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Installation Instructions P/N 3600647-EU, Rev. B (01/02) January 2002

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs Installation and Operation Manual

www.micromotion.com


Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs Installation and Operation Manual For technical assistance, phone the Micro Motion Customer Service Department: • In UK, phone: 0800 - 966 180 toll-free (UK only) • In Europe, phone: +31 (0) 318 - 549 443


Contents 1 Installing the Transmitter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 1.2 1.3

1.4

1.5 1.6 1.7

1.8

1.9 1.10

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Determining an appropriate location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Environmental requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Wire distances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Hazardous area classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mounting the transmitter remotely from the sensor . . . . . . . 2 Installing the remote mount transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mounting the transmitter/core processor assembly remotely from the sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Rotating an integrally mounted transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Connecting the transmitter wires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Safe area output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 mA output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Frequency/discrete output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Hazardous area output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Voltage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Capacitance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Inductance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 mA output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Frequency/discrete output wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Grounding the transmitter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Rotating the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

2 Starting the Flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applying power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performing a loop test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trimming the milliamp outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zeroing the flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19 20 20 24 26

3 Using the Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.1 3.2 3.3

3.4

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing process variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Responding to alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledging alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the totalizers and inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the mass totalizer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the volume totalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the mass inventory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing the volume inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting the totalizers and inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stopping the totalizers and inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resetting the mass totalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resetting the volume totalizer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resetting both totalizers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

29 29 30 30 31 32 32 33 34 34 35 35 36 36 37

i


Contents continued

4 Changing the Transmitter Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 4.1 4.2 4.3

4.4

4.5 4.6 4.7

4.8 4.9

4.10

4.11 4.12 4.13

4.14

4.15

4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19

4.20

ii

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the measurement units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass-flow units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Volume-flow units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Density units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating special measurement units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special mass-flow unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special volume-flow unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the update rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing event settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the damping values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flow damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Density damping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temperature damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjusting meter factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing slug-flow limits and duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low slug-flow limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High slug-flow limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slug-flow duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing low cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mass low-flow cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Volume low-flow cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Density low cutoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the flow direction parameter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the software tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the display functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling and disabling display parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the scroll rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the off-line password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the display variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the milliamp outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the process variable(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the upper range value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the lower range value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the added damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the fault output indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the frequency output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the process variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the output scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the fault output indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the pulse width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the discrete output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the fault timeout parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the digital communication fault setting . . . . . . . . Changing HART settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the polling address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling and disabling burst mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the burst mode setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39 40 41 41 43 46 48 50 51 52 53 53 55 55 56 56 57 57 58 58 59 59 60 60 61 62 63 64 64 65 65 66 67 68 70 72 74 74 76 76 78 80 81 82 83 84 85 85 85 86 87

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Contents continued

5 Characterizing and Calibrating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 5.1 5.2

5.3

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Characterizing the flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 When to characterize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 How to characterize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Calibrating the flowmeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 When to calibrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 How to calibrate for density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Density calibration with a HART Communicator . . . . . . . . 93 Density calibration with ProLink II software . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 How to calibrate for temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Temperature calibration with ProLink II software . . . . . . 101 Pressure compensation setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

6 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8

6.9 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15

6.16

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter does not operate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transmitter does not communicate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zero or calibration failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HART output problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analog output problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fault conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Status alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagnosing wiring problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the power-supply wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the core processor-to-transmitter wiring . . . . . . Checking the communication loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the receiving device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting the HART polling address to zero. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the upper and lower range values . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the frequency output scale and method . . . . . . . Checking the characterization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Checking the test points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Obtaining the test points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Evaluating the test points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Excessive drive gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erratic drive gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bad pickoff voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contacting customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

107 107 107 107 108 108 109 109 112 112 112 112 113 113 113 113 113 114 114 114 115 115 115 116 116

iii


Contents continued

Appendix A: Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 A.1

A.2

A.3 A.4

Functional specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Input/output signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Digital communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmental requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electromagnetic interference effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hazardous area classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UL and CSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CENELEC compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Performance specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Field-mount housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interface/display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weight: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

117 117 118 118 118 118 119 119 119 119 119 119 120 120 121 121 121

Appendix B: Using the HART Communicator . . . . . . . . . . 125 B.1 B.2

B.3 B.4 B.5

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting the HART Communicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to communication terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to a multidrop network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventions used in this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HART Communicator safety messages and notes . . . . . . . HART Communicator menu tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

125 125 125 126 126 126 126

Appendix C: Using ProLink II Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 C.1 C.2

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Connecting to a personal computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Connecting to the service port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

Appendix D: Using the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 D.1 D.2 D.3

Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Menu tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Appendix E: Return Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

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Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


1

1.1

Installing the Transmitter

Overview

This section describes how to install Micro Motion® Series 1000 and 2000 transmitters with intrinsically safe outputs. These procedures will enable you to: • Determine an appropriate location to install the transmitter • Mount the transmitter remotely from or integral to the sensor • Rotate an integrally mounted transmitter • Connect the transmitter wires • Rotate the display

1.2

Safety

Safety messages are provided throughout this manual to protect personnel and equipment. Read each safety message carefully before proceeding to the next step.

I IMPORTANT Procedures and instructions in this manual may require special precautions. Actions that raise potential safety issues are preceded by a safety message. Read each safety message before performing the task that follows the message.

WARNING Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II software via the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases.

1.3

Determining an appropriate location

To determine an appropriate location for the transmitter, you must consider the transmitter’s environmental requirements, wire distances, accessibility for maintenance, visibility of the display (if it is equipped with a display), and hazardous area classification.

Environmental requirements

Install the transmitter in an environment where ambient temperature is between –37 and 60 °C.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

1


Installing the Transmitter continued

Wire distances

Power source Connect to a voltage source of 18–100 VDC or 85–250 VAC. • The transmitter automatically recognizes the source voltage. • Install up to 300 meters of 0,8 mm2 or larger wire. At distances approaching 300 meters, a minimum DC input of 22 V is required.

Core processor to remote-mount transmitter • Install up to 90 meters of 0,35 mm2 or up to 300 meters of 0,8mm2 4-wire twisted-pair instrument cable. • Install shielded wiring with drain wires connected at both ends or unshielded wiring in continuous metallic conduit that provides 360 ° termination shielding for the enclosed wiring.

Junction box to remote mount transmitter and core processor • The maximum cable length for a 9-wire sensor to core processor is 20 meters. • Refer to the manual shipped with the cable for flowmeter cable preparation and wiring instructions.

Hazardous area classifications

If you plan to mount the transmitter in a hazardous area, verify that the transmitter has the appropriate hazardous area approval. Each transmitter has a hazardous area approval tag attached to the outside of the transmitter housing. For more information about hazardous area classifications, see Hazardous area classifications, page 119.

1.4

Mounting the transmitter remotely from the sensor

Mounting the transmitter apart from the sensor involves attaching it to an instrument pole or wall with the mounting bracket. The bracket will accommodate either of two possible mounting configurations: • Mount the transmitter apart from the sensor and core processor assembly. • Mount the transmitter with core processor assembly apart from the sensor. Instrument pole and wall-mount options for either of the two possible mounting configurations are shown in Figure 1-1. You can mount the transmitter in any orientation as long as the conduit openings do not point upward.

2

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Installing the Transmitter continued

Figure 1-1. Instrument pole or wall mount TRANSMITTER ALONE

Mounting bracket (instrument pole mount)

Mounting bracket (wall mount)

TRANSMITTER WITH CORE PROCESSOR ATTACHED

Mounting bracket

CAUTION Condensation or excessive moisture entering the transmitter could damage the transmitter and result in measurement error or flowmeter failure. • Ensure the integrity of gaskets and O-rings. • Do not mount the transmitter with the conduit openings pointing upward. • Install drip legs if a conduit is used. • Seal the conduit openings. • Fully tighten the transmitter cover.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

3


Installing the Transmitter continued

Installing the remote mount transmitter

The following procedure assumes that the core processor is attached to the sensor. To mount the transmitter apart from the sensor and core processor assembly: 1. Identify the components shown in Figure 1-2 and Figure 1-3. 2. Remove the junction end-cap from the junction housing.

Figure 1-2. Remote mount transmitter components Main enclosure

Ground lug

Bracket

Junction housing

Junction end-cap Mating connector

Mating connector socket

Figure 1-3. Remote-mount transmitter, junction end-cap removed Ground screw

Conduit opening for sensor interface

Cap screws

4

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Installing the Transmitter continued

3. If desired, re-orient the transmitter on the bracket. a. Loosen each of the four hex bolts (4mm) in the junction housing three or four turns. b. Rotate the bracket so that the transmitter is oriented as desired. c. Tighten hex bolts, torquing to 3-4 N-m. 4. Securely mount the bracket and transmitter to a panel or instrument pole. 5. Use one of these methods to shield the wiring from the core processor to the transmitter: a. Connect the drain wires to the ground screws in the junction housing and core processor, or b. If wiring is in metallic conduit, make sure the conduit provides 360째 termination shielding for the enclosed wiring. 6. Prepare wiring for connection by cutting back sheathing and stripping wire ends. If shielded wiring is used, unwind drain wires back to sheathing and twist the ends together for grounding. 7. Pull the mating connector out of the junction housing. 8. Pass the cable end through the conduit opening in the junction housing. 9. Connect the four wires to the numbered slots on the mating connector, matching corresponding numbered terminals on the core processor. 10. Plug the wired connector into the socket in the junction housing. 11. If cable shields are to be used for grounding, connect the shield wire ends to the ground screw (see Figure 1-3, page 4). 12. Reattach the junction end-cap, tightening until O-ring seats.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

5


Installing the Transmitter continued

Figure 1-4. Connecting the mating connector to the core processor Core processor

Use the grounds screws to connect ground wiring at both ends. Mating connector

Color-coded wires

Connect the four color-coded wires to the numbered slots on the mating connector. Connect the opposite end of each color-coded wire to the same-numbered terminal on the core processor.

6

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Installing the Transmitter continued

Mounting the transmitter/core processor assembly remotely from the sensor

The following procedure assumes that the core processor is attached to the transmitter. To mount the transmitter and core processor assembly remotely from the sensor: 1. Attach the mounting bracket to an instrument pole or wall. 2. Remove the lower conduit ring and the end-cap from the bottom of the transmitter and core processor assembly (see Figure 1-5). 3. Place the transmitter and core processor assembly onto the mounting bracket. 4. Replace the lower conduit ring, clamping the mounting bracket between the core processor and the conduit ring as shown in Figure 1-1, page 3. 5. Connect the transmitter end of a Micro Motion 9-wire flowmeter cable to the underside of the core processor. Refer to the manual shipped with the cable for flowmeter cable preparation and wiring instructions. 6. Replace the end cap on the conduit ring.

Figure 1-5. Transmitter/core processor assembly exploded view

Mounting bracket

Lower conduit ring End cap

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

7


Installing the Transmitter continued

1.5

Rotating an integrally mounted transmitter

You can rotate an integrally mounted transmitter on the sensor up to 360 째 in 90 째 increments to one of four possible positions. See Figure 1-6.

WARNING Twisting the core processor will damage the sensor. Do not twist the core processor.

Figure 1-6. Rotating the transmitter Transmitter

Transition

Core processor Sensor

CAUTION To avoid damaging the wires that connect the transmitter to the core processor, do not move the transmitter more than a few inches from the core processor.

To rotate the transmitter on the core processor: 1. Push down and turn the transmitter counterclockwise (approximately 1 /8 turn) to disengage the transmitter at the transition. 2. Rotate the transmitter to the desired position. 3. Align the camlock pins (not shown) with the grooves on the transition. 4. Push down and turn the transmitter clockwise to lock it into place on the sensor.

8

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Installing the Transmitter continued

1.6

Connecting the transmitter wires

There are multiple ways to connect the transmitter wires in a hazardous area depending upon how you will use the HART® protocol or analog functionality. Pages 10 through 16 provide several possible configurations, including: • Milliamp Output Wiring • Frequency/Discrete Output Wiring

1.7

Safe area output wiring

The following notes and diagrams are designed to be used as a guide for wiring the Model 1700 or 2700 outputs for safe area applications. It is the user’s responsibility to verify that their specific installation meets the local and national safety requirements and electrical codes.

mA output wiring

The following 4–20 mA wiring diagram is an example of a proper basic wiring installation to the Model 1700/2700.

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Figure 1-7. Basic (safe area) milliamp output wiring (mA2 is only available on intrinsically safe Model 2700)

See Figure 1-8 for voltage and resistance values

VDC

Power supply 85-265 VAC, 50/60 Hz 18-100 VDC VDC

Figure 1-8. mA output load resistance values Rmax = (Vsupply – 12)/0,023 If communicating with HART a minimum of 250 ohms is required

1000 900

External resistor (Ohms)

800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

28

30

Supply voltage (Volts)

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Figure 1-9. HART/analog single-loop wiring

VDC

Power supply 85-265 VAC, 50/60 Hz 18-100 VDC

See Figure 1-8 for voltage and resistance values

250–600 Ω resistance

HART-compatible host or controller

Figure 1-10. HART multidrop wiring with SMART FAMILY™ transmitters and a configuration tool HART-compatible transmitters HART Communicator or interface for ProLink II™ or AMS software

250 Ω loop resistance

SMART FAMILY™ transmitters

24 VDC loop power supply

Note: For optimum HART communication, make sure the output loop is single point, grounded to an instrument-grade ground.

Frequency/discrete output wiring

The following frequency/discrete output wiring diagram is an example of a proper basic wiring installation to the Model 1700/2700.

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Figure 1-11. Frequency/discrete output wiring

VDC

See Figure 1-12 for voltage and resistance values

Counter

Figure 1-12. Frequency/discrete output load resistance values Rmax = (Vsupply – 4)/0,003 Rmin = (Vsupply – 25)/0,006 Absolute minimum = 100 ohms for supply voltage less than 25,6 Volts

10000 9000

External resistor (Ohms)

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 5

7

9

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

25

27

29

Supply voltage (Volts)

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1.8

Hazardous area output wiring

The following notes and diagrams are designed to be used as a guide for wiring the Model 1700 or 2700 IS Output option for intrinsically safe applications. It is the user’s responsibility to verify that their specific installation meets the local and national safety requirements and electrical codes. The proper barrier selection will depend on what output is desired, which approval is applicable, and many installation-specific parameters. The information that is provided about I.S. barrier selection is intended as an overview. Refer to barrier manufacturers for more detailed information regarding the use of their products. Application specific questions should be addressed to the barrier manufacturer or to Micro Motion Inc.

WARNING Hazardous voltage can cause severe injury or death. Shut off the power before wiring the transmitter.

WARNING A transmitter that has been improperly wired or installed in a hazardous area could cause an explosion. • Make sure the transmitter is wired to meet or exceed local code requirements. • Install the transmitter in an environment that complies with the classification tag on the transmitter. See Hazardous area classifications, page 119.

Table 1-1. Safety Parameters 4/20 mA Output

Frequency/Discrete Output

Parameter

Value

Parameter

Value

Voltage (Ui)

30 V

Voltage (Ui)

30 V

Current (Ii)

300 mA

Current (Ii)

100 mA

Power (Pi)

1,0 W

Power (Pi)

0,75 W

Capacitance (Ci)

0,0005 uF

Capacitance (Ci)

0,0005 uF

Inductance (Li)

0,0 mH

Inductance (Li)

0,0 mH

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Voltage

The Model 1700/2700’s safety parameters require the selected barrier’s open-circuit voltage to be limited to less than 30 VDC (Vmax = 30 VDC). This voltage is the combination of the maximum safety barrier voltage (typically 28 VDC) plus an additional 2 VDC for HART communications when communicating in the hazardous area.

Current

The Model 1700/2700’s safety parameters require the selected barrier’s short-circuit currents sum to less than 300 mA (Imax = 300 mA) for the milliamp outputs and 100 mA (Imax = 100 mA) for the Frequency/Discrete Output.

Capacitance

The capacitance (Ci) of the Model 1700/2700 is 0,0005 uF. This value added to the wire capacitance (Ccable) must be lower than the maximum allowable capacitance (Ca) specified by the IS barrier: Ci + Ccable ≤ Ca

Inductance

The inductance (Li) of the Model 1700/2700 is 0,0 uH. This value plus the field wiring inductance (Lcable), must be lower than the maximum allowable inductance (La) specified by the IS barrier. The following equation can then be used to calculate the minimum cable length between the transmitter and the barrier: Li + Lcable ≤ La

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mA output wiring

The following 4/20 mA wiring diagram is an example of a proper basic wiring installation to the Model 1700/2700.

Figure 1-13. mA output wiring for hazardous areas

Hazardous area

Safe area

Vin Rbarrier

Vout 4-20 mA

Rload Ground

Note: Rbarrier and Rload should be added together to determine the proper Vin. Refer to Figure 1-8.

Frequency/discrete output wiring

The following frequency/discrete output wiring diagram is an example of a proper wiring installation to the Model 1700/2700. The first diagram utilizes a Galvanic Isolator that has an internal 1000-ohm resistor used for sensing current. On > 2,1 mA, OFF < 1,2 mA. The second diagram utilizes a barrier with external load resistance.

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Figure 1-14. Frequency/discrete output wiring using galvanic isolator

Hazardous area

Safe area External power supply

Vout

COUNTER

Rload

Galvanic isolator

Figure 1-15. Frequency/discrete output wiring using barrier with external load resistance

Hazardous area

Safe area

Vin Rbarrier

Vout Rload

COUNTER

Ground

Note: Rbarrier and Rload should be added together to determine the proper Vin. Refer to Figure 1-12.

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1.9

Grounding the transmitter

Ground the transmitter and the sensor independently. The sensor can be grounded via the piping, if joints in the pipeline are ground-bonded, or by means of a ground screw on the outside of the core processor or the junction box housing.

WARNING Improper grounding could cause measurement error. To reduce the risk of measurement error: • Ground the flowmeter to earth, or follow ground network requirements for the facility. • For installation in an area that requires intrinsic safety, refer to Micro Motion UL, CSA. A UL or CSA manual is shipped with transmitters approved by UL or CSA. • For hazardous area installations in Europe, refer to standard EN 60079-14 if national standards do not apply.

The transmitter is grounded by means of a ground screw on the outside of the transmitter housing. If national standards are not in effect, adhere to these transmitter grounding guidelines: • Use copper wire, 2,5mm2 or larger • Keep all ground leads as short as possible • Ground leads must have less than 1 Ω impedance • Connect ground leads directly to earth, or follow plant standards

1.10 Rotating the display

You can rotate the display on the transmitter up to 360 ° in 90 ° increments.

