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User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band Copyright © 2007 Garritan, Corp. All rights reserved

This guide written by: Gary Garritan, Chuck Israels, Gary Lindsay and Tom Hopkins Produced by: Director of Programming: Software Development: Graphic Design: Cover Design: Manual Layout: Director of Editing:

Gary Garritan & Tom Hopkins Tom Hopkins Jeff Hurchalla Michael Sandberg&James Mireau James Mireau Adina Cucicov Jeannot Welter

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Garritan Corporation or on the part of Native Instruments GmBH. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or otherwise transmitted or recorded, for any purpose, without prior written permission by Garritan Corporation. Use of the Garritan Jazz & Big Band™ library and the contents herein are subject to the terms and conditions of the license agreement distributed with the library. You should carefully read the license agreement before using this product. The sounds presented in Garritan Jazz & Big Band™ are protected by copyright and cannot be distributed, whether modified or unmodified. This Guide to Garritan Jazz and Big Band library and articulation lists contained herein are also covered by copyright. Garritan Jazz & Big Band is a trademark of Garritan Corp. KONTAKT™ is a trademark of Native Instruments GmbH.The information contained herein may change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Garritan Corporation.

Garritan Jazz & Big Band Garritan, Corp. P.O. Box 400, Orcas, WA 98280 USA Tel: (360) 376-5766 e-mail: gary@garritan.com Visit us on the World Wide Web at: www.garritan.com or www.jazz-bigband.com Printed in the United States of America. Garritan Jazz & Big Band is a trademark of Garritan.com, registration applied for. KONTAKT™ is a trademark of Native Instruments GmbH.


Table of Contents Garritan Jazz & Big Band At-a-Glance Welcome to Garritan Jazz & Big Band License Agreement What You Can Do: What You Cannot Do:

What This Package Includes System Requirements & Recommendations: Installation Instructions VST, DXi, Audio Units and RTAS Plug-in Installation Updates

Product Authorization Installation and Start Launching Service Center: Online operation Service Center Update NI Login Creating Your NI user account Online Activation Assistant Oine Activation Assistant NI Service Center Options Support Information

The World of Sampling and Software Instruments How to Use Jazz and Big Band Using Kontakt2 Player as a Standalone Application Basic Setup Information for Stand-alone Mode: Using Garritan Jazz and Big Band in a SpeciďŹ c Sequencer: Using Garritan Jazz and Big Band with a Notation Program

How the Kontakt2 Player Works The Basic Interface

What is Jazz? The Growth of Jazz Jazz Arranging Techniques Kinds of Jazz

Playing the Jazz & Big Band Instruments Basic Controls for All Wind Instruments: The Basic Real-Time Control System: Other Controls for All Wind Instruments Special Features in Saxophones: Special Features in Both Trumpets and Trombones: Additional Features in Just the Trumpets: Controls for the Rhythm Section

5 7 8 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 11 12 12 12 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 17 17 17 17 18 19 20 20 30 31 34 35 36 36 36 39 41 42 43 44


The Basic Instrument Interface Instrument Information Window General Controllers Instrument SpeciďŹ c Controller Knobs

The Woodwind Instruments The Brass Instruments The Rhythm Section Piano and Guitar Acoustic Bass Drum Kit

Notation Version of Jazz & Big Band Putting It All Together for a Real-Time Performance Building Sections from Individual Instruments Directory of Instruments in Garritan Jazz & Big Band The Rythm Section Instruments The Woodwind Instruments The Brass Instruments Multis

The Garritan Community Getting Help Acknowledgements Appendix A: Quick MIDI Controller Reference Guide Appendix B: Drum Maps Appendix C: Percussion Maps

49 49 49 50 51 52 53 53 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 59 62 68 69 70 71 72 74 76


• User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Garritan Jazz & Big Band At-a-Glance Thank you for choosing Garritan Jazz & Big Band. The following list presents some of the outstanding features of the Garritan Jazz and Big Band library:

The First Jazz and Big Band Sample Library – Garritan Jazz & Big Band is the first library of its kind. As of this writing, no sampled library of Jazz and Big Band has existed. A Comprehensive Jazz and Big Band collection – Garritan Jazz & Big Band puts at your fingertips a complete sample library of Jazz and Big Band instruments along with an integrated Native Instrument’s Kontakt™2 sample player. It provides all the major instruments you need construct your jazz and big band arrangements. A High-Quality Jazz Instrument collection – The jazz and big band library contains over 50 instruments including sixteen different saxophones, brass instruments with various mutes, a Steinway® piano, guitars, acoustic and electric basses, an electric piano, drum kits and other instruments. No Sampler Required – The entire Jazz & Big Band library is integrated with a Native Instrument Kontakt2™ Player. You will not need to purchase a separate sampler. Ensemble Maker – Garritan Jazz & Big Band provides the instruments you need to build your

own ensembles. You can build your jazz ensembles and big bands one instrument at a time exactly as you wish. This ensemble making is a key to realistic performances. It lets you create solos, duos, jazz trios, quartets, jazz ensembles, or a full big band. Intuitive Controls – The controls in Garritan Jazz & Big Band are streamlined and standardized, so you can quickly become familiar with the library. Advanced functions, such as tongue/slur, falloffs, doits, growls and automatic variability are easily accessible for realistic results with minimal effort. Notation Integration to Play from the Score – You can create great-sounding jazz and big band sounds directly from the score of major notation programs. Check your notation program for integrated support for the Garritan Jazz & Big Band library. Universal Format – No worries about platform or proprietary formats. Garritan Jazz & Big Band will work on all popular formats, both Mac and PC, either as a standalone program or as a plug-in (supporting VST, DXi, RTAS, and OS X AudioUnits). Garritan Jazz & Big Band instruments will also load into KONTAKT Native Instruments’ flagship sampler (v.2.2 or higher). The entire library can be loaded on a single PC or laptop with sufficient RAM. Suited for Every Musician – Professional composers can use this collection for quick big band charts and capturing creative ideas. Hobbyists can use it for adding jazz instrumentation to their tracks. Beginners or students can use it for scoring projects and studying jazz. The instruments in this collection can also be used to supplement orchestral sounds.

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Welcome to Garritan Jazz & Big Band Nothing quite captures the experience of listening to jazz. There is something unique and alive about the interaction of the players, the spontaneous improvisation, and the varied styles. Our aims are to give musicians the tools to play jazz and big band music, to provide information about jazz and big band music to as many people as possible, and to promote and encourage jazz and big band music everywhere. Garritan Jazz & Big Band is the first library of its kind. As of this writing, no sampled library of Jazz and Big Band has existed. We wanted to do something special and produce a new kind of library. Jazz instruments are very expressive, individualistic and the most difficult to accurately sample. New computing and sampling technology now makes this possible. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the individuals who contributed to this project and made it possible to provide these sounds and tools for musicians. I would particularly like to thank Tom Hopkins who has recorded, performed and programmed much of this library. Tom brings over thirty five years of professional jazz experience and this product certainly demonstrates Tom’s mastery and musicality. Garritan Jazz and Big Band is a dynamic library that will evolve and grow. Please check our website at www.garritan.com for the latest up-to-date information downloads, updates, FAQs, troubleshooting, helpful hints and tutorials. It is my hope that this Jazz and Big Band collection will enable you to make great music that enriches your life.

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License Agreement Please read the terms of the following software licensing agreement before using this sample collection. By installing and loading this product you acknowledge that you have read this license agreement, understand the agreement and agree to its terms and conditions. If you do not agree to these terms, do not install or use the sounds contained herein. This is the complete agreement between you and Garritan Corporation that supersedes any other representations or prior agreements, whether oral or in writing. An important thing to understand is that YOU ARE OBTAINING A LICENSE FOR YOUR USE ONLY – THEY DO NOT BELONG TO YOU. The sounds, samples and programming in the Garritan Jazz and Big Band library remain the sole property of Garritan Corporation and are licensed (not sold) to you.

