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Introduction

Endz

2Endz

A group of inner city youths have come together from multiple backgrounds and tough areas of London. They met in college while studying and began to bond because they had similar interests and life experiences. Some come from negative lifestyles due to a lack of role models, poverty and a sense of neglect from society. But are now channelling their time into something fun, entertaining and positive by inspiring other youths.

The magazine is aimed at people from ages 16 through to their 20s, aiming to empower them from quite a young age because we believe that’s where it all starts. One thing that we believe is critical, is the magazine must be young people lead, for young people to relate with each other. We enable youths to be inspired by other youths doing positive things and finding out more on issues going on in and around their communities.

Especially ones that have struggled growing up in tough areas and think there’s no way out. The team became good friends and got along well together with creative minds alike and founded Endz 2 Endz.

We are open to promote and meet anyone interested and willing to support the movement. We aim to work with people who are dedicated, motivated, willing to take their talents to another level, feel it’s time we come out of negative media and feel like they would like to be a part of what we are about. So feel free to contribute, and show Endz 2 Endz and the public what you’re made of.

Endz 2 Endz is an urban British e-magazine established in 2008. The magazine is run by young people for young people, which provides a pathway for young talented people in our communities to reach their goals. It is about showcasing young underground and established UK talents and skills. These include models, writers, fashion designers, poets, musicians, athletes, photographers and many more. We are creating a new era that provides opportunity and at the same time informing readers and giving an insight into what goes on in the society around us. It creates opportunities for those who know they have talent to show the world what they are about. We decided we want to create an ‘online magazine’ that will showcase youths talents no matter what their race, area they’re from or disability they may have-so we do not discriminate in anyway. The magazine will also be looking at social issues which affect the community as a whole and individuals. We will have a topic in every issue that may be very important or has great effect on today’s society.

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Contents 14 Regulars

12 22 28 38 48 54

5

6 Hot Topic

What my life’s like? Mysterious Diary Photo-Lab

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16

Young Voice-Old Voice

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30

Fashion & Culture

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24

Poetry

Top Gadgets

5 Top Films 5 Top Gifts

Best Goals: World Cup ‘10’

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Nite Out

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50

34

10 3

Features

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14 Page

Young Mad B

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Simmy Wilson

Clare Foxx

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Pound Sterling

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Marvell


Hot Topic

written By Libby Majumdar

nite out Hot Topic

Culture makes up who you are, it’s your identity. By definition, culture is ‘the attitudes and behaviour that are characteristic of a particular social group or organization’. It’s also ‘all the knowledge and values shared by a society’.

“Each one of us has a unique culture:

Each one of us has a unique culture: quirky phrases we do and mannerisms that people can spot a mile off. No-one’s cultural background is the same.

These things ground me. They make up a massive part. of my culture and when any of us are feeling down we look to these memories to cheer us up and remind ourselves of who we are and what we stand for. But your culture doesn’t just stop there. It seeps into our music, the books we Culture is something that is both tangible and invisible all at the same time. It’s a massive part of your identity: who you are and often, what you want to become. It’s not just your heritage, whether you’re black, white, Asian or purple. It’s where you grew up. It’s your best friend, who hugs you when you’re upset. It’s your family who always know the right thing to say... most of the time. It’s your school, and that teacher who hated you and kept kicking you out of the class. It’s everything, good and bad; and it’s unique.

Your family and friends and their stories add to your own personal culture. My granddad was forced to leave his home during the partition of India when he was about 7, (If you’ve seen ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ it’s the part right at the beginning where Jamal sees his mother get killed and is asked what the Lord Rama holds in his hand to test if he’s a Muslim). I can remember very vividly my granddad telling me all about his train journey away from Lahore, about the people whose lives depended on the drawing of the partition and climbing trees in Calcutta, where he was forced to move. Then there are my mum’s stories of when she was a teenager and sitting in a bath of cold water to make her jeans skinnier, coupled with my own experiences staying up late talking about almost everything with a close friend and walking in on a surprise party for my 16th.