WARNING Removing the display cover in explosive atmospheres while the power is on can cause an explosion. Do not remove the display cover in explosive atmospheres before shutting off the power and waiting the required delay time as indicated on the transmitter housing.

WARNING Using a dry cloth to clean the display cover can cause static discharge, which could result in an explosion in an explosive atmosphere. Always use a damp cloth to clean the display cover in an explosive atmosphere.

To rotate the display, complete the following procedure: 1. Remove the end-cap clamp by removing the cap screw. See Figure 1-16.

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2. Turn the display cover counterclockwise to remove it from the main enclosure. 3. Carefully loosen (and remove if necessary) the semicaptive display screws while holding the display module in place. 4. Carefully pull the display module out of the main enclosure until the sub-bezel pin terminals are disengaged from the display module. 5. Rotate the display module to the desired position. 6. Insert the sub-bezel pin terminals into the display module pin holes to secure the display in its new position. 7. If you have removed the display screws, then reinsert and tighten them. 8. Place the display cover onto the main enclosure. Turn the display cover clockwise until it is snug. 9. Replace the end-cap clamp by reinserting and tightening the cap screw.

Figure 1-16. Display components Main enclosure

Pin terminals

Sub-bezel

Display module

Display cover

Display screws

End-cap clamp Cap screw

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2.1

Starting the Flowmeter

Overview

This section describes the procedures you should perform the first time you start the flowmeter. You do not need to use these procedures every time you cycle power to the flowmeter. The procedures in this chapter will enable you to: • Apply power to the flowmeter • Perform a loop test on the transmitter • Trim the mA outputs, if necessary • Zero the flowmeter Figure 2-1 provides an overview of the flowmeter startup procedures.

Figure 2-1. Startup procedures

Start Perform these steps if you are using analog outputs. Apply power.

Perform a loop test.

Zero the flowmeter.

Trim mA outputs (if necessary).

Finish

Note: All HART Communicator key sequences provided in this section assume that you are starting from the “Online” menu. See Using the HART Communicator, page 125. Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. See Using ProLink II Software, page 129.

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Starting the Flowmeter continued

2.2

Applying power

Before you apply power to the flowmeter, close and tighten all housing covers.

WARNING Operating the flowmeter without covers in place creates electrical hazards that can cause death, injury, or property damage. Make sure safety barrier partition and covers for the field-wiring, circuit board compartments, electronics module, and housing are all in place before applying power to the transmitter.

WARNING Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II softwarevia the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases.

Turn on the electrical power at the power supply. The flowmeter will automatically perform diagnostic routines. When the flowmeter has completed its power-up sequence, the display status indicator will turn green and begin to flash (if the transmitter is equipped with a display).

2.3

Performing a loop test

A loop test is a means to: â&#x20AC;˘ Verify that analog outputs (mA and frequency) are being sent by the transmitter and received accurately by the receiving devices â&#x20AC;˘ Determine whether or not you need to trim the mA outputs You can perform a loop test with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

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With a HART Communicator To perform a loop test with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 2. 2. Select “Loop test.” 3. Select “Fix Analog Out 1 Fix” or “Analog Out 2.” 4. Select “4 mA.” 5. Read the mA output at the receiving device or another point on the loop. The reading should be near 4 mA. Note: The 4 mA reading does not need to be exact at this point. You will correct differences when you trim the mA outputs. See Trimming the milliamp outputs, page 24. 6. If you don’t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 7. Select “End.” 8. Select “Fix frequency out.” 9. Select “10 KHz.” 10. Read the frequency output at the receiving device or another point on the loop. The reading should be 10 kilohertz (KHz). 11. If you don’t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 12. Select “End.”

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With the display To perform a loop test with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until “OFF-LINE MAINT” appears. 3. Press Select. 4. If “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll to select the first number (0–9) of the off-line password. b. When you see the correct number, press Select. The selection moves over by one decimal place so you can enter the next digit. c. Repeat steps a and b until you complete the four-digit password. 5. Press Scroll until “OFF-LINE SIM” appears on the display. See Figure 2-2, page 22.

Figure 2-2. Loop test with the display

Select button

Scroll button

6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll to “Set MA01” or “Set MA02.” 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until one of three possible test points appears: “4 mA,” “12 mA,” or “20 mA.” 10. Press Select. The transmitter begins to simulate its mA output. Dots will traverse the top line of the display while the loop test is in progress. 11. Read the mA output at the receiving device. The reading should be near the test point value you selected in Step 9. Note: The mA reading does not need to be exact at this point. You will correct differences when you trim the mA outputs. See Trimming the milliamp outputs, page 24.

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12. If you don’t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 13. Press Select to stop the simulation. 14. Press Scroll to “EXIT.” 15. Press Select. 16. Press Scroll to “Set FO.” 17. Press Select. 18. Press Scroll until one of two possible test points appears: “1 KHz” or “10 KHz.” 19. Press Select. The transmitter begins to simulate its KHz output. Dots will traverse the top line of the display while the loop test is in progress. 20. Read the frequency output at the receiving device. The reading should be the test point value you selected in Step 18. 21. If you don’t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 22. Press Select to stop the simulation. 23. Press Scroll until “OFF-LINE EXIT” appears on the display. 24. Press Select to exit off-line mode.

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Starting the Flowmeter continued

With ProLink II software To perform a loop test with ProLink II software: 1. Click the ProLink menu. 2. Select Test. 3. Select Fix Freq Out. 4. Type the number of pulses per second that you want the transmitter to report. The number of pulses can be any number within the frequency range of the transmitter. 5. Click Fix Frequency. 6. Read the frequency output at the receiving device. The reading should be the value you typed in Step 4. 7. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 8. Close the Fix Frequency Output Level window. 9. Click the ProLink menu. 10. Select Test. 11. Select Fix Milliamp 1 or Fix Milliamp 2. 12. Type the mA value you want the transmitter to report. The value can be any number within the mA range of the transmitter. 13. Click Fix mA. 14. Read the mA output at the receiving device. The reading should be near the value you typed in Step 12. Note: The mA reading does not need to be exact. You will correct differences when you trim the mA outputs. See Trimming the milliamp outputs, below. 15. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a reading, then the loop test has failed. Abort the loop test and see Table 6-1, page 108. 16. Close the window. The loop test is complete

2.4

Trimming the milliamp outputs

Trimming the mA outputs creates a common measurement range between the transmitter and the device that receives the mA output. For instance, a transmitter might send a 4 mA signal that the receiving device reports incorrectly as 3,8 mA. If the transmitter output is trimmed correctly, it will send a signal appropriately compensated to ensure that the receiving device actually indicates a 4 mA signal. You must trim the output at both the 4 mA and 20 mA points to ensure appropriate compensation across the entire range of outputs. You can trim the outputs with the HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

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With a HART Communicator To trim the mA output with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 2. 2. Select “Trim Analog Out 1” or “Trim Analog Out 2.” 3. Read the mA output at the receiving device. 4. Return to the HART Communicator. 5. Type the value that you read at the receiving device. The value can contain up to two decimal places. 6. Press F4 “ENTER.” 7. Read the mA output again at the receiving device. 8. If the receiving device and the HART Communicator readings are NOT equal, then select “no.” Repeat Step 3 through Step 7 until the outputs are equal. 9. If the receiving device and the HART Communicator readings are equal, then select “no.” The HART Communicator will proceed to the 20 mA trim. 10. Repeat the procedure beginning with Step 3. After you have completed the 20 mA trim, the procedure is complete.

With ProLink II software To trim the mA outputs with ProLink II software: 1. Click the ProLink menu. 2. Select Milliamp 1 Trim or Milliamp 2 Trim from the Calibration menu. 3. Click OK to begin the 4 mA trim. 4. Read the mA output at the receiving device. 5. Type the value that you read at the receiving device in the Enter Meas box. 6. Click Do Cal. 7. Read the mA output again at the receiving device. 8. If the receiving device and the ProLink II software readings are NOT equal, then click No and go to Step 5. 9. If the receiving device and the ProLink II software readings are equal, then click Yes. 10. Click OK to begin the 20 mA trim. 11. Repeat the procedure beginning with Step 4. Once you have completed the 20 mA trim, the procedure is complete.

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Starting the Flowmeter continued

2.5

Zeroing the flowmeter

Zeroing the flowmeter establishes the flowmeter’s point of reference when there is no flow. When you zero the flowmeter, you may need to adjust the zero time parameter. Zero time is the amount of time the transmitter takes to determine its zero-flow reference point. The default zero time is 20 seconds. • A long zero time may produce a more accurate zero reference but is more likely to result in a zero failure. • A short zero time is less likely to result in a zero failure but may produce a less accurate zero reference. You can zero the flowmeter with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To zero the flowmeter with a HART Communicator: 1. Apply power to the flowmeter. Allow the flowmeter to warm up for approximately 30 minutes. 2. Run the process fluid through the sensor until the sensor temperature approximates the normal process operating temperature. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Ensure that the sensor is completely filled with fluid. 5. Ensure that the process flow has completely stopped. 6. Press 2, 3, 1. 7. Look at the number of seconds to the right of “Zero time.” 8. If you want to change the zero time, then: a. Select “Zero time.” b. Type a new zero time. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Select “Perform auto zero.” 10. If “Auto Zero Failed” appears on the HART Communicator, then the zero procedure failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 11. If “Auto Zero Passed” appears on the HART Communicator, then the zero procedure succeeded. 12. Press F4 “OK.”

With the display If the off-line menu has been disabled, you will not be able to zero the transmitter with the display. For information about enabling and disabling the off-line menu, see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64.

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To zero the flowmeter with the display: Note: You cannot change the zero time with the display. If you need to change the zero time, you must use the HART Communicator or ProLink II software. 1. Apply power to the flowmeter. Allow the flowmeter to warm up for approximately 30 minutes. 2. Run the process fluid through the sensor until the sensor temperature approximates the normal process operating temperature. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Ensure that the sensor is completely filled with fluid. 5. Ensure that the process flow has completely stopped. 6. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 7. Press Scroll until “OFF-LINE MAINT” appears. 8. Press Select. 9. If “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll to select the first number (0–9) of the off-line password. b. When you see the correct number, press Select. The selection moves over by one decimal place so you can enter the next digit. c. Repeat steps a and b until you complete the four-digit password. 10. Press Scroll until “OFF-LINE ZERO” appears on the display. 11. Press Select. The word “ZERO” begins to alternate with the word “YES?” 12. Press Select to start the zeroing. Dots will traverse the top line of the display while the zero is in progress. a. If “TEST FAIL” appears on the display, then the zero procedure failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. b. If “TEST OK” appears on the display, then the zero procedure succeeded. 13. Press Select until “OFF-LINE EXIT” appears on the display. 14. Press Select to exit off-line mode. 15. Press Scroll until the words “SEE ALARM” appear. 16. Press Select. See Responding to alarms, page 30 for information on alarms. 17. When you have acknowledged the alarm, then press Scroll until you see the word “EXIT.” 18. Press Select.

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Starting the Flowmeter continued

With ProLink II software To zero the flowmeter with ProLink II software: 1. Apply power to the flowmeter. Allow the flowmeter to warm up for approximately 30 minutes. 2. Run the process fluid through the sensor until the sensor temperature reaches the normal process operating temperature. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Ensure that the sensor is completely filled with fluid. 5. Ensure that the process flow has completely stopped. 6. Click the ProLink menu. 7. Select Zero Calibration from the Calibration menu. 8. Type a new zero time in the Zero Time box or accept the default value. 9. Click Zero. The flowmeter will begin zeroing. 10. If the Zero Failure box appears, then the zero procedure failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 11. Click Done.

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3

3.1

Using the Transmitter

Overview

This section describes how to use the transmitter in everyday operation. The procedures in this section will enable you to: • View process variables • Respond to alarms • Use the totalizers and inventories Note: All HART Communicator key sequences in this section assume that you are starting from the “Online” menu. See Using the HART Communicator, page 125. Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. See Using ProLink II Software, page 129.

WARNING Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II software via the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases

3.2

Viewing process variables

Process variables include measurements such as mass-flow rate, volume-flow rate, mass total, volume total, temperature, and density. You can view process variables with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view process variables with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 1. 2. Scroll through the list of process variables by pressing the Down Arrow key. 3. Press the number corresponding to the process variable you wish to view.

With the display The display reports the abbreviated name of the process variable (e.g., “DENS” for density), the current value of that process variable, and the associated units of measure (e.g., g/cc). To view a process variable with the display, press Scroll until the name of the desired process variable either: • Appears on the process variable line • Begins to alternate with the units of measure

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Using the Transmitter continued

With ProLink II software To view process variables with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Process Variables.

3.3

Responding to alarms

The transmitter broadcasts alarms whenever a process variable exceeds its defined limits or the transmitter detects a fault condition. For instructions regarding all the possible alarms, see Status alarms, page 109.

Viewing alarms

You can view alarms with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view alarms with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1. 2. Select View Status. 3. Press F4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;OKâ&#x20AC;? to scroll through the list of current alarms.

With the display The display reports alarms with a status indicator. See Figure 3-1. The status indicator can be in one of six possible states, as listed in Table 3-1.

Figure 3-1. Display alarm menu

Status indicator

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Table 3-1. Priorities reported by the status indicator Status indicator state

Alarm priority

Green

No alarm—normal operating mode

Flashing green

Unacknowledged corrected condition

Yellow

Acknowledged low severity alarm

Flashing yellow

Unacknowledged low severity alarm

Red

Acknowledged high severity alarm

Flashing red

Unacknowledged high severity alarm

Alarms reported by the display are arranged according to priority in an alarm queue. To view specific alarms in the queue: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the screen, then release the buttons. See Figure 3-1, page 30. 2. Press Select. 3. If the alternating words “ACK ALL” appear, then press Scroll. 4. If the words “NO ALARM” appear, then go to Step 6. 5. Press Scroll to view each alarm in the queue. See Status alarms, page 109, for an explanation of the alarm codes reported by the display. 6. Press Scroll until the word “EXIT” appears. 7. Press Select.

With ProLink II software To view alarms with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Status. 3. View the status indicators. Red status indicators indicate current status alarms.

Acknowledging alarms

You can acknowledge alarms with the display. Note: If the alarm menu has been disabled, then the display will not indicate an alarm condition. The status LED, however, will always by solid red, green or yellow. To acknowledge alarms: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the screen, then release the buttons. See Figure 3-1, page 30. 2. Press Select. 3. If the words “NO ALARM” appear, then go to Step 8.

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Using the Transmitter continued

4. If you want to acknowledge all alarms, then: a. Press Scroll until the word “ACK” appears by itself. The word “ACK” begins to alternate with the word “ALL?” b. Press Select. Note: If the “acknowledge all alarms” feature has been disabled, then you must acknowledge each alarm individually. See Step 5. 5. If you want to acknowledge a single alarm, then: a. Press Scroll until the alarm you want to acknowledge appears. b. Press Select. The word “ALARM” begins to alternate with the word “ACK.” c. Press Select to acknowledge the alarm. 6. If you want to acknowledge another alarm, then go to Step 3. 7. If you do NOT want to acknowledge any more alarms, then go to Step 8. 8. Press Scroll until the word “EXIT” appears. 9. Press Select.

3.4

Using the totalizers and inventories

The totalizers keep track of the total amount of mass or volume measured by the transmitter over a period of time. The totalizers can be viewed, started, stopped, and reset. The Inventories track the same values as the totalizers but are normally never reset.

Viewing the mass totalizer

You can view the current value of the mass totalizer with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view the current value of the mass totalizer with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 1. 2. Select Mass totl.

With the display To view the current value of the mass totalizer with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears and the units of measure are mass units (e.g., kg, lb). See Figure 3-2, page 33. 2. Read the current value from the top line of the display.

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Figure 3-2. Display totalizer

Current value Process variable line

Units of measure Scroll button

With ProLink II software To view the current value of the mass totalizer with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Process Variables.

Viewing the volume totalizer

You can view the current value of the volume totalizer with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view the current value of the volume totalizer with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 1. 2. Select Vol totl.

With the display To view the current value of the volume totalizer with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable â&#x20AC;&#x153;TOTALâ&#x20AC;? appears and the units of measure are volume units (e.g., gal, cuft). 2. Read the current value from the top line of the display.

With ProLink II software To view the current value of the volume totalizer with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Process Variables.

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Using the Transmitter continued

Viewing the mass inventory

You can view the current value of the mass inventory with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view the current value of the mass inventory with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 1. 2. Select Mass inventory.

With the display To view the current value of the mass inventory with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears and the word “MASSI” (Mass Inventory) alternates with the units of measure. 2. Read the current value from the top line of the display.

With ProLink II software To view the current value of the mass inventory with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Process Variables.

Viewing the volume inventory

You can view the current value of the volume inventory with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To view the current value of the volume inventory with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 1. 2. Select Vol inventory.

With the display To view the current value of the volume inventory with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears and the word “LVOLI” (Line Volume Inventory) alternates with the units of measure. 2. Read the current value from the top line of the display.

With ProLink II software To view the current value of the volume inventory with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Process Variables.

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Starting the totalizers and inventories

The totalizers and inventories are always started together. You can start the totalizers and inventories with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To start all totalizers and inventories with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 4. 2. Select Start totalizer.

With the display To start all totalizers and inventories with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears. 2. Press Select. 3. Press Scroll. The word “START” appears beneath the current totalizer value. 4. Press Select. The word “YES?” begins to alternate with the word “START.” 5. Press Select to start all totalizers and inventories.

With ProLink II software To start all totalizers and inventories with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Totalizer Control. 3. Click Start.

Stopping the totalizers and inventories

The totalizers and inventories are always stopped together. You can stop the totalizers and inventories with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To stop all totalizers and inventories with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 4. 2. Select Stop totalizer.

With the display To stop all totalizers and inventories with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears. 2. Press Select. 3. Press Scroll until the word “STOP” appears beneath the current totalizer value. 4. Press Select. The word “YES?” begins to alternate with the word “STOP.” 5. Press Select to stop the totalizers and inventories.

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Using the Transmitter continued

With ProLink II software To stop all totalizers and inventories with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Totalizer Control. 3. Click Stop.

Resetting the mass totalizer

Resetting the mass totalizer sets the mass total to zero. You can reset the mass totalizer independent of the volume totalizer with a HART Communicator or the display.

With a HART Communicator To reset the mass totalizer with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 4. 2. Select Reset mass total.

With the display If the ability to reset totalizers has been disabled, you will not be able to reset the mass totalizer with the display. For information about enabling and disabling the display parameters, see Changing the display functionality, page 64. To reset the mass totalizer with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears and the units of measure are mass units (e.g., kg, lb). 2. Press Select. The word “RESET” appears beneath the current totalizer value. 3. Press Select. The word “YES?” begins to alternate with the word “RESET.” 4. Press Select to reset the mass totalizer.