WHAT YOU CAN DO: You can use these sounds in music productions, public performances, and other reasonable musical purposes within musical compositions. You can use these sounds in your own musical compositions as much as you like without any need to pay Garritan Corporation or obtain further permission. If you do use these sounds, we ask that in any written materials or credits accompanying your music that utilizes material from Garritan Jazz and Big Band collection (CD booklet, film credits, etc), that you include the following courtesy credits: “samples used in this recording are from Garritan Jazz and Big Band™, or a similar credit where practicable.

WHAT YOU CANNOT DO: The enclosed sounds cannot be re-used in any other commercial sample library or any competitive product. You are absolutely forbidden to duplicate, copy, distribute, transfer, upload or download, trade, loan, reissue or resell this library or any of the contents in any way to anyone. You cannot redistribute them through an archive, nor a collection, nor through the Internet, nor binaries groups, nor newsgroup, nor any type of removable media nor through a network. The sounds and samples contained herein cannot be edited, modified, digitally altered, re-synthesized or manipulated without direct written consent of Garritan Corporation. A right to use Garritan Jazz and Big Band is granted to the original end-user only, and this license is not transferable unless there is written consent of Native Instruments GmB and Garritan Corporation and payment of an additional fee. The sounds of Garritan Jazz and Big Band will only work with Native Instruments Kontakt and the bundled Kontakt Player and will not work with any other sampler. Licensor will not be responsible if the content of this disc does not fit the particular purpose of the Licensee. Please make sure before ordering this item that it meets your needs. Information contained herein is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Garritan Corporation. The sounds are licensed “as is” without warranties of any kind. Garritan Corporation, nor any agent or distributor can be held responsible for any direct or indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this product in whatever form.

The Garritan Jazz and Big Band library may not be returned for any reason other than manufacturing defects. The terms of this license shall be construed in accordance with the substantive laws of the United States of America and/or the State of New York. U.S.A. All product and company names are ™ or ® trademarks of their respective owners. Garritan Corporation is not responsible if the Kontakt Player or any of the third-party programs do not fit a particular purpose of the Licensee, nor if there are any direct, indirect, or consequential losses arising from the use of them. We do not offer support and are 8


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not responsible for supporting these products. Our support is limited to the samples themselves. All support with respect to the Kontakt Player must be directed to Native Instruments. The user agrees to read the manual before seeking tech support. The RECOMMENDED REQUIREMENTS for Kontakt2 Player & Sound Library is 2.8 GB of free hard disk space, DVD Drive, Windows XP (Pentium 4 /Athlon 2 GHz or better is recommended), Mac OS 10.4 or higher and a G5 or Mac Intel is recommended. The Mod Wheel on your keyboard controls volume so make sure to move it up to an audible level. If you do not have a Mod Wheel, then the ability to assign the controller within your notation program or sequencer or to an external controller is required. To play the entire orchestra, we recommend a minimum of 1 GB of RAM. Your system must meet or exceeds these requirements. Please also observe the system requirements of your host application.

What This Package Includes • 1 DVD Disc containing the installation for the Garritan Jazz & Big Band Sample Library with the KONTAKT™ documentation and templates. • The Garritan Jazz & Big Band User’s Guide.

System Requirements & Recommendations: • Hard Drive Space: 2.8 GB of free hard disk space. • Additional Drives: DVD Drive required to install. • Processor & Operating System: On a PC, Windows XP, Pentium 4 /Athlon 2.0+ GHz or better is recommended. On a Mac, OS 10.4 or higher, G5 or MacIntel 1.8 GHz or faster is recommended. • RAM: A minimum of 1 GB of RAM is required to play the entire library. There is a direct correlation between the number of instruments that can be loaded and the amount of available RAM. The more RAM available the better. • Sound Card: A sound card is required for playing the sounds of the Garritan Jazz and Big Band library. For Windows, DirectSound, MME or ASIO drivers are required (ASIO recommended for use with Garritan Studio). For Mac: Core Audio or ASIO. • MIDI: A MIDI interface may be required if you are using a MIDI keyboard, MIDI controller, or an external sequencer. Some keyboards using USB may not require a MIDI interface. • Mod Wheel: The Mod Wheel on your keyboard controls volume/timbre for wind instruments; it must be advanced to hear sound. Wind instruments automatically load with a moderate default level. If you do not have a Mod Wheel, then you will need to either assign the controller (cc#1) to an external slider/knob or draw Mod Wheel data directly into your MIDI tracks. IMPORTANT NOTE: The Kontakt audio engine is designed to make use of the processing power of your computer’s CPU. The powerful and complex algorithms of the Kontakt Player work best on newer CPUs. Please also observe the system requirements of your host application, notation program and/or sequencing program if applicable. 9


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Installation Instructions If this is your first Kontakt2 Player product, then the Player will be installed with the library. If you already own a Kontakt2 Player library, the Player installation will be skipped and just the library will be installed. To install the Garritan Jazz and Big Band and Kontakt2 Player:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Check that your computer meets the minimum requirements to run Kontakt Player. Quit all applications. Insert the DVD into the drive. Use the Windows Explorer (PC) or Apple Finder (Mac) to open the installation DVD if does not open automatically. 5. Start the Installation Program by double clicking Setup.exe (Windows) or the Kontakt Player OSX Install icon (Mac). Follow the instructions on the screen to guide you through the installation procedure.

VST, DXI, AUDIO UNITS AND RTAS PLUG-IN INSTALLATION When you run the Kontakt Player installer, you can select which components you would like to install:

PC INSTALL

MAC INSTALL

Make sure you always install the Standalone Application and the Library. Install the VST, Audio Units, DXi and RTAS options if you wish to use those particular plug-in formats. The VST plug-in will be required if you will use the GPO Studio application. For VST, you can choose to automatically search for the VST plug-in folder, or manually select the VST plug-in folder of your choice. Please select the option that best suits your installation requirements. If you decide to install the VST plug-ins at a later date, you may need to place the Kontakt 2 Player into the VST plug-ins folder of the host program. Please consult the manual of your VST host program. NOTE: If the VST plug-ins are not visible in the Windows Explorer, select the Show All Files option. This option is located in the Explorer menu View—>Folder Options...on the View tab below Hidden files. Optionally, you can set up your host programs so that they all use the same VST plug-ins folder. The VST plug-in will be required if you will use the Garritan Studio application. 10


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It may be easiest to install all listed components; if asked for a destination location, you can use the default location provided. On Windows the setup program will suggest a path in the Native Instruments folder as the path for the destination folder. This folder contains the files required to operate the software. The default path is preferred but you may also choose another folder. If you do not choose a different program path during installation, links to Kontakt2 Player and a ReadMe file are added to the Start menu under Programs\Native Instruments. IMPORTANT: Do not move the installation folder to another location!

UPDATES Be sure to check the Native Instruments web site for any possible Kontakt2 Player updates that have occurred since the time your software was manufactured. Software is frequently updated and a more recent version may be available. Library updates may also be available at the www.garritan.com website. On these websites, you can get the latest updates to the Player and library, access tutorials, obtain technical support, get special upgrade pricing, and participate in the Garritan and Kontakt forums and more. An important part of the Library and Kontakt Player installation is the Product Authorization. After installation, it needs to be registered to make permanent use of the product.

