30

99.57

420

181.56

810

258.14

1200

329.29

40

101.74

430

183.59

820

260.03

1210

331.04

50

103.90

440

185.62

830

261.92

1220

332.79

NOTE To convert from °C to °F: [1.8  (°C)] + 32 =°F Example: (1.8 100) + 32 = 212°F To convert from °F to °C: 0.556 [(°F) – 32] = °C Example: 0.556 (212 – 32) = 100°C

9-9


Section 10

Specifications and Reference Data

MODEL 1195 INTEGRAL ORIFICE Ordering Information

Ordering information is available in the ProPlate, Mass ProPlate, and Model 1195 Integral Orifice Product Data Sheet, publication number 00813-0100-4686.

Functional Specifications

Service and Flow Range Liquid, gas, or vapor flow in the approximate ranges shown in Table 10-1. Operating Process Temperature Limits Standard teflon gaskets rated for –40 to 450°F (–40 to 232 °C). Special high temperature Inconel X-750 gaskets available rated for -40 to 850°F (-40 to 454°C). Maximum Working Pressure Body only rating per ANSI Class 600. Flange rating per ANSI B16.5.

Physical Specifications

Materials of Construction Orifice Plate 316 / 316L stainless steel, Hastelloy C-276®, or Monel® 400. Body 316 stainless steel (CF8M), material per ASTM A351. Hastelloy C® (CW12MW), material per ASTM A494.

1195-004AB

Figure 10-1. Model 1195 Integral Orifice.

10-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Flange and Pipe Material (if applicable) 316L SST. Flange pressure limits are per ANSI B16.5 for 316 SST and material per SA182. Flange face finish per ANSI B16.5, 125 to 250 RMS. Pipe meets ASTM A312. Bolts SAE 429 Grade 8 (meets or exceeds ASTM A193 B7 requirements), ASTM A193 Grade B7M, or ASTM A193 Grade B8, Type 304. (Body bolts are supplied in the same material as specified for mounting bolts.) Gaskets/O-rings Glass-filled PTFE. Optional high temperature Inconel X-750. Gaskets and O-rings must be replaced each time the Model 1195 is disassembled for installation or maintenance. Manifold Stainless steel per A479 316SS, Hastelloy C per B575/C-276. Assembly Process Connections Threaded Connections: ½-, 1-, and 1½-in. NPT. Socket-Weld: ò-, 1-, and 1ò-in. Associated Piping: ½-in. SCH40 or 80, 1-in. SCH40 or 80, and 1½-in. SCH80. (Precision bored for greater flow accuracy.) Flanged Pipe: ANSI Class 150, 300, and 600 RF. DIN Flanges: DN15, DN25, DN40. Bore Sizes The bore sizes in Table 10-2 on page 10-3 are standard. Betas listed are for assemblies with piping. Table 10-1. Service and Flow Ranges Liquids Example is Water @ 60°F (15.6°C)

Gases/Vapors Example is Air @ 500 psia (3448 kPa), 68°F (20°C)

Line Size in. (mm)

Plate Type

GPM

I/min

SCFH

m3/hr

½ (15) ½ (15) 1 (25) 1½ (40)

Quadrant Square Square Square

0.001–0.1 0.047–7.0 0.18–41 0.7–95

0.004–0.4 0.15–26.5 0.68–155 2.65–360.0

0.75–300 30–8,800 115–55,000 450–125,000

0.021–8.1 0.9–250 2.9–1,575 11.7–3,650

Standard conditions: 14.696 psia (101 kPa), 60°F (15.6°C).

10-2


Table 10-2. Standard Bore Sizes(1) ½ in. Lines (15 mm)

1 in. Lines (25 mm)

1½ Lines (40 mm)

in.

mm

Beta

in.

mm

Beta

in.

mm

Beta

0.010 0.014 0.020 0.034 0.066 0.109 0.160 0.196 0.260 0.340

0.25 0.36 0.51 0.86 1.68 2.77 4.06 4.98 6.60 8.64

0.015 0.021 0.030 0.051 0.099 0.164 0.241 0.295 0.392 0.512

0.150 0.250 0.345 0.500 0.630 0.800

3.81 6.35 8.76 12.70 16.00 20.32

0.137 0.228 0.314 0.456 0.574 0.729

0.295 0.376 0.512 0.748 1.022 1.184

7.49 9.55 13.00 19.00 25.96 30.07

0.188 0.240 0.327 0.477 0.652 0.756

(1) Special bores are available between beta limits of 0.1 and 0.8. Consult Factory.

Available Pipe Lengths See pipe lengths Table 10-3. Table 10-3. Pipe Lengths. Flanged Total Length (flange face to flange face)

Beveled or Threaded Total Length (pipe end to pipe end)

Line Size

in.

mm

in.

mm

½ in. (15 mm) 1 in. (25 mm) 1 ½ in. (40 mm)

18.2 28.9 40.3

462 734 1023

18.0 28.6 39.9

457 726 1013

NOTE The above dimensions are based on standard model offering. Transmitter Connections 21/8 in. (54 mm) center-to-center. Other transmitter spacing can be accommodated using the optional remote adaptors and customer-supplied impulse piping. DIN 19213 connections are available. Transmitter Fill Model 1195—Transmitter specific; ProPlate—silicone filled (3051CD transmitter); Mass ProPlate—silicone filled (3095 MV Transmitter). Orifice Type Square edge: Orifice bore sizes 0.066 and larger. Quadrant edge: Orifice bore sizes 0.034, 0.020, 0.014, and 0.010. Bodies contain corner tapped pressure ports. Weight The following weights provided in Table 10-4 are approximate:

10-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Table 10-4. Assembly Weights, Body Only. Assembly Weights, Body Only Line Size

Model 1195 Only

ProPlate

lb

kg

lb

kg

½ in. (15 mm.)

4

1.8

17

7.7

1 in. (25 mm.)

6

2.7

19

8.6

1½ in. (40 mm)

8

3.6

21

9.5

Table 10-5. Assembly Weights, With Piping Assembly Weights, With Piping Line Size

Model 1195 Only 150 #

300#

ProPlate 600#

150 #

Mass ProPlate

300#

600#

150 #

300#

600#

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

kg

lb

½ in. (15 mm)

8

3.6

10

4.5

10

4.5

21

9.5

23

10.4

23

10.4

22.2

10.1

24.2

11.0

24.2

1 in. (25 mm)

12

5.4

14

6.4

16

7.3

25

11.3

27

12.2

29

13.2

26.2

11.9

28.2

12.8

30.2

13.7

1½ in. (40 mm)

25

11.3

31

14.1

33

15.0

38

17.2

44

20.0

46

20.9

39.2

17.8

45.2

20.5

47.2

21.4

NJ

11.0

NOTE The above dimensions are based on standard model offering. Torque Values of Standard Bolts Orifice Body Bolting: Carbon steel: 60 ft.-lb (81 N-m), stainless steel: 34-38 ft.-lb (46-52 N-m). Transmitter Bolting: Carbon and stainless steel: 34–38 ft.-lb. (46-52 N-m) 3-Valve Manifold Bolting: Carbon and stainless steel: 34–38 ft.-lb (46-52 N-m). Straight Pipe Requirements Figure 10-3 on page 10-5 lists the recommended lengths of straight pipe for specific flow situations per ISO 5167. Use the appropriate lengths of straight pipe upstream and downstream from the Model 1195 body to minimize the effects of moderate flow disturbances in the line. Piped assemblies incorporate some or all of the recommended lengths. The Mass ProPlate assembly incorporates some or all of the recommended straight pipe required lengths, since upstream and downstream piping sections are standard. The piping section lengths are referenced in Table 10-3. See Figure 10-3 to determine if additional pipe length is required for your given flow situation. Upstream and downstream piping sections are optional with the ProPlate and Model 1195. If the piping sections are selected, see Figure 10-3 to ensure that the appropriate lengths of straight pipe are sufficient for your application. 10-4


Figure 10-3. Pipe Length Requirements for Installation. U

U

D

B) SINGLE 90° BEND

A) REDUCER

U

U

D

D

D) TWO OR MORE 90° BENDS IN DIFFERENT PLANES

C) TWO OR MORE 90° BENDS IN THE SAME PLANES

U

D

D

U

D

F) GLOBE/GATE VALVE FULLY OPEN

E) EXPANDER

The following chart gives the upstream (U) and downstream (D) lengths, in conformance with ISO 5167, required for the above installations. The lengths are given in terms of pipe diameters. For example, for a 1 in. line size with a beta ratio (b) of 0.4 using installation type B above, the straight length of upstream piping required is 14 ⫻1 = 14 in., and downstream 6 ⫻1 = 6 in. On downstream (D outlet side)

On Upstream (U inlet side of the primary device)

Orifice Bore ⫼ Pipe Bore b

A Reducer (2 d to d over a length of 1.5 d to 3 d)

B Single 90° bend or tee (flow from one branch only)

<0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35

5 5 5 5

10 10 10 12

14 14 16 16

0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55

5 5 6 8

14 14 14 16

0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75

9 11 14 22

18 22 28 36

E Expander (0.5 d to d over a length of d to 2 d)

F Globe valve fully open

34 34 34 36

16 16 16 16

18 18 18 18

12 12 12 12

4 4 5 5

18 18 20 22

36 38 40 44

16 17 18 20

20 20 22 24

12 12 12 14

6 6 6 6

26 32 36 42

48 54 62 70

22 25 30 38

26 28 32 36

14 16 20 24

7 7 7 8

C D Two or more Two or more 90° bends in the 90° bends in same plane different planes

G Gate valve All fittings included fully open in this table

10-5

$   $     


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

PROPLATE FLOWMETER Ordering Information

Ordering information is available in the ProPlate, Mass ProPlate, and Model 1195 Integral Orifice Product Data Sheet, publication number 00813-0100-4686.