“when she was a

teenager and sitting in a bath of cold water It doesn’t define us, it represents us. It to make her jeans represents you. skinnier,

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Culture is your Identity 7


Interviewed by Manny

Simmy Wilson

E2E: Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

E2E:
What do you think of the UK music and fashion industry?

M

y name is Simmy Louise Wilson, I’m a model/ rapper/producer from Manchester but living in London. I started my quest in 1999 when I won a competition to star in MTV’s Singled Out, with that 15 minutes of fame left me gasping for more.

I

t’s difficult. You have to be on top of your game, and in the urban modeling industry there’s no money whatsoever. You can get all the exposure you want on music channels if you decide to go down the video model route. But I advise girls to have another plan or talent because there is only E2E: You recently did a tune with Spragga Benz so many videos you can do. However, you can called “HotBoi”. How does it feel working with network and get yourself out there, same with such an artist? producing. All it takes is for one MC to spit on your track (rap on your track) and they could turn your track into a hit. feel blessed that was one of the amazing things 
 which has happened for me; sometimes things E2E: You’ve met well-known American artists happen for a reason. My sound is more American including Ginuwine, Lloyd, 50 Cent and Stevie and I have been told time and time again I’ll Wonder. What does this mean to you? never break through because I’m trying to be American, but that is not the case. I was brought up in Manchester not London and I was brought t makes me feel like one day I will get there; up strictly on “Yo MTV Raps”, NWA, Eazy-E, Dre even though I haven’t reached it yet. and Snoop. I just think I adopted that style when I rap. It’s just difficult to do a style that I’m not used to. It’s been quite of a journey but I believe

I

I

in myself and I feel blessed to have met Stevie Wonder .

E2E:
As you know, Culture is our topic for this issue. What’s your cultural background and would you say you represent your background to the fullest?

It’s been quite of a journey but I believe in myself and I feel blessed to have met Stevie Wonder . 



Both of my parents are mixed raced. My mother is half Jewish, half Sierra Leone and my father half Irish, half Ghanian.

Both of my parents are mixed raced. My mother

is half Jewish, half Sierra Leone and my father half Irish, half Ghanian. I know what my roots are and I know where my ancestors came from and the struggle they went through (even on my white side, the Irish also struggled). Being mixed raced is also a struggle because sometimes you feel, “Where do I fit in?” because no matter how dark or light you are you’re still of mixed heritage.

E2E: So what else do you have in store for UK in 2010?

Well that’s hard, I just never know what is

around the corner. I have two more shoots with American magazines coming up and I will also be promoting my “Hotboi”. I will also be doing a music video and writing more songs. I am currently working on a tune with Glamour Kid so get ready for some Glamourfaboulas...

My mixtape with Skygang will be dropping mid-July. My mixtape with Skygang will be dropping midJuly.

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Interv

iewed by Ma n

ny

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nite & outculture Fashion

Fashion & Culture Written By Chrissie Fizz

Team wooden accessories, and stack huge bangles on your wrist. Those type of accessories have a very cultural look to them. Feather earrings and long beaded earrings are quite effective, without overpowering your outfit. For footwear, cork wedges or strappy Gladiator sandals add to the look!

My second design is an orange flower print dress, which was inspired by Brazil. The fiery colours compliment a variety of skin tones and it is the new dress for the summer. The dress is just below knee length, which is different as Maxi and Mini dresses are everywhere this season. The back drapes very low, or the dress can be worn as off the shoulder. It is extremely versatile.

The designs shown with African Print are designed by Larissa MĂŠat. Larissa is a talented young designer who mainly uses The photoshoot took place outside African fabric to create contemporary in Croydon, a place of diversity and and wearable designs. The designs show mixed cultures. that she has a passion for where she is from and are exclusive one off pieces. Her collection consists of Playsuits, dresses, shorts and corset type tops which are all on trend for this season. Her bold use of colours is just what is needed for this summer! I designed two new pieces, exclusively for this issue of Endz 2 Endz! The first piece iss a turquoise silk, one shouldered dress, which was inspired by Greece. The front folds give the look more of an edge. This was paired with the models own harem pants to make it less dressy. The chocolate brown belt defines the waist and adds an earthy tone to the outfit.