Product Authorization - NI SERVICE CENTER To authorize the library, you should use the Native Instruments Service Center application, which was installed along with the Kontakt2 Player software. NI SERVICE CENTER is a user-friendly application that helps you to activate all NI products on your computer in one go. The NI Service Center guides you through the easy-to-follow step by step activation process. Product Authorization provides full registration and entitles you to make full use of this library and all related services. You are given a 30-day grace period for each library before registration is required, but it is recommended that you register as soon as possible. Information on the registration procedure is given below. After installing the Library and Player, it will run in demo mode (also called a grace period) for 30 days. When you launch Kontakt2 Player, in the Browser you will see a little caution icon to the left of the library title. A yellow icon means the library is running in demo mode. After a library has been properly registered, the caution icon disappears entirely. A red icon means the demo period has expired and the library can no longer be used until it has been registered. The red icon may also appear if the system ID of the computer changes due to new hardware components (CPU, motherboard, etc.) If this occurs, the library will need to be re-registered. You get two installations with your product. Therefore you can use the library on both a laptop and a desktop, or on two separate computers. The Update Manager provides access to the latest updates, hotfixes and more for your products. You can select the files you wish to download; view information regarding the update as well as manage all downloads. 11


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INSTALLATION AND START The NI Service Center takes care of the Garritan Jazz and Big Band registration as well as all NI product activations, including earlier NI products formerly authorized with the “Registration Tool”. It can also be installed individually using an installer, which can be downloaded from the Native Instruments web site.

LAUNCHING SERVICE CENTER: The NI Service Center can be started from the following locations: • • • •

Splash screen from your Garritan/ Native Instruments product which is in 30-days mode From the Help menu of the Garritan/Native Instruments product PC only: In the Windows start menu From the installation folder, e.g. C:\Program Files\Native Instruments\NI Service Center on PC and Applications\Native Instruments\NI Service Center on Mac. PLEASE NOTE: NI Service Center needs Administration rights to be able to activate your products.

ONLINE OPERATION This section explains the operation of the NI Service Center if your computer has an internet connection. Read on in chapter “Offline Operation” if your computer has no internet connection. Checking Internet Connection NI Service Center checks for an existing Internet connection first. If your computer is currently not online, the connection box of your operating system is launched. While trying to connect, a circle is shown. NOTE: You may get a warning message from your internet firewall as soon as NI Service Center tries to connect to the internet. This is normal and good protection of your computer. Please allow NI Service Center to pass the firewall in order to proceed. We recommend to “always allow” the internet connection of NI Service Center, that way you do not have to confirm this every time you launch the Service Center. If you still encounter problems with the detection of the internet connection please ensure that you use the latest version of NI Service Center. For more information and downloads please visit: www.native-instruments.com/servicecenter.info. If NI Service Center fails to establish an internet connection, it offers three options to proceed: • Try connecting to the internet again: Select this and press Next when you have established an internet connection. 12


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• Use a proxy server to connect to the internet: NI Service Center may not be able to detect the proxy settings you have made for certain internet software. Therefore you have to enter your proxy server settings when required. Usually you can copy these settings from your standard web browser which you have set up for a proxy server. • Offline mode - continue without connection to the internet: Select this option and press Next when your computer has no internet connection at all. In this case proceed with chapter “Offline Operation”. If your computer is part of a larger network (e.g. if you work in a company) a direct internet connection is usually not allowed, but a proxy server is used for security reasons. In this case you need to enter the settings for the proxy server to connect to our registration server. The settings in Service Center are the same as any web browser. You can easily copy them from the browsers proxy settings. The following settings are required: Host Name, the IP address, and the Port Number. PLEASE NOTE: If you do not use a proxy server, please leave the fields blank and save the settings with the “Save Settings” button.

SERVICE CENTER UPDATE As soon as a new NI Service Center version is available, it will be detected automatically and a download procedure will be initiated. The following dialogue will appear (shown right). Please click Next to proceed with the software download. Native Instruments strongly recommends using the latest client software version. A dialogue will show the status of the software download and when the update has been successfully downloaded. After the latest software version has been downloaded successfully, NI Service Center has to be restarted. This can be done easily by clicking on the Next Button within the appearing dialogue.

NI LOGIN Login page: This page allows you to create a new user account, or to enter an existing user name and password, if you already have a NI user account. When you create a user account at Native Instruments, the user name and password are automatically sent to the e-mail address you entered. • Yes, I already have an NI account: Enter your existing user name and password here, if you already have an NI user account. 13


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• Remember Login: Activate this check box to store the login permanently on your computer. Once it is stored you do not need to enter it when accessing protected areas of the NI web site from NI Service Center. • Forgot your password? Click this link to receive an e-mail containing a new password. It also allows you to change your current password. • No, I do not have an NI account: Choose this option, if you have no NI user account. A dialog to enter your details will open. PLEASE NOTE: Be sure to use a serial number of a Native Instruments product which has already been registered in your user profile. For security reasons there is no way to resend your current password to you. You always need to create a new one in case you have lost your current one.

CREATING YOUR NI USER ACCOUNT This step is only necessary if you have no NI account yet. If you already have a user account, you can directly enter your username and password on the previous page (see Login page). NOTE: A user account is necessary for all types of product activation, update downloads, access to our web site content and technical support. The registration view asks for your user name, your full email address and your full name and address. These items are mandatory. Make sure to enter a complete and valid e-mail address as your user name, since your password will be sent to this e-mail address. Optional: Forum Account - You can also sign up to the NI forum here and create a nickname under which you participate in the forums as well as a password for the forum login. Confirm your personal data by pressing Next. NOTE: Native Instruments uses a secure SSL connection with 128-bit encryption that meets current security standards to transmit your personal data over the web. Native Instruments will treat the information you provide confidentially. It will be used for registration purposes only and not be passed on to third parties.

ONLINE ACTIVATION ASSISTANT The Activation Assistant allows you to activate your installed NI software. Simply select the yet inactivated NI product(s) and click Next to start the activation process. The Online Activation Assistant will contact the NI registration server and the NI server will return with an activation key to unlock the product(s) permanently. After activating a product for the first time its serial number 14


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is allocated to your username in our registration database and you gain access to all product-specific content on the NI web site.

OFFLINE ACTIVATION ASSISTANT If you do not have an internet connection on the computer in which the product is installed, choose “Offline mode Continue without connection to the internet”. This message appears if no internet connection has been found. These are the steps to complete an Offline Activation: • Choose Offline mode when there is no internet connection. • Press the Export button to save the Activation Request File (HTML file) on a portable medium (e.g. USB stick, CD, etc) • Transfer the Activation Request File to a computer with internet connection. • Double click to open the HTML file in your standard web browser. • Click the Send-button appearing in your web browser and follow the steps. • On the website, choose either “Yes – I do have an NI account” and enter your login data or choose “No – I don’t have an NI account” and register. NOTE: Your username and password will be sent to you per e-mail after creating a new user account. Keep in mind that the e-mail can only be delivered to you if you have entered a correct and complete e-mail address. • At the end of the online process click the link to download the Activation Return File (.naf ) and save it on your portable medium. • Transfer the Activation Return File (.naf ) to your audio computer. • Go to the “Offline Activation Assistant” in NI Service Center and click the Import button to load the Activation Return File.