Functional Specifications

Service (1) Liquid, Gas or Steam service. Pipe Sizes (2) ½ in. (15 mm), 1 in. (25 mm), and 1½ in. (40 mm). Output 4-20mADC, flow rate output. Digital HART protocol superimposed on 4-20mA signal, available to any host that conforms to the HART protocol. Power Supply External power supply required. Standard transmitter (4–20 mA) operates on 10.5-55VDC with no load. 4–20mA Load Limitations Maximum loop resistance is determined by the voltage level of the external power supply, as described in the following flowmeter chart. Max. Loop Resistance = Power Supply Voltage–11.0 0.022

4–20 mA dc

1935

V P K 2  G D R /

Operating Region 0

10.5

35 42.4 V(1) Power Supply Voltage V dc

55

HART protocol communication requires a loop resistance value between 250–1100 ohms, inclusive (1) For CSA approval, power supply must not exceed 42.4 V dc.

Temperature Limits Storage: –50 to 230°F (–46 to 110°C). With Integral Meter: –40 to 185°F (–40 to 85°C). Process: Integral Mount –40 to 450°F (–40 to 232°C). (1) (2)

10-6

Fluid density and Reynolds number corrections should be compensated per DSI Annubar Handbook Equation #2.1–2.5. Consult the factory for line sizes greater than 72 in. Multipoint calibration is available for line sizes between × to 36 in. Consult the factory for calibration ranges in larger line sizes.


Remote Mount –40 to 850°F (–40 to 454°C). Damping Analog output response to a step input change is user selectable from 0 to 36 seconds for one time constant. This software damping is in addition to sensor module response time. Turn-on Time Performance within specification less than two seconds after power is applied. Humidity Limits 0–100% relative humidity.

Performance Specifications

Stability –

0.25% of URL for 5 years.

Time Response (Electronics Only) Dead time (Td): 45 milliseconds (nominal). Time Constant (Tc): 55 milliseconds. Update Rate: 20 times per sec. (minimum). Vibration Effect Less than 0.1% of URL per g when tested from 15 to 2000 Hz in any axis relative to pipe-mounted process conditions. Power Supply Effect Less than 0.005% of calibrated span per volt. RFI Effect 0.1% of span from 20 to 1000 MHz and for field strength up to 30 V/m. Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) –

(0.0188% URL + 0.0938% span).

Spans from 1:1 to 10:1. –

(0.038% URL + 0.188% span).

Spans from 10:1 to 100:1. For Range 1:–(0.18% URL + 0.375% span). Static Pressure Effect Zero error (can be calibrated out at line pressure). –0.1% of URL/1,000 psi (6.9MPa) for line pressures from 0 to 2,000 psi (0 to 13.7MPa). –0.2% of URL/1,000 psi (6.9MPa) for line pressure above 2,000 psi (13.7MPa).

Range 1: +0.25% of URL/1,000 psi (6.9MPa). 10-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Mounting Position Effect Zero shifts up to 2.5” ws (0.62kPa), which can be calibrated out. No span effect.

Physical Specifications

Electrical Considerations ½–14 NPT, PG 13.5, and CM20 conduit. HART interface connections permanently fixed to terminal block. Process-Wetted Parts Sensor 316/316L SST. Integral manifolds 316 SST. Remote Manifolds 316SST or CS. Electronics Vent Valves and Process Flanges 316 SST. Process Isolating Diaphragms 316L SST. O-rings Glass-filled TFE. Integral Manifold O-Rings Teflon. Non-Wetted Parts Electronic Housing Low copper aluminum, NEMA 4x, IP65. Paint Polyurethane. Bolts (Integral Manifold & Electronics Process Flange) 316 SST. Sensor Module Fill Fluid Silicone oil. Cover O-Rings Buna-N. Remote Mounting Bracket All SST. Sensor Mounting (including nuts, bolts and gasket) CS (SS optional).

10-8


Hazardous Locations Certifications Factory Mutual (FM) Approvals (

Explosion Proof for Class I, Division 1, Groups B, C, and D. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class III, Division 1. NEMA 4X. Factory-sealed.

,

Intrinsically safe for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D; Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G; Class III, Division 1 when connected in accordance with Rosemount drawings 03031-1019 and 00275-0081 (when used with HART Communicator Model 275), or 00268-0031 (when used with Rosemount Model 268 Communicator). Temperature Code T4. Non-incendive for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. NEMA 4X. Factory-sealed.

.

Combination of E5 and I5. NEMA 4X. Factory-sealed. FM Approved Entity Parameters(1)

VMax = 40 V dc IMax = 165 mA IMax = 225 mA IMax = 160 mA (Option Code T1) PMax = 1 W CI = 0.01 F (Output Code A) LI = 10 H LI = 1.05 mH (Output Code A with T1)

FM Approved for Class I, II, and III; Division 1 and 2; Groups A–G A–G C–G A–G A–G A–G A–G A–G

(1) When connected in accordance with Rosemount drawings 3031-1019 and 00275-0081 (for use with the HART Communicator Model 275), or 00268-0031 (for use with the Rosemount Model 268 Communicator).

Canadian Standards Association (CSA) &

Explosion Proof for Class I, Division 1, Groups C, and D. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class III, Division 1. Suitable for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. CSA Enclosure-Type 4X. Factory-sealed. Intrinsically safe for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D when connected in accordance with Rosemount drawings 03031-1024. Temperature Code T3C. CSA Enclosure-Type 4X. Factory-sealed.

Output Code A

CSA Approved Barriers(1) (2)

Output Code M

Approvals Pending

30 V, ˜ 330 W ˆ 28 ⍀, ˜ 300 W 25 V, ˜ 200 W ˆ 22 ⍀, ˜ 180 W ˆ 30 V, ˜150 W ˆ

CSA Approved for Class I, Division 1 and 2, Groups A-D

ˆ

Supply Return Supply Return

28V, ˜300 W 10 V, ˜47 W ˆ 30 V, ˜150 W ˆ 10 V, ˜47 W ˆ

C-D A-D

ˆ

C-D

(1) When connected in accordance with Rosemount drawings 00275-0082 and 3031-1024.

10-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate KEMA/CENELEC ('

,'

Explosion Proof. EEx d IIC T5 (Tamb = 70 C); EEx d IIC T6 (Tamb = 40 C). Enclosure Type: IP65. Intrinsically Safe. EEx ia IIC T5 (Tamb = -45 to +40°C); EEx ia IIC T54 (Tamb = -45 to +70°C). Enclosure Type: IP65. Ui = 30V dc. Ii = 200 mA. Pi = 0.9 W. Ci = 0.012 uF. Li = 0.

MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER Ordering Information

Ordering information is available in the ProPlate, Mass ProPlate, and Model 1195 Integral Orifice Product Data Sheet, publication number 00813-0100-4686.

Functional Specifications

Service(1) Liquid, gas and steam service. Pipe Sizes ½ in. (15 mm), 1 in. (25 mm), and 1½ in (40 mm). Absolute/Gage Sensor Ranges Range 3: 0–8 to 0–800 psia (0–55.16 to 0–5515.8 kPaA). Range 4: 0–36.26 to 0–3,626 psia (0–250 to 0–25000kPaA). Range C: 0–8 to 0–800 psig (0–55.16 to 0–5515.8 kPaG). Range D: 0–36.26 to 0–3,626 psig (0–250 to 0–25000kPaG). Temperature Sensor Ranges Integral –40°F to 450°F (–40°C to 232°C). Remote –40°F to 850°F (–40°C to 454°C).

(1)

10-10

In most cases, the Mass ProPlate can measure different fluids with different specific gravity values with no adjustments. High Reynolds number values may cause some shifts in overall accuracy; consult the factory when high Reynolds numbers are used.


Output Two wire 4–20 mA, user-selectable for DP, AP, PT, or mass flow. Digital HART protocol super imposed on 4–20 mA signal, available to any host that conforms to the HART protocol. Power Supply External power supply (or PS120 /PS240 option) required. Operates on 11–55 V DC with no load. Load Limitations Loop resistance is determined by the voltage level of the external power supply, as described in the following diagram: Max. Loop Resistance = Power Supply Voltage–11.0 0.022

4–20 mA dc 2000

V P K 2  G D R /

Operating Region 0 11.0

35

42.4 V(1)

55

Power Supply Voltage V dc HART protocol communication requires a loop resistance value between 250–1100 ohms, inclusive. (1) For CSA approval, power supply must not exceed 42.4 V dc.

Temperature Integral Mount Process: –40°F to 450°F (–40°C to 232°C). Ambient: –40°F to 185°F (–40°C to 85°C). Storage: –50°F to 212°F (–40°C to 100°C). Contact factory for higher temperatures. Damping Response to step input change can be user selectable from 0 to 30 seconds for one time constant. This in addition to sensor response time of 0.2 seconds. Turn-on-Time Performance within specification less than two seconds after power is applied. Humidity Limits 0–100% relative humidity.

10-11


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Performance Specifications

Differential Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) –0.025% of URL + 0.175% of span. Spans from 1:1 to 30:1.

0.035% of URL – 0.125% of span. Spans from 30:1 to 100:1.

–

Static Pressure Effects Zero error = –0.10% of URL per 1,000 psi (6894 kPa). Span error = –0.20% of reading per 1,000 psi (6894 kPa). Stability –

0.1% of URL for 12 months.

Absolute/Gage Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) –

0.05% of URL + 0.175% of span.

Spans from 1:1 to 30:1. –

0.06% of URL-0.125% of span.

Spans from 30:1 to 100:1. Stability –

0.1% of URL for 12 months.

Process Temperature Ambient Temperature Effect Per 50°F (28°C) 0.36°F (0.20°C) for process temperatures from –40 °F to 185°F (– 40°C to 85°C). –(0.64°F (0.36°C) + 0.16% of reading) for process temperatures from 185°F (85°C) to 400°F (204°C).

Physical Specifications

Electrical Considerations ½–14 NPT, PG 13.5, and CM20 conduit. HART interface connections permanently fixed to terminal block. Process-Wetted Parts Sensor 316L SST. Integral Manifolds 316 SST. Remote Manifolds 316 SST or CS. Electronics Vent Valves and Process Flanges 316 SST.