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Model: Holly Heron-Stuart , Photographer: Mannray Powell , Hair, Make-up and direction: Chrissiefizz , Fashion Designer: Larissa MĂŠat

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Model:Holly HollyHeron-Stuart Heron-Stuart, ,Photographer: Photographer:Mannray MannrayPowell Powell, ,Hair, Hair,Make-up Make-upand and Model: Fashion Designer: Chrissiefizz , Accessories: Primark Dress: Newlook , Shoes and Accessories: Primark ww w. e n d z 2 e ndz . com

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Model: Holly Heron-Stuart , Photographer: Mannray Powell , Hair, Make-up and Fashion Designer: Chrissiefizz , Accessories: Primark

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Model: Holly Heron-Stuart , Photographer: Mannray Powell , Hair, Make-up and Director: Chrissiefizz , Fashion Designer: Larissa MĂŠat www. e n d z 2 e n dz . com

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Model: Holly Heron-Stuart , Photographer: Mannray Powell , Hair, Make-up and Fashion Designer: Chrissiefizz , , Accessories: Primark

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What My Life’s Like? What My Life’s Like?

My name is Sarah, I currently live in south London, where I moved to when I was three years old. I lived with my mother, stepdad and younger sister and life wasn’t always easy for me. I never really saw my real dad and didn’t get on with my step dad. By the time I was 12 my situation at home was bad and things at school weren’t easy either. I was bullied, and I eventually changed school but it was too late; I had already made up my mind that nobody was going to bully me ever again. This was when I started skipping school, smoking cigarettes, weed and drinking alcohol. At the time, I didn’t really want to do these things but I guess I just wanted to fit in because I felt I didn’t belong anywhere. Doing these things made me popular which felt good; but, I realise it was attention for the wrong reasons and from the wrong people.

The judge didn’t send me to a jail but said the next time I was in court, I wouldn’t be going home. This had a little impact on me because I was about to become a mother and I wanted to be there for my child.

By the time I was 13, I was associating with a gang and things kept getting worse. I was known to the police for various violent crimes

My relationship with my family improved while I was pregnant and I was slowly changing as a person. I was eventually moved into a mother and baby unit were I met other young mothers and completely stopped seeing people from the gang.

By the time I was 13, I was associating with a gang and things kept getting worse. I was known to the police for various violent crimes and because of this, my parents kicked me out and I became a ward of the Court and I ended up in a children’s home. While in the children’s home I stopped going to school and my crimes became even worse. I was constantly in and out of court until at 15 I became pregnant with my daughter. I was placed on bail for robbery, because I was pregnant.

The judge didn’t send me to a jail but said the next time I was in court, I wouldn’t be going home. This had a little impact on me because I was about to become a mother and I wanted to be there for my child. w ww. e n d z 2 e n dz . com

Unfortunately, things didn’t stay that way. I split up with my daughter’s father and eventually became involved with another criminal. Eventually I put an end to the relationship and the crimes I’d started committing again, Unfortunately, things didn’t stay that way. I split up with my daughter’s father and eventually became involved with another criminal. Eventually I put an end to the relationship and the crimes I’d started committing again, because I wanted to get an education and find a job and be independent.

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The judge said although I hadn’t been in trouble for 17 years it was another violent crime and that this was a pattern. , Everyone was surprised because I was now seen as someone who was grown up, going to college and doing the right thing.

In 2002 I got a job in a department store and worked there for nearly eight years.

All the people I met there were at university but since I didn’t take my GCSEs, this was the only job I knew. Eventually, I made a decision that I wanted a career, so I started college All the people I met there were at university but since I didn’t take my GCSEs, this was the only job I knew. . Eventually, I made a decision that I wanted a career, so I started college. I was working part time and studying full time and I had never felt so proud of myself.