Resetting the volume totalizer

Resetting the volume totalizer sets the volume total to zero. You can reset the volume totalizer independent of the mass totalizer with a HART Communicator or the display.

With a HART Communicator To reset the volume totalizer with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 4. 2. Select Reset volume total.

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With the display If the ability to reset totalizers has been disabled, you will not be able to reset the volume totalizer with the display. For information about enabling and disabling the display parameters, see Changing the display functionality, page 64. To reset the volume totalizer with the display: 1. Press Scroll until the process variable “TOTAL” appears and the units of measure are volume units (e.g., gal, ft3). 2. Press Select. The word “RESET” appears beneath the current totalizer value. 3. Press Select. The word “YES?” begins to alternate with the word “RESET.” 4. Press Select to reset the volume totalizer.

Resetting both totalizers

Resetting both totalizers simultaneously sets the mass and volume totals to zero. You can reset both totalizers with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To reset the mass and volume totalizers with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 1, 4. 2. Select Reset all totals.

With ProLink II software To reset the mass and volume totalizers with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Totalizer Control. 3. Click Reset.

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4

Changing the Transmitter Settings

Stop

4.1

Overview

Aside from performing the startup procedures in Section 2, you should only change the transmitter’s settings if the application needs have changed or the transmitter is being put into a service other than the one for which it was ordered.

This section describes procedures for changing the operating settings of the transmitter. The procedures in this section will enable you to: • Change the measurement units • Create special measurement units • Change event settings • Change the damping and slug-flow values • Change the low cutoff • Change the flow direction parameter • Change the software tag • Change the display functionality • Change the mA outputs • Change the frequency output and the discrete output • Change the fault timeout parameter • Change communications settings Note: All HART Communicator key sequences in this section assume that you are starting from the “Online” menu. See Conventions used in this manual, page 126. Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already connected to the transmitter, you have established communication, and you are starting from the “Configuration” menu. See Using ProLink II Software, page 129.

WARNING Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II software via the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases.

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4.2

Configuration map

Use the map in Figure 4-1, page 40, to guide you through a complete or partial configuration of the transmitter.

Figure 4-1. Configuration map Measurement units Special measurement units Update rate and events

Pages 41–48 Mass-flow units

Volume-flow units

Mass-flow units

Volume-flow units

Update rate

100 Hz variable

Events

Flow damping

Density damping

Temperature damping

Density units

Temperature units Pages 50–52

Page 53–55

Damping

Meter factors and slug flow

Pages 55–56

Pages 57–59 Meter factors

High slug-flow limit

Low slug-flow limit

Slug-flow duration

Low cutoff

Pages 59–60 Mass low cutoff

Volume low cutoff

Density low cutoff

Flow direction

Page 62

Software tag

Page 63

Display functionality

mA outputs

Frequency/ discrete output

Pages 64–66 Enable and disable

Off-line password

Scroll rate

Display variables

Pages 67–74 Process variable

Upper range value

Lower range value

Added damping

Fault output

Pages 76–82 Process variable

Output scale

Fault output

Pulse width

Discrete output

Fault timeout

Page 83

Miscellaneous

Pages 85–87 Polling address

40

Enable/disable burst mode

Changing burst settings

Entering values with the display

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4.3

Changing the measurement units

You can change the unit of measure used for each process variable with a HART Communicator, ProLink II software, or the display.

Mass-flow units

You can change the mass-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator, ProLink II software, or the transmitter display.

With a HART Communicator To change the mass-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Mass flo unit.” 3. Select a unit from the list. See Table 4-1 for a complete list of mass-flow measurement units. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

Table 4-1. Mass-flow measurement units Mass-flow unit

Unit description

g/s

Grams per second

g/min

Grams per minute

g/h

Grams per hour

kg/s

Kilograms per second

kg/min

Kilograms per minute

kg/h

Kilograms per hour

kg/d

Kilograms per day

MetTon/min

Metric tons per minute

MetTon/h

Metric tons per hour

MetTon/d

Metric tons per day

lb/s

Pounds per second

lb/min

Pounds per minute

lb/h

Pounds per hour

lb/d

Pounds per day

STon/min

Short tons (2000 pounds) per minute

STon/h

Short tons (2000 pounds) per hour

STon/d

Short tons (2000 pounds) per day

LTon/h

Long tons (2240 pounds) per hour

LTon/d

Long tons (2240 pounds) per day

Spcl

Special unit (See Creating special measurement units, page 50)

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With ProLink II software To change the mass-flow measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Mass Flow Units box, and select a measurement unit from the list. 3. Click Apply.

With the display To change the mass-flow measurement unit with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Scroll to “CONFIG UNITS.” 8. Press Select. 9. Scroll to “UNITS MASS.” 10. Scroll to the desired mass over time unit (e.g., g/m, kg/H). 11. Press Select. 12. Scroll to “UNITS EXIT.” 13. Press Select. 14. Scroll to “CONFIG EXIT.” 15. Press Select. 16. Scroll to “OFF LINE EXIT.” 17. Press Select. 18. Scroll to “EXIT.” 19. Press Select. The display will now read with the chosen mass units.

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Volume-flow units

You can change the volume-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator, ProLink II software, or the display.

With a HART Communicator To change the volume-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Vol flo unit.” 3. Select a measurement unit from the list. See Table 4-2, page 45, for a complete list of volume-flow measurement units. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the volume-flow measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Vol Flow Units box, and select a measurement unit from the list. 3. Click Apply.

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With the display To change the volume-flow measurement unit with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Scroll to “CONFIG UNITS.” 8. Press Select. 9. Scroll to “UNITS VOL.” 10. Scroll to the desired mass over time unit (e.g., Cuft/s, L/min). 11. Press Select. 12. Scroll to “UNITS EXIT.” 13. Press Select. 14. Scroll to “CONFIG EXIT.” 15. Press Select. 16. Scroll to “OFF LINE EXIT.” 17. Press Select. 18. Scroll to “EXIT.” 19. Press Select. The display will now read with the chosen volume units.

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Table 4-2. Volume-flow measurement units Volume-flow unit

Unit description

Cuft/s

Cubic feet per second

Cuft/min

Cubic feet per minute

Cuft/h

Cubic feet per hour

Cuft/d

Cubic feet per day

Cum/s

Cubic meters per second

Cum/min

Cubic meters per minute

Cum/h

Cubic meters per hour

Cum/d

Cubic meters per day

gal/s

U.S. gallons per second

gal/min

U.S. gallons per minute

gal/h

U.S. gallons per hour

gal/d

U.S. gallons per day

MMgal/d

Million U.S. gallons per day

L/s

Liters per second

L/min

Liters per minute

L/hr

Liters per hour

ML/d

Million liters per day

Impgal/s

Imperial gallons per second

Impgal/min

Imperial gallons per minute

Impgal/h

Imperial gallons per hour

Impgal/d

Imperial gallons per day

bbl/s

Barrels per second

bbl/min

Barrels per minute

bbl/h

Barrels per hour

bbl/d

Barrels per day

Spcl

Special unit (See Creating special measurement units, page 50)

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Density units

You can change the density measurement units with a HART Communicator, ProLink II software, or the display.

With a HART Communicator To change the density measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Dens unit.” 3. Select a unit from the list. See Table 4-3 for a complete list of density measurement units. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

Table 4-3. Density measurement units Density unit

Unit description

SGU

Specific gravity unit

g/Cucm

Grams per cubic centimeter

kg/Cum

Kilograms per cubic meter

lb/gal

Pounds per gallon

lb/Cuft

Pounds per cubic foot

g/mL

Grams per milliliter

kg/L

Kilograms per liter

g/L

Grams per liter

lb/Cuin

Pounds per cubic inch

STon/Cuyd

Short ton per cubic yard

With ProLink II software To change the density measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Dens Units box, and select a measurement unit from the list. 3. Click Apply.

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With the display To change the density measurement unit with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Scroll to “CONFIG UNITS.” 8. Press Select. 9. Scroll to “UNITS DENS.” 10. Scroll to the desired density unit (e.g., g/Cucm, lb/Cuft). 11. Press Select. 12. Scroll to “UNITS EXIT.” 13. Press Select. 14. Scroll to “CONFIG EXIT.” 15. Press Select. 16. Scroll to “OFF LINE EXIT.” 17. Press Select. 18. Scroll to “EXIT.” 19. Press Select. The display will now read with the chosen density units.

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Temperature units

You can change the temperature measurement unit with a HART Communicator, ProLink II software, or the transmitter display.

With a HART Communicator To change the temperature measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 3. 2. Select “Temp unit.” 3. Select a unit from the list. See Table 4-4 for a complete list of temperature measurement units. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

Table 4-4. Temperature measurement units Temperature unit

Unit description

degC

Degrees Celsius

degF

Degrees Fahrenheit

degR

Degrees Rankine

Kelvin

Kelvin

With ProLink II software To change the temperature measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Temperature tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Temp Units box, and select a measurement unit from the list. 3. Click Apply.

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With the display To change the temperature measurement unit with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Scroll to “CONFIG UNITS.” 8. Press Select. 9. Scroll to “UNITS TEMPR.” 10. Scroll to the desired temperature unit (i.e., °C, °F, °R, or °K). 11. Press Select. 12. Scroll to “UNITS EXIT.” 13. Press Select. 14. Scroll to “CONFIG EXIT.” 15. Press Select. 16. Scroll to “OFF LINE EXIT.” 17. Press Select. 18. Scroll to “EXIT.” 19. Press Select. The display will now read with the chosen temperature units.

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4.4

Creating special measurement units

If you need to use a non-standard unit of measure, you can create one special measurement unit for mass flow and one special measurement unit for volume flow. Special measurement units consist of: • Base unit—A combination of: - Base mass or base volume unit—A measurement unit that the transmitter already recognizes (e.g., kg, m3) - Base time unit—A unit of time that the transmitter already recognizes (e.g., seconds, days) • Conversion factor—The number by which the base unit will be divided to convert to the special unit • Special unit—A non-standard volume-flow or mass-flow unit of measure that you want to be reported by the transmitter The terms above are related by the following formula: Base unit ------------------------------- = Conversion factor Special unit

To create a special unit, you must: 1. Identify the simplest base volume or mass and base time units for your special mass-flow or volume-flow unit. For example, to create the special volume-flow unit pints per minute, the simplest base units are gallons per minute: a. Base volume unit: gallon b. Base time unit: minute 2. Calculate the conversion factor using the formula below: Note: 1 gallon per minute = 8 pints per minute 1 (gallon per minute) ------------------------------------------------------- = 0,125 (conversion factor) 8 (pints per minute)

3. Name the new special mass-flow or volume-flow measurement unit and its corresponding totalizer measurement unit: a. Special volume-flow measurement unit name: Pint/min b. Volume totalizer measurement unit name: Pints Note: Special measurement unit names can be up to 8 characters long (i.e., 8 numbers or letters), but only the first 5 characters appear on the display.

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Special mass-flow unit

You can create a special mass-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software. You may select the previously configured special unit to be shown on the display, but you may not configure the special unit using the display.

With a HART Communicator To create a special mass-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Spcl mass units.” 3. Specify the base mass unit: a. Select “Base mass unit.” b. Select a mass unit from the list. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 4. Specify the base mass time: a. Select “Base mass time.” b. Select a time unit from the list. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Specify the mass-flow conversion factor: a. Select “Mass flo conv fact.” b. Type a conversion factor. The value can contain up to 5 digits. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Assign a name to the new special mass-flow measurement unit: a. Select “Mass flo text.” b. Type the name of the special mass-flow measurement unit. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 7. Assign a name to the mass totalizer measurement unit: a. Select “Mass totl text.” b. Type the name of the mass totalizer measurement unit. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To create a special mass-flow measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Special Units tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Base Mass Unit box, and select a base mass unit from the list. 3. Click the arrow in the Base Mass Time box, and select a base time unit from the list. 4. Type the conversion factor in the Mass Flow Conv Fact box. 5. Type the name of the special mass-flow measurement unit in the Mass Flow Text box. 6. Type the name of the mass totalizer measurement unit in the Mass Total Text box. 7. Click Apply.

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Special volume-flow unit

You can create a special volume-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.You may select the, previously configured, special unit to be shown on the display, but you may not configure the special unit using the display.

With a HART Communicator To create a special volume-flow measurement unit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Spcl vol units.” 3. Specify the base volume unit: a. Select “Base vol unit.” b. Select a volume unit from the list. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 4. Specify the base time unit: a. Select “Base vol time.” b. Select a time unit from the list. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Specify the volume-flow conversion factor: a. Select “Vol flo conv fact.” b. Type a conversion factor. The value can contain up to 5 digits. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Assign a name to the new special volume-flow measurement unit: a. Select “Vol flo text.” b. Type the name of the special volume-flow measurement unit. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 7. Assign a name to the volume totalizer measurement unit: a. Select “Vol totl text.” b. Type the name of the volume totalizer measurement unit. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To create a special volume-flow measurement unit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Special Units tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Base Vol Units box, and select a volume unit from the list. 3. Click the arrow in the Base Vol Time box, and select a time unit from the list. 4. Type the conversion factor in the Vol Flow Conv Fact box. 5. Type the name of the special volume-flow measurement unit in the Vol Flow Text box. 6. Type the name of the volume totalizer measurement unit in the Vol Total Text box. 7. Click Apply.

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4.5

Changing the update rate

The update rate is the rate at which the transmitter reports the process variables. There are two settings for the update rate: Normal and Special. The Special update rate updates the variable at 100 times per second (100 Hz). The Normal update rate is 20 times per second (20 Hz). The Special update rate will update only one assigned variable at the higher speed—all other variables will be updated at 5 times per second (5 Hz). Note: Most users should select the Normal update rate. Use the Special update rate only if absolutely necessary. You can change the update rate using ProLink II software or the HART Communicator: With ProLink II software 1. Click the Variable Mapping tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Update Rate box, and select Normal or Special from the list. 3. Select the variable to be updated at the 100Hz rate. 4. Click Apply. Note: Since the connection to the transmitter is through the universal service port (USP), setting the update rate to Special will cause the USP connection baud rate to reset at 1.200 baud (normal USP connection speed is 38.400 baud). Therefore, you must disconnect and reconnect after changing the update rate.

With a HART Communicator 1. Select 4, 1, 7. 2. Select “Normal” or “Special.” 3. Select “Update Rate Var.” 4. Select the variable to be updated at the 100Hz rate. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Press F2 “SEND.”

4.6

Changing event settings

Events are specified process variable levels that trigger alarms. You can set up to two events, either on the same process variable or on two different process variables. Each event is associated with either a high or a low alarm. Before you set the events, determine the process variable, alarm type, and setpoint that will be associated with each event. Table 4-5 lists the process variables, alarm types, and setpoints you must specify for each event.

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Table 4-5. Event settings Event number

Process variable

Alarm type

Setpoint

Event 1

Any process variable for Event 1

• High alarm—Event 1 is triggered if the process variable exceeds the setpoint. • Low alarm—Event 1 is triggered if the process variable drops below the setpoint.

The user-defined value at which the Event 1 alarm is triggered

Event 2

Any process variable for Event 2

• High alarm—Event 2 is triggered if the process variable exceeds the setpoint. • Low alarm—Event 2 is triggered if the process variable drops below the setpoint.

The user-defined value at which the Event 2 alarm is triggered

You can change the event settings with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the event settings with a HART Communicator: 1. Select the process variable: a. Press 4, 5. b. Select “Event 1” or “Event 2.” c. Press 1 “var.” d. Select a process variable from the list. e. Press F4 “ENTER.” f. Press F2 “SEND.” 2. Select the alarm type: a. Press 2 “type.” b. Select “High alarm” or “Low alarm.” c. Press F4 “ENTER.” d. Press F2 “SEND.” 3. Define the setpoint: a. Press 3 “setpoint.” b. Type the setpoint. The setpoint can contain up to 8 digits. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” d. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the event settings with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Events tab. 2. Click the arrow in each Var box, and select a process variable. 3. Click the arrow in each Type box, and select an alarm type. 4. Type the setpoint level for each event in the Setpoint boxes. 5. Click Apply.

4.7

Changing the damping values

A damping value is a period of time, in seconds, that helps the transmitter smooth out small, rapid measurement fluctuations. • A high damping value makes the output appear to be smoother because the output must change slowly. • A low damping value makes the output appear to be more erratic because the output changes more quickly. You can change the damping values for flow, density, and temperature.

Flow damping

Flow damping affects mass flow and volume flow. You can change the flow damping value with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the flow damping value with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Flo damp.” 3. Type a new damping value. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the flow damping value with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Type a new damping value in the Flow Damp box. 3. Click Apply.

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Density damping

You can change the density damping value with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the density damping value with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Dens damp.” 3. Type a new damping value. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the density damping value with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Type a new damping value in the Dens Damping box. 3. Click Apply.

Temperature damping

You can change the temperature damping value with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the temperature damping value with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 3. 2. Select “Temp damp.” 3. Type a new damping value. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the temperature damping value with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Temperature tab. 2. Type a new damping value in the Temp Damp box. 3. Click Apply.

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4.8

Adjusting meter factors

Meter factors allow you to modify the transmitter’s output so that it matches an external measurement standard. Meter factors are used for proving the flowmeter against a Weights & Measures standard. You can adjust meter factors for mass flow, volume flow, and density. Only values from 0,8 to 1,2 may be entered. To determine a meter factor’s value, divide the value of the external standard by the actual output of the transmitter, as in the following formula: External standard Meter factor = ----------------------------------------------------------------Actual transmitter output

For example, if the external standard states that the transmitter should have a flow output of 5 gallons for a given volume of fluid, then divide the transmitter’s actual output (in gallons) by 5. The result is the volume flow meter factor. You can adjust meter factors with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To adjust the mass flow, volume flow, or density meter factor with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 1, 5. 2. Select the meter factor you want to change. 3. Type a new meter factor value. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To adjust the mass flow, volume flow, or density meter factor with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Type the desired meter factor in the Mass Factor (for mass flow), Dens Factor (for density), or Vol Factor (for volume) box. 3. Click Apply.

4.9

Changing slug-flow limits and duration

Slugs—gas in a liquid process or liquid in a gas process—occasionally appear in some applications. The presence of slugs can affect the process density reading dramatically. Slug-flow limits and duration can help the transmitter suppress dramatic changes in reading.

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Low slug-flow limit

The low slug-flow limit is the lowest point of the typical density range of the process you are measuring. The transmitter uses the low slug-flow limit to distinguish between normal process flow and slug-flow. You can change the low slug-flow limit with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the low slug-flow limit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Slug low limit.” 3. Type a new low slug-flow limit. The value must be between 0,0 and 10,0 g/cc. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the low slug-flow limit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Type a new low slug-flow limit in the Slug Low Limit box. The value must be between 0,0 and 10,0 g/cc. 3. Click Apply.