10-12


Process Isolating Diaphragms 316L SST. O-rings Glass-filled TFE. Integral Manifold O-Rings Teflon速. Non-Wetted Parts Electronic Housing Low copper aluminum, NEMA 4x, IP65. Paint Polyurethane. Bolts for Integral Manifold and Electronics Process Flange 316 SST. Sensor Module Fill Fluid Silicone oil. Cover O-Rings Buna-N. Remote Mounting Bracket All SST. Sensor Mounting (including nuts, bolts and gasket) CS (SS optional).

APPROVALS PENDING

Hazardous Locations Certifications Factory Mutual (FM) Approvals $

Explosion Proof for Class I, Division 1, Groups B, C, and D. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class III, Division 1. NEMA 4X. Factory Sealed. Install per Rosemount drawing 03095-1025.

%

Combination of Approval Code A and the following: Intrinsically Safe for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C and D; Class II, Division 2, Groups E, F, and G; Intrinsically safe for Class III, Division 1. Non-incendive for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. Temperature Code T4. Install per Rosemount drawing 03095-1020.

Canadian Standards Association (CSA) &

Explosion Proof for Class I, Division 1, Groups C, and D. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class II, Division 1, Groups E, F, and G. Dust-Ignition Proof for Class III, Division 1. Suitable for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. CSA Enclosure-Type 4X. Factory-sealed. Rosemount Drawings 03095-1024.

10-13


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate '

Combination of Approval Code C and the following:Intrinsically safe for use in Class I, Division 1, Groups A, B, C, and D when connected in accordance with Rosemount Drawings 03095-1021.Temperature Code T3C.

KEMA/CENELEC +

Explosion Proof. EEx d IIC T5 (Tamb = 70°C). EEx d IIC T6 (Tamb = 40°C). Enclosure Type: IP65.

)

Intrinsically safe. EEx ia IIC T5 (Tamb = -45°C to +40°C). EEx ia IIC T4 (Tamb = -45°C to +70°C). Ui = 30V dc Ii = 200 mA Pi = 1.0 W Ci = 0.012 uF Li = 0

Figure 10-4. Mounting Configurations. 2.82 (72)

4.3 (110)

7.07 (180)

1.10 (28) 6.15 (156) 2.81 (71)

4.74 (120) NOTE Dimensions are in inches (millimeters)

10-14

3.54 (90)

6.25 (159)

%   /  $   .  %        


Figure 10-5. Dimensional Drawings of Mass ProPlate Electronics. 5.0 (127) â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14 NPT Conduit Connection (Two Places)

Ă&#x2014;

4.3 (110)

Meter Cover (Optional)

2.15 (55)

0.75 (19) Clearance for Cover Removal

0.75 (19) Clearance for Cover Removal

Transmitter Connections This Side

Transmitter Circuitry This Side Nameplate Drain/Vent Valve

6.4 (163) Ă&#x2014; â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14 NPT on Optional Mounting Adapters. Adapters Can Be Rotated to Give Connection Centers of 2.00 (51), 2.125 (54), or 2.25 (57).

4.20 (107) 4.09 (104)

Certification Label

7.07 (180) 8.17 (208)

Housing Rotation Set Screw $   +  %   *         

NOTE Dimensions are in inches (millimeters)

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;18 NPT on Coplanar Flange for Pressure Connection without the Use of Mounting Adapters

p

10-15


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Figure 10-6. Optional Mounting Bracket and Mounting Configurations. PANEL MOUNTING 2.82 (72)

4.3 (110) 2.81 (71)

/16 ⍝ 11/2 Bolts for Panel Mounting (Not Supplied) 5

7.07 (180)

/8-16 ⍝ 11/4 Bolts for Mounting to Transmitter

3

6.15 (156) 2.81 (71)

3.35 (85) 4.74 (120)

PIPE MOUNTING

2-Inch U-Bolt for Pipe Mounting

$    $   ,          

3.54 (90)

NOTE Dimensions are in inches (millimeters).

10-16

6.25 (159)

%   /  $   .  %           


Figure 10-7. Coplanar Mounting Bolts and Bolting Configurations for Coplanar Flange Description

Qty.

Flange bolts Flange/adapter bolts Manifold/flange bolts

4 4 4

Size 1.75 in. (44 mm) 2.88 in. (73 mm) 2.25 in. (57 mm)

1.75 (44) тл╗ 4

TRANSMITTER WITH FLANGE BOLTS

2.25 (57) тл╗ 4

$   %     

1.75 (44) тл╗ 4

2.88 (73) тл╗ 4

$   (     

TRANSMITTER WITH 3-VALVE MANIFOLD MANIFOLD/FLANGE BOLTS FLANGE ADAPTERS AND FLANGE/ADAPTER BOLTS

$   '         

TRANSMITTER WITH OPTIONAL FLANGE ADAPTERS AND FLANGE/ADAPTER BOLTS

NOTE Dimensions are in inches (millimeters).

10-17


Appendix A PROPLATE FLOWMETER

HART Communicator This appendix provides basic communicator information on the HART Communicator Model 275 when used with a ProPlate Flowmeter. This brief appendix will familiarize you with the HART Communicator but is not meant to replace the HART Communicator product manual. For complete information on the HART Communicator, refer to the HART Communicator Product Manual p/n 00275-8026-0001.

SAFETY MESSAGES

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions can result in death or serious injury. •

Do not remove the flowmeter covers in explosive environments when the circuit is alive.

Both flowmeter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Before connecting a communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or nonincendive field wiring practices.

A-1


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure A-1. HART Communicator Menu Tree for the ProPlate.* 352&(66 9$5,$%/(6

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*“ProPlate” will appear in the upper left of the communicator screen when this menu tree is valid.

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A-2

6

5HY 6:5HY


Table A-1. HART Fast Key Sequences for the ProPlate.

)XQFWLRQ

NOTE A check ( ) indicates the basic configuration parameters. At a minimum, these parameters should be verified as part of the configuration and startup procedures.

4

+$57&RPPXQLFDWRU)DVW.H\6HTXHQFHV

Alarm and Saturation Levels

1, 4, 2, 7

Analog Output Alarm Type

1, 4, 3, 2, 4

Burst Mode Control

1, 4, 3, 3, 3

Burst Operation

1, 4, 3, 3, 3

Clone Data

See ProBar Installation and Operation Manual (00809-0100-4761)

Custom Meter Configuration

1, 3, 7, 2

Custom Meter Value

4 Damping

1, 4, 3, 4, 3

Date

1, 3, 4, 1

Descriptor

1, 3, 4, 2

Digital To Analog Trim (4–20 mA Output)

1, 2, 3, 2, 1

Disable Local Span/Zero Adjustment

1, 4, 4, 1, 7

DP Pressure

1, 1, 4

Field Device Info

1, 4, 4, 1

Flow Pressure

2

1, 3, 6

Full Trim

1, 2, 3, 3

Keypad Input – Rerange

1, 2, 3, 1, 1

Local Zero and Span Control

1, 4, 4,1, 7

Loop Test

1, 2, 2

Lower Sensor Trim

1, 2, 3, 3, 2

Message

1, 3, 4, 3

Meter Options

1, 4, 3, 4

Number Of Requested Preambles

1, 4, 3, 3, 2

Poll Address

1, 4, 3, 3, 1

Poll a Multidropped Flowmeter

Left Arrow, 4, 1, 1

4 Range Values

1, 3, 3

Recall Factory Trim

1, 2, 3, 4

Rerange

1, 2, 3, 1

Scaled D/A Trim (4–20 mA Output)

1, 2, 3, 2, 2

Self Test (Flowmeter)

1, 2, 1, 1

Sensor Info

1, 4, 4, 2

Sensor Temperature

1, 1, 5

Sensor Trim Points

1, 2, 3, 3, 4

Status

1, 2, 1, 2

A-3


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

4 Tag 4 Transfer Function (Setting Output Type)

1, 3, 1 1, 3, 5

Flowmeter Security (Write Protect)

1, 3, 4, 4

4 Units (Primary Variable)

Trim Analog Output

1, 2, 3, 2

Upper Sensor Trim

1, 2, 3, 3, 3

Zero Trim

1, 2, 3, 3, 1

1, 3, 2

CONNECTIONS AND HARDWARE

The HART Communicator Model 275 can interface with a flowmeter from the control room, the instrument site, or any wiring termination point in the loop through the rear connection panel as shown in Figure A-2. Do not make connections to the serial port or NiCad recharger jack in an explosive atmosphere. To communicate, connect the HART Communicator in parallel with the instrument or load resistor. The connections are non-polarized. Before connecting the HART Communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or nonincendive field wiring practices. NOTE The HART Communicator needs a minimum of 250 ohms resistance in the loop to function properly. The HART Communicator is not a measurement device and does not need to be calibrated; it is a communications device through which you can read and adjust the flowmeter configuration information. All variable outputs displayed by the communicator are functions of the flowmeter.

Figure A-2. Rear Connection Panel with Optional NiCad Recharger Pack. /RRS&RQQHFWLRQ3RUWV

6HULDO3RUW

2SWLRQDO1L&DG 5HFKDUJHU-DFN

A-4

% $       


Figure A-3. Bench Hook-up (4–20 mA Flowmeters).

24 V dc Supply RL˜ 250

V

%   *         

Current Meter

Figure A-4. Field Hook-up (4–20 mA Flowmeters). CAUTION Do not use inductive-based transient protectors.

RL˜ 250 V

Current Meter

Power Supply

%   +         

Signal point may be grounded at any point or left ungrounded.

A-5


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

COMMUNICATOR KEYS

The keys of the HART Commuincator include action, function, alphanumeric, and shift keys

Figure A-5. Model 275 HART Communicator.