NI SERVICE CENTER OPTIONS Online Activation Assistant - This will launch the Activation Assistant for activating not yet activated products. Update Manager - The Update Manager shows the available downloads for the installed Garritan and other Native Instruments products on your computer. In detail, the following information is displayed: Release Date, File size in Megabyte and Release Notes. The option “Open Download folder after download” allows it to automatically open the folder where the update has been downloaded to. To perform a download please click the check boxes for the different updates and click Next. The Update 15


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Manager is accessible from the main menu and from the Activation Assistant. In case all your products are activated, the update manager opens as the Service Center’s first page. PLEASE NOTE: The Update Manager only works in online mode. After clicking Next, please choose the folder to which you want to download the update installers. By clicking ‘New Folder’ a new folder will be created in a selected directory. While downloading, a download statusbar is shown. After the file has been downloaded the download status is printed in green letters. By pressing ‘Next’ you’ll be forwarded to the Main Menu. • Product Overview - This view displays all NI software on your computer that requires activation. Select the respective tab to see either the status of activation or product details like serial number and activation key. • Product Details view displays information that may be useful when contacting NI support e.g. the serial number, system IDs and activation keys for each product. Click on the “+”-symbols to see the details. • Personal Settings - The Personal Settings page lets you change the language of NI Service Center and edits your personal details like e-mail and postal address. Change your user name (e-mail address) as well as postal address by clicking on the Edit your address data link. Make sure to keep your postal address up to date. Language - NI Service Center adjusts to the language of your operating system when starting up for the first time. However, you may choose another language on the settings page. A click on the “Choose your language” link displays the languages currently offered.

SUPPORT INFORMATION This provides information for Registration and Technical Support.

For more information about the NI Service Center, go to www.native-instruments.com 16


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The World of Sampling and Software Instruments Garritan Jazz & Big Band is a complete collection of actual high-quality recordings (or samples) of nearly every note, of each musical instrument commonly used in a Jazz and big band context. When Garritan Jazz & Big Band is loaded and you play a note on your keyboard, what you hear sounds remarkably like the real thing, because it is an actual recording of an instrument. Developed in the early eighties, sampling technology has grown substantially. Sampling is now everywhere. Many movies, prime-time television shows and interactive games use sampling technology. Now everyone can have a jazz and big band in their computer. With Garritan Jazz & Big Band, the sample player is integrated with the sounds effectively turning a computer into a band of virtual instruments. TIP: Don’t overlook the possibility of combining Jazz and Big Band instruments with GPO or other orchestral libraries. JABB instruments can expand your palette of sounds for many musical applications, not just Jazz.

How to Use Jazz and Big Band Once installed and authorized, it’s time to get started with Jazz and Big Band. There are three ways to use the Garritan Jazz and Big Band: as a plug-in within a sequencer, with a notation program (via your notation program’s hosting or with a VST Host), or you can run the stand-alone Jazz and Big Band application.

USING KONTAKT2 PLAYER AS A STANDALONE APPLICATION The stand-alone version of Garritan Jazz and Big Band can be played live via MIDI keyboard, independent of other programs. In this case, your computer acts as a stand-alone instrument, similar to an electronic keyboard or synthesizer with MIDI ports and analog inputs and outputs. To use Kontakt2 Player as a standalone application, go to the Program Files or Applications folder and launch Kontakt2 Player. When you do this, Kontakt2 Player communicates directly with your computer’s audio and MIDI hardware interfaces. You must configure the Audio and MIDI Settings in the File menu of Kontakt2 Player. For more information on Audio and MIDI setup instructions, please refer to the readme files with the Kontakt2 Player.

BASIC SETUP INFORMATION FOR STANDALONE MODE: To use the Standalone version you have to configure the Audio and MIDI settings in the Kontakt2 Player Setup dialog box (found in the File menu). 17


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Soundcard Tab • Interface: All of the supported (and installed) audio interfaces are available in this drop-down list. Select the desired audio driver (PC: MME, Direct- Sound, ASIO 2.0; and for MAC: ASIO 2.0 or Core Audio) from the list. Note: ASIO is recommended. • Sample Rate: Depending on the sound card and driver you are using, various sample rates are available. Set the desired sample rate here. • Output Device: Here you can define which of the installed audio interfaces should be used for the audio outputs based on the driver selected under Interface. • Input Device: Here you can define which of the installed audio interfaces should be used for the audio inputs based on the driver selected under Interface. Note: With some interface types (e.g. ASIO or Core Audio), the Input Device setting is not available. Instead you can set the inputs for the chosen driver on the Routing tab. • Output Latency: This box displays the output latency. With some drivers you also get a latency slider for setting an individual latency for the Kontakt2 Player.

Routing tab

Audio & MIDI tab

In the Routing tab, if you are using a multi-channel sound card, Kontakt2 Player also allows you to freely select which channels to use for the output signals. In the MIDI tab, the two boxes (MIDI inputs and MIDI outputs) display all of the MIDI inputs and outputs that are correctly installed on your system. Click in the right column to “on” or “off” to activate or deactivate the corresponding MIDI input or output. From this point on, Kontakt2 Player sends and receives MIDI on these activated inputs and outputs.

USING GARRITAN JAZZ AND BIG BAND IN A SPECIFIC SEQUENCER: When used as a plug-in, the Garritan Jazz and Big Band becomes a virtual instrument that can be seamlessly integrated into your favorite sequencer or “host” computer program. A major advantage to using a sequencer is that all settings are saved together with the song files and are totally retained and recalled upon reload. You can also load multiple instances and many instruments can be loaded at once in a sequencer. The Garritan Jazz and Big Band works as a plug-in with many popular sequencers including Cubase, Sonar, Logic, Digital Performer, Samplitude, Nuendo, ProTools, GarageBand, Tracktion, FL Studio, Orion and others. There are many resources and tutorials on how to use the Garritan Libraries with the various popular sequencers and are available on the Garritan website at www.garritan.com. 18


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There are four major plug-in standards: Plug-in Standard

Description

VST

The VST plug-in stands for Virtual Studio Technology and was developed by Steinberg, the makers of the Cubase family of audio programs. It is also used by Cakewalk Sonar, Mackie Tracktion, Magix Samplitude, Nuendo, FL Studio and other sequencers.

x

DirectX (DX) is Microsoft’s multimedia plug-in standard for Windows 95, 98, 2000, ME, NT and XP. DirectX plug-ins work only with Windows on a PC. It is currently used by Cakewalk Sonar, FL Studio, and Sony Vegas

x

DirectX (DX)

Audio Units

RTAS

Windows Mac

The Audio Units (AU) plug-in standard was developed by Apple Inc. for Core Audio under Mac OS X. Audio Units is becoming the preferred plug-in format on Mac OSX and is used by Emagic Logic Audio under OS X. It is also used by Digital Performer 4.11+ RTAS plug-ins (Real Time Audio Suite) are designed to work in the Digidesign Pro Tools environment. Pro Tools hardware and software are used extensively in the pro audio and post production communities.

x

x x

x

USING GARRITAN JAZZ AND BIG BAND WITH A NOTATION PROGRAM Notation is a fundamental part of music creation. Notation programs allow you to easily create and print sheet music with your computer. Until recently it was not possible to play realistic sounds from notation programs. Garritan Jazz and Big Band pioneered the use of notation with samples and was developed specifically for notation. For the first time it was possible to play orchestrations directly from a score. A special “notation version” of the Garritan Jazz and Big Band library is included on the disc along with the Standard Garritan Jazz and Big Band version. The Notation version of GPO is very similar to the Standard version but there are important differences which make it more compatible with the way some notation programs handle MIDI data. MakeMusic Finale® and Human Playback® have special integration with GPO. Sibelius®, GenieSoft Overture®, Quickscore, MidiNotate and other notation programs have also developed specific soundsets for GPO. There are also specific notation plug-ins designed to optimize use with Garritan Jazz and Big Band. There are two ways to use Garritan Jazz and Big Band with notation programs. One is to use it directly from within a notation program that can host Jazz and Big Band. The other is to use the Garritan Studio host application. Recent advances in notation technology will allow you to play Garritan Jazz and Big Band sounds directly from within certain notation programs. Programs such as MakeMusic FINALE 2006® will now allow you to host and integrate Garritan Jazz and Big Band directly in the application. You can also play from the score of your notation program using Garritan Studio. Garritan Studio is a downloadable VST Host application designed to allow you to play Jazz and Big Band from a notation program. You can use nearly any notation program that supports MIDI including Finale (2005 and earlier), Sibelius, Overture, MidiNotate, Quickscore, Noteworthy Composer, Encore and other notation programs. IMPORTANT NOTE: Please refer to the Support Pages at www.garritan.com for tutorials on how to use Garritan Libraries with various different sequencers and notation programs. 19


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How the Kontakt2 Player Works THE BASIC INTERFACE

The Kontakt2 Player allows you to load and customize the Garritan Jazz and Big Band sounds to be used for playback. The Kontakt2 Player consists of several main parts: the Browser, the Main Control Panel, the Tabs (to access specialized screens) and the speciďŹ c controls for the library. This section will familiarize you with the Kontakt Player interface. It can get a little technical but stay with it. 1. BROWSER On the left side of the screen is the Browser window with three tabs. The Browser gives you the capability to navigate through the library (or libraries), as well as view engine information and assign automation. In the screenshot above, the Browser is opened to the Libraries tab.