Although I was ok in jail, my friends and family were the ones hurting especially my daughter, who was 15 Although I was ok in jail, my friends and family were the ones hurting especially my daughter, who was 15 and about to take her exams. She needed me more than anything now but I wasn’t there. When I was released, I lost my job because of my sentence and couldn’t continue with my course. I was determined to help young people so I didn’t give up hope.

There were times when I wanted to give up because it was so hard After two years of proving but I would just remember the life I myself, I am finally doing had before and there was no way I the work I always wanted was going back. There were times when I wanted to give up to do. I currently work with because it was so hard but I would just remember young people who are looking the life I had before and there was no way I was for employment, training or going back. education.

In 2007 I went out to a nightclub with a friend, and my handbag was stolen. I found out who stole it and instead of thinking,

I attacked her. I was arrested and charged with GBH and eventually sentenced to five months in prison.

After two years of proving myself, I am finally doing the work I always wanted to do. I currently work with young people who are looking for employment, training or education. I talk to youths about my life experiences and how I changed. I am finally where I want to be and my past is behind me. My only regret is I didn’t change sooner -even though I am in a good job, I will always have a criminal record and this will limit my options.

In 2007 I went out to a nightclub with a friend, and my handbag was stolen. I found out who stole it and instead of thinking, I attacked her. I was arrested and charged with GBH and eventually sentenced to five months in prison.

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Prisoner

Poetry

Fun Culture For you

Culture

In chains on my block one cell block cell bed On cell bed Empty space Just thinking of you I got it so you got me baby High Dry just Waiting for you To Bat an eye lid or blink a blind eye Check me you mean check yourself So you Arrest me Sweet nothing One day see me I’ll be free

Does your culture define you? Does it tell you how to live your life and what to do? What’s the difference between culture and traditions? Does it encourage you to have more or less ambitions? Does your culture define what you wear? How to talk, work, question if you dare

Why didn’t you Look the other way Turn the other cheek It’s so systematic Beats me He sits beside the bench long night so lonely baby Awake stolen dreams up its time to go home Just longing for my sanity to empty back to your sanity So I Surrender over my belongings to you so you can walk safely again slowly fade away face it screw the sardines in the tin And I’m Small me here to face the world on my own

Is it the way you cook, clean wash and rinse your dishes The way you pray or ask for three wishes

(Graphic designer) Sasha Pirthee

Is it your colour, race or religion? Who makes these decisions? Why do people have to always be categorised Is it to keep the ignorance going, or to make people more wise? Written by Empress

Written by Sybil Aadelaja

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There Is A Land

Cultures.

Over the seas, past council estates Canary Wharfs, Empire state buildings Tesco, Sainsbury’s, KFC, £1.99 meal deals

The underlying question “Where are you from?” May determine What you believe. How you live. What you eat.

There is a Land A Land where, the snow is too afraid to come, Where the spring or autumn dare not oppose the sun Where they deliver bread to ur doorstep every morning instead of milk Where you can see the grandeur of the houses, in the way they’ve been built Where the neighbours say “Hello” coz they mean it, not out of guilt.

Culture. The way you dress. Act. Perhaps even talk. The question Remains The same “Where are you from?”

Over the seas, Past the train tracks, the tube stations, the bus stop, the trams, the weekly travel pass and the oyster cards There is a land, Where rivers run deep, And the trees grow free, Where there we don’t do pets, You run if u see a dog that’s not on a lease Might catch ur relatives using a “stick” to clean their teeth Where the blood of ancestors flow deep beneath Where Nigerians and Ghanians constantly disagree Over who has the betta football team Where u neva hear the two words together “School” and “Free” But take away the “R” and u always hear the two “School” and “Fees” A land where the soul can feel at ease

Culture. I speak my mind. Freedom of speech And all of that. You get me? My upbringing Allows it. Your culture may not. Culture. You You may need to be seen But Not heard. They might have told you What you must learn. Told you.