Function Keys

Action Keys

Alphanumeric Keys

Shift Keys % $       

Action Keys As shown in Figure A-5, the action keys are the six blue, white, and black keys located above the alphanumeric keys. The function of each key is described as follows: ON/OFF Key Use this key to power the HART Communicator. When the communicator is turned on, it searches for a flowmeter on the 4–20 mA loop. If a device is not found, the communicator displays the message, “No Device Found. Press OK.” If a HART-compatible device is found, the communicator displays the Online Menu with device ID and tag. Directional Keys Use these keys to move the cursor up, down, left, or right. The right arrow key also selects menu options, and the left arrow key returns to the previous menu.

A-6


HOT Key Use this key to quickly access important, user-selectable options when connected to a HART-compatible device. Pressing the Hot Key turns the HART Communicator on and displays the Hot Key Menu. See Customizing the Hot Key Menu in the HART Communicator manual for more information. F3

Function Keys Use the four software-defined function keys, located below the LCD, to perform software functions. On any given menu, the label appearing above a function key indicates the function of that key for the current menu. As you move among menus, different function key labels appear over the four keys. For example, in menus providing access to on-line help, the +(/3 label may appear above the F1 key. In menus providing access to the Online Menu, the +20(label may appear above the F3 key. Simply press the key to activate the function. See your HART Communicator manual for details on specific function key definitions. Alphanumeric and Shift Keys The alphanumeric keys (Figure A-6) perform two functions: the fast selection of menu options and data entry. Figure A-6. HART Communicator Alphanumeric and Shift Keys.

$        

Data Entry Some menus require data entry. Use the alphanumeric and shift keys to enter all alphanumeric information into the HART Communicator. If you press an alphanumeric key alone from within an edit menu, the bold character in the center of the key appears. These large characters include the numbers zero through nine, the decimal point (.), and the dash symbol (â&#x20AC;&#x201D;). To enter an alphabetic character, first press the shift key that corresponds to the position of the letter you want on the alphanumeric key. Then press the alphanumeric key. For example, to enter the letter R, first press the right shift key, then the â&#x20AC;&#x153;6â&#x20AC;? key (see Figure A-7). Do not press these keys simultaneously, but one after the other. A-7


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure A-7. Data Entry Key Sequence. $       $        

Fast Key Sequences

HART fast key sequences provide quick on-line access to flowmeter variables and functions. Instead of stepping your way through the menu structure using the action keys, you can press a HART fast key sequence to move from the Online Menu to the desired variable or function. On-screen instructions guide you through the rest of the screens. Fast Key Sequence Conventions The fast key sequences for the Model 275 use the following conventions for their identification: WKURXJKâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Refer to the keys located directly below the dedicated keypad. /HIW$ UURZ

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Refers to the left arrow directional key.

Fast Key Sequence Example HART fast key sequences are made up of the series of numbers corresponding to the individual options in each step of the menu structure. For example, from the Online Menu you can change the Date. Following the menu structure, press 1 to reach Device Setup, press 3 for Basic Setup, press 4 for Device Info, press 5 for Date. The corresponding HART fast key sequence is 1,3,4,5. HART fast keys are operational only from the Online Menu. If you use them consistently, you will need to return to the Online Menu by pressing +20((F3) when it is available. If you do not start at the Online Menu, the HART fast key sequences will not function properly. Use Table A-1, an alphabetical listing of every on-line function, to find the corresponding HART fast key sequences. These codes are applicable only to ProPlate flowmeters and the HART Communicator.

MENUS AND FUNCTIONS

The HART Communicator is a menu driven system. Each screen provides a menu of options that can be selected as outlined above, or provides direction for input of data, warnings, messages, or other instructions.

Main Menu

When the HART Communicator is turned on, one of two menus will appear. If the HART Communicator is connected to an operating loop, the communicator will find the device and display the Online Menu (see below). If it is not connected to a loop, the communicator will indicate that no device was found. When you press OK (F4), it will display the Main menu.

A-8


The Main menu provides the following options: • Offline–The Offline option provides access to offline configuration data and simulation functions. • Online–The Online option checks for a device and if it finds one, brings up the Online Menu. • Transfer–The Transfer option provides access to options for transferring data either from the HART Communicator (memory) to the flowmeter (device) or vice versa. Transfer is used to move off-line data from the HART Communicator to the flowmeter, or to retrieve data from a flowmeter for off-line revision. NOTE Online communication with the flowmeter automatically loads the current flowmeter data to the HART Communicator. Changes in on-line data are made active by pressing SEND (F2). The transfer function is used only for off-line data retrieval and sending. • Frequency Device–The Frequency Device option displays the frequency output and corresponding pressure output of current-to-pressure flowmeters. • Utility–The Utility option provides access to the contrast control for the HART Communicator LCD screen and to the autopoll setting used in multidrop applications. Once selecting a Main menu option, the HART Communicator provides the information you need to complete the operation. If further details are required, consult the HART Communicator manual.

Online Menu

The Online Menu can be selected from the Main menu as outlined above, or it may appear automatically if the HART Communicator is connected to an active loop and can detect an operating flowmeter. NOTE The Main menu can be accessed from the Online Menu. Press the left arrow action key to deactivate the on-line communication with the flowmeter and to activate the Main menu options. When configuration variables are reset in the on-line mode, the new settings are not activated until the data is sent to the flowmeter. Press SEND (F2) when it is activated to update the process variables of the flowmeter. On-line mode is used for direct evaluation of a particular meter, re-configuration, changing parameters, maintenance, and other functions.

Diagnostic Messages

Table A-2 contains a list of messages used by the HART Communicator (HC) and their corresponding descriptions. Variable parameters within the text of a message are indicated with <variable parameter>.

A-9


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Reference to the name of another message is identified by [another message].

Table A-2. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

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1k snsr EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the sensor module

1k snsr EEPROM error-user-no out ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the following parameters: remote seal isolator, remote seal fill fluid, flange material, o-ring material, flowmeter type, remote seal type, flange type, meter type, number of remote seals.

1k snsr EEPROM error-user ON

Perform a full trim to recalibrate the flowmeter.

4k micro EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the electronics board.

4k micro EEPROM error-user-no out ON

Use the hart communicator to reset the message field.

4k micro EEPROM error-user ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the following parameters: units, range values, damping, analog output, transfer function, tag, scaled meter values. Perform a d/a trim to ensure that the error is corrected.

4k snsr EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the sensor module.

4k snsr EEPROM error-user ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the temperature units and the calibration type.

Add item for ALL device types or only for this ONE device type.

Asks the user whether the hot key item being added should be added for all device types or only for the type of device that is connected.

Command Not Implemented

The connected device does not support this function.

Communication Error

The communicator and the device are not communicating correctly. Check all connections between the communicator and the device and resend the information.

Configuration memory not compatible with connected device

The configuration stored in memory is incompatible with the device to which a transfer has been requested.

CPU board not initialized ON

The electronics board is not initialized. Replace the electronics board

CPU EEPROM write failure ON

Message sent to electronics board from HART signal failed. Replace the electronics board.

Device Busy

The connected device is busy performing another task.

Device Disconnected

The device failed to respond to a command. Check all connections between the communicator and the device and resend the command.

Device write protected

Device is in write-protect mode. Data can not be written.

Device write protected. Do you still want to shut off?

Device is in write-protect mode. Press YES to turn the HART communicator off and lose the unsent data.

Display value of variable on hotkey menu?

Asks whether the value of the variable should be displayed adjacent to its label on the hotkey menu if the item being added to the hotkey menu is a variable.

Download data from configuration memory to device

Press the SEND softkey to transfer information from the communicator memory to the device.

Exceed field width

Indicates that the field width for the current arithmetic variable exceeds the device-specified description edit format.

Exceed precision

Indicates that the precision for the current arithmetic variable exceeds the device-specified description edit format.

Ignore next 50 occurrences of status?

Select YES to ignore the next 50 occurrences of device status, or select no to display every occurrence.

Illegal character

An invalid character for the variable type was entered.

Illegal date

The day portion of the date is invalid.

A-10


Table A-2. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

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Illegal month

The month portion of the date is invalid.

Illegal year

The year portion of the date is invalid.

Incompatible CPU board and module ON

Upgrade the electronics board or the sensor module to the current revision.

Incomplete exponent

The exponent of a scientific notation floating point variable is incomplete.

Incomplete field

The value entered is not complete for the variable type.

Looking for a device

Polling for multidropped devices at addresses 1–15.

Local buttons operator error ON

Illegal pressure applied during zero or span operation. Repeat the process after verifying the correct pressures.

Mark as read only variable on hotkey menu?

Asks whether the user should be allowed to edit the variable from the hotkey menu if the item being added to the hotkey menu is a variable.

Module EEPROM write failure ON

Message sent to the module from the HART signal failed. Replace the sensor module.

No device configuration in configuration memory

There is no configuration saved in memory available to re-configure off-line or transfer to a device.

No Device Found

Poll of address zero fails to find a device, or poll of all addresses fails to find a device if auto-poll is enabled.

No hotkey menu available for this device.

There is no menu named “hotkey” defined in the device description for this device.

No pressure updates ON

No pressure updates being received from the sensor module. Verify that the sensor module ribbon cable is attached correctly. Or replace the sensor module.

No offline devices available.

There are no device descriptions available to be used to configure a device offline.

No simulation devices available.

There are no device descriptions available to simulate a device.

No temperature updates ON

No temperature updates being received from the sensor module. Verify that the sensor module ribbon cable is attached correctly. Or replace the sensor module.

No UPLOAD_VARIABLES in ddl for this device

There is no menu named “upload_variables” defined in the device description for this device. This menu is required for offline configuration.

No Valid Items

The selected menu or edit display contains no valid items.

OFF KEY DISABLED

Appears when the user attempts to turn the HC off before sending modified data or before completing a method.

Online device disconnected with unsent data. RETRY or OK to lose data.

There is unsent data for a previously connected device. Press RETRY to send data, or press OK to disconnect and lose unsent data.