Libraries Tab The Libraries tab shows the libraries that can be played in the Kontakt2 Player. For each library, there are Instruments, Multis, and Info menu. These three menus allow you to navigate through the library. Instruments are the basic patches that are created for you to use and Multis are combinations of various instruments. If you click on the Instruments button, all instruments will be displayed below in the Browser. If you click on the arrows just to the right of either button, the contents of the library will appear in an easyto-use hierarchical menu. If you click on the Multis button (especially with other libraries), all Multis will be displayed in the Browser. The Info tab brings up additional information about the library such as Updates, Registration, Forum and Support. In the submenu under the Libraries tab are a few buttons. There is a refresh button to refresh the Browser and an eject button to eject an optical disc. 20


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NOTE: Kontakt2 Player is only able to play libraries developed specifically for it. Kontakt2 Player is not able to load general Kontakt patches, nor is it able to import libraries from other formats. To do these things, you must own the full version of Kontakt 2.

Engine Tab Clicking on the Engine tab brings up information about how the Kontakt engine is performing. This information is updated in real-time, so you can watch exactly how it behaves under various conditions (e.g. high polyphony, high CPU loads, etc.)

Automation Tab The Automation tab allows you to assign various types of MIDI automation to various knobs within Kontakt2 Player either in standalone mode or when using Kontakt2 Player as a plug-in, select Host Automation. (See Appendix A – MIDI Automation for more information). 2. MAIN CONTROL PANEL

The Kontakt2 Player main control panel gives you access to several controls and displays which are global to the program.

The upper four buttons (Browser, Outputs, Keyboard, and MasterKontrol) toggle the visibility of these four areas of the program. NOTE: If you are using the standalone version of Kontakt2 Player, you can use the F1-F4 keys to toggle each of these buttons from the keyboard.

Browser Section: The Browser has been discussed above; we will now look at the other three areas individually.

Output Section: When you click the Output button, the Output window appears at the bottom of the rack. There are two types of faders: “Blue” faders that relate to channel outputs (the number of faders depends on the number of available outputs), and four “orange” faders that control return from the four send effects.Each fader, output or aux return, has four effect insert points. The output channel features, going from left to right across the top, are: 21


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• Add Channel: Adds another output channel to the Outputs section. • Delete Channel: To delete a channel, click on any section of the channel that doesn’t contain an editable parameter; the channel becomes outlined in yellow. Click on Delete Channel to delete. Note: You cannot delete the Aux return channels. • Hide Inserts: Hides all inserts to conserve space. • Edit Effect: To edit an insert effect, click on it. Then click on this button to open and close the edit section for that effect. To delete an effect, click on the effect strip that includes the parameters (not the module in the slot); the effect strip becomes outlined in orange. Then, press the computer keyboard’s Delete key. • Reset Out Map: This button can be used to restore the output mapping to the default settings. • Make Default: Clicking on this button saves the current output mappings as your permanent defaults. (These output mappings are saved to the Kontakt2 Player application directory inside the Defaults folder.) Each channel has a name field at the top. You can double-click in the field and type in the desired name. Below the name are four effect slots. To insert an effect, click on the downward arrow toward the right of the slot, and select the desired effect from the drop-down list. You can Adjust Output or Aux Return Level by moving the appropriate fader.

Config: This is where you configure the output for a number of channels and channel assignments. When you click on a channel’s Config button, a dialog box appears with several fields. You can edit the Channel Name, but also, the number of audio channels (click on the Audio Channels parameter, then drag it up or down). Note that you can’t specify more audio channels than actually exist. Each channel shows up in a list. Click on the channel’s Physical Out field, and a pop-up menu appears with all available output. Click on a physical output to assign it to a Kontakt2 Player virtual output. You can use the << and >> buttons in the lower left hand corner to automatically go to the next available output.

Keyboard The Keyboard button displays an onscreen virtual keyboard which features tinted keys, which can be helpful in auditioning the sounds of the instrument. Keys which have samples mapped on them are tinted blue, and keyswitch keys are tinted red. Keys which are being played will be shown in real time. You can transpose the keyboard’s range within three octaves as well as create pitch bend and Modulation events (MIDI CC 1). NOTE: Clicking on the graphic keys, moving the mod wheel, etc. in the player will not be recorded to your sequencer. This must be done from your sequencer tracks or an external keyboard controller. If you have a MIDI keyboard connected, you may play the samples using your keyboard as well. 22


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Master Control When enabled in the Main Control Panel, this sits right under that panel and provides various functions. The tempo knob sets the tempo for tempo-synched effects. If Kontakt2 Player is used within a host program, this displays the host’s tempo. The default is 120.00 BPM. There is also a sync button to sync to incoming tempo information (not visible in the standalone version). You can set the tempo manually by adjusting the tempo knob, or double-clicking on the tempo field and type in a new number, or by tapping a rhythm on the Tap button. To use the Metronome, click the On button to enable it. The light below the On button flashes with the tempo, and the control varies the metronome volume. The Master Tune area defaults to A=440, but can be adjusted with the knob from A=392 to A=493. You can set a reference pitch, and tune the sample against it. Turn it on with the On button, and use the knob to set the reference tone level.

Load/Save The Load/Save menu gives you options for loading and saving instrument and multis, as well as resetting the entire multi (i.e. clearing the rack). Instruments and multis can be loaded using the Load option, and can also be loaded by simply dragging and dropping the NKI or NKM file from the desktop. NOTE: When saving instruments and multis, you are only saving the instrument/multi definition files, not the individual samples. Each individual sample is encrypted within the protected monolith file, and the raw samples cannot be extracted. In the Save dialog box, the patch + samples and monolith options are not available. This is due to the copy protection of the library; the samples cannot be extracted nor resaved. There is an option to save the patch with absolute sample paths enabled or disabled. When you save with absolute paths enabled, the patch file includes a direct and absolute link to the location of the encoded samples on your hard drive. In other words, the absolute path will reference your hard drive name and the exact subfolders which the encoded samples are stored. This is the best option to use if you will not be sharing this library among multiple computers and intend not to move the location of the encoded samples. By doing this, every time you load one of the user patches, it will instantly and automatically find the samples. By disabling the absolute path option, a relative path is used instead. For example, if you save the instrument in a subfolder which sits alongside the encoded sample files, a relative path will read something like “go up one level in the folder hierarchy and you’ll find the encoded samples there.” Relative paths are the best option if you think you may move the samples around. Be sure that the relative location between the newly saved patch and the encoded samples stays the same in order to make sure the samples can always be found automatically. 23


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If a saved patch ever loses track of where its samples are stored, you will be presented with a dialog box upon load which prompts you to find the location of the samples. Instruments and multis saved from within Kontakt2 Player are accessible through the Browser’s User Instruments and User Multis menus, and can be used by anyone who owns the same library, from within either Kontakt2 Player or the full version of Kontakt 2. The instruments cannot be used by a user who does not own the same library.