High slug-flow limit

The high slug-flow limit is the highest point of the typical density range of the process you are measuring. The transmitter uses the high slug-flow limit to distinguish between normal process flow and slug flow. You can change the high slug-flow limit with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the high slug-flow limit with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Slug high limit.” 3. Type a new high slug-flow limit. The value must be between 0,0 and 10,0 g/cc. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the high slug-flow limit with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Type a new high slug-flow limit in the Slug High Limit box. The value must be between 0,0 and 10,0 g/cc. 3. Click Apply.

Slug-flow duration

The slug-flow duration is the number of seconds the transmitter waits for a slug-flow condition (outside the slug-flow limits) to return to normal (inside the slug-flow limits). If the transmitter detects slug flow, it will post a slug-flow alarm and hold its last “pre-slug” flow rate until the end of the slug-flow duration. If slugs are still present after the slug-flow duration has expired, the transmitter will report a flow rate of zero. You can change the slug-flow duration with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the slug-flow duration with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Slug duration.” 3. Type a new slug-flow duration. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the slug-flow duration with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Type a new slug-flow duration in the Slug Duration box. 3. Click Apply.

4.10 Changing low cutoff

Low cutoff is a user-defined flow measurement below which the transmitter reports zero flow. Low cutoff can be changed for either mass flow or volume flow.

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Mass low-flow cutoff

You can change the mass low-flow cutoff with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the mass low-flow cutoff with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Mass flo cutoff.” 3. Type the new mass low-flow cutoff. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the mass low-flow cutoff with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Type the new mass low-flow cutoff in the Mass Flow Cutoff box. 3. Click Apply.

Volume low-flow cutoff

You can change the volume low-flow cutoff with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the volume low-flow cutoff with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Vol flo cutoff.” 3. Type the new volume low-flow cutoff. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the volume low-flow cutoff with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Type the new volume low-flow cutoff in the Vol Flow Cutoff box. 3. Click Apply.

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Density low cutoff

You can change the density low cutoff with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software. Note: Density low cutoff only applies to core processor software 2.0 or above and MVD 1700/2700 software rev 3.0 or above.

With a HART Communicator To change the density low cutoff with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 2. 2. Select “Dens Cutoff.” 3. Type the new density cutoff. The value must be between 0 and 10 g/cc. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.”

With ProLink II software To change the density low cutoff with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Density tab. 2. Type a new low cutoff in the Low Density Cutoff box. The value must be between 0 and 10 g/cc. 3. Click Apply.

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4.11 Changing the flow direction parameter

The flow direction parameter defines whether the transmitter reports a positive or negative flow rate and how the flow is added to or subtracted from the totalizers. Table 4-6 shows the possible values for the flow direction parameter and the transmitter’s behavior when the flow is positive or negative. • Positive flow moves in the direction of the arrow on the sensor. • Negative flow moves in the direction opposite of the arrow on the sensor.

Table 4-6. Transmitter behavior for each flow direction value Process fluid flow is positive Flow direction value

Milliamp and frequency outputs

Forward only

Increase

Reverse only

Zero

1

Process fluid flow is negative

Flow totals

Flow values on display or via digital comm.

Milliamp and frequency outputs

Flow totals

Flow values on display or via digital comm.

Increase

Read positive

Zero

No change

Read negative

No change

Read positive

Increase

Increase

Read negative

Bidirectional

Increase

Increase

Read positive

Increase

Decrease

Read negative

Absolute value

Increase

Increase

Read positive2

Increase

Increase

Read positive2

1. Indicates low range value. 2. Refer to the digital communications status bits for an indication of whether flow is positive or negative.

You can change the flow direction parameter with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the flow direction parameter with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 2, 1. 2. Select “Flo direction.” 3. Select a flow direction value. See Table 4-6. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the flow direction parameter with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Flow tab. 2. Click the arrow in the Flow Direction box, and select a flow direction value from the list. See Table 4-6. 3. Click Apply.

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4.12 Changing the software tag

The software tag is a short name or identifier for the transmitter which can be used for polling with HART communications. You can change the software tag with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the software tag with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 3. 2. Select ‘Tag.” 3. Type the new software tag name. The name can contain up to 8 characters (i.e., 8 numbers or letters). 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the software tag with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Device tab. 2. Type the desired software tag in the Tag box. 3. Click Apply.

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4.13 Changing the display functionality Enabling and disabling display parameters

You can restrict the display functionality or change the variables that are shown on the display.

Each display parameter is listed in Table 4-7.

Table 4-7. Display parameters Parameter

Enabled

Disabled

Totalizer reset

Operators are able to reset the mass and volume totalizers.

Operators are prevented from resetting the mass and volume totalizers.

Auto scroll

The display automatically scrolls through each process variable at a configurable rate.

Operators must press the Scroll button to view process variables.

Off-line menu

Operators have access to the off-line menu (zero, simulation, and configuration).

Operators are prevented from gaining access to the off-line menu.

Off-line password

Operators must use a password to gain access to the off-line menu. See Changing the off-line password, page 65.

Operators have access to the off-line menu without a password.

Alarm menu

Operators have access to the alarm menu (viewing and acknowledging alarms).

Operators are prevented from gaining access to the alarm menu.

Acknowledge all alarms

Operators are able to acknowledge all current alarms at once.

Operators must acknowledge alarms individually.

You can enable and disable the display parameters with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To enable or disable the display parameters with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 6. 2. Select “Enable/Disable.” 3. Select one of the display parameters listed. 4. Select “Enabled” or “Disabled.” 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To enable or disable the display parameters with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Display Config tab. 2. If you want to enable a display function, then select the checkbox next to the parameter name. Parameters with check marks next to them indicate enabled functions. 3. If you want to disable a display function, then clear the checkbox next to the parameter name. Parameters without check marks next to them indicate disabled functions. 4. Click Apply.

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Changing the scroll rate

The scroll rate is the speed at which the defined display variables cycle on the display screen. A shorter scroll rate makes the variables cycle more quickly. You can change the scroll rate with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator You must enable auto scroll before the scroll rate will appear on the HART Communicator (see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64). To change the display scroll rate with a HART Communicator: 1. Enable Auto scroll (see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64). 2. Select “Scroll Rate.” 3. Type the desired scroll rate (from 1 to 10 seconds). 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the scroll rate with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Display Config tab. 2. Type the desired scroll rate (from 1 to 10 seconds) in the Auto Scroll Rate box. 3. Click Apply.

Changing the off-line password

The off-line password prevents unauthorized users from gaining access to the off-line menu. You can change the off-line password with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator You must enable the off-line password before you can set the off-line password (see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64). To change the off-line password with a HART Communicator: 1. Enable the off-line password (see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64). 2. Select “Off-line Password.” 3. Type a new password. The password can contain up to four numbers. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the off-line password with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Display Config tab. 2. Type the desired off-line password in the Off-line Password box. The password can contain up to four numbers. 3. Click Apply.

Changing the display variables

The display can scroll through up to 15 process variables in any order. You can select the process variables you wish to see and the order in which they should appear. The first process variable is permanently set to the variable assigned to the mA output. Table 4-8 shows an example of a display variable configuration. Notice that you can repeat variables.

Table 4-8. Example of a display variable configuration Display variable 1

Process variable

Display variable 1

Mass flow

Display variable 2

Volume flow

Display variable 3

Density

Display variable 4

Mass flow

Display variable 5

Volume flow

Display variable 6

Mass totalizer

Display variable 7

Mass flow

Display variable 8

Temperature

Display variable 9

Volume flow

Display variable 10

Volume totalizer

Display variable 11

Density

Display variable 12

Temperature

Display variable 13

None

Display variable 14

None

Display variable 15

None

1. Display variable 1 always represents the same process variable that is assigned to the mA output, and cannot be changed.

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You can change the display variables with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the display variables with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4. 2. Select “Display Setup.” 3. Select the display variable number you want to change. 4. Select a process variable from the list. Note: You can also select “None” from the list, which disables a variable from being shown in the position. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 to change the remaining display variables. You can select as many as 14 process variables. 7. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the display variables with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Display Config tab. 2. Click the arrow in each variable’s box, and select a process variable from the list. 3. Click Apply.

4.14 Changing the milliamp outputs

To change the mA outputs for analog measurement, define or change the following values: • Process variable • Upper range value (URV) • Lower range value (LRV) • Damping • Fault output indicator

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Changing the process variable(s)

When assigning process variables, the primary mA output is referred to as the primary variable (PV) and the secondary mA output is referred to as the secondary variable (SV). Note: Milliamp output 2 is not available with Series 1000 transmitters. The available process variables for the PV and SV are: • Mass flow • Volume flow • Temperature • Density • Drive Signal You can change the PV and SV with HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To assign process variables as the PV and SV with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 1, 1. 2. Select “PV is.” 3. Select a process variable (see list above). 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press the “Left Arrow.” 6. Press 2. 7. Select “SV is.” 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press the Left Arrow. 10. Select a process variable (see list above). 11. Press F4 “ENTER.” 12. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With the display To assign process variables as the PV and SV with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the words “CONFIG MAO 1” (for milliamp output 1) and/or “CONFIG MAO 2” (for milliamp output 2). 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until the words “SrC MAO 1” and/or “SrC MAO 2” appear on the display. 10. Press Select. 11. Select a process variable (see above list). 12. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the words “CONFIG EXIT” appear on the display. 13. Press Select to exit the off-line configuration menu. 14. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE EXIT” appear on the display. 15. Press Select to exit the off-line menu.

With ProLink II software To assign process variables as the PV and SV with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Analog Output tab. 2. Click the arrow in the PV is box, and select a process variable. 3. If you have a Series 2000 transmitter, then click the arrow in the SV is box, and select a process variable. 4. Click Apply.

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Changing the upper range value

The transmitter uses a range of 4 to 20 mA. The upper range value (URV) is the measurement that you want to associate with the 20 mA output. You can change the URV with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the URV with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 1 for Analog Output 1. 2. Select 2. 3. Select URV. 4. Type a new URV. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Press F2 “SEND.” 7. Press 4, 3, 2 for Analog Output 2. 8. Select 2. 9. Select URV. 10. Type a new URV. 11. Press F4 “ENTER.” 12. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With the display To change the URV with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the words “CONFIG MAO 1” (for milliamp output 1) or “CONFIG MAO 2” (for milliamp output 2) appear on the display. Note: Milliamp output 2 is not available with Series 1000 transmitters. 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until the words “20 MAO 1” or “20 MAO 2” appear on the display. 10. Press Select. 11. Enter a new URV. See Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display, page 87. 12. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the words “CONFIG EXIT” appear on the display. 13. Press Select to exit the off-line configuration menu. 14. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE EXIT” appear on the display. 15. Press Select to exit the off-line menu.

With ProLink II software To change the URV for the Primary or Secondary Output with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Analog Output tab. 2. Type a new URV in the URV box. 3. Click Apply.

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Changing the lower range value

The transmitter uses a range of 4 to 20 mA. The lower range value (LRV) is the measurement that you want to associate with the 4 mA output. You can change the LRV with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the LRV with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 1 for Analog Output 1. 2. Select 2. 3. Select LRV for PV. 4. Type a new LRV. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Press F2 “SEND.” 7. Press 4, 3, 2 for Analog Output 2. 8. Select 2. 9. Select LRV for SV. 10. Type a new LRV. 11. Press F4 “ENTER.” 12. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With the display To change the LRV with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the words “CONFIG MAO 1” (for milliamp output 1) or “CONFIG MAO 2” (for milliamp output 2) appear on the display. Note: Milliamp output 2 is not available with Series 1000 transmitters. 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until the words “4 MAO 1” or “4 MAO 2” appear on the display. 10. Press Select. 11. Enter a new LRV. See Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display, page 87. 12. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the words “CONFIG EXIT” appear on the display. 13. Press Select to exit the off-line configuration menu. 14. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE EXIT” appear on the display. 15. Press Select to exit the off-line menu.

With ProLink II software To change the LRV for the Primary or Secondary Output with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Analog Output tab. 2. Type a new LRV in the LRV box. 3. Click Apply.

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Changing the added damping

You can specify a damping value strictly for the mA outputs. (See Changing the damping values, page 55, for general information about damping.) If you specify damping for the mA outputs, it affects only the mA outputs, not the HART digital output. Note: Milliamp output 2 is not available with Series 1000 transmitters. You can change the damping value for the mA outputs with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the added damping value for the mA outputs with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 1 for Analog Output 1. 2. Select PV AO added damp. 3. Type the desired number of seconds for damping. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.” 6. Press 4, 3, 2 for Analog Output 2. 7. Select SV AO added damp. 8. Type the desired number of seconds for damping. 9. Press F4 “ENTER.” 10. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the added damping value for the Primary or Secondary mA output with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Analog Output tab. 2. Type a new damping value in the AO Added Damp box for mA output 1 or mA output 2. 3. Click Apply.

Changing the fault output indicator

If the transmitter encounters an internal fault condition, it will send a preprogrammed measurement value to the receiving device. You can change the value by changing the output indicator. See Table 4-9. Note: By default, the transmitter immediately reports a fault when a fault is encountered. You can delay reporting faults by changing the fault timeout. See Changing the fault timeout parameter, page 83.

Table 4-9. Milliamp fault output indicators and values

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Fault indicator

Fault output value

Upscale

21–24 mA (22 mA by default)

Downscale

3,2–3,6 mA (3,2 mA by default)

Internal zero

The value associated with 0 (zero) flow

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You can change the mA fault output indicator with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the fault output indicator for the primary mA output with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 1. 2. Select AO1 Fault Setup. 3. Select AO1 Fault Indicator. 4. Select a fault indicator. See Table 4-9. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. If the selected fault indicator is either Upscale or Downscale, then select “mA1 Fault Value” and enter the desired value within the range specified in Table 4-9. 7. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F2 “SEND.” To change the fault output indicator for the secondary mA output with a HART Communicator (Series 2000 transmitters only): 1. Press 4, 3, 2. 2. Select AO2 Fault Setup. 3. Select AO2 Fault Indicator. 4. Select a fault indicator. See Table 4-9, page 74. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. If the selected fault indicator is either Upscale or Downscale, then select “mA2 Fault Value” and enter the desired value within the range specified in Table 4-9, page 74. 7. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the primary or secondary mA fault output indicator with ProLink II software: Note: Milliamp output 2 is not available with Series 1000 transmitters. 1. Click the Analog Output tab. 2. Click the arrow in the AO Fault Action box of either the Primary or Secondary Output frames, and select the desired fault output indicator. 3. If you chose Upscale or Downscale in Step 2, click the AO Fault Level box, and enter a new value. 4. Click Apply.

4.15 Changing the frequency output

To change the frequency output, select or change the following variables: • Process variable • Output scale • Fault output indicator • Pulse width

Changing the process variable

When assigning process variables on the Series 2000 transmitter, the frequency output is also referred to as the tertiary variable (TV). You can choose between two process variables to assign to the TV: • Mass flow • Volume flow • Temperature • Drive gain With a Series 1000 transmitter, the mA and frequency outputs’ assignments are directly related. The TV is assigned the same process variable as the mA output (PV) if mass flow or volume flow is the mA output assignment. If you selected temperature or drive gain as the frequency output process variable, the frequency output becomes inactive. If you assigned density to the PV, the frequency output will act as a flow switch. You can change the TV with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To assign process variables as the TV with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3. 2. Select “FO/DO Config.” 3. Select “Frequency/DO Setup.” 4. Select “Frequency Output.” 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Select “TV is.”

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7. Select a process variable (see above list). 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press F2 “SEND.”

With the display To assign process variables as the TV with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the words “CONFIG FO” (for frequency output). 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until the words “FO SRC” appear on the display. 10. Press Select. 11. Select a process variable (see above list). 12. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the words “CONFIG EXIT” appear on the display. 13. Press Select to exit the off-line configuration menu. 14. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE EXIT” appear on the display. 15. Press Select to exit the off-line menu.

With ProLink II software To assign process variables as the TV with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Freq/Discrete Output tab. 2. Select Frequency Output radio button. 3. Click the arrow in the TV is box, and select a process variable. 4. Click Apply.

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Changing the output scale

The frequency output scale denotes the relationship between each pulse the transmitter reports and the number of flow units each pulse represents. You can select one of three output scale methods as listed in Table 4-10.

Table 4-10. Frequency output scale methods and results Method

Parameters you must define

Scale result

Frequency = flow

• TV frequency factor—The number of pulses you want to equal the TV rate factor • TV rate factor—The number of units you want to equal the TV frequency factor

The relationship between the frequency and the units is defined by the TV frequency factor and the TV rate factor.

Pulses per unit

• TV pulses/unit—The number of pulses you want to equal one unit

One measurement unit equals the number of pulses defined as “TV pulses/unit.”

Units per pulse

• TV units/pulse—The number of units you want to equal one pulse

One pulse equals the number of units of measure defined as “TV units/pulse.”

You can change the frequency output scale with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the frequency output scale with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 3. 2. Select FO Scale Method. 3. Select one of the scale methods listed in Table 4-10. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.” 6. If you selected Freq = flow in Step 3, then: a. Press 4 TV Freq factr. b. Type the number of pulses you want to equal a specific number of units. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” d. Press 5 TV Rate factr. e. Type the number of units you want to equal the number of pulses you assigned to the TV frequency factor in Step b. f. Press F4 “ENTER.” g. Press F2 “SEND.” 7. If you selected Pulses/Unit in Step 3, then: a. Press 4 TV Pulses/Unit. b. Type the number of pulses you want to equal one measurement unit. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” d. Press F2 “SEND.” 8. If you selected Units/Pulse in Step 3, then: a. Press 4 TV Units/Pulse. b. Type the number of units you want to equal one frequency pulse. c. Press F4 “ENTER.” d. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With the display If the off-line menu has been disabled, you will not be able to change the output scale with the display. For information about enabling and disabling the off-line menu, see Enabling and disabling display parameters, page 64. To change the frequency output scale with the display: 1. Simultaneously press and hold Scroll and Select for 4 seconds. When the words “SEE ALARM” appear on the display, then release the buttons. 2. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE MAINT” appear. 3. Press Select. 4. If the word “CODE?” appears on the display, then enter the off-line password (see Changing the off-line password, page 65): a. Press Scroll until the digit above “CODE?” equals the first digit of the off-line password. b. Press Select. c. Repeat steps a and b for the second, third, and fourth digits of the off-line password. 5. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE CONFIG” appear on the display. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the words “CONFIG FO” appear on the display. 8. Press Select. 9. Press Select again to enter “FO FREQ.” 10. Enter the number of pulses you want to equal a specific number of units. See Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display, page 87. 11. Press Scroll until the words “FO RATE” appear on the display. 12. Press Select. 13. Enter the number of units you want to equal the number of pulses you entered in Step 10. See Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display, page 87. 14. Press Scroll to see “FO EXIT.” 15. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the words “CONFIG EXIT” appear on the display. 16. Press Select to exit the off-line configuration menu. 17. Press Scroll until the words “OFF-LINE EXIT” appear on the display. 18. Press Select to exit the off-line menu.