Out of memory for hotkey configuration. Delete unnecessary items.

There is no more memory available to store additional hotkey items. Unnecessary items should be deleted to make space available.

Overwrite existing configuration memory

Requests permission to overwrite existing configuration either by a device-to-memory transfer or by an offline configuration. User answers using the softkeys.

Press OK...

Press the OK softkey. This message usually appears after an error message from the application or as a result of HART communications.

Restore device value?

The edited value that was sent to a device was not properly implemented. Restoring the device value returns the variable to its original value.

ROM checksum error ON

Checksum of flowmeter software has detected a fault. Replace the electronics board.

Save data from device to configuration memory

Prompts user to press SAVE softkey to initiate a device-to-memory transfer.

Saving data to configuration memory.

Data is being transferred from a device to configuration memory.

Sending data to device.

Data is being transferred from configuration memory to a device.

Sensor board not initialized ON

The sensor module electronics board is not initialized. Replace the sensor module.

There are write only variables which have not been edited. Please edit them.

There are write-only variables which have not been set by the user. These variables should be set or invalid values may be sent to the device.

There is unsent data. Send it before shutting off?

Press YES to send unsent data and turn the HC off. Press NO to turn the HC off and lose the unsent data.

A-11


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Table A-2. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

Too few data bytes received

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Command returns fewer data bytes than expected as determined by the device description.

Flowmeter Fault

Device returns a command response indicating a fault with the connected device.

Units for <variable label> has changed. Unit must be sent before editing, or invalid data will be sent.

The engineering units for this variable have been edited. Send engineering units to the device before editing this variable.

Unsent data to online device. SEND or LOSE data

There is unsent data for a previously connected device which must be sent or thrown away before connecting to another device.

Upgrade 275 software to access XMTR function. Continue with old description?

The communicator does not contain the most recent ProPlate Device Descriptors (DDs). Select YES to communicate using the existing DDs. Select NO to abort communication.

Use up/down arrows to change contrast. Press DONE when done.

Gives direction to change the contrast of the HC display.

Value out of range

The user-entered value is either not within the range for the given type and size of variable or not within the min/max specified by the device.

<message> occurred reading/writing <variable label>

Either a read/write command indicates too few data bytes received, flowmeter fault, invalid response code, invalid response command, invalid reply data field, or failed pre- or post-read method; or a response code of any class other than SUCCESS is returned reading a particular variable.

<variable label> has an unknown value. Unit must be sent before editing, or invalid data will be sent.

A variable related to this variable has been edited. Send related variable to the device before editing this variable.

MASS PROPLATE FLOWMETER

This section provides basic communicator information on the HART Communicator Model 275 when used with a Mass ProPlate Flowmeter. This brief appendix will familiarize you with the HART Communicator but is not meant to replace the HART Communicator product manual. For complete information on the HART Communicator, refer to the HART Communicator Product Manual p/n 00275-8026-0001. NOTE You must upgrade the software in your HART Communicator in order to take advantage of the additional features of the 3095 Multivariable Transmitter. If you initiate communication with a Mass ProPlate using a Communicator that has a previous version of the transmitter Device Descriptors (DDs), the communicator will display the following message: NOTICE: Upgrade 275 software to access XMTR function. Continue with old description? If you select YES, the communicator will communicate properly with the flowmeter using the existing 3095 MV DDs. However, software features added since the revision of the DDs in the communicator will not be accessible. If you select NO, the communicator will default to a generic flowmeter functionality. Contact your nearest Rosemount Service Center or Sales Representative to upgrade your communicator.

A-12


SAFETY MESSAGES

Procedures and instructions in this section may require special precautions to ensure the safety of the personnel performing the operations. Information that raises potential safety issues is indicated by a warning symbol ( ). Refer to the following safety messages before performing an operation preceded by this symbol.

Explosions can result in death or serious injury. •

Do not remove the flowmeter covers in explosive environments when the circuit is alive.

Both flowmeter covers must be fully engaged to meet explosion-proof requirements.

Before connecting a communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or nonincendive field wiring practices.

A-13


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure A-8. HART Communicator Menu Tree for the Mass ProPlate 352&(66 9$5,$%/(6

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A-14


NOTE A check ( ) indicates the basic configuration parameters. At a minimum, these parameters should be verified as part of the configuration and startup procedures.

4

CONNECTIONS AND HARDWARE

The HART Communicator Model 275 can interface with a flowmeter from the control room, the instrument site, or any wiring termination point in the loop through the rear connection panel as shown in Figure A-2. Do not make connections to the serial port or NiCad recharger jack in an explosive atmosphere. To communicate, connect the HART Communicator in parallel with the instrument or load resistor. The connections are non-polarized. Before connecting the HART Communicator in an explosive atmosphere, make sure the instruments in the loop are installed in accordance with intrinsically safe or nonincendive field wiring practices. NOTE The HART Communicator needs a minimum of 250 ohms resistance in the loop to function properly. The HART Communicator is not a measurement device and does not need to be calibrated; it is a communications device through which you can read and adjust the flowmeter configuration information. All variable outputs displayed by the communicator are functions of the flowmeter.

Figure A-9. Rear Connection Panel with Optional NiCad Recharger Pack. /RRS&RQQHFWLRQ3RUWV

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A-15


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Table A-3. HART Fast Key Sequences for the Mass ProPlate. +$57 )XQFWLRQ

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% rnge

1, 1, 2

GP Sens Trim

% rnge

1, 1, 5, 1, 3

GP Units

1, 2, 2, 1, 3 1, 3, 2, 4

4V is

1, 1, 5, 4, 1

Gage (GP)

1, 1, 4, 4

AO Alrm typ

1, 4, 1, 1, 1

Hardware rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 4

AO1

1, 1, 3

Isoltr matl

1, 3, 5, 4

AO1

3

Loop test

1, 2, 1, 1

AP Damping

1, 4, 2, 5, 2

Manufacturer

1, 3, 4, 6

AP Sens Trim

1, 2, 2, 1, 2

Message

1, 3, 4, 3

AP Units

1, 3, 2, 2

Model

1, 3, 4, 7

Absolute (AP)

1, 1, 4, 2

Num remote seal

1, 3, 5, 13

Atm Press Cnfg

1, 4, 2, 3

Num req preams

1, 4, 1, 2, 2

Burst mode

1, 4, 1, 2, 4, 2

Num resp preams

1, 4, 1, 2, 3

Burst option

1, 4, 1, 2, 4, 1

O ring matl

1, 3, 5, 9

Change PV Assgn

1, 1, 5, 1, 5

PV is

1, 1, 5, 1, 1

Change SV Assgn

1, 1, 5, 2, 3

Poll addr

1, 4, 1, 2, 1

Change TV Assgn

1, 1, 5, 3, 3

Change 4V Assgn

1, 1, 5, 4, 3

Process temp unit 3URFHVVWHPS

1, 3, 2, 3 1, 1, 4, 3

D/A trim

1, 2, 2, 2, 1

RS fill fluid

1, 3, 5, 11

DP LRV

4

RS isoltr matl

1, 3, 5, 12

DP Sens Trim

1, 2, 2, 1, 1

RS type

1, 3, 5, 10

DP Snsr Range

1, 3, 5, 1

RTD Config

1, 4, 2, 2

DP URV

5

Range values

1, 3, 3

DP unit

1, 3, 2, 1

Reset

1, 2, 1, 3

Date

1, 3, 4, 4

SP Snsr Range

1, 3, 5, 2

Descriptor

1, 3, 4, 2

SP Type

1, 3, 5, 3

Diff pres damp

1, 4, 2, 4

SV is

1, 1, 5, 2, 1

Diff pres

1, 1, 1

Scaled D/A trim

1, 2, 2, 2, 2

Diff pres

2

Snsr module hw rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 6

Drain vent matl

1, 3, 5, 8

Snsr module sw rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 5

Factory Trim

1, 2, 2, 2, 3

Software rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 3

Fill fluid

1, 3, 5, 5

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1, 6

Final asmbly num

1, 3, 4, 5

TV is

1, 1, 5, 3, 1

Flange type

1, 3, 5, 7

Tag

1, 3, 1

Fld dev rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 2

Temp Sens Trim

1, 2, 2, 1, 4

Flnge matl

1, 3, 5, 6

Temp damp

1, 4, 2, 5, 3

Flo rate

1, 1, 4, 5

Universal rev

1, 3, 4, 9, 1

Flow Units

1, 3, 2, 5

View status

1, 2, 1, 2

GP Damping

1, 4, 2, 5, 4

A-16

Write protect

1, 3, 4, 8

Xmtr Var Slot Assn

1, 4, 1, 2, 4, 3


Figure A-10. Bench Hook-up (4–20 mA Flowmeters).

24 V dc Supply RL˜ 250

V

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Current Meter

Figure A-11. Field Hook-up (4–20 mA Flowmeters). CAUTION Do not use inductive-based transient protectors.

RL˜ 250 V Current Meter

Power Supply

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Signal point may be grounded at any point or left ungrounded.

COMMUNICATOR KEYS

The keys of the HART Commuincator include action, function, alphanumeric, and shift keys

A-17


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Figure A-12. Model 275 HART Communicator.

Function Keys

Action Keys

Alphanumeric Keys

Shift Keys % $       

Action Keys

As shown in Figure A-5, the action keys are the six blue, white, and black keys located above the alphanumeric keys. The function of each key is described as follows:

ON/OFF Key Use this key to power the HART Communicator. When the communicator is turned on, it searches for a flowmeter on the 4–20 mA loop. If a device is not found, the communicator displays the message, “No Device Found. Press OK.” If a HART-compatible device is found, the communicator displays the Online Menu with device ID and tag.

Directional Keys Use these keys to move the cursor up, down, left, or right. The right arrow key also selects menu options, and the left arrow key returns to the previous menu.