Options The Options menu is where you determine overall Kontakt2 Player preferences. Clicking on this button opens the Options window, which has five subcategories. TAB 1: INTERFACE - Here you make basic adjustments to Kontakt2 Player’s layout of Kontakt and functionality. • Small, Medium & Big Size: The View menu lets you choose one of three sizes for Kontakt2 Player: Small, Mid, and Big. The edit boxes let you specify the size, in pixels, for the size. The width and height have separate fields; to change a field, double-click on it and enter the new value. Note: New values will take effect the next time you open Kontakt Player. • Capture Keyboard from Host: Enabling this button catches certain keyboard keys and routes them to Kontakt2 Player rather than to the host program. For example, you may want to type certain things on the keyboard and have them affect Kontakt2 Player but have no effect on the host (e.g. you want to name something in Kontakt2 Player using a letter that happens to be a keyboard shortcut for the host). Enabling this ensures the keystroke is interpreted by Kontakt2 Player but not the host. • Capture Mouse from Host: This is similar to Capture Keyboard from Host, but directs the Mouse Wheel movements to Kontakt2 Player instead of the host. • Show Mapping and Keyswitches on Keyboard: This button shades keys on the “virtual master keyboard” (along the lower part of the window) to indicate mapping and keyswitching. • Auto-refresh Browser: This option activates the auto updating of the browser. When activated, the browser automatically detects from the operating system if a folder is changed / created. • Menu Font Size: This drop-down list allows setting the font size bigger for increased legibility, or smaller to fit more items on screen. TAB 2: AUDIO ENGINE - These settings affect Kontakt2 Player’s audio engine. • Default Volume for New Instruments and Volume Reset: Choose between –6dB and 0dB. • CPU Overload Protection: This function will kill voices if the CPU load gets too high. You can specify how tolerant you want the engine to be. • Multiprocessor Support: Enable this checkbox if you have a computer with more than one processor to take advantage of the additional CPU power. • Offline Interpolation Quality: The new HQI mode allows you to select among three quality options when bouncing audio from within a host. “Standard” corresponds to the old mode, 24


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whereas “High” and “Perfect” increase the quality. HQI mode helps you eliminate digital aliasing sounds which become particularly audible when you transpose sounds with significant high frequency content upwards. Note that this quality comes with a price in the form of additional CPU load and thus a lower total voice count. IMPORTANT: Both modes “high” and “perfect” will use more CPU if the transposition is higher.e.g. if you transpose a sample one, then 2 octaves, the CPU load will double every octave. So if you transpose your sample many octaves higher, the CPU load might be very high. • Open Audio and MIDI Settings: Click on this button to view audio and MIDI settings that relate to your audio interface. TAB 3: HANDLING • Use Computer Keyboard for MIDI Playback: This lets you use your computer keyboard to trigger Kontakt2 Player (handy for laptop jockeys on airplanes!). You can also edit the Velocity value that a key will trigger. • Keyboard Velocity: This specifies what velocity should be sent when using the computer keyboard for MIDI playback. • Solo Mode: Choose between Solo-In-Place (only one instrument can be soloed, others will be muted) and Solo Latch (you can switch several instruments into solo mode). • Browser: Double-Click Loads Instrument: If enabled, double-clicking on a Sample in the Browser creates a new Instrument, with the sample spanning the entire keyboard range. If you Shift-Click multiple samples and double-click on the group of Samples, this not only creates a new Instrument, but also auto-maps the Samples equally across the keyboard. • Browser: Show Files Before Folders: This alters the sorting algorithm of the Browser to show files before folders. • Default Root Key for New Zones: Samples without root key information will default to this as their root key. • MIDI Channel Assignment for Loaded Patches: This menu tells Kontakt2 Player what MIDI channel you want newly loaded instruments to be assigned to. “1st Free” loads up each subsequent instrument on the first unused MIDI channel. “Omni” assigns all instruments to OMNI (meaning they will receive MIDI on any incoming channel). “Keep channels from K 1.x Patches” will allow the patches to load with whatever MIDI channels were saved within older Kontakt 1 patches. • Installation Base Path: If you change the name of the Kontakt2 Player folder, certain presets might not be available anymore. Set the installation path here to the location of the Kontakt2 Player folder. TAB 4: LOAD/IMPORT • Load Instruments/Banks/Multis in “Purged Mode” (Without Loading Samples into RAM): Reloads the parameters of Samples that were purged, but without the Sample data itself. See Purge Menu below. 25


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• Force-load Pre-2.0 Patches in DFD Mode: This forces the engine to use DFD streaming even for old patches that were not originally saved with it. TAB 5: SEARCH/DB -This screen gives you options to specify what folders or volumes should be used when using search functions. TAB 6: DFD - Direct from Disk • Amount of Memory for DFD: Adjusts the amount of RAM to dedicate to the DFD process. Although samples stream from disk, it is necessary to store attacks in RAM so they are available instantly upon playback. If DFD isn’t working properly, try allocating more RAM to this function.

Purge Menu Purge analyzes which samples were used in an arrangement, and removes from RAM any samples that weren’t used. Thus, Kontakt2 Player can handle huge amounts of samples while exhibiting very low RAM usage. Scoring of large ensembles with many instruments and samples now becomes manageable. Purge is available here on a Global level, but is also available on the Instrument level. You would use Global purge after a song was done, and you wanted to remove all unneeded samples. The Instrument purge is handy if you’ve finished a part; you can purge samples for that Instrument alone, thus freeing up RAM for additional overdubs. Click on the downward arrow to access the following functions. • Reset Markers: Deletes all “tags” that mark samples as used. • Update Sample Pool: Unloads unused samples from RAM, loads newly marked Samples in RAM. • Purge All Samples: Unloads all Samples from RAM. • Reload All Samples: Reloads all Samples used in an Instrument. • Load Everything Purged (Without Samples): Reloads the parameters of Samples that were purged, but without the Sample data itself. A display for the instrument shows Purge status. • Green: All Samples are loaded. • Orange: Samples have been purged to reduce RAM requirements. • Red: Empty – all Samples are unloaded from RAM.

View Menu The entire instrument can be re-sized from the View menu. Choices are Normal, Bigger, and Large. Typically you will use Large when creating Instruments, and Normal when everything has been programmed, and you’re using Kontakt2 Player as a plug-in or stand-alone device. You can set the window size under Options > Interface. 26


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System Performance Meters These are located in the upper right section of the Main Control Panel. Clockwise from upper left, these show the following. • Polyphony: The amount of polyphony being used. The first digit shows the current number of notes being played; the second digit shows the maximum amount of polyphony. • CPU: Shows how much CPU power is being used by Kontakt2 Player. More bars indicate more CPU use. • Disk: Shows the amount of Kontakt2 Player’s hard disk access. Pulling more data from disk illuminates more bars. • RAM: Indicates how much memory is being taken up by the samples used by Kontakt2 Player. This figure will be much higher if DFD is not being used.

Minimized Player View The last button on the right (next to the NI logo) is for Instrument Focus view. Clicking on this button will instantly zoom into the currently selected instrument, and will hide all other areas of the Kontakt2 Player interface (e.g. Browser). This can be a useful tool to instantly collapse the Kontakt2 Player screen to its smallest size and most essential elements.

About Screen An About screen can be accessed by clicking either the Kontakt2 Player logo in the far upper left corner of the interface, or the NI logo in the far upper right corner. The About screen contains the specific version numbers of all components of Kontakt2 Player, as well as design credits and links to web pages containing updates, support, and more.