A LAND, the motherLAND, promised LAND, blessed LAND, Out-LAND, OutLANDish LANDscapes There is a land...

Culture. Regardless of how I look Where I am from Where I live Or what I eat. I am human You are human.

A land that talks, land that speaks, a land that breaths You hear it in each and every drum beat, When u feel it u see re-runs of Martin Luther King recitin “I have a Dream” You can taste it in each plate of jolof rice or bowl of rice and peas Fufu, eba, egussi

In this multicultural bin In which we live Culture should not matter So much that is divides us It so unite us.

Yes, far across the seas, past the skyscrapers, and Cinema screens South of Europe, North of Australia,over 1000 miles from Asia, east of America Yes there is a land, And this land is the motherland, homeland, the forgotten land,

We can learn about different cultures. And that in itself is Culture. Written by CeCe Stewart

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AFRICA. Written by Suli Breaks


e2e: Can you briefly tell us about yourself ?

(Graphic designer Chloe Ainsley

PS: What can I say, I’m Pound Sterling independent artist from the UK, I got my own label couple studios and I make uncompromising music that some people love and some can’t understand.

e2e: From your first video “For My Dogs” to one of your recent video’s “Fresh”, do you feel you have developed as an artist ?

e2e: Where did the name Pound Sterling come from ?

PS: Over the years I’ve evolved as a man and like I said my music is a reflection of my life you might not hear it on those particular tracks because they’re club tunes but yeah there’s developments being made, when I dropped “For My Dogs” one of the first lines in the song was “we just rap to take the piss.” I’m alot more serious about it now but not so serious that I don’t enjoy it and I still take the piss sometimes.

PS: Before all this music stuff I was known in my area for always being flashy and into making money so people used to call me “Pounds” or “Money” so when I started to make music I just stuck with the name. e2e: What inspirations did you have that inspired you in becoming a music artist ?

e2e: As you know culture is our topic for this issue, what’s your cultural background and would you say you represent your background to the fullest ?

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PS: My background is all Caribbean, Jamaica and Grenada, I don’t know about me representing there too much, I holiday there alot but I was born in Lewisham Hospital! I know I definitely represent a

£

PS: See initially this was just something I did just because we had the studio there and we had money to throw at videos, I had no intention of going all out as an artist but now I’ve got a big fan base I take it more seriously as for inspiration I draw from my life experiences I’ve lived an interesting life so when I jump on tracks its some autobiographical w ww. e n d z 2 e nstuff. dz . com

£

POU

ND S TER LING

Pound Sterling

£

£


£

£

‘...don’t just think you’re going to blow and rely on that, you might end up skinny and broke. Pursue your dreams but make sure you’rE maintaining...’

certain demographic of people brought up in Britain though. e2e: How money motivated would you say you are ? PS: I’m a highly motivated and driven person full stop, I’m a Go Getter. I wouldn’t say moneys my motivation if it was I’d probably be doing things alot different music wise but yeah I like money, it makes the world go round. e2e: Do you see yourself as more of a business man than a artist ? PS: Definitely more of a businessman. e2e: What do you think of the UK music industry ? PS: It is what it is, just like any other industry its got its good and bad points. e2e: What advice would you give to upcoming UK music artist or businessmen ? PS: From what I hear every man is trying to do music, rapping, producing whatever, make sure you’ve got a job or money coming in somehow while you’re doing it, don’t just think you’re going to blow and rely on that, you might end up skinny and broke. Pursue your dreams but make sure you’re maintaining. I wouldn’t even be doing this if

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I wasn’t in a decent financial position. e2e: Are there any businessmen who inspire you in becoming a big successful businessman ? PS: Everyday I hear about businesses and business people that inspire me. Anyone that’s accomplishing big things gives me inspiration. e2e: As a teenager what one thing did you always want that you feel you have accomplished now and got ? PS: There’s nothing that I said I wanted as a teenager that I haven’t had or got now, I achieved all my teenage goals and went way beyond them so now I’ve had to set extra high goals as a man. e2e: So what more can the UK expect from you in 2010 ? PS: Look out for a new video on the TV and the Warm Up 2 mix tape in June. If you haven’t got “The Warm Up” go to my facebook group page and download it. e2e: Describe yourself in one word ? PS: Hustler!!