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With ProLink II software To change the frequency output scale with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Frequency/Discrete Ouput tab. 2. Click the Frequency radio button. 3. Click the arrow next to Scaling Method, and select one of the scale methods listed in Table 4-10, page 78. 4. If you selected Freq = Flow in Step 3, then: a. Type the number of pulses you want to equal a specific number of units in the Pulses/Unit box. b. Type the number of units you want to equal the number of pulses per unit you typed in Step a in the Units/Pulse box. c. Click Apply. 5. If you selected Pulses/Unit in Step 3, then: a. Type the number of pulses you want to equal one measurement unit in the Pulses/Unit box. b. Click Apply. 6. If you selected Units/Pulse in Step 3, then: a. Type the number of units you want to equal one pulse in the Units/Pulse box. b. Click Apply.

Changing the fault output indicator

If the transmitter encounters an internal fault condition, it will send a preprogrammed measurement value to the receiving device. You can change the value by changing the fault output indicator. See Table 4-11. Note: By default, the transmitter immediately reports a fault when a fault is encountered. You can delay reporting faults by changing the fault timeout. See Changing the fault timeout parameter, page 83.

Table 4-11. Frequency fault output indicators and values Fault indicator

Fault output value

Upscale

The user-specified upscale value in Hz (15 KHz default)

Downscale

0 Hz

Internal zero

0 Hz

You can change the fault output indicator with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

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With a HART Communicator To change the frequency output fault output indicator with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3. 2. Select FO Fault Indicator. 3. Select a fault indicator. See Table 4-11, page 80. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. If you selected Upscale in Step 3, then select “FO Fault Value” and enter the desired value within the range specified in Table 4-11, page 80. 6. Press F4 “ENTER.” 7. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the frequency output fault output indicator with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Frequency/Discrete Ouput tab. 2. Click the Frequency radio button if it is not already selected. 3. Click the arrow in the Freq Fault Action box, and select the desired fault indicator. 4. If you selected Upscale in Step 3, click the Freq Fault Level box and enter a new value. 5. Click Apply.

Changing the pulse width

The frequency output pulse width denotes the maximum duration of each pulse the transmitter sends to the frequency receiving device. If you have a receiving device that cannot recognize long pulse durations (widths), you might need to change the maximum pulse width. You can change the maximum pulse width with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the maximum pulse width with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 3. 2. Select Max Pulse Width. 3. Type a new maximum pulse width (duration), in seconds. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the maximum pulse width with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Frequency/Discrete Ouput tab. 2. If not already selected, click the Frequency radio button. 3. Type a new maximum pulse width (duration), in milliseconds, in the Freq Pulse Width box. 4. Click Apply.

4.16 Changing the discrete output

A discrete output may be selected instead of a frequency output on the Model 2700 transmitter. Pre-defined events can be set to trigger the discrete output. You can set the discrete output using ProLink II software or the HART Communicator. To change the discrete output:

With ProLink II software 1. Click the Frequency/Discrete Output tab. 2. Click the Discrete Output radio button if it is not already selected. 3. Click the arrow next to Assignment, and select one of the discrete output assignments listed below: - Event 1 - Event 2 - Event 1 or 2 Note: Events can be configured on the Events tab of the configuration screen - Flow Switch Note: If you select Flow Switch, enter a setpoint value in the Flow Switch Setpoint box. The flow switch has a 5% hysteresis [e.g., if the setpoint is 100 lb/min, the flow switch will be triggered when the flow rate falls below 100 lb/min, but not turned off until a 5% (5 lb/min) change occurs (i.e., the flow rate rises to 105 lb/min)]. - Fwd / Rev - Cal in Progress - Fault 4. Click Apply.

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Changing the Transmitter Settings continued

With a HART Communicator 1. Select 4, 3. 2. Select “FO/DO Config.” 3. Select “Freq/DO Setup.” 4. Select “Discrete Output.” 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Select DO is to select one of the discrete output assignments listed below: -

Event 1 Event 2 Event 1 or 2 Flow Switch Forward / Reverse Calibration in Progr Fault

Note: If you select Flow Switch, select 3, then enter a setpoint value. The flow switch has a 5% hysteresis (e.g., if the setpoint is 100 lb/min, the flow switch will be triggered when the flow rate falls below 100 lb/min, but not turned off until a 5% [5 lb/min] change occurs [i.e., the flow rate rises to 105 lb/min]). 7. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F2 “SEND.”

4.17 Changing the fault timeout parameter

By default, the transmitter immediately reports a fault when a fault is encountered. You can configure the transmitter to delay reporting a fault by changing the fault timeout parameter to a nonzero value. During the fault timeout period, the transmitter continues to report its last valid measurement. You can change the fault timeout parameter with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With the HART Communicator To change the fault timeout parameter with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3. 2. Select “Fault Timeout.” 3. Type a new fault timeout value. The value can be no greater than 60 seconds. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the fault timeout parameter with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Analog Output or the Frequency/Discrete Output tab. 2. Type a new value in the Last Measured Value Timeout box. 3. Click Apply.

4.18 Changing the digital communication fault setting

The Series 1000 or 2000 RS-485 digital output can indicate fault conditions. You can change the digital communication fault setting with ProLink II software or the HART Communicator.

With ProLink II software 1. Click the Device tab. 2. Open the Digital Comm Fault Settings list box in the Digital Comm Settings frame. 3. Select one of the fault setting options listed in Table 4-12. 4. Click Apply.

With the HART Communicator 1. Select 4, 3. 2. Select Comm Fault Ind. 3. Select one of the fault setting options listed in Table 4-12. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

Table 4-12. Digital communication fault output indicators and values Fault indicator

HART Comm. fault indicator

Upscale

Upscale

Process variables indicate the value is greater than the upper sensor limit. Totals stop

Downscale

Downscale

Process variables indicate the value is less than the lower sensor limit. Totals stop

Zero

IntZero-All 0

Flow rates, density, and temperature indicate 0,0

Not-A-Number (NAN)

Not-a-Number

Process variables report IEEE NAN. Stop totals and Modbus scaled integers report “Max Int.”

Flow to Zero

IntZero-Flow 0

Flow rates indicate 0,0; other process variables are not affected.

None (default)

None

Process variables reported as measured

84

Fault output value

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4.19 Changing HART settings

The following HART communication settings can be changed: • The polling address • Enable/disable burst mode • Burst-mode options

Changing the polling address

Polling addresses are integers assigned to transmitters to distinguish them from other devices on multidrop networks. Each transmitter on a multidrop network must have a polling address that is different from the polling addresses of other devices on the network. Transmitters that communicate using HART protocol can have polling addresses of 0–15. Zero is a special-purpose polling address that enables the primary mA output to vary according to the PV. When a transmitter’s HART polling address is set to any value other than zero, the primary mA output is fixed at 4 mA. You can change the transmitter’s polling address with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To change the transmitter’s polling address with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 4. 2. Select Poll addr. 3. Type a new polling address. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To change the transmitter’s polling address with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Device tab. 2. Type a new polling address in the Address box. 3. Click Apply.

Enabling and disabling burst mode

Burst mode is a specialized mode of communication during which the primary mA output is fixed at 4 mA and the transmitter regularly broadcasts HART digital information. Burst mode is ordinarily disabled, and should be enabled only if another device on the network requires HART burst mode communication. You can enable or disable HART burst mode with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

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With a HART Communicator To enable or disable HART burst mode with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 4. 2. Select Burst Mode. 3. If you want to enable burst mode, then select On. 4. If you want to disable burst mode, then select Off. 5. Press F4 “ENTER.” 6. Press F2 “SEND.”

With ProLink II software To enable or disable HART burst mode with ProLink II software: 1. Click the Device tab. 2. Click the Enable Burst checkbox. When the checkbox is selected, burst mode is enabled. 3. Click Apply.

Changing the burst mode setting

When the transmitter is in burst mode, it produces one of the following outputs: • PV—The transmitter repeats the primary variable (in measurement units) in each burst (e.g., 14,0 g/s, 13,5 g/s, 12,0 g/s). • % range/current—the transmitter sends the PV’s percent of range and the PV’s actual mA level in each burst. (e.g., 25%, 11,0 mA). • Process variables/current—the transmitter sends PV, SV, TV, and quaternary variable (QV) in measurement units and the PV’s actual milliamp reading in each burst (e.g., 50 lb/min, 23 °C, 50 lb/min, 0,0023 g/cc; 11,8 mA). You can change the burst-mode setting with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software. See Enabling and disabling burst mode, page 85 for information on enabling burst mode.

With a HART Communicator To change the burst-mode setting with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 3, 4. 2. Select Burst option. 3. Select one of the three burst-mode settings. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” 5. Press F2 “SEND.”

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With ProLink II software To change the burst-mode setting with ProLink II software: Note: Enable burst mode before you change the burst-mode output. See Enabling and disabling burst mode, page 85. 1. Click the Device tab. 2. Click the arrow next to Burst Cmd, and select an item from the drop-down list. 3. Click Apply.

4.20 Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display

The display uses a standard format and procedure for entering range values for either mA or frequency outputs. Enter range and scale values in scientific notation according to the following format:

SX.XXXESY Sign For positive numbers, leave this space blank. Digits For negative numbers, Enter a four-digit Sign number; three digits enter a dash (â&#x20AC;&#x201C;). must fall to the right of E the decimal point. Indicates exponents.

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Exponent Enter the power of 10 by which the digits will be multiplied.

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Example of range value format The correct format for the number –810,000 is shown below:

–8.100E 5 To enter mA or frequency range values with the display: Note: This procedure assumes that you are already at the correct point in the display menu to begin entering the range values. 1. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the first space is either a dash (–) for a negative number or a blank space for a positive number. 2. Press Select. 3. Press Scroll until the first digit is the correct number. 4. Press Select. 5. Press Scroll until the second digit is the correct number. 6. Press Select. 7. Press Scroll until the third digit is the correct number. 8. Press Select. 9. Press Scroll until the fourth digit is the correct number. 10. Press Select. 11. Press Scroll, if necessary, until the sign for the exponent is either a dash (–) for a negative exponent or a blank space for a positive exponent. 12. Press Select. 13. Press Scroll until the exponent is the correct power of ten. 14. Press Scroll and Select simultaneously for four seconds to exit.

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5

Characterizing and Calibrating

Stop

5.1

Overview

If the sensor and transmitter were ordered together as a Coriolis flowmeter, then the transmitter has already been characterized for the sensor. Only perform the procedures described in this section when the conditions under When to characterize and When to calibrate are met.

This section describes transmitter characterization and calibration procedures. Using the procedures in this section, you will be able to: • Characterize the flowmeter • Calibrate the flowmeter Note: All HART Communicator key sequences in this section assume that you are starting from the “Online” menu. See Conventions used in this manual, page 126. Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. See Using ProLink II Software, page 129.

WARNING Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II software via the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases.

5.2

Characterizing the flowmeter

Characterizing the flowmeter adjusts the transmitter to compensate for the unique traits of the sensor it is paired with.

When to characterize

If the transmitter and the sensor were ordered together as a Coriolis flowmeter, then the flowmeter has already been characterized. You need to characterize the flowmeter only if the transmitter and the sensor are being paired together for the first time.

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

How to characterize

Every sensor’s characterization data are printed on its calibration tag. See Figure 5-1.

Figure 5-1. Sample sensor calibration tag

To characterize the flowmeter, you must enter data from the sensor’s calibration tag into the transmitter memory. You can characterize the flowmeter with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To characterize the flowmeter with a HART Communicator, first select the appropriate sensor. Complete the following procedure to select the sensor: 1. Press 4, 1. 2. Select Sensor Selection. 3. Select the appropriate sensor. 4. Press F4 “ENTER.” Next, set each of the HART parameters to the values printed on the sensor’s calibration tag. See Figure 5-1. The HART Communicator locations for each sensor tag name are listed in Table 5-1, page 91.

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Table 5-1. Characterization guide Sensor calibration tag name 1

HART Communicator location

FCF and FT

4, 1, 2, FCF

FTG

4, 1, 2, FTG

FFQ

4, 1, 2, FFQ

D1

4, 1, 3, D1

K1

4, 1, 3, K1

D2

4, 1, 3, D2

K2

4, 1, 3, K2

DTG

4, 1, 3, DTG

DFQ1

4, 1, 3, DFQ1

DFQ2

4, 1, 3, DFQ2

DT

4, 1, 3, DT

FD

4, 1, 3, FD

1. FCF and FT consist of 10 characters that are labeled “FCF” and “FT” on the sensor tag. To characterize the flowmeter for FCF and FT, type the six characters that appear after “FCF” and the four characters that appear after “FT” on the sensor’s calibration tag.

FCF and FT

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With ProLink II software To characterize the flowmeter with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Configuration. 3. Click the Density tab. 4. Type the K1 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the K1 box. 5. Type the K2 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the K2 box. 6. Type the FD data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the FD box. 7. Type the D1 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the D1 box. 8. Type the D2 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the D2 box. 9. Type the DT data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the Temp Coeff (DT) box. 10. Click Apply. 11. Click the Flow tab. 12. Type the FCF and FT data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the Flow Cal box. Note: FCF and FT data consist of 10 characters that are labeled “FCF” and “FT” on the sensor’s calibration tag. To properly characterize the transmitter, enter all six characters that appear after “FCF” followed by all four characters that appear after “FT.” 13. Click Apply. For a T-Series sensor, continue with Step 14 through Step 20. Otherwise, you have completed characterization. 14. Click the T Series Config tab. 15. Type the FTG data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the FTG box. 16. Type the FFQ data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the FFQ box. 17. Type the DTG data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the DTG box. 18. Type the DFQ1 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the DFQ1 box. 19. Type the DFQ2 data from the sensor’s calibration tag in the DFQ2 box. 20. Click Apply.

5.3

92

Calibrating the flowmeter

The flowmeter measures process variables based on fixed points of reference. Calibration adjusts those points of reference.

When to calibrate

The transmitter is factory calibrated and does not normally need to be calibrated in the field. Calibrate the transmitter only if you must do so to meet regulatory requirements.

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

How to calibrate for density

Density calibration consists of three mandatory calibration points and two optional calibration points: • Point one (low density) • Point two (high density) • Flowing density • Optional D3 calibration (T-Series only) • Optional D4 calibration (T-Series only) You must perform all of the density calibration procedures in sequence, without interruption, including the optional D3 and D4 calibrations if you choose to include them.

When to perform optional D3 or D4 calibration (T-Series only) The optional D3 and D4 calibration might improve the accuracy of the density measurement. If the density measurement is critical at high flow rates, or if the process fluid varies greatly in flow rate or density, consider performing the D3 and D4 calibration.

Density calibration with a HART Communicator

Perform the following steps to calibrate the flowmeter for density with a HART Communicator.

Step 1: Point one (low-density calibration) To perform a low-density calibration: 1. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 2. Fill the sensor completely with a low-density fluid (e.g., air). 3. Press 2, 3. 4. Select Density cal. 5. Select Dens Pt1. 6. Select Perform Cal. 7. Type the density of the low-density fluid. 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press F4 “OK” to begin the calibration. 10. Press F4 “OK” when the calibration is complete. 11. Press F3 “HOME” and proceed to the high-density calibration procedure.

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Step 2: Point two (high-density calibration) To perform a high-density calibration: 1. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 2. Fill the sensor completely with a high-density fluid (e.g., water). 3. Press 2, 3. 4. Select Density cal. 5. Select Dens Pt2. 6. Select Perform Cal. 7. Type the density of the high-density fluid. 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press F4 “OK” to begin the calibration. 10. Press F4 “OK” when the calibration is complete. 11. Press F3 “HOME” and proceed to the flowing-density calibration procedure.

Step 3: Flowing-density calibration To perform a flowing-density calibration: 1. Press 2, 3. 2. Select Density cal. 3. Select Flowing Dens (FD). 4. Adjust process conditions so that the process flow rate is greater than or equal to the appropriate flow rate that is listed in Table 5-2, page 95. If the maximum flow rate for the process is lower than the appropriate flow rate listed in Table 5-2, then the flowing-density calibration should not be performed. 5. Select Perform Cal. 6. Type the density of the fluid. 7. Press F4 “ENTER.” 8. Press F4 “OK” to begin the calibration. 9. Press F4 “OK” when the calibration is complete. 10. Press F3 “HOME.”

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Table 5-2. Flowing density calibration minimum flow rates Minimum flow rate in kg/h

Sensor model ELITE速 sensor

T-Series sensor

F-Series sensor R-Series sensor Model D sensor

CMF010

69

CMF025

720

CMF050

2350

CMF100

7575

CMF200

34540

CMF300

119600

CMF400

409000

T025

Flowing density calibration not necessary

T050

Flowing density calibration not necessary

T075

13630

T100

29990

T150

95430

F200

63045

All other F-Series sensors

Flowing density calibration not necessary

All R-Series sensors

Flowing density calibration not necessary

D6

25

D12

125

D25

485

D40 stainless steel 速

900

D40 Hastelloy C-22

1395

D65

3060

D100

11010

D150

31050

D300

73660

D600

245520

Model DH sensor

All DH sensors

Flowing density calibration not necessary

Model DL sensor

DL65

3075

DL100

8780

DL200

32950

DT65

4040

DT100

8460

DT150

15780

Model DT sensor

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Step 4: Optional D3 calibration (T-Series only) You may perform a D3 calibration, a D4 calibration, or both calibrations. • The minimum density of the D3 or D4 fluid is 0,6 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D3 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D4 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • If D3 and D4 density calibrations are performed, the difference between the densities of the D3 and D4 calibration fluids must be at least 0,1 g/cc. To perform the optional D3 calibration: 1. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 2. Fill the sensor completely with a fluid with a known density. 3. Press 2, 3. 4. Select Density cal. 5. Select Dens Pt3 T-series. 6. Select Perform Cal. 7. Type the density of the fluid. 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press F4 “OK” to begin the calibration. 10. Press F4 “OK” when the calibration is complete. 11. Press F3 “HOME.”

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Step 5: Optional D4 calibration (T-Series only) You may perform a D3 calibration, a D4 calibration, or both calibrations. • The minimum density of the D3 or D4 fluid is 0,6 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D3 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D4 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • If D3 and D4 density calibrations are performed, then the difference between the densities of the D3 and D4 calibration fluids must be at least 0,1 g/cc. To perform the optional D4 calibration: 1. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 2. Fill the sensor completely with a fluid with a known density. 3. Press 2, 3. 4. Select Density cal. 5. Select Dens Pt4 T-series. 6. Select Perform Cal. 7. Type the density of the fluid. 8. Press F4 “ENTER.” 9. Press F4 “OK” to begin the calibration. 10. Press F4 “OK” when the calibration is complete. 11. Press F3 “HOME.”