Multi Area The Multi area is the large area on the right side of the Kontakt2 Player. Also referred to as the rack, this is where all loaded Kontakt2 Player instruments reside. You can load multis (which are combinations of instruments) or you can load individual instruments, and they will both appear here. There are a few buttons in the upper right hand corner that allow you to work with the rack. The four numerical buttons allow you to switch between four different pages of the rack. By using these, it’s possible to load up to 64 different instruments at once. The Aux button is a toggle switch to show or hide the aux send faders for each instrument.

Instrument views PERFORMANCE VIEW The performance view shows a custom panel which allows you to alter specific characteristics of the instrument. You can view this panel by clicking on the “G” icon immediately below the gear icon in the upper left hand corner. 27


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In the J&BB interface there are various controls. There are controls for tuning, volume, pitchbend range, portamento, variability, and other controls. These will be discussed in a later section of this manual. MINIMIZED AND MAXIMIZED VIEW The instrument minimize and maximize buttons allow you to instantly collapse or expand every instrument in the rack to its minimized or maximized view, respectively. The maximized view, as shown above, is useful when editing an instrument and accessing its panel. The minimized view is useful when you want to view all your instruments at once. An instrument in minimized view shows only its name, solo and mute buttons, volume, pan, and tune knobs, and meters. The X button in the upper right corner deletes the instrument, and the + button switches to performance view.

Instrument maximized view is also available. An instrument in maximized view shows additional details about the instrument, such as output settings, MIDI channel, polyphony, a memory meter, and the purge. Clicking on the gear icon itself brings up the Instrument Options window, which will be discussed below.

Instrument Options INSTRUMENT TAB • Voice Stealing Mode: Choose from:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Kill any (the algorithm decides which is the best one to steal); Kill Oldest (oldest note still sounding); Kill Newest (most recently played note); Kill Highest (highest-pitched note); Kill Lowest (lowest-pitched note)

• Voice Stealing Fadeout Time: Sets how long a stolen voice will fade out before it disappears, from 0 to 1000ms. This may cause the number of voices to temporarily exceed the maximum amount of polyphony specified. • Key Switch Default Key: This is the first key that is activated when you load this instrument with “Start on key” group start options. • MIDI Transpose: Transposes incoming MIDI data in semitones. Example: If this is set to 2 and you play a C# on your keyboard, the Instrument being triggered will play a D#. 28


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• Key Range: This sets the Instrument’s keyboard range. Placing your mouse over the lower or upper limit causes a double arrow to appear. Drag up to raise the limit’s note pitch, or drag down to lower. The range cannot go below C-2, or above G8. Use this with multiple Instruments to create keyboard splits - for example, bass could cover the lower two octaves of your keyboard, and piano the rest. Double-click the value field to enter a note from your computer keyboard. • Velocity Range: This restricts the velocity range to which an Instrument will respond. Placing your mouse over the lower or upper limit causes a double arrow to appear. Drag up to raise the velocity limit, or drag down to lower. The range cannot go below 1, or above 127. Double-click a value field to enter a value from your computer keyboard.

DFD & Load Tab DFD PRELOAD BUFFER SIZE: Sets the amount of RAM dedicated to each preload buffer when using DFD. This is an expert setting and should not be adjusted unless you are instructed to do so from tech support. You have been warned!

Controller Tab • MIDI Controller #64: This drop-down menu determines how Kontakt2 Player responds to MIDI Controller #64, which defaults to different choices depending upon the type of instrument. Here are your options.

1. Sustain Pedal and Controller: Kontakt2 Player will respond to a switched (on-off) or continuous controller (values above 64 = sustain on, values 64 or under = sustain off). 2. Sustain Pedal without Controller: Kontakt2 Player will recognize only a switched controller. (e.g. Piano) 3. Controller Only: Kontakt2 Player will recognize only a continuous controller. (e.g. Saxophone) • Accept All Notes Off/All Sounds Off: This option will filter All Notes Off and All Sounds Off messages, which some older controllers send by default. • Accept Standard Controllers for Volume and Pan: This option will cause each instrument to automatically respond to CC#7 for volume and CC#10 for pan. • MIDI Controller #7 (Volume) Range: Using this dropdown menu, you can adjust the minimum and maximum values that incoming MIDI CC#7 will translate to when controlling the volume of an instrument. 29


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Info Tab • Instrument Icon: Choose an Instrument’s identifying icon. • Instrument Info: A notepad for the Instrument, possibly including copyright information, helpful tips, etc. • Instrument Categories: Choose an Instrument category. Being able to search on this can help considerably with database searches. • Author: Information on the sample’s creator. This is limited to 8 characters, so longer descriptions can go in the Info box. • Weblink: Provides a web link to the Garritan web site.

What is Jazz? Ask 100 people “What is jazz?” and you’ll probably get 100 different answers. Part of the reason is because jazz is not predictable like classical music where players must play what is on the printed page without much artistic license. Jazz is a living art form, always changing and evolving, and never the same. The essence of Jazz is improvisation. In most jazz performances, players interpret and communicate music in their own unique way and express their own individual voices. The players typically play solos they make up on the spot. This makes jazz a very expressive musical form, capable of musically communicating the thoughts and feelings of the players. Whether it is sorrow or joy, no music so eloquently gives voice to an individual. Jazz music is player oriented where basic guidelines are established and the players are free to individually or collectively improvise. Usually, the same piece can not be played again in the exact same manner as it can in classical music. Jazz can take a familiar tune and make it fresh each time it is played. “Never play a thing the same way twice.” remarked Louis Armstrong. Although improvisational in nature, jazz requires considerable skill. The simplicity will fool you. It is in the act of spontaneous creation where we truly find Jazz, and the listener plays an important role and experiences what is being expressed. There is a personal connection with the musing that is unlike other forms of music. Jazz invites the listener into a relationship with the players. The inspired motif at a particular instant may be in response to audience involvement as the player communicates. So, again, what is jazz? Someone once asked this question to legendary great jazz musician, “Fats” Waller and his response was: “If you hafta ask, you ain’t never gonna know!” 30


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THE GROWTH OF JAZZ by Chuck Israels In the late 19th Century USA, the popularity of brass bands, like John Philip Sousa’s, made trumpets, trombones, flutes, clarinets, saxophones, and drums familiar and easily accessible to young American musicians. Before long, players of these instruments, especially those who lacked the traditional European style schooling in technique, began to exhibit some of the nuances and inflections of American spoken language in the way they expressed themselves through musical sounds. In the evolution of classical music, a general consensus had developed about how instrumentalists were to be trained to adjust and modify their playing in order to create a homogeneous ensemble blend and an instrumental version of the operatic vocal line. The situation in the shorter history of jazz was somewhat different. Individual nuances of timbre, attack, and pitch inflection became valuable commodities to the jazz musician, and the development of a personal sound was taken as a sign of musical maturity. For example, the saxophone, developed in the 19th Century as a reed instrument capable of competing in loudness with brass instruments, and which has a more or less uniform sound in classical music, evolved in the 20th Century into a jazz instrument most remarkable for its ability to accommodate a variety of personal expressive styles. There is not so much a jazz saxophone sound as there are Coleman Hawkins sounds, Lester Young sounds, Johnny Hodges sounds, Charlie Parker sounds, Harry Carney sounds and Gerry Mulligan sounds. The situation is not all that different for brass instruments. Louis Armstrong changed the sound of the trumpet for everyone, even classical trumpet players, but Miles Davis and Clark Terry are instantly recognizable too, not to mention all the sounds that Ellington’s players contributed with special mutes and plungers. And whose sound represents the jazz trombone, Jack Teagarden’s, Al Grey’s, Bill Harris’ or J.J. Johnson’s? Similar situations exist among the rhythm instruments where creative bass players, drummers, and guitarists developed personal approaches to their instruments. Bassists Jimmy Blanton and Ray Brown invented ways of playing pizzicato sounds that had a remarkably extended decay, while still maintaining a nearly superhuman power of rhythmic precision and strength of attack. Over time, this kind of instrumental sound became accepted as the “default” for jazz bass lines, supplanting the tuba, bass saxophone, and left hand of the piano player, as the ideal embodiment of pulse and pitch for propelling the rhythm of this American music. Charlie Christian was the first jazz guitarist to find acceptance and acclaim using an electromagnetic pickup, and his playing remains a template for the electric guitar in jazz. Others have continued to develop this technology, so that the accepted sound of the electric guitar now embraces timbres as diverse as Wes Montgomery’s and Jim Hall’s. The development of the standard jazz drum kit, with each of the drummer’s limbs available to contribute to the pallet of percussion sounds and rhythmic textures, was another factor in the history of the idiom. Drummers like Jo Jones, Kenny Clarke, Max Roach, Roy Haynes, Buddy Rich, Art Blakey, Philly Joe 31