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Mysterious D Mysterious Diary

Question

I’m about to move in with my Hindu boyfriend and his parents have some issues with our relationship in general, never mind us living together. He’s really supportive and wonderful but I’m worried about how his parents will react. Do you have any advice?

(Graphic designer) Will kay Oddkingdom

Answer From what you’ve said, you’ve evidently met a kind and supportive man who shares your affections, respect and trust. In many ways, he’s the best person to help you through this time, because by standing side by side, you’ll be able to show everyone concerned you’re happy with one another. So, talk to him about the situation, and find out how he feels his parents would respond to the news that you’re moving in together. The most effective thing you can do is to show them it’s the right thing for you both, as opposed to simply telling them and expecting them to accept it. At the same time, you do need to show respect for their beliefs, which will mean being prepared to listen and engage in dialogue. If you can, stay calm, keep an open mind and be patient, they can only do the same for you. It means even if they don’t respond well to begin with, hopefully they’ll relax their attitude as things flourish between you. For more information, including telephone advice you can contact The Asian Family Counselling Service on 020 8571 3933. http://www.thesite.org/sexandrelationships/askthesiteqandas/ relationshipsqandas/racerelations

Questions were submitted to Askthesite by 16 - 25s in the UK.For more advice on any issue go to TheSite.org

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Diary... Question

I’m white and I’ve been dating my boyfriend, who’s black, for just over a year. I’ve recently moved in with him but I think his family have a problem with us being together because of my colour. They don’t seem to want to talk to me about anything and seem to give us both the cold shoulder when I’m around. I don’t want to confront my boyfriend about this as I don’t want to make the difference in our colour a big deal. Answer There are two relationships at stake here: your relationship with your boyfriend’s family; and your relationship with him. Only his family can say what’s on their mind, and you won’t find out unless you raise the subject. The key is to keep an open mind, and tackle things sensitively and with respect. If you can maintain such a constructive attitude, they will probably be able to do the same. Before talking to your boyfriend’s family you might want to rethink talking to him about it. A good relationship is often based on trust and honesty, so it’s worth considering talking to him about what is bothering you. If you don’t give him a chance to support you then you’ll never know how he feels about the problem. Whether or not his family harbour any racial prejudice, the fact is you’re feeling insecure right now and deserve his support. If he cares for you as much as you clearly do for him, then there’s a good chance he’ll stand by you. That way he can help you address this problem with his family, as a couple. http://www.thesite.org/sexandrelationships/askthesiteqandas/relationshipsqandas/racistrelatives

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Written by Ricardo Nunes

Top Gadgets

Nintendo DSi XL The DSi XL features bigger 4.2 inch screens and has a new longer stylus pen, called XL Touch Pen. DSi XL comes pre-loaded with three games: DSiWare Brain Training 1 & 2, plus a Dictionary DSiWare App. DSi XL promises to bring multi-player gaming for two on one console. Price £149

Sony Walkman NWZ-A845 Sony’s slimmest ever Walkman at 7.2mm thin and weighing 62 grams movie player houses a 2.8in OLED showing films and can be hooked up to a full size TV outputting 720x480 pixel pics at 30fps. battery life a touted 29 hours for audio and nine hours for video and iTunes 9.0 is supported. Price TBA

Sony MDR-NC60 Silence the world around you with the MDRNC60 noise canceling headphones. They provide 16.5dB noise reduction at 200Hz. This means you can shut out up to 85% of the ambient noise around you, including jet engines, office printers and subway chatter. Price £98

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Canon IXUS 300 HS hands-on Canon IXUS 300 HS is a premium compact camera with some advanced features that grab the attention of any discerning photographer. These include a backilluminated 10 megapixel CMOS sensor, a 3.8x, 28-106mm lens with a fastest aperture of f/2.0 and optical image stabiliser, 3.7 frames per second burst mode at full resolution, 720p HD movie recording with stereo sound and a HDMI port, Available in blasted steel silver, matt black, glossy white or high gloss red. Price £379