HOT Key Use this key to quickly access important, user-selectable options whenconnected to a HART-compatible device. Pressing the Hot Key turnsthe HART Communicator on and displays the Hot Key Menu. See Customizing the Hot Key Menu in the HART Communicator manual for more information. A-18


Function Keys F3

Alphanumeric and Shift Keys

Use the four software-defined function keys, located below the LCD, to perform software functions. On any given menu, the label appearing above a function key indicates the function of that key for the current menu. As you move among menus, different function key labels appear over the four keys. For example, in menus providing access to on-line help, the +(/3 label may appear above the F1 key. In menus providing access to the Online Menu, the +20(label may appear above the F3 key. Simply press the key to activate the function. See your HART Communicator manual for details on specific function key definitions. The alphanumeric keys (Figure A-6) perform two functions: the fast selection of menu options and data entry.

Figure A-13. HART Communicator Alphanumeric and Shift Keys.

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Data Entry Some menus require data entry. Use the alphanumeric and shift keys to enter all alphanumeric information into the HART Communicator. If you press an alphanumeric key alone from within an edit menu, the bold character in the center of the key appears. These large characters include the numbers zero through nine, the decimal point (.), and the dash symbol (â&#x20AC;&#x201C;). To enter an alphabetic character, first press the shift key that corresponds to the position of the letter you want on the alphanumeric key. Then press the alphanumeric key. For example, to enter the letter R, first press the right shift key, then the â&#x20AC;&#x153;6â&#x20AC;? key (see Figure A-7). Do not press these keys simultaneously, but one after the other. Figure A-14. Data Entry Key Sequence

$       $        

A-19


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate

Fast Key Sequences

HART fast key sequences provide quick on-line access to flowmeter variables and functions. Instead of stepping your way through the menu structure using the action keys, you can press a HART fast key sequence to move from the Online Menu to the desired variable or function. On-screen instructions guide you through the rest of the screens. Fast Key Sequence Conventions The fast key sequences for the Model 275 use the following conventions for their identification: WKURXJKâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Refer to the keys located directly below the dedicated keypad. /HIW$ UURZ

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Refers to the left arrow directional key.

Fast Key Sequence Example HART fast key sequences are made up of the series of numbers corresponding to the individual options in each step of the menu structure. For example, from the Online Menu you can change the Date. Following the menu structure, press 1 to reach Device Setup, press 3 for Basic Setup, press 4 for Device Info, press 5 for Date. The corresponding HART fast key sequence is 1,3,4,5. HART fast keys are operational only from the Online Menu. If you use them consistently, you will need to return to the Online Menu by pressing +20((F3) when it is available. If you do not start at the Online Menu, the HART fast key sequences will not function properly. Use Table A-1, an alphabetical listing of every on-line function, to find the corresponding HART fast key sequences. These codes are applicable only to Mass ProPlate flowmeters and the HART Communicator.

MENUS AND FUNCTIONS

The HART Communicator is a menu driven system. Each screen provides a menu of options that can be selected as outlined above, or provides direction for input of data, warnings, messages, or other instructions.

Main Menu

When the HART Communicator is turned on, one of two menus will appear. If the HART Communicator is connected to an operating loop, the communicator will find the device and display the Online Menu (see below). If it is not connected to a loop, the communicator will indicate that no device was found. When you press OK (F4), it will display the Main menu.

A-20


The Main menu provides the following options: • Offline–The Offline option provides access to offline configuration data and simulation functions. • Online–The Online option checks for a device and if it finds one, brings up the Online Menu. • Transfer–The Transfer option provides access to options for transferring data either from the HART Communicator (memory) to the flowmeter (device) or vice versa. Transfer is used to move off-line data from the HART Communicator to the flowmeter, or to retrieve data from a flowmeter for off-line revision. NOTE Online communication with the flowmeter automatically loads the current flowmeter data to the HART Communicator. Changes in on-line data are made active by pressing SEND (F2). The transfer function is used only for off-line data retrieval and sending. • Frequency Device–The Frequency Device option displays the frequency output and corresponding pressure output of current-to-pressure flowmeters. • Utility–The Utility option provides access to the contrast control for the HART Communicator LCD screen and to the autopoll setting used in multidrop applications. Once selecting a Main menu option, the HART Communicator provides the information you need to complete the operation. If further details are required, consult the HART Communicator manual.

Online Menu

The Online Menu can be selected from the Main menu as outlined above, or it may appear automatically if the HART Communicator is connected to an active loop and can detect an operating flowmeter. NOTE The Main menu can be accessed from the Online Menu. Press the left arrow action key to deactivate the on-line communication with the flowmeter and to activate the Main menu options. When configuration variables are reset in the on-line mode, the new settings are not activated until the data is sent to the flowmeter. Press SEND (F2) when it is activated to update the process variables of the flowmeter. On-line mode is used for direct evaluation of a particular meter, re-configuration, changing parameters, maintenance, and other functions.

Diagnostic Messages

Table A-4 contains a list of messages used by the HART Communicator (HC) and their corresponding descriptions. Variable parameters within the text of a message are indicated with <variable parameter>.

A-21


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Reference to the name of another message is identified by [another message].

Table A-4. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

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1k snsr EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the sensor module

1k snsr EEPROM error-user-no out ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the following parameters: remote seal isolator, remote seal fill fluid, flange material, o-ring material, flowmeter type, remote seal type, flange type, meter type, number of remote seals.

1k snsr EEPROM error-user ON

Perform a full trim to recalibrate the flowmeter.

4k micro EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the electronics board.

4k micro EEPROM error-user-no out ON

Use the hart communicator to reset the message field.

4k micro EEPROM error-user ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the following parameters: units, range values, damping, analog output, transfer function, tag, scaled meter values. Perform a d/a trim to ensure that the error is corrected.

4k snsr EEPROM error-factory ON

Replace the sensor module.

4k snsr EEPROM error-user ON

Use the HART communicator to reset the temperature units and the calibration type.

Add item for ALL device types or only for this ONE device type.

Asks the user whether the hot key item being added should be added for all device types or only for the type of device that is connected.

Command Not Implemented

The connected device does not support this function.

Communication Error

The communicator and the device are not communicating correctly. Check all connections between the communicator and the device and resend the information.

Configuration memory not compatible with connected device

The configuration stored in memory is incompatible with the device to which a transfer has been requested.

CPU board not initialized ON

The electronics board is not initialized. Replace the electronics board

CPU EEPROM write failure ON

Message sent to electronics board from HART signal failed. Replace the electronics board.

Device Busy

The connected device is busy performing another task.

Device Disconnected

The device failed to respond to a command. Check all connections between the communicator and the device and resend the command.

Device write protected

Device is in write-protect mode. Data can not be written.

Device write protected. Do you still want to shut off?

Device is in write-protect mode. Press YES to turn the HART communicator off and lose the unsent data.

Display value of variable on hotkey menu?

Asks whether the value of the variable should be displayed adjacent to its label on the hotkey menu if the item being added to the hotkey menu is a variable.

Download data from configuration memory to device

Press the SEND softkey to transfer information from the communicator memory to the device.

Exceed field width

Indicates that the field width for the current arithmetic variable exceeds the device-specified description edit format.

Exceed precision

Indicates that the precision for the current arithmetic variable exceeds the device-specified description edit format.

Ignore next 50 occurrences of status?

Select YES to ignore the next 50 occurrences of device status, or select no to display every occurrence.

Illegal character

An invalid character for the variable type was entered.

Illegal date

The day portion of the date is invalid.

A-22


Table A-4. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

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Illegal month

The month portion of the date is invalid.

Illegal year

The year portion of the date is invalid.

Incompatible CPU board and module ON

Upgrade the electronics board or the sensor module to the current revision.

Incomplete exponent

The exponent of a scientific notation floating point variable is incomplete.

Incomplete field

The value entered is not complete for the variable type.

Looking for a device

Polling for multidropped devices at addresses 1–15.

Local buttons operator error ON

Illegal pressure applied during zero or span operation. Repeat the process after verifying the correct pressures.

Mark as read only variable on hotkey menu?

Asks whether the user should be allowed to edit the variable from the hotkey menu if the item being added to the hotkey menu is a variable.

Module EEPROM write failure ON

Message sent to the module from the HART signal failed. Replace the sensor module.

No device configuration in configuration memory

There is no configuration saved in memory available to re-configure off-line or transfer to a device.

No Device Found

Poll of address zero fails to find a device, or poll of all addresses fails to find a device if auto-poll is enabled.

No hotkey menu available for this device.

There is no menu named “hotkey” defined in the device description for this device.

No pressure updates ON

No pressure updates being received from the sensor module. Verify that the sensor module ribbon cable is attached correctly. Or replace the sensor module.

No offline devices available.

There are no device descriptions available to be used to configure a device offline.

No simulation devices available.

There are no device descriptions available to simulate a device.

No temperature updates ON

No temperature updates being received from the sensor module. Verify that the sensor module ribbon cable is attached correctly. Or replace the sensor module.

No UPLOAD_VARIABLES in ddl for this device

There is no menu named “upload_variables” defined in the device description for this device. This menu is required for offline configuration.

No Valid Items

The selected menu or edit display contains no valid items.

OFF KEY DISABLED

Appears when the user attempts to turn the HC off before sending modified data or before completing a method.

Online device disconnected with unsent data. RETRY or OK to lose data.

There is unsent data for a previously connected device. Press RETRY to send data, or press OK to disconnect and lose unsent data.

Out of memory for hotkey configuration. Delete unnecessary items.

There is no more memory available to store additional hotkey items. Unnecessary items should be deleted to make space available.

Overwrite existing configuration memory

Requests permission to overwrite existing configuration either by a device-to-memory transfer or by an offline configuration. User answers using the softkeys.

Press OK...

Press the OK softkey. This message usually appears after an error message from the application or as a result of HART communications.

Restore device value?

The edited value that was sent to a device was not properly implemented. Restoring the device value returns the variable to its original value.

ROM checksum error ON

Checksum of flowmeter software has detected a fault. Replace the electronics board.