Density calibration with ProLink II software

Perform the following procedures to calibrate the flowmeter for density with ProLink II software.

Step 1: Point one (low-density calibration) To perform a low-density calibration: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Density Cal - Point 1 from the Calibration menu. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Fill the sensor completely with a low-density fluid (e.g., air). 5. Type the density of the low-density fluid in the Enter Actual Density box. 6. Click Do Cal. 7. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Checking the calibration, page 114. 8. Read the results of the calibration in the K1 box. 9. Click Done and proceed to the high-density calibration procedure.

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Step 2: Point two (high-density calibration) To perform a high-density calibration: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Density Cal - Point 2 from the Calibration menu. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Fill the sensor completely with a high-density fluid (e.g., water). 5. Type the density of the fluid in the Enter Actual Density box. 6. Click Do Cal. 7. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Checking the calibration, page 114. 8. Read the results of the calibration in the K2 box. 9. Click Done and proceed to the flowing-density calibration procedure.

Step 3: Flowing-density calibration To perform a flowing-density calibration: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Density Cal - Flowing Density from the Calibration menu. 3. Adjust process conditions so that the process flow is greater than or equal to the appropriate flow rate that is listed in Table 5-2, page 95. If the maximum flow rate for the process is lower than the appropriate flow rate listed in Table 5-2, then the flowing-density calibration should not be performed. 4. Type the density of the fluid in the Enter Actual Density box. 5. Click Do Cal. 6. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Checking the calibration, page 114. 7. Read the results of the calibration in the FD box. 8. Click Done.

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Step 4: Optional D3 calibration (T-Series only) You may perform a D3 calibration, a D4 calibration, or both calibrations. • The minimum density of the D3 or D4 fluid is 0,6 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D3 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D4 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • If D3 and D4 density calibrations are performed, then the difference between the densities of the D3 and D4 calibration fluids must be at least 0,1 g/cc. To perform an optional D3 calibration with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Density Cal - Point 3 from the Calibration menu. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Fill the sensor completely with a fluid of known density. 5. Type the density of the fluid in the Enter Actual Density box. 6. Click Do Cal. 7. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 8. Read the results of the calibration in the K3 box. 9. Click Done.

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Step 5: Optional D4 calibration (T-Series only) You may perform a D3 calibration, a D4 calibration, or both calibrations. • The minimum density of the D3 or D4 fluid is 0,6 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D3 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • The difference between the density of the D4 calibration fluid and the fluid that was used to perform the high-density calibration must be at least 0,1 g/cc. • If D3 and D4 density calibrations are performed, then the difference between the densities of the D3 and D4 calibration fluids must be at least 0,1 g/cc. To perform an optional D4 calibration with ProLink II software: 1. Click ProLink. 2. Select Density Cal - Point 4 from the Calibration menu. 3. Close the shutoff valve downstream from the sensor. 4. Fill the sensor completely with a fluid of known density. 5. Type the density of the fluid in the Enter Actual Density box. 6. Click Do Cal. 7. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 8. Read the results of the calibration in the K4 box. 9. Click Done.

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How to calibrate for temperature

Temperature calibration is a two-point procedure. The entire procedure must be completed without interruption. You can calibrate for temperature with ProLink II software.

Temperature calibration with ProLink II software

To calibrate for temperature with ProLink II software: 1. Click the ProLink menu. 2. Select Temp Offset Cal from the Calibration menu. 3. Fill the sensor with a low-temperature fluid, and allow the sensor to achieve thermal equilibrium. 4. Type the temperature of the low-temperature fluid in the Enter Actual Temp box. 5. Click Do Cal. 6. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 7. Click Done. 8. Click the Temperature tab. 9. Read the number after the "T" in the Temp Cal Factor box. 10. Click the ProLink menu. 11. Select Temp Slope Cal from the Calibration menu. 12. Fill the sensor with a high-temperature fluid, and allow the sensor to achieve thermal equilibrium. 13. Type the temperature of the high-temperature fluid in the Enter Actual Temp box. 14. Click Do Cal. 15. If a status light indicates calibration failure (red light), then the calibration procedure has failed. See Zero or calibration failure, page 107. 16. Read the number before the "T" in the Temp Cal Factor box in the Temperature tab. 17. Click Done.

Pressure compensation setup

Intrinsically safe Series 1000 and 2000 transmitters can compensate for the effect of pressure on the sensor flow tubes. Pressure effect is defined as the change in sensor flow and density sensitivity due to process pressure change away from calibration pressure. Figure 5-2, page 102 illustrates pressure compensation wiring. If the pressure is a known, static pressure, then you may choose to enter the external pressure in the software and not poll for a pressure measurement device. In that case, you should enter static pressure amount so it can compensate for any deviation from the calibrated pressure value. Two pressure compensation factors must also be entered, one for flow and one for density. Further, you need to enter the flow calibration pressure. Flow calibration is performed at the factory to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards (20 psi).

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

Figure 5-2. Pressure compensation wiring

Power supply 85â&#x20AC;&#x201C;265 VAC, 50/60 Hz 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;100 VDC

HARTcompatible host or transmitter

You can change pressure compensation either with ProLink II software, or with a HART Communicator.

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

Entering static pressure with ProLink II software To set a static pressure compensation value with ProLink II software: 1. From the View menu, select Preferences. 2. If the Enable Pressure Compensation box does not already contain a check mark, then click the box to enable pressure compensation. 3. On the ProLink menu, click Configuration. 4. Click the Polled Variables tab. 5. Ensure that "Do not poll" is selected in the Polling Control box of the Polled Variable 1 frame. a. If "Do not poll" is not selected, click the arrow in the Polling Control box and select "Do not poll." b. Click Apply. 6. Click the Pressure tab. 7. Type a new value in the External Pressure box. 8. Click Apply. 9. Click the Pressure tab. 10. Enter new values in the Flow factor, Density factor, and Cal Pressure boxes. 11. Click Apply.

Polling pressure compensation with ProLink II software To poll for a pressure measurement device with ProLink II software: 1. On the View menu, click Preferences. 2. Ensure that the Enable External Pressure Compensation box is checked. 3. Click OK. 4. Click the Polled Variables tab on the Configuration window. 5. Click the arrow on the Polling Control box (for Polled Variable 1 and/or Polled Variable 2) and select Poll as Primary or Poll as Secondary. Choose Primary if another secondary host will likely access the pressure transmitter (e.g., HART Communicator). Choose Secondary if another primary host will access the pressure transmitter. 6. Enter the tag name of the pressure instrument being polled in the External Tag box. 7. Click the arrow next to the Variable Type box and select Pressure. 8. Click Apply. 9. Click the Pressure tab. 10. Enter new values in the Flow factor and Density factor boxes. Enter the flowcal pressure in the Cal Pressure box. 11. Click Apply.

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

Entering static pressure with a HART Communicator To set a static pressure compensation without polling a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 1, 5. 2. Select "Enable Pressure Co." 3. If it is not already selected, then select "Enabled." 4. Press F4 "ENTER." 5. Select "Flow fctr." 6. Enter a new flow factor. 7. Press F4 "ENTER." 8. Select "Dens factr." 9. Enter a new density factor. 10. Press F4 "ENTER." 11. Select "Flowcal pressure." 12. Enter a new flowcal pressure. 13. Press F4 "ENTER." 14. If your pressure is a constant, known value, then select "Static pressure." a. Enter the static pressure. b. Press F4 "ENTER." 15. Press F2 "SEND."

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Characterizing and Calibrating continued

Polling pressure compensation with HART Communicator To poll for a pressure compensation device with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 4, 1, 5. 2. Select "Enable Pressure Co." 3. If it is not already selected, then select "Enabled." 4. Press F4 "ENTER." 5. Press F3 "HOME." 6. Press 4, 1, 8. 7. Select "Poll Control 1." 8. Select "Poll as primary host" or "Poll as secondary host." Choose Primary if another secondary host will likely access the pressure transmitter (e.g., HART Communicator). Choose Secondary if another primary host will access the pressure transmitter. 9. Press F4 "ENTER." 10. Press F3 "HOME." 11. Press 4, 1, 5. 12. Follow Step 5 to Step 15 from Entering static pressure with a HART Communicator, page 104. Note: MVD and pressure transmitter polling addresses must be unique and non-zero.

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6

6.1

Troubleshooting

Overview

This section describes guidelines and procedures for troubleshooting the flowmeter. The information in this section will enable you to: • Categorize the problem • Determine whether you are able to correct the problem • Take corrective measures (if possible) • Contact the appropriate support agency Note: All HART Communicator key sequences in this section assume that you are starting from the “Online” menu. See Conventions used in this manual, page 126. Note: All ProLink II procedures provided in this section assume that your computer is already connected to the transmitter and you have established communication. See Using ProLink II Software, page 129.

CAUTION Using the RS-485/USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area can cause an explosion. Before using ProLink II software via the USP port to communicate with the transmitter in a hazardous area, make sure the atmosphere is free of explosive gases

6.2

Transmitter does not operate

If the transmitter does not operate at all (i.e., the transmitter is not receiving power and cannot communicate over the HART network or the display), then perform all of the procedures under Diagnosing wiring problems, page 112. If the procedures do not indicate a problem with the electrical connections, contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department. See Contacting customer service, page 116.

6.3

Transmitter does not communicate

If the transmitter does not appear to be communicating on the HART network, then the network wiring may be faulty. Perform the procedures under Checking the communication loop, page 112.

6.4

Zero or calibration failure

If a zero or calibration procedure fails, the transmitter will send a status alarm indicating the cause of failure. See Status alarms, page 109, for specific remedies for status alarms indicating calibration failure.

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Troubleshooting continued

6.5

HART output problems

HART output problems include inconsistent or unexpected behavior that does not trigger status alarms. For example, the HART Communicator might show incorrect units of measure or respond sluggishly. If you experience HART output problems, verify that the transmitter configuration is correct. If you discover that the configuration is incorrect, change the necessary transmitter settings. See Changing the Transmitter Settings, page 39, for the procedures to change the appropriate transmitter settings. If you confirm that all the settings are correct, but the unexpected outputs prevail, then the transmitter or sensor could require service. See Contacting customer service, page 116.

6.6

Analog output problems

If you are experiencing problems with the analog outputs (frequency or mA), use Table 6-1 to identify an appropriate remedy.

Table 6-1. Analog output problems and remedies Symptom

Possible cause

Possible remedy

No mA output and no frequency output or loop test failed

Power supply problem

Check power supply and power-supply wiring. See page 112.

Fault condition present if fault outputs are set to downscale or internal zero

Check the fault output settings to verify whether or not the transmitter is in a fault condition. See page 74 to check the mA fault output or page 80 to check the frequency fault output. If a fault condition is present, then see page 109.

No mA output

Bad mA receiving device

Check the mA receiving device or try another mA receiving device. See page 113.

No frequency output

Actual flow is below flow cutoff

Verify or change the flow cutoff. See page 59.

Fault condition if fault output is set to downscale or internal zero

Check the fault output settings to verify whether or not the transmitter is in a fault condition. See page 80. If a fault condition is present, then see page 109.

Constant 4 mA output or transmitter in fix mode mA output consistently out of range

Bad frequency receiving device

Check the frequency receiving device or try another frequency receiving device. See page 113.

Transmitter is set to multidrop (digital only) communication

Set HART polling address to zero. See page 113.

Output is fixed in a test mode

Exit output from test mode

Fault condition if fault output is set to upscale or downscale

Check the fault output settings to verify whether or not the transmitter is in a fault condition. See page 74. If a fault condition is present, then see page 109.

LRV and URV not set correctly

Check the LRV and URV. See page 113.

Consistently incorrect mA measurement

Output not trimmed correctly

Trim the output. See page 24.

LRV and URV not set correctly

Check the LRV and URV. See page 113.

Consistently incorrect frequency measurement

Output not scaled correctly

Check frequency output scale and method. See page 113. Verify voltage and resistance match the frequency Output Load Resistance Value chart (See Figure 1-8, page 10).

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Troubleshooting continued

6.7

Fault conditions

If the analog and HART outputs can indicate a fault condition (by reporting a fault output), determine the exact nature of the fault by checking the status alarms with a HART Communicator, the display, or ProLink II software. Once you have identified the status alarm(s) associated with the fault condition, refer to Status alarms.

Status alarms

Status alarms are reported by a HART Communicator, the display, and ProLink II software. Remedies for the alarm states appear in Table 6-2, page 109.

Table 6-2. Status alarms and remedies Display code

HART Communicator

A1

A2

ProLink II software

Possible remedy

EEPROM Checksum—Core Processor

EEPROM Checksum

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

RAM Error—Core Processor

RAM Error

Cycle power to the flowmeter. The flowmeter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A3

Sensor failure

Sensor Failure

Check the test points. See page 114.

A4

Temperature out of range

Temperature Overrange

Check the test points. See page 114.

A5

Input over range

Input Overrange

Check the test points. See page 114.

A6

Field device not characterized

Not Configured

Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the FCF and K1 values. See page 113. If the problem persists, contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A7

Real time interrupt failure

RTI Failure

The transmitter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A8

Density outside limits

Density Overrange

Check the test points. See page 114.

A9

Field device warming up

Transmitter Initializing

Allow the flowmeter to warm up. The error should disappear once the flowmeter is ready for normal operation.

A10

Calibration failed

Calibration Failure

Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry calibrating the transmitter. See page 114.

A11

Excess calibration correction, zero too low

Zero too Low

Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry calibrating the transmitter. See page 114.

A12

Excess calibration correction, zero too high

Zero too High

Cycle power to the flowmeter, then retry calibrating the transmitter. See page 114.

A13

Process too noisy to perform auto zero

Zero too Noisy

Remove or reduce sources of electromechanical noise, then attempt the calibration or zero procedure again. Sources of noise include: • Mechanical pumps • Electrical interference • Vibration effects from nearby machinery

A14

Electronics failure

Transmitter Fail

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A16

Line RTD Overrange

Line Temp Out-of-range

Check the test points. See page 114.

A17

Meter RTD Overrange

Meter Temp Out-of-Range

Check the test points. See page 114.

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Troubleshooting continued

Table 6-2. Status alarms and remedies (continued) Display code

HART Communicator

A18 A19

ProLink II software

Possible remedy

EEPROM Checksum— 1000/2000

EEPROM Checksum

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

RAM Error— 1000/2000

RAM Error

Cycle power to the flowmeter.

A20

Calibration Factor Unentered (Flocal)

Cal Factor Unentered

Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the FCF value. See page 90.

A21

Unrecognized/Unenter ed Sensor Type (K1)

Incorrect Sensor Type

Check the characterization. Specifically, verify the K1 value. See page 90.

A22

EEPROM Config Corrupt–Core Processor

Configuration Corrupt

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A23

EEPROM Totals Corrupt–Core Processor

Totals Corrupt

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A24

EEPROM Program Corrupt–Core Processor

CP Program Corrupt

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A25

Core Processor Boot Sector Fault

Boot Sector Fault

The flowmeter needs service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

A26

Sensor/Xmtr Communication Error

Sensor/Transmitter Comm Failure

Check the wiring between the transmitter and the core processor. The wires may be swapped. See page 6.

A100

Analog output 1 saturated

Analog 1 Saturated

Change the mA output scale. See page 70.

A101

Analog output 1 fixed

Analog 1 Fixed

Check the HART polling address. See page 113.

A102

Drive over range

Drive Overrange

Excessive drive gain. See page 115.

A103

Data loss possible

Data Loss Possible

Cycle power to the flowmeter.

The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

Be advised that a loop test is in progress.

View the entire current configuration to determine what data were lost. Configure any settings with missing or incorrect data. The transmitter might need service. Contact Micro Motion. See page 116. A104

Calibration in progress

Calibration in Progress

A105

Slug flow

Slug Flow

Allow the flowmeter to complete calibration. Allow the slug flow to clear from the process. Adjust slug-flow limits and duration to prevent future error. See page 57.

A106

Burst mode enabled

Burst Mode

No action required.

A107

Power reset occurred

Power Reset

No action required.

A108

Event 1 triggered

Event 1 On

Be advised of alarm condition. If you believe the event has been triggered erroneously, verify the Event 1 settings. See page 53.

A109

Event 2 triggered

Event 2 On

Be advised of alarm condition. If you believe the event has been triggered erroneously, verify the Event 2 settings. See page 53.

A110

110

Frequency over range

Frequency Saturated

Change the frequency output. See page 76.

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Troubleshooting continued

Table 6-2. Status alarms and remedies (continued) Display code

HART Communicator

A111

ProLink II software

Possible remedy

Freq output fixed

Frequency Output Fixed

Be advised that a loop test is in progress.

A112

Series 1000/2000 software upgrade recommended

NA

Contact Micro Motion to get a Series 1000/2000 transmitter software upgrade. See page 116. Note that the device is still functional.

A113

Analog output 2 saturated

Analog 2 Saturated

Change the mA output scale. See page 70.

A114

Analog output 2 fixed

Analog 2 Fixed

Be advised that a loop test is in progress.

A115

External input error

External Input Error

HART polling connection has failed to external device

NA

Density FD cal in progress

NA

Be advised that density calibration is in progress.

NA

Density 1st point cal in progress

NA

Be advised that density calibration is in progress.

NA

Density 2nd point cal in progress

NA

Be advised that density calibration is in progress.

NA

Density 3rd point cal in progress

NA

Be advised that density calibration is in progress.

NA

Density 4th point cal in progress

NA

Be advised that density calibration is in progress.

NA

Mech. zero cal in progress

NA

Be advised that zero calibration is in progress.

NA

Flow is in reverse direction

NA

Be advised that the process is flowing in reverse direction.

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Troubleshooting continued

6.8

Diagnosing wiring problems

Use the procedures under the following headings to check the transmitter installation for wiring problems.

Checking the power-supply wiring

To check the power-supply wiring:

WARNING Removing the wiring compartment covers in explosive atmospheres while the power is on can cause an explosion. Do not remove the field wiring compartment cover in explosive atmospheres before shutting off the power and waiting the required delay time as indicated on the transmitter housing.

1. Open the field-wiring compartment cover. 2. Inspect the voltage label on the inside of the field-wiring compartment. Verify that the voltage supplied to the transmitter matches the voltage specified on the label. 3. Use a voltmeter to test the voltage at the power-supply terminals. 4. Verify that the power-supply wires are making good contact with the power-supply terminals.