Blackberry Pearl 3G The BlackBerry Pearl 3G has a 3.2 megapixel camera, which is upgraded from the 1.3 megapixel version on the original. It supports both Wi-Fi and 3G for all your internet browsing needs. You can easily sync the Pearl with your iTunes and the microSD support up to 32GB enables you to carry all your music around with you. The battery present in the Pearl enables 30 hours of music playback, which is a great asset. Price TBA

Dell Streak tablet The Dell Streak will have a 5-inch WVGA touchscreen, Qualcomm’s 1-GHz Snapdragon Processor, 2 GB internal storage, maximum 32GB of external SD storage, 5 megapixel camera with LED flash, and a front-facing camera for video chat. The Streak will also have 3G, 802.11b/g Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 2.1 connectivity. £25 a month with no voice calls or text allowance, or £35 a month with a voice tariff As for SIM-free, the Dell Streak price is £429

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Endz 2 Endz spent a couple or hours with the boys from Marvell Crew. We watched them warming up in the studio and managed to squeeze in an interview. We find out how the crew Vertex, Double S and Shocka came together, what it was like meeting US rapper Drake and what else they’ve been up to. Interviewed by Janeice Ladnar I’m going straight in on this. Who’s the best lyricist out of all of you?

All: (laugh) Vertex: Trust me, I feel myself to death! (points at

Marvell

Double S) he feels himself to death and (points at Shocka) he does too.

Shocka: That’s the first question!? That’s the biggest question. All: (laugh) Vertex: Trust me, I feel myself to death! (points at Double S) he feels himself to death and (points at Shocka) he does too. Shocka: That’s the first question!? That’s the biggest question. I So you’re saying you are all equal then?

Vertex: We’ve all got different styles and different ways of spittin’

Shocka: We’ve all got fans that just want to hear Double S strictly like! That’s all they listen to Marvell for. Then we’ve got fans that just want to hear Vertex and others that just want to hear me!

Double S Either way they’re going listen to all three of us anyway!

Vertex: We try to cater for everyone as well. If you like flow, or you like wordplay we’ve got something for you. And obviously we got Double singing as well. So we’re just hitting all the fields. How did Marvell Crew come together?

Shocka: You’re meant to leave that to the public to decide!

Double S: Everyone has

Vertex: It goes way back. We properly started around 2007, and we decided to take it seriously about 2009. It all started from a group we called Shoddy Crew up in North London.

their aspects you know!

Graphic Designer John Northam - DMGroup www.dosime.co.uk

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At the time North London wasn’t really big East London was still holding the torch for Grime music so Shoddy Crew was like one of the first young crews to come out of North London. So we got big quite quick and Chip [Chipmunk] was in that as well. Double was leading that basically.

Vertex:

We used to do this other thing called

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Continue


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Photo-Lab Title:

Humility Photographer

Kobbie Kessie

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Title:

Bravery Photographer

Kobbie Kessie

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Photo-Lab Title:

Confidence Photographer

Kobbie Kessie

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Title:

Readiness Photographer

Kobbie Kessie

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Page

s e u n i t n o c OUT NOW e g a p 44


Page Artist : PAGE BORN : Christopher Rose, 24 My dad & uncle were DJs, so I was always into music, I grew up around different genres of musics, but mostly : Bashment, RnB and Rap. I used to watch the Box /Yo Rap on MTV and emulate the stars - that’s not when I decided that I was going to become a rapper - but I did think to myself that I could do what they did, if not better. Throughout school, I was smart and had lots of potential, or at least that’s what the teachers used to tell me; or should I say, sell me. But like most young black males from the ghetto, supressed by the system, I had a problem with the authorities, and due to be my hard head, I rebelled agaisnt their curriculum. I spent most my time outside/inside the head master’s office, was suspended a lot… I had loads of time on my hands, so I began writing my thoughts on paper, that’s where it all began, really. A rap teacher was allocated to my school, for students whom weren’t wanted in lessons. In class I formed a group called R.O.L ( Rebels Of Life ), we went on to perform at the Brit school, Fairfield hall and both performances were headlined in the newspaper. But the other members went to prison, I left school, and with everyone doing separate things, the group quickly disintergrated. Still I kept making a name for myself locally on what was then the garage scene. Years passed and whilst living on the streets, I was introduced to cream cartel, the first song I featured on Bang Bang. It went on to be released as a single featuring SoSolid’s Megaman and the rest of the cream artists. That song was blowing up on the A-list radio stations BBC radio 1, 1Xtra, Choice FM and off the back of that I went on to perform at Trafalgar square for Childrens in Need, The Royal Prince’s Trust fund, Uxbridge University, Birmingham University to clubs in Aiya Napa Island. I then released the double mixtape “Walk with Rage Part 1 & 2”, and a year later a more mature PAGE was introduced to the public with the release of “The UnturnablaPage “ mixtape, but the UK industry wasn’t ready for rap music, so I took a break to focus on real life and preparing to become a Dad to my son KHALIL, who was just about to be born. In one year 2008-2009 I came back with a BANG by releasing three mixtapes after collaborating with the country’s top urban artists. They took the streets by storm and caused a high impact on the rap scene and music industry with the “The Lost PAGES : The best of PAGE” getting nominated for BEST HIP HOP AWARD. At the end of 2009-2010 I released the most anticipated and talked-about duo mix-album with Islington’ s finest JOE BLACK , titled “THE BLACK PAGE Chapter 1”, which is rated as the best duo cd of the year so far. Sadly this same year, I had to part company with cream cartel amicably and started supporting GHETTO SUPERSTARZ fully, a crew/independant record label we started from around 2008-2009 with a childhood friend of mine ( Qdizzy ). Now I’m waiting on my first ever debut album (THE PAGE CONTINUES) out later this summer.

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Best Goals: Fifa World Cup ‘10

Written by Ty

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yrone Smiley

‘who Would You have changed, Do you agree with are choice?’

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Interviewed by Seun Oginni

Young Mad B

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Nite diary Out mysterious

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www.endz2endz.com


Miss Uni-UK 2010: Thursday 10th June Sponsored by Cancer Research UK, Chrissiefizz Designs, Subway and Play.Dot Apparel, Miss Uni-UK 2010 was definitely a night to remember. Sikiru Kasali (Founder) and Moneat Grant Williams (Managerial Director) put on an excellent show. There was an array of both inner and outer beauty plus a lot of talent. For the females, there were male models who escorted the young women onto the stage in the Eveningwear round, just to let you know! Entertainment on the night included hilarious comedian Adot and funky house songstress A.L. The night began with a touching one minute silence in loving memory of ‘Charmz’ Carl Beatson-Asiedu. The lucky 14 who made it to the final round came from universities such as: Bedfordshire, Brunel and Northampton, some of my personal favourites. Congratulations to Tosin Lamidi, Miss De Montfort, who was crowned Miss Uni-UK 2010 and to all of the contestants. I look forward to Miss Uni-UK 2011!

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Graphic Editor Tyrone smiley Editor Seun Oginni Fashion Editor Chrissie Fizz Graphic Designer John Northam Sasha Pirthee Chloe Ainsley Will Kay Oddkingdom Photographers Manray Powell Kobbie Kessie Writers Libby Majumdan Ricardo Nunes Empress Sybil Aadelaja Ce Ce Stewart Suli Breaks Journalist Manny Janeice Ladnar Editorial Mentors Anna Leach Jason Daponte Contributors Go Chains Gibz Graphics Holly Heron-Stuart Larissa MĂŠat The Site.Org Blazing Films 4 Ever Fresh Elite-Entertainment Storm Parties Miss University

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Endz2Endz Magazine: Issue 4