Save data from device to configuration memory

Prompts user to press SAVE softkey to initiate a device-to-memory transfer.

Saving data to configuration memory.

Data is being transferred from a device to configuration memory.

Sending data to device.

Data is being transferred from configuration memory to a device.

Sensor board not initialized ON

The sensor module electronics board is not initialized. Replace the sensor module.

There are write only variables which have not been edited. Please edit them.

There are write-only variables which have not been set by the user. These variables should be set or invalid values may be sent to the device.

A-23


Rosemount Model 1195/ProPlate/Mass ProPlate Table A-4. Diagnostic Messages 0HVVDJH

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There is unsent data. Send it before shutting off?

Press YES to send unsent data and turn the HC off. Press NO to turn the HC off and lose the unsent data.

Too few data bytes received

Command returns fewer data bytes than expected as determined by the device description.

Flowmeter Fault

Device returns a command response indicating a fault with the connected device.

Units for <variable label> has changed. Unit must be sent before editing, or invalid data will be sent.

The engineering units for this variable have been edited. Send engineering units to the device before editing this variable.

Unsent data to online device. SEND or LOSE data

There is unsent data for a previously connected device which must be sent or thrown away before connecting to another device.

Upgrade 275 software to access XMTR function. Continue with old description?

The communicator does not contain the most recent Mass ProPlate Device Descriptors (DDs). Select YES to communicate using the existing DDs. Select NO to abort communication.

Use up/down arrows to change contrast. Press DONE when done.

Gives direction to change the contrast of the HC display.

Value out of range

The user-entered value is either not within the range for the given type and size of variable or not within the min/max specified by the device.

<message> occurred reading/writing <variable label>

Either a read/write command indicates too few data bytes received, flowmeter fault, invalid response code, invalid response command, invalid reply data field, or failed pre- or post-read method; or a response code of any class other than SUCCESS is returned reading a particular variable.

<variable label> has an unknown value. Unit must be sent before editing, or invalid data will be sent.

A variable related to this variable has been edited. Send related variable to the device before editing this variable.

A-24


Appendix B

Process Configuration Data Sheets A Process Configuration Data Sheet, such as the ones shown in this appendix, list important physical specifications about the process and the Model 1195, ProPlate, and Mass ProPlate. This data must be provided on this form when the optional calculation is specified with Option Code B in the 1195 Model number. The following pages may be copied and completed for data submittal, or forms are available from your local Rosemount office.

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B-12


Appendix C CALCULATION DATA SHEETS

Calculation Data Sheets A detailed sizing calculation may be done by sending a completed Process Configuration Data Sheet to Rosemount Inc. (see Appendix B). The following Calculation Data Sheet will be generated and shipped directly to the customer. 526(02817,1& ,17(*5$/25,),&($66(0%/< &$/&8/$7,21'$7$6+((7 *(1(5$/'$7$ &XVWRPHUV

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C-1


Appendix D APPROVALS PENDING

Approval Drawings Index of Factory Mutual Explosion-Proof Installation for Models 3095MV (Drawing Number 03095-1025, Rev G) Index of intrinsically safe Factory Mutual barrier systems and entity parameters for Models 3095MV(Drawing Numbers 03095-1020, Rev D) Index of C.S.A. Explosion-Proof Installation for Models 3095MVExplosion-Proof Installation Drawing, (Drawing Number 03095-1024, Rev D) Index of intrinsically safe C.S.A. barrier systems for Models 3095MV(Drawing Number 03095-1021, Rev C)

D-1


Appendix E

Spare Parts

Plate O-Ring Kits 01195-0036-0031 01195-0036-0032 01195-0036-0033 01195-0036-0040 01195-0036-0041 01195-0036-0042

Material

Size

Teflon -400F to 4500F (2320C) Teflon -400F to 4500F (2320C) Teflon -400F to 4500F (2320C) Inconel -1480F to 8500F (4540C) Inconel - 480F to 8500F (4540C) Inconel -1480F to 8500F (4540C)

½ in. (15 mm) 1 in. (25 mm) 1½ in (40 mm) ½ in.(15 mm) 1 in. (25 mm) 1½ in. (40 mm) Size

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0

0

Teflon / RF Flange up to 300 F (149 F) Teflon / Din Flange up to 3000F (1490F) Inconel / RF Flanges up to 8500F (4540C)

All All All

Material

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01195-0206-0001

7/16-20, CS, SAE J429 Gr 8

All

01195-0206-0002

7/16-20, SS, A193 Gr B8

All

01195-0206-0003

7/16-20, CS, A193 Gr B7M

All Material

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001195-0036-0022

SS Adapter, CS bolts & nuts

All

001195-0036-0022G4 9

SS Adapter, CS bolts & nuts, high temp

All

001195-0036-0023

SS Adapter, CS bolts & nuts

All

001195-0036-0023G4 9

SS Adapter, CS bolts & nuts, high temp

All

001195-0036-0024

SS Adapter, CS bolts & nuts

All

57'6SDUH3DUWV

00079-0325-0004 24995-3.35 24995-3.6 24995-3.9

Description

Size

Head, flat cover, FM approved

All 0

0

RTD, 3.35” x .093” dia., -40 to 900 F (-40 to -518 C)

All

0

0

All

0

0

All

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1) Teflon Kits include ten gaskets. Iconel kits include four gaskets. 2) See PPL 00814-0100-4686 for additional spare parts and pricing.

E-1


Index Numerics 275. See HART Communicator 3-Valve Manifolds . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 5-Valve Manifolds . . . . . . . . . . 2-23

Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Direct Mount . . . . . . . .4-2–4-4 Direct Mounted ProPlates 4-2–

4-4 Gas Service . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Liquid Service . . . . . . . 4-2 Steam Service . . . . . . . 4-3 On the Bench . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Remote Mounted ProPlates 4-4–

A Absolute/Gage Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect . . . . . . . . 10-12 Absolute/Gage Sensor . . . . . . 10-10 Access Requirements . . . . . . . . 3-4 Alarm. See Failure Mode Alarm Ambient Temperature Effect . . 10-7 Analog Output Range Values . 6-45 Approval Drawings . . . . . . . . . .D-1 List of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1 Automatic Error Messages . . . 6-10

B Bench Calibration Outline . . . . 6-9 Bench Configuration and Calibration

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25 Bench Configuration Outline . . . 6-8 Bolt Installation . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26 Burst Mode . . . . . . . . . 5-22, 6-35

C Calculation Data Sheet . . . . . . . C-1 Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 Deciding Which Procedure to Use

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 . . . . 5-20 . . . . 5-20 . . . . 5-20 . . . . 5-16 . . . . 5-18 . . . . 5-18 . . . . 5-18 . . . . . 6-9 . . . . 6-47 . . . . 5-21

Output Trim . . . . . . D/A Trim . . . . . . Using other Scale Overview . . . . . . . . . Sensor Trim . . . . . . . Full Trim . . . . . Zero Trim . . . . . Calibration Outline . . . . . Change Passwords . . . . . Cloning a Configuration .

4-10 Gas Service . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Liquid Service below 450 °F (232 °C) . . . . . 4-8 Steam Service or Liquid Service above 450 °F (232 °C) . . 4-10 With a HART-Based Communicator . . . 5-5 Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23 Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Detail Configuration) . . . . . . . 6-26 Computer Requirements . . . . . . 6-2 Configuration Cloning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21 Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Saving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21 Configuration Outline . . . . . . . 6-8 Configurations Direct Mount . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 In-Line Models . . . . . . . . 2-12 Model 1195 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Remote Mount . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Electronic Functions . . . . . . . .5-24 Electronics Board Installing . . . . . . . . . . 9-5, 9-6 Removing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3 Electronics Housing Circuit Side . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Exterior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Terminal Side . . . . . . . . . . .3-4 Electronics Remote Mounting Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-22 Enable/Disable Security Screen 6-48 Engineering Asisstant Change Passwords . . . . . .6-47

D D/A Trim. See Calibration Damping . . . . . . 5-12, 10-7, 10-11 Damping Screen . . . . . . . . . . . 6-32 Default Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-33 Device Info Screen . . . . . . . . . 6-33 Differential Pressure Ambient Temperature Effect . . . . . . . 10-12 Differential Producer . . 6-14, 6-18,

6-30 Direct Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Direct Mount ProPlates Commissioning . . . . . . . . .4-2–4-4

E EA Default Units . . . . . . . . . . 6-33 Electrical Considerations . 3-1, 3-2,

3-5, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-8, 10-12 I-1


Rosemount Model 3244MV MultiVariable Temperature Transmitter with Profibus-PA Engineering Assistant Analog Output Range Values . .

6-45 Assign Variables Screen. . 6-46 Bench Calibration Outline . 6-9 Bench Configuration Outline . .

6-8 Burst Mode . . . . . . . . . . . 6-35 Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Configuration) . . . 6-23 Compensated Flow (Natural Gas Detail Configuration) . .