Checking the core processor-to-transmitter wiring

To check the core processor-to-transmitter wiring, verify that: • The transmitter is connected to the core processor according to the wiring information beginning on page 1. • The wires are making good contact with the terminals. If the wires are reversed, then turn the power off, and swap the communication wires.

Checking the communication loop

To check the communication loop, verify that the loop wires are connected as shown in the wiring diagrams on pages 10–16. If your HART network is more complex than the wiring diagrams on pages 9–16, either: • Contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department. See page 116. • Contact the HART Communication Foundation or refer to the HART Application Guide, available from the HART Communication Foundation on the Internet at:

http://www.hartcomm.org

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Troubleshooting continued

6.9

Checking the receiving device

If you receive an inaccurate frequency or mA reading, you might be using a faulty receiving device. Use a different receiving device to confirm that the mA or frequency reading you are receiving is accurate. Another receiving device will help you determine if the problem exists in the receiving device or in the transmitter.

6.10 Setting the HART polling address to zero

If the HART polling address is set to a nonzero number, or if the transmitter is in burst mode, the mA output is fixed at 4 mA. If the polling address is changed to zero and the transmitter is not in burst mode, the mA output will report the primary variable on a 4–20 mA scale. See Entering milliamp and frequency range values with the display, page 87 and Enabling and disabling burst mode, page 85.

6.11 Checking the upper and lower range values

A saturated mA output or incorrect mA measurement could indicate a faulty URV or LRV. Verify that the URV and LRV are correct and change them if necessary. See Changing the upper range value and Changing the lower range value, page 72.

6.12 Checking the frequency output scale and method

A saturated frequency output or an incorrect frequency measurement could indicate a faulty frequency output scale and/or method. Verify that the frequency output scale and method are correct and change them if necessary. See Changing the output scale, page 78.

6.13 Checking the characterization

A flowmeter that is incorrectly characterized for its sensor might produce inaccurate output values. If the flowmeter appears to be operating correctly but sends inaccurate output values, then an incorrect characterization could be the cause. To verify the characterization with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 5. 2. Select “Charize sensor.” 3. Press F3 “NEXT” to scroll through the list of characterization data. 4. Compare the characterization data to the characterization data on the sensor’s factory tag. 5. Press F4 “EXIT.” If you discover that any of the characterization data are wrong, then perform a complete characterization. See How to characterize, page 90.

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Troubleshooting continued

6.14 Checking the calibration

Improper calibration can cause the transmitter to send unexpected output values. If the transmitter appears to be operating correctly but sends inaccurate output values, then an improper calibration may be the cause. Micro Motion calibrates every transmitter at the factory. Therefore, you should only suspect improper calibration if the transmitter has been calibrated after it was shipped from the factory. The calibration procedures in this manual are designed for calibration to a regulatory standard. See Calibrating the flowmeter, page 92. To calibrate for true accuracy, always use a measurement source that is more accurate than the flowmeter. Contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department for assistance. See Contacting customer service, page 116.

6.15 Checking the test points

Obtaining the test points

Some status alarms that indicate a sensor failure or overrange condition can be caused by problems other than a failed sensor. You can diagnose sensor failure or overrange status alarms by checking the flowmeter test points. The test points include left and right pickoff voltages, drive gain, and tube frequency.

You can obtain the test points with a HART Communicator or ProLink II software.

With a HART Communicator To obtain the test points with a HART Communicator: 1. Press 2, 8. 2. Select Drive. 3. Write down the drive gain. 4. Press F4. 5. Select LPO. 6. Write down the left pickoff voltage. 7. Press F4. 8. Select RPO. 9. Write down the right pickoff voltage. 10. Press F4. 11. Select Tube. 12. Write down the tube frequency. 13. Press F4.

With ProLink II software To obtain the test points with ProLink II software: 1. Select Diagnostic Information from the ProLink menu. 2. Write down the value you find in the Tube Frequency box, the Left Pickoff box, the Right Pickoff box, and the Drive Gain box.

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Troubleshooting continued

Evaluating the test points

Use the following guidelines to evaluate the test points: • If the drive gain is unstable, refer to Excessive drive gain. • If the value for the left or right pickoff does not equal the appropriate value from Table 6-3, based on the sensor flow tube frequency, refer to Bad pickoff voltage. • If the values for the left and right pickoffs equal the appropriate values from Table 6-3, based on the sensor flow tube frequency, contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department for assistance. See Contacting customer service, page 116.

Table 6-3. Sensor pickoff values Sensor model

Pickoff value

®

ELITE Model CMF sensors

3,4 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Model D, DL, and DT sensors

3,4 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Micro Motion F-Series sensors

3,4 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Model R025, R050, or R100 sensor

3,4 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Model R200 sensor

2,0 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Micro Motion T-Series sensors

0,5 mV per Hz based on sensor flow tube frequency

Excessive drive gain

Excessive drive can be caused by several problems. See Table 6-4.

Table 6-4. Excessive drive gain causes and solutions Cause

Solution

Excessive slug flow

Eliminate slugs. Change the sensor orientation.

Plugged flow tube

Purge the flow tubes.

Cavitation or flashing

Increase inlet or back pressure at the sensor. If a pump is located upstream from the sensor, increase the distance between the pump and sensor.

Drive board or module failure, cracked flow tube, or sensor imbalance

Erratic drive gain

Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

Erratic drive gain can be caused by several problems. See Table 6-5.

Table 6-5. Erratic drive gain causes and solutions Cause

Solution

Wrong K1 characterization constant for sensor

Re-enter the K1 characterization constant. See page 90.

Polarity of pick-off reversed or polarity of drive reversed

Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

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Troubleshooting continued

Bad pickoff voltage

Bad pickoff voltage can be caused by several problems. See Table 6-6.

Table 6-6. Bad pickoff voltage causes and solutions

6.16 Contacting customer service

Cause

Solution

Faulty wiring runs between the sensor and core processor.

Refer to the sensor manual.

The process flow rate is beyond the limits of the sensor.

Verify that the process flow rate is not out of range of the sensor.

There is moisture in the sensor electronics.

Eliminate the moisture in the sensor electronics.

The sensor is damaged.

Contact Micro Motion. See page 116.

For technical assistance, contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department at: • In the UK., phone 0800-966 180 (toll-free) • Outside the U.K ., phone +31 (0) 318 549 443 • Or visit our website at www.micromotion.com

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Appendix A

Specifications

A.1

The transmitter’s functional specifications include:

Functional specifications

• Electrical connections • Input/output signals • Digital communications • Power supply • Environmental requirements • Electromagnetic interference (EMI) effects

Electrical connections

Input and output connections The transmitter has the following input and output connections: • Three pairs of wiring terminals for transmitter outputs • Screw terminals accept one or two solid conductors, 2,5 to 4 mm2; or one or two stranded conductors, 0,34 to 2,5 mm2

Power connection The transmitter has the following power connection: • One pair of wiring terminals accepts either AC or DC power • One internal ground lug for power-supply ground wiring • Screw terminals accept one or two solid conductors, 2,5 to 4 mm2; or one or two stranded conductors, 0,34 to 2,5 mm2

Service port connection The transmitter has two clips for temporary connection to the service port.

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Specifications continued

Input/output signals

The transmitter communicates using the following input and output methods: • One 4-wire sensor signal input connection with ground, intrinsically safe • Two passive 4-20 mA outputs - Isolated to ±50 VDC from all other outputs and earth ground - Maximum load limit (See Figure 1-8, page 10). - Can report mass flow, volume flow, density, temperature, or drive gain - Output is linear with process from 3,8 to 20,5 mA, per NAMUR NE43 (June 1994) • One passive frequency/pulse output - Can report mass flow or volume flow, which can be used to indicate flow rate or total - For Series 1000, output is dependent on mA output; for Series 2000, output is independent - Scalable to 10000 Hz - Output is linear with flow rate to 12500 Hz

Digital communications

The transmitter has the following digital communications ports: • One service port can be used for temporary connection only - Uses RS-485 Modbus signal, baud rate of 38.4 kilobaud, one stop bit, no parity • HART Bell 202 signal is superimposed on the primary milliamp output, and is available for host system interface -

Power supply

Frequency 1,2 and 2,2 kHz Amplitude 0,8 V peak-to-peak 1200 baud Requires 250 to 600 ohms load resistance

The power supply switches automatically to accept AC or DC power: • 18–100 VDC or 85–250 VAC 50/60 Hz: - 9 W maximum power - 1,25 A slow-blow fuse - Complies with low-voltage directive 73/23/EEC per IEC 1010-1 with Amendment 2 - Installation (Overvoltage) Category II, Pollution Degree 2

Environmental requirements

Environmental requirements include ambient temperature limits: • Ambient temperature limits between –37 and 60°C - Some darkening of the display may occur above 55 °C - Display responsiveness decreases below 20 °C

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Specifications continued

Electromagnetic interference effects

The transmitter meets the following EMI effects standards: • Compliance is pending for NAMUR NE21 (May 1999) • Series 1000 and 2000 transmitters meet EMC directive 89/336/EEC per EN 50081-2 (August 1993) and EN 50082-2 (March 1995), and EN 61326 Industrial

A.2

Hazardous area classifications

The transmitter may have a tag listing hazardous area classifications, which indicate compliance with the standards listed below.

UL and CSA

UL and CSA marked transmitters comply to the following standards: • Transmitter: Class I, Div. 1, Groups C and D. Class II, Div. 1, Groups E, F, and G explosion proof (when installed with approved conduit seals). Otherwise, Class I, Div. 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. • Outputs: Provides nonincendive sensor outputs for use in Class I, Div. 2, Groups A, B, C, and D; or intrinsically safe sensor outputs for use in Class I, Div. 1, Groups C and D or Class II, Div. 1, Groups E, F, and G.

CENELEC compliance

Transmitters with the CENELEC-compliant tag are suitable for installation in hazardous areas as follows: • Flameproof when installed with approved cable glands: - with display EEx d [ib] IIB+H2 T5, EEx d [ia/ib] IIB+H2 T5 - without display EEx d [ib] IIB T5, EEx d [ia/ib] IIC T5 • Increased safety when installed with approved cable glands: - with display EEx de [ib] IIB+H2 T5, EEx de [ia/ib] IIB+H2 T5 - without display EEx de [ib] IIB T5, EEx de [ia/ib] IIC T5

A.3

Performance specifications

For performance specifications, refer to the manual that was shipped with the sensor.

A.4

Physical specifications

The physical specifications of the transmitter include: • Field-mount housing • Mounting • Interface/display

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Specifications continued

Field-mount housing

The characteristics of the field-mount transmitter housing are as follows: • IP67 (NEMA 4X) epoxy-painted cast aluminum housing • Terminal compartment contains output terminals, power terminals and service-port terminals. The output terminals are physically separated from the power- and service-port terminals. - The electronics compartment contains all electronics and the standard display. - The sensor compartment contains the wiring terminals for connection to the core processor on the sensor. • Screw-terminal on housing for chassis ground • Cable gland entrances are either ½-14 NPT or M20 x 1,5 female conduit ports

Mounting

Model 1700 and 2700 field-mount transmitters are available integrally mounted to Micro Motion sensors, or in a remote-mount configuration. • Remote-mount transmitters include a mounting bracket, and require standard 4-wire or 9-wire signal cables, up to 300 meters in length, between the sensor and the transmitter. Hardware for installing the transmitter on the mounting bracket is included. • The transmitter can be rotated on the sensor or the mounting bracket, 360 degrees, in 90-degree increments.

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Specifications continued

Interface/display

The characteristics of the display are as follows: • Segmented 2-line display with LCD screen with optical controls and flowmeter-status LED is standard and is suitable for hazardous area installation. • To facilitate various mounting orientations, the display can rotate 360° on the transmitter in 90° increments. - LCD line 1 lists the process variable, line 2 lists engineering unit of measure through a non-glare tempered glass lens. - Display controls feature optical switches that are operated through the glass with a red LED visual-feedback to confirm when a “button” is pressed.

Display functions The display supports the following functions: • Operational: view process variables; start, stop, and reset totalizers. • Off-line: change measurement units; view diagnostic messages, zero flowmeter, initiate output simulation and configuration

Status light Three-color LED status light on display panel indicates flowmeter condition at a glance. A green, yellow, or red status light, either continuously on or blinking, immediately indicates flowmeter status.

Weight:

The weight of the remotely mounted transmitter is as follows: • 4 kg • For weight of intregally mounted transmitter and sensor, refer to sensor specifications

Dimensions

Figure A-1, page 122, and Figure A-2, page 123 show the transmitter and core processor assembly’s dimensions. For dimensions of integrally mounted transmitters and sensors, refer to sensor specifications.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

121


Specifications continued

Figure A-1. Remote mount transmitter dimensions

Dimensions in in mm

174 99 62 Ă&#x2DC;4

3X M20 X 1.5

124

69

26

122 48 58

93 71

45

114

110 4X Ă&#x2DC;10

214

71 244

122

60 120

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Specifications continued

Figure A-2. Remote mount transmitter and core processor assembly dimensions

Dimensions in mm

174 62

99

3X M20 X 1.5

Ă&#x2DC;4

124

69 207 111 22

71

65

93

114 21

4X Ă&#x2DC;10

78 60

71

110

120 214 244

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

123


124

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Appendix B

Using the HART Communicator

B.1

The instructions in this manual assume that users are already familiar with the HART Communicator and can perform the following tasks:

Overview

• Turn on the HART Communicator • Navigate the HART Communicator menus • Establish communication with HART-compatible devices • Transmit and receive configuration information between the HART Communicator and HART-compatible devices • Use the alpha keys to type information

B.2

Connecting the HART Communicator

You can connect the HART Communicator directly to the transmitter’s HART/mA terminals or to a point on a HART network.

Connecting to communication terminals

To connect the HART Communicator directly to the transmitter’s communication terminals: 1. Open the cover to the intrinsically safe wiring compartment. Note: The HART Communicator must be connected across a resistance of 250–600 Ω . Add resistance to the connection. 2. Connect the HART Communicator leads to transmitter terminals 1 and 2. See Figure B-1.

Figure B-1. Connecting to communication terminals 250–600 Ω resistance

VDC See Table 1-1, page 13 for voltage and resistance values

Power supply 85-265 VAC, 50/60 Hz 18-100 VDC

250–600 Ω resistance

HART Communicator

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

125


Using the HART Communicator continued

Connecting to a multidrop network

The HART Communicator can be connected to any point in a multidrop network. See Figure B-2. Note: The HART communicator must be connected across a resistance of 250–600 Ω . Add resistance to the connection if necessary.

Figure B-2. Connecting to a multidrop network

Master device

250–600 Ω resistance (if necessary)

Transmitters HART Communicator

B.3

Conventions used in this manual

All HART Communicator procedures assume that you are starting at the on-line menu. “Online” appears on the top line of the HART Communicator main menu when the HART Communicator is at the on-line menu. See Figure B-3.

Figure B-3. HART Communicator on-line menu

B.4

HART Communicator safety messages and notes

Users are responsible for responding to safety messages (e.g., warnings) and notes that appear on the HART Communicator. Safety messages and notes that appear on the HART Communicator are not discussed in this manual.

B.5

HART Communicator menu tree

Figure B-4, page 127, illustrates the HART Communicator menu tree for Series 1000 and 2000 transmitters.

126

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Using the HART Communicator continued

Figure B-4. HART Communicator menu tree 1 Process Variables

2 Diag/Services

1 View field dev vars 2 View output vars 3 View status 4 Totalizer cntrl

1 Test/status 2 Loop test 3 Calibration 4 Trim analog out 1 5 Trim analog out 2 6 Scaled AO 1 trim 7 Scaled AO 2 trim 8 Test points

1

2

4

1 Mass flow 2 Temp 3 Mas totl 4 Dens 5 Mass inventory 6 Vol flo 7 Vol totl 8 Vol inventory 9 Pressure

1 View PV-analog1 2 View SV-analog2 3 View TV-freq/DO 4 View QV 5 View event1 6 View event2 1 Mass totl 2 Vol totl 3 Start totalizer 4 Stop totalizer 5 Reset all totals 6 Reset mass total 7 Reset volume total

1 Value 2 Event1 type 3 Event1 setpoint 4 Status event 1 1 Value 2 Event2 type 3 Event2 setpoint 4 Status event 2

1Tag 2 PV unit 3 Analog 1 range vals 4 SV unit 5 Analog 2 range vals 6 Freq scaling 1 PV URV 2 PV LRV

5

1 SV URV 2 SV LRV

6

1 FO scale method 2 FO scaling

1 View status 2 Self test

2

1 Fix analog out 1 2 Fix analog out 2 3 Fix frequency out

3

6

1 Auto zero 2 Density cal 1 LPO 2 RPO 3 Tube 4 Drive 5 Board temperature 6 Meter temp 7 Live zero flow

4 Detailed Setup

3 Basic Setup

3

1

See page 128

1 Perform auto zero 2 Mass flo 3 Zero time 4 Zero 1 Dens pt 1 (air) 2 Dens pt 2 (water) 3 Dens pt 3 T-series 4 Dens pt 4 T-series 5 Flowing dens (FD)

1 Perform cal 2 Dens 3 K1 1 Perform cal 2 Dens 3 K2 1 Perform cal 2 Dens 1 Perform cal 2 Dens

5 Review

1 Perform cal 2 Dens 3 FD 4 Mass flo

1 Device info 2 Charize sensor 3 Fld dev vars 4 Outputs

1 TV freq factr 2 TV rate factr

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

127


Using the HART Communicator continued

Figure B-4. HART Communicator menu tree (continued) 4 Detailed Setup 1 Charize sensor 2 Config fld dev var 3 Config outputs 4 Device information 5 Config events 6 Display setup

1

1 Sensor selection 2 Flow 3 Density 4 Temp cal factor 5 Pressure comp 6 Meter factors 7 Update rate 8 Polling setup

1 T-Series 2 Other 1 FCF1 2 FTG 3 FFQ 1 D11 2 K1 3 D2 4 K2 5 DTG 6 DFQ1 7 DFQ2 8 DT 9 FD D3 K3 D4 K4 1 Flow factr 2 Dens factr 3 Flowcal pressure 1 Mass factor 2 Vol factor 3 Dens factor

1 Analog output1 2 Analog output 2 3 FO/DO config 4 HART output 5 Fault timeout 6 Comm fault ind.

1

2

1 PV is 2 Range values 3 PV AO cutoff 4 PV AO added damp 5 AO1 fault setup 6 Fix analog out 1 7 Trim analog out 1 8 Scaled AO1 trim 1 SV is 2 Range values 3 SV AO cutoff 4 SV AO added damp 5 AO2 fault setup 6 Fix analog out 2 7 Trim analog out 2 8 Scaled AO2 trim

1 Polling type 2

1 AO1 fault indicator 2 mA1 fault value 3

4 1 AO2 fault indicator 2 mA2 fault value

1 Flow 2 Density 3 Temperature 4 Pressure

1 Tag 2 Descriptor 3 Message 4 Date 5 Dev id 6 Final asmbly num 7 Snsr s/n 8 Snsr model 9 Output opt brd Construction matls Revision #s

1 Mass flo unit 2 Mass flo cutoff 3 Spcl mass units 4 Vol flo unit 5 Vol flo cutoff 6 Spcl vol units 7 Flo direction 8 Flo damp 1 Dens unit 2 Dens damping 3 Slug low limit 4 Slug high limit 5 Slug duration

1 Poll Control 12 2 Ext Dev Tag 12 3 Polled Var 12 1 Base mass unit 2 Base mass time 3 Mass flo conv factor 4 Mass flo text 5 Mass totl text 1 Base vol unit 2 Base vol time 3 Vol flow conv fact 4 Vol flo text 5 Vol totl text

1 Temp unit 2 Temp damp 1 Pressure unit

3

4

1 Freq/Do setup3 2 TV is 3 FO scale method 4 TV freq factr 5 TV rate factr 6 Max pulse width 7 FO fault indicator 8 FO fault value 1Poll addr 2 Num req preams 3 Burst mode 4 Burst option

1 Frequency ouput 2 Discrete output 5

1 Event1 2 Event2

6

1 Enable/disable 2 Display var #s

1 Event1 var 2 Event1 type 3 Event1 setpoint 1 Event2 var 2 Event2 type 3 Event2 setpoint 1 Total reset 2 Auto scroll 3 Offline menu 4 Alarm menu 5 Ack all 6 Offline pswd

1. Only applicable items appear dependent on "Sensor Selection." 2. Only applicable items appear dependent on "Freq/DO Setup." "Flow switch setpt" appears if "DO is" is set to "Flow switch."