6-26 Diagnostic Screens . . . . . . 6-50 Differential Producer . . . 6-14,

6-18, . . . . . . . . . 6-30 Fast Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Field Calibration Outline . . 6-9 Hot Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Installation Procedure . . . . 6-2 Maintenance Screens . . . . 6-40 Menu Categories . . . . . . . . 6-8 Menu Structure . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Minimum Equipment and Software . . . . . . . . 6-2 Natural Gas Properties (Detail)

6-26 Output Trim Screens . . . . 6-46 Path Name Convention . . 6-11 Primary Element . . 6-14, 6-18,

6-30 Procedure Outlines . . . . . . . 6-8 Recall Factory Trim Settings Procedure . . . . . . 6-44 Screen Components . . . . . 6-10 Sensor Trim . . . . . . . . . . . 6-40 Setup Screens . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Status Bar Codes . . . . . . . 6-11 System Requirements . . . . . 6-2 Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 View Selections . . . . . . . . 6-55 Environmental Considerations 2-7,

3-4 Equipment for Remote Mounting the Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22 Error Info Screen . . . . . . . . . . 6-54

F Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-26

I-2

Failure Mode Alarm Function of . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 Values for . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 NAMUR Compliant . . . 5-3 versus Saturation Output Values . . . . . . 5-2 Verifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 see also Loop Test Failure Mode Alarm Jumper . . 5-25 Fast Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Field Calibration . . . . . . . . . . 6-43 Field Calibration Outline . . . . . 6-9 Field Hook-up Wiring Diagrams 3-1 Field Wiring and Electrical Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Field Wiring Considerations . . . 3-1 Fixed Process Temp Range . . . 6-49 Fixed Process Temp Screen . . 6-49 Flange Adapter O-Rings . . . . . 2-27 Full Trim. See Calibration Functional Limitations . . . . . . . 2-7 Functional Specifications . . . . 10-6,

10-10

I Impulse Piping . . . . . . . . . . . .2-20 Impulse Piping Valves and Components . . . . . . . . . . 2-23, 4-5 Install EA Software . . . . . . . . . .6-2 Installation In-Line Models . . . . 2-12–2-14 Model 1195 In-Line . . 2-8–2-11 Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1 Mounting Brackets . . . . . .2-26 Mounting Configurations .10-14 Installing the Electronics Board 9-5,

9-6 Installing the LCD Meter . . . . . .7-2 Installing the Terminal Block . . .9-7 Instrument Manifolds . . . . . . .2-22 Integral Mount. See Direct Mount Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1

L LCD Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 Custom Configuration for .5-12 Diagnostic Messages,Defined . .

7-4

G Gross versus Detail Characterization

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23

Exploded View Installing . . . . Load Limitations . . Loop Test . . . . . . . Loop Test Screen . .

. . . . . . . . . .7-2 . . . . . . . . . .7-2 . . . . . . . .10-11 . . . . . . . . .5-13 . . . . . . . . .6-54

H HART Communicator Action Keys Directional Keys A-6, A-18 Hot Key . . . . . . A-7, A-18 ON/OFF Key . . . A-6, A-18 Alphanumeric and Shift Keys . .

A-7, . . . . . . . . . . A-19 Connecting to Transmitter A-5,

A-17 Connections and Hardware A-4,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15 Data Entry . . . . . . . A-7, A-19 Diagnostic Messages A-9, A-21 Fast-Key Sequences . A-3, A-16 Defined . . . . . . . A-8, A-20 Function Keys Help Key . . . . . . A-7, A-19 Home Key . . . . . A-7, A-19 Keypad . . . . . . . . . . A-6, A-18 Menu Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 Menus and Functions A-8, A-20 Hazardous Locations . . . . . . . . 3-5 Hot Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Housing Rotation . . . . . . . .3-4, 7-3 Humidity Limits . . . . .10-7, 10-11

M Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1 Return of Materials . . . . . . .9-7 Mass ProPlate Commissioning Direct Mount . . . . . . . 4-2–4-4 Mass ProPlate Configurations . .2-6 In-Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15 Mass ProPlate Orientation In-Line Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . . . . .2-16 Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . .2-17 Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . .

2-15 Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . .2-17 Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe . .

2-16 Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . . . . . .2-18 Master Reset Screen . . . . . . . .6-54 Menu Categories . . . . . . . . . . . .6-8 Menu Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7


Index Meter. See LCD Meter Model 1195 Configurations . . . . 2-9 Module Info Screen . . . . . . . . . 6-51 Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Bypass Manifold . . . . . . . . 2-2 Gaskets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Remote Connectors . . . . . . . 2-2 Straight Pipe Lengths . . . . 2-2 Transmitter Orientation . . . 2-4 Wetleg Seal Liquid . . . . . . . 2-2 Mounting Bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26 Mounting Brackets . . . . . . . . . 2-26 Mounting Configurations . . . 10-14 Mounting Position Effect . . . . . 10-8 Multidrop Communication . . . 5-22 Changing a Transmitter Address

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23 Polling a Loop . . . . . . . . . 5-23

Performance Specifications . . . 10-7,

10-12 Physical Specifications .10-8, 10-12 Pipe Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10 Power Supply 3-2, 3-5, 10-6, 10-11 Power Supply Effect . . . . . . . . 10-7 Primary Element . 6-14, 6-18, 6-30 Privileges Screen . . . . . . . . . . 6-40 Process Connections . . . . . . . . 2-18 Process Flange Orientation . . . . 3-4 Process Temperature Ambient Temperature Effect . . . . . . . 10-12 Process Variables . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Setting Units for . . . . . . . . 5-7 Process-Wetted Parts . .10-8, 10-12 ProPlate Case Ground . . . . . . . 3-3 ProPlate Configurations . . . . . . 2-6 ProPlate In-Line Configurations . . .

2-12 N NAMUR-Compliant Operation . 5-3 Natural Gas Configuration . . . 6-23 Natural Gas Detail Configuration . .

6-26 Natural Gas Properties (Detail) 6-26 Non-flow Calibration . . . . . . . . 2-6 Non-Wetted Parts . . . . 10-8, 10-13

ProPlate Orientation In-Line Models Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . .2-9, 2-13 Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . .2-11, 2-14 Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . .

2-9, . . . . . . . 2-12 Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . .2-10, 2-14 Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe . .

O Orientation In-Line Models Gas Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . . 2-9, 2-13 Gas Service in a Vertical Pipe . . 2-11, 2-14 Liquid Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . .

2-9, . . . . . . . 2-12 Liquid Service in a Vertical Pipe . . 2-10, 2-14 Steam Service in a Horizontal Pipe . . .

2-10, . . . . . . 2-13 Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . 2-11, 2-14 Orifice Plate Inspection . . . . . . . 8-2 Orifice Plate Reinstallation . . . . 8-2 Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Linear versus Square Root . 5-8 Reviewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6 Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 Output Trim Screens . . . . . . . 6-46 Output Trim. See Calibration

P

2-10, . . . . . . 2-13 Steam Service in a Vertical Pipe . . .2-11, 2-14 ProPlate Valve Identification . . 4-4 ProPlate Valves and Fittings . 2-20

R Range Values. See Rerange Ranges Absolute/Gage Sensor . . 10-10 Read Outputs Screen . . . . . . . 6-50 Recall Factory Trim Settings Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-44 Receiving and Inspection . . . . . 2-6 Recv Config Screen . . . . . . . . . 6-39 Remote Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 Remote Mount ProPlates Commissioning . . . . . . . .4-4–4-10 Remote Mounted ProPlate Electronics Locations . . .2-24–2-26 Remote Mounting Equipment . 2-22 Remote Mounting Fittings . . . 2-20 Remote Mounting Valves . . . . 2-20 Removing the Terminal Block . . 9-3

Rerange Description of . . . . . . . . . . .5-9 Using Communicator . . . .5-10 Using Communicator and Input Source . . . . . . . . .5-10 Using Zero and Span Buttons and Input Source .5-11 Return of Materials . . . . . . . . . .8-1 RFI Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-7

S Safety Messages 2-4, 2-8, 3-1, 4-1,

5-1, . . . . 5-24, 7-1, 9-1, A-1, A-13 Saturation Output Values 5-2, 5-26 Saving a Configuration . . . . . .5-21 Screen Components . . . . . . . . .6-10 Send Config Screen . . . . . . . . .6-39 Sensor Temperature . . . . . . . . .5-7 Sensor Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-40 Sensor Trim. See Calibration Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-10 Setting the Loop to Manual . . . .5-5 Signal Wiring Ground . . . . . . . .3-3 Specifications and Reference Data .

10-1– . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-16 Stability . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7, 10-12 Static Pressure Effect . . . . . . .10-7 Static Pressure Effects . . . . . .10-12 Status Bar Codes . . . . . . . . . . .6-11 Steam Configuration . . . . . . . .6-16 Steam Table Values . . . . . . . . .6-16 Straight Run Requirements . . . .2-7 Structural Limitations . . . . . . . .2-6 System Leak Check . . . . . . . . . .4-5

T Temperature Effect Calibration .4-6 Temperature Limits . . . . . . . .10-11 Temperature Sensor Ranges .10-10 Terminal Block Installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-7 Removing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3 Test Calculation Screen . . . . . .6-52 Time Response . . . . . . . . . . . .10-7 Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-12 Transmitter Housing Rotating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3 Tri-Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-46 Trim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-40 Trim. See Calibration Troubleshooting Alarm Values . . . . . . . . . .5-26 Saturation Values . . . . . . .5-26 Turn-on -Time . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-7 Turn-on-Time . . . . . . . . . . . .10-11

Path Name Convention . . . . . . 6-11

I-3


Rosemount Model 3244MV MultiVariable Temperature Transmitter with Profibus-PA U Units Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31

V Valve Identification . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Valves and Fittings . . . . . . . . . 2-20 Vibration Effect . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7

W Wet Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Wiring Diagrams In the Field . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 On the Bench . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Wiring Diagrams for Field Hook-up .

3-1 Write Protect and Failure Mode Alarm Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25 Write Protect Jumper . . . . . . . 5-25

Z Zero and Span Adjustment Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Zero or Wet Calibration . . . . . . 4-7 Zero the Electronics . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Zero Trim. See Calibration

I-4


Rosemount Inc. 8200 Market Boulevard Chanhassen, MN 55317 USA Tel 1-800-999-9307 Fax (952) 949-7001 ©1999 Rosemount, Inc.

Fisher-Rosemount Lmited Heath Place Bognor Regis West Sussex PO22 9SH England Tel 44 (1243) 863 121 Fax 44 (1243) 867 5541

Fisher-Rosemount Singapore Pte Ltd. 1 Pandan Crescent Singapore 128461 Tel (65) 777-8211 Fax (65) 777-0947 AP.RMT-Specialist@frco.com Product documentation available at...

www.rosemount.com 00809-0100-4686, Rev. FA, 8/01

PR

INT IN U. S. A.

ED

¢00809-0100-4686)¤

MAN_1195_00809-0100-4686_FA_EN  

Installation and Operation Manual 00809-0100-4686 English Rev. FA SECTION 1 Introduction Safety Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

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