128

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Appendix C

Using ProLink II Software

C.1

The instructions in this manual assume that users are already familiar with ProLink II software and can perform the following tasks:

Overview

• Start and navigate in ProLink II software • Establish communication between ProLink II software and compatible devices • Transmit and receive configuration information between ProLink II software and compatible devices If you are unable to perform the tasks listed above, consult the ProLink II software manual before attempting to use the software to configure a transmitter.

C.2

Connecting to a personal computer

You can connect a personal computer (PC) directly to the service port. Figure C-1 identifies the transmitter terminals to which a PC can be connected. Note: You must use a signal converter to convert the transmitter’s RS-485 to the RS-232 standard used by the PC’s serial port.

Figure C-1. Transmitter terminal identification Model 1700 transmitter mA output/Bell 202 terminals (1, 2)

Frequency/discrete output terminals (3, 4)

Model 2700 transmitter Primary mA output/ Bell 202 terminals (1, 2)

Frequency/discrete output terminals (3, 4)

Secondary mA output terminals (5, 6)

Service port terminals (7, 8) (beneath hinged cover)

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

Service port terminals (7, 8) (beneath hinged cover)

129


Using ProLink II Software continued

Connecting to the service port

To temporarily connect to the service port, which is located in the non-intrinsically safe power-supply compartment: 1. Open the cover to the intrinsically safe wiring compartment.

WARNING Opening the power-supply compartment in explosive atmospheres while the power is on can cause an explosion. Do not open the power-supply compartment in explosive atmospheres before shutting off the power and waiting the required delay time as indicated on the transmitter housing.

2. Open the transmitterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power-supply compartment door. 3. Connect one end of the signal converter leads to the RS-485 terminals on the signal converter. 4. Connect the other end of the signal converter leads to the service-port terminals. See Figure C-2.

Figure C-2. Connecting to the service port Series 1000 or 2000 transmitter terminal compartment

25 to 9 pin serial port adapter (if necessary) Service port

130

RS-485 to RS-232 signal converter

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Appendix D

Using the Display

D.1

Overview

This appendix describes the basic use of the display and provides a menu tree for the display. You can use the menu tree to locate and perform display commands quickly.

D.2

Components

Figure D-1 illustrates the display components.

Figure D-1. Display components Current value

Process variable line Button-press indicator

Scroll button

Units of measure

Select button

The Scroll and Select buttons are infrared-sensitive detectors. To press either button, touch the glass in front of the button or move your finger close enough over the button to trigger the detector. The button-press indicator will flash red each time a button is pressed.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

131


Using the Display continued

D.3

Menu tree

Figure D-2 shows the display menu tree for the transmitter. To perform the functions listed in the menu tree, refer to the appropriate procedures in sections 2, 3, and 4, and in this appendix.

Figure D-2. Display menu tree Press SCROLL until a totalizer or inventory appears.

Totalizers and inventories

SELECT

Reset totalizers

SCROLL

Start totalizers

SELECT

Acknowledge alarms

SCROLL

Zero the flowmeter

SCROLL

Stop totalizers

SCROLL

Off-line configure

Press SCROLL and SELECT simultaneously.

SELECT

Alarm menu

View alarms

SCROLL

Off-line menu

SELECT

Simulate outputs

SELECT

Configure Units SCROLL

Configure mA 1 SCROLL

Configure mA 21 SCROLL

Configure frequency outputs SCROLL

Exit

1

132

Model 2700 transmitter only.

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Appendix E

Return Policy

To conform with Dutch ARBO regulations and to provide a safe working environment for our employees, Micro Motion has instituted the following Return/Repair conditions. Strict adherence to these conditions is required. Returned equipment that does not conform to the requirements listed below will NOT be processed. If Micro Motion finds evidence of contamination, we may, at our option, have the sensor cleaned or returned AT YOUR EXPENSE, after notifying you of the contamination. 1. The equipment must be COMPLETELY cleaned and decontaminated prior to shipment to Fisher-Rosemount. This decontamination procedure applies to the sensor tubes, sensor case exterior, sensor case interior, electronics, and any part that might have been exposed to process fluids or cleaning substances. 2. A Decontamination Statement is REQUIRED for all process fluids that have been in contact with the equipment. This includes fluids used for cleaning the equipment. A blank Decontamination/Cleaning Statement is provided on page 134. You may copy and use this form to return any Micro Motion instrument. Complete the form PRIOR to returning the equipment. 3. If the equipment being returned has been used on a food-grade process fluid, for which no decontamination statement is available, a statement listing all process fluids and certifying decontamination is acceptable. 4. Obtain a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number from the Micro Motion Service Department: +31 (0) 318 549 443. Complete the RMA form on page 135 PRIOR to returning the equipment. 5. The Decontamination Statement and RMA form must be attached to the outside of the packaging. Goods received without these forms will be put on hold

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

133


.

Decontamination Statement

PO NUMBER: EQUIPMENT TO BE

LIST ALL CHEMICALS AND PROCESS FLUIDS IN CONTACT WITH THE EQUIPMENT

*ATTACH ADDITIONAL PAGES IF NECESSARY* INFORMATION PRODUCT(S): CHEMICAL NAME DESCRIPTION HEALTH SAFETY HAZARDS PRECAUTIONS FIRST AID

I hereby certify that the equipment being returned has been cleaned and decontaminated in accordance with good industrial practices and is in compliance with all regulations. This equipment poses no health or safety risks due to contamination.

BY: (Signature) TITLE: COMPANY COUNTRY: PHONE FAX NUMBER: E-MAIL

(Please Print) DATE:

(dd/mm/yy)


Return Material Authorization (RMA) RMA Number

For an RMA number, contact the Micro Motion Customer Service Department: +31 (0) 318 549 443

User information

Return shipping information

Customer name

Name

Customer address

Address

Customer contact

City

Fax number

Country

Phone number Purchase order number

Requested return date

Returning instrument information Sensor model

Transmitter model

Sensor serial number Sales order number

Transmitter serial number Sales order number

Flange type

Power supply

Tag number

Tag number

Process conditions

Order information

Medium

Date of delivery

Chemical formula

Date of installation

Max. temperature

Date of failure

Max. pressure

Reason of return Warranty (Yes or No)

Calibration data mA output 1

mA output 2

Frequency output

Units of measure =

Units of measure =

4 mA =

flow rate =

20 mA =

Frequency =

Reason for return / description of failure (in detail)

Receiving date received by Authorized by


136

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Index A

Bad pickoff voltage 116 Base mass unit 50 Base time unit 50 Base unit 50 Base volume unit 50 Burst mode 85

temperature units 48 upper range value 70 volume-flow units 43 Changing the update rate 53 Characterizing 89 FCF parameter 91 how to characterize 90 troubleshooting 113 when to characterize 89 with ProLink II 92 with the HART Communicator 90 Checking the test points 114 Command tree for the display 132 Communication loop, troubleshooting 112 Components of the transmitter 4 Connecting ProLink II 129, 130 Connecting the HART Communicator 125 Contacting customer service 116 Conventions 126 Conversion factor 50 Customer service, contacting 116

C

D

Calibrating 92 failure 107 how to calibrate 93 troubleshooting 114 when to calibrate 92 with ProLink II 97 with the HART Communicator 93 Changing damping values 55 density damping 56 density units 46 display options 64 display scroll rate 65 display variables 66 fault output frequency output 80 flow damping 55 flow direction 62 high slug-flow limit 58 low slug-flow limit 58 lower range value 72 low-flow cutoff mass flow 60 volume flow 60 mA output damping 74 mass-flow units 41 meter factors 57 off-line password 65 output scale 78 pulse width 81 slug-flow duration 59 slug-flow limits 57 software tag 63 temperature damping 56

Damping density damping 56 flow damping 55 mA output 74 temperature damping 56 values 55 Density low cutoff 61 meter factor 57 Density calibration 93 Density damping, changing 56 Density units changing 46 list 46 Digital communications 118 Disabling display parameters 64 Display alarm menu 30 alarms acknowledging 31 viewing 30 changing lower range value 73 changing output scale 79 changing upper range value 71 changing variables 66 command tree 132 components 18, 131 enabling/disabling parameters 64 loop test 22 mA and frequency range values 87 options 64 resetting mass totalizer 36 resetting volume totalizer 37 rotating 17

Acknowledging alarms 31 Adjusting meter factors 57 Alarm menu 30 Alarm priorities, status indicator 31 Alarms acknowledging 31 events high alarm 54 low alarm 54 status 109 viewing 30 Analog wiring 10, 11

B

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

137


Index continued

scroll rate 65 starting all inventories 35 starting all totalizers 35 stopping all inventories 35 stopping all totalizers 35, 36 viewing mass inventory 34 viewing mass totalizer 32 viewing process variables 29, 30 viewing volume inventory 34 viewing volume totalizer 33 zeroing 26 Drive gain erratic 115

E Electrical connections 117 EMI effects 119 Enabling display parameters 64 Environmental effects 119 Environmental limits 118 Environmental requirements 1 Erratic drive gain 115 Events definition 53 setting 53 alarm type 54 process variable 54 setpoint 54 Excessive drive gain 115

F Fault conditions 109 Fault output, changing frequency output 80 FCF parameter 91 Flow damping, changing 55 Flow direction, changing 62 Flowmeter calibrating 92 Flowmeter, characterizing 89 Frequency output, changing fault output 80 output scale 78 pulse width 81 Frequency range values 87 Frequency/pulse output characteristics 118 Functional specifications 117 Fuse power supply 118

H HART burst mode 85 enabling/disabling 85 settings 86 menu tree 126 multidrop wiring 11 polling address 113 single-loop wiring 11 HART Communicator assigning variables 68, 76 burst mode 86 calibrating with 93

138

changing density damping 56 density units 46 display scroll rate 65 display variables 67 fault timeout 83 flow damping 55 flow direction 62 frequency fault output 81 high slug-flow limit 58 low slug-flow limit 58 lower range value 72 mA damping 74 mA fault output 75 mA output damping 74 mass low-flow cutoff 60 mass-flow units 41 off-line password 65 output scale 78 polling address 85 pulse width 81 slug-flow duration 59 software tag 63 temperature damping 56 temperature units 48 upper range value 70 volume low-flow cutoff 60 volume-flow units 43 characterizing with 90 connecting 125 conventions 126 inventories starting all 35 stopping all 35 loop test 21 menu tree 126 obtaining test points 114 polling address 113 safety messages 126 setting events 54 special units mass-flow unit 51 volume-flow unit 52 totalizers resetting all 37 resetting mass totalizer 36, 37 resetting volume totalizer 36, 37 starting all 35 stopping all 35 trimming mA output 25 viewing alarms 30 mass inventory 34 mass totalizer 32 process variables 29 volume inventory 34 volume totalizer 33 zeroing with 26 Hazardous area classifications 119 High alarm 54 High slug-flow limit 58 Humidity limits 119

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Index continued

I Input signals 118 Inventories definition 32 starting 35 stopping 35 viewing mass inventory 34 viewing volume inventory 34

L Location, determining appropriate 1 Loop test 20, 21, 22, 24 Low alarm 54 Low cutoff density 61 Low slug-flow limit 58 Lower range value changing 72 definition 72 troubleshooting 113 Low-flow cutoff mass flow 60 volume flow 60

M Mass flow meter factor 57 Mass inventory, viewing 34 Mass-flow units changing 41 list 41 Mating connector 6 Measurement range, changing lower range value 72 upper range value 70 Measurement units changing density units 46 mass-flow units 41 temperature units 48 volume-flow units 43 density 46 mass flow 41 special mass-flow unit 51 volume-flow unit 52 temperature 48 volume flow 45 Menu tree HART 126 Meter factors 57 Milliamp output, changing damping 74 lower range value 72 upper range value 70 Milliamp output, trimming 24, 25 Milliamp range values 87 Mounting

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

pipe 3 wall 3 Mounting the transmitter 2

O Off-line password, changing 65 Output scale changing 78 definition 78 troubleshooting 113 Output signals 118 Output, troubleshooting analog 108 HART 108

P Password, changing 65 Performance specifications 119 Physical specifications 119 Pickoff voltage 116 Pipe mounting 3 Power supply 118 Power supply, troubleshooting 112 Power, applying to transmitter 20 Process variables viewing 29 ProLink II assigning variables 69, 77 burst mode 86, 87 calibrating 97 changing density damping 56 density units 46 display scroll rate 65 display variables 67 fault timeout 84 flow damping 55 flow direction 62 frequency fault output 81 high slug-flow limit 59 low slug-flow limit 58 lower range value 73 mA damping 74 mA fault output 76 mass low-flow cutoff 60 mass-flow units 42, 44 off-line password 66 output scale 80 polling address 85 pulse width 82 slug-flow duration 59 software tag 63 temperature damping 56 temperature units 48 upper range value 71 volume low-flow cutoff 60 volume-flow units 43 characterizing with 92

139


Index continued

connecting 129, 130 display parameters 64 loop test 24 resetting totalizers 37 setting events 55 special units mass-flow unit 51 volume-flow unit 52 starting all inventories 35 starting all totalizers 35 stopping all inventories 36 test points 114 trimming the mA output 25 viewing alarms 31 viewing mass inventory 34 viewing mass totalizer 33 viewing process variables 30 viewing volume inventory 34 viewing volume totalizer 33 zeroing with 28 Pulse width changing 81 definition 81

R Receiving device, troubleshooting 113 Remote mount transmitter installing 4 Return policy 133â&#x20AC;&#x201C;?? Europe ??â&#x20AC;&#x201C;134 Rotating the display 17 Rotating the transmitter 8

S Safety messages 1 HART Communicator 126 Scroll rate changing 65 definition 65 Sensor pickoff values 115 Sensor, characterizing for 89 Service port 129 Setpoint 54 Slug flow duration 59 limits 57 Slugs 57 Software tag 63 Special units base mass unit 50 base time unit 50 base unit 50 base volume unit 50 conversion factor 50 mass-flow unit 51 volume-flow unit 52 Specifications functional 117 performance 119 physical 119 Status alarm indicator 31 Status alarms 109 140

T Tables flowing density calibration minimum flow rates 95 sensor pickoff values 115 Tag, software 63 Temperature damping, changing 56 Temperature effect 119 Temperature limits 119 Temperature units changing 48 list 48 Terminals communication 129 Test points checking 114 obtaining with a HART Communicator 114 obtaining with ProLink II 114 Totalizers definition 32 resetting all 37 resetting mass totalizer 36 resetting volume totalizer 36 starting 35 stopping 35 viewing mass totalizer 32 viewing volume totalizer 33 Transmitter changing settings 39 components 4 environmental requirements 1 installing 1 mounting 2 rotating 8 troubleshooting no communication 107 no operation 107 wiring 9 Trimming mA output 25 Trimming the mA output 24, 25 Troubleshooting alarms 109 analog output 108 bad pickoff voltage 116 calibration 107, 114 characterization 113 checking test points 114 communication loop 112 core module to transmitter wiring 112 customer service telephone number 116 erratic drive gain 115 excessive drive gain 115 fault conditions 109 frequency output scale and method 113 HART output 108 HART polling address 113 measurement range 113 power supply wiring 112 receiving device 113 transmitter does not communicate 107 transmitter does not operate 107 wiring problems 112 zero failure 107

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Index continued

U Update rate 53 Upper range value changing 70 definition 70 troubleshooting 113

V Viewing alarms 30 mass inventory 34 mass totalizer 32 process variables 29 volume inventory 34 volume totalizer 33 Volume flow meter factor 57 Volume inventory, viewing 34 Volume-flow units changing 43 list 45

W Wall mounting 3 Wire distances 2 Wiring problems 112 Wiring the transmitter 9

Z Zeroing 26 failure 107 with ProLink II 28 with the display 26 with the HART Communicator 26

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs

141


142

Series 1000 and 2000 Transmitters with Intrinsically Safe Outputs


Visit us on the Internet at

WWW.MICROMOTION.COM

Toll-free numbers (UK only)

Tel 0800-966 180 / Fax 0800-966 181

Micro Motion is a registered trademark of Micro Motion, Inc. ProLink II is a trademark of Micro Motion, Inc. SMART FAMILY is a registered trademark of Rosemount, Inc. HART is a registered trademark of the HART Communication Foundation. Modbus is a registered trademark of Modicon, Inc.

Emerson Process Management Micro Motion Europe Groeneveldselaan 6-8 3903 AZ Veenendaal The Netherlands Tel +31 (0) 318 549 549 Fax +31 (0) 318 549 559

Toll-free numbers

(UK only)

Tel 0800-966 180 Fax 0800-966 181

Customer Service Tel +31 (0) 318 549 443 Fax +31 (0) 318 549 449

Š 2002, Micro Motion, Inc. All rights reserved P/N: 3600647-EU, Rev. B (01/02)

MAN_1000-2000 IS_PN 3600647-EU_B_2002-01_EN  

InstallationandOperationManual P/N3600647-EU,Rev.B(01/02) January2002 InstallationInstructions www.micromotion.com InstallationandOperationM...