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Jones, and Elvin Jones each left an indelible mark on the way we hear the possibilities of the drum set, establishing a variety of ways of using ride cymbals, high hat cymbals, snare drums, tom toms, pedal operated bass drums, mallets, sticks, and wire brushes, to create interesting and changing drum parts. The inclusion of a rhythm section (piano/guitar, bass, and drums) “continuo” part in most jazz ensembles is a part of the tradition that is particularly useful in a kind of music which often depends on a repeated series of chords to set a controlling background texture against which a varied foreground can be successfully designed. That foreground may consist of an improvisation played by an individual instrumentalist, a singer, or a combination of instruments in a written passage. The rhythm section instruments have a wonderful effect on the music, but it’s also useful to leave them out in some passages for contrast and for the dramatic propulsive effect of their re-entry. The history of the organization of these instrumental sounds into efficacious combinations is full of change and development, from early New Orleans style polyphonic ensembles, to the modern wind ensemble sounds of Gil Evans’ music. There is a world of idiomatic history just in the study of rhythm section combinations and balances, and another encyclopedia’s worth of tradition in the way Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and Billy Strayhorn organized the reed and brass sections. The history of jazz instruments is full of unique and personal ways of making individual instrumental sounds and equally unique and creative ways of combining them. There is a rich pallet of sounds available to those jazz composers/arrangers lucky enough to have access to good musicians to perform their work. For those for whom this access is unavailable, there are sample sounds to use as audio “sketches” to check basic timbres and balances as they experiment and create new music. The Garritan Jazz and Big Band library is intended to serve this purpose. Getting started using the sounds in the Garritan Jazz and Big Band will be intuitive enough for jazz arrangers who have had experience with live musicians. For those whose experience is more limited, here is some basic jazz arranging information: All the saxophones have the same written range, from B flat below middle C, to F, 2 1/2 octaves above. This transposing trick allows a saxophone player to switch instruments without the necessity of learning new fingering, and it makes an understanding of the range and registers clear simply by observing the position of the notes on the staff system. It is helpful to understand that the saxophone was invented for volume, and it is not an easy instrument to play softly. The lowest two or three notes on the soprano, alto and tenor tend towards a rough and honking quality that is not easy to control, while the baritone is a little easier in this respect. The high range of the baritone, somewhat underused in the standard repertoire, can have a stentorian, singing quality that makes an effective solo voice and, incidentally, blends well with the French Horn. When combining saxophones in unison with brass instruments, the most effective combinations occur when the timbres are recognizably different. Combining a baritone Sax with a Trombone is more interesting than using a tenor sax with it. Trumpet and trombone ranges are roughly similar, though separated by an octave. The trumpet range starts on E below middle C (written F#) and extends comfortably 2 ½ octaves to a high B 32


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flat (written C above the staff). This range is accessible to most student trumpet players. Expert lead players can extend that range up to a 5th higher while high note specialists soar another octave or more above that. The trombone has a similar range, starting on E below the bass clef staff and reaching the high B flat a 7th above middle C. Many trombone players are quite comfortable extending that range upwards by a 3rd, and lead players go even higher on occasion. There are also useful pedal notes available below the usual bottom of the range. Tenor trombones cannot play any of the notes between the low E and the pedal B flat (a diminished 5th lower), but the pedal notes can be effective, especially in a three or four part unison. (B flat, A, and A flat are all available, but the tradition is to make special use of the B flat.) Bass trombones (with extra tubing brought into play with trigger valves) can play all the chromatic notes down to the pedal notes and then extend the range down to an F below that. The most useful guitar range is written from E below the treble clef to G, 3 octaves above middle C (sounding an octave below the written range). Most guitars have fret boards that extend a 4th above that G, but that range becomes a little thin sounding because of the short length of the vibrating string. When writing for the guitar in unison with other instruments, it is often good to keep the guitar range within the staff. For instance, having the guitar part in a written unison with a piano line puts the sounding guitar an octave below the piano, but the effect is that the sounds blend well, sometimes better than writing the guitar an octave higher, resulting in a real unison. Basses go from a written low E (below the bass clef staff) to G above the staff for normal bass lines (sounding an octave lower) with another octave available for solo passages. When it is necessary to have bass notes sound in sustained passages with wind instruments, the results are better when those notes appear in the lower winds. Overdoing the volume of the string bass, or using an electric bass to balance the harmony in the winds may overpower the ear’s ability to hear the mixtures of notes and harmonies in the middle and upper parts of the music’s range. To my way of hearing things, this is the biggest and most common error in the use of the many technological advances that allow musical instruments to play louder. The electric bass guitar (or amplified string bass) is a fine choice for music largely devoid of dynamic and textural nuance, and there is some fine music in that category, but may not be appropriate for even the loudest music that Basie or Ellington ever played. It is helpful to remember that all instruments have the effect of sounding low at the bottom of their ranges, and high at the top of their ranges, so that middle C on the flute sounds deep and low, while the same note on the baritone saxophone or trombone sounds quite high, and it sounds very high on the bass. This is only a quick overview of what’s available to the user of this sample library. There are many fine arranging and orchestration books available where one can find information about the traditions of writing for jazz instruments, range charts for these and other instruments, and examples of classic scores. A good source of arranging knowledge is the collection of Ellington scores published by Jazz @ Lincoln Center.

CHUCK ISRAELS, Bellingham, WA 33


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JAZZ ARRANGING TECHNIQUES by Gary Lindsay The road from orchestrator to jazz arranger may be navigated more easily if you have the right tools. The most fundamental tool, “jazz concept,” is developed through listening to jazz arrangers and composers, and defining the roles of members of a jazz ensemble. The roles of horn players (a generic term referring to trumpet, trombone and saxophone players) in a jazz arrangement fall within three categories: melody (or improvised lines), counter-melody, and accompanying rhythmic or sustain pads. The jazz band rhythm section (piano, bass, guitar and drum set) doesn’t have a direct parallel in most orchestra music. In addition, the members of the rhythm section play dramatically differently according to the style of music, i.e., swing, Latin, funk, etc. The role of the piano and/or guitar is predominantly as accompanist providing a combination of sustained and rhythmic pads commonly referred to as “comping.” Occasionally, their function includes melody or counter- melodies in the form of written music or improvised solos. Depending on the style of the music the bass may provide an ostinato pattern, a highly rhythmic/syncopated pattern or a quarter note walking style (swing) - any of which will contribute a harmonic, rhythmic, and even melodic (walking bass) element to the proceedings. The drummer, usually using all four limbs, provides rhythmic pulse to the arrangement as defined by the musical style. Listen with “arranger’s ears” to identify the elements of melody, counter-melody, rhythmic and sustained pads, and the roll of each member of the rhythm section. Observe how each element is being scored (orchestrated). An arrangement is not static, it is moving along a timeline at a speed determined by the tempo of the arrangement (constant or otherwise). As with orchestral writing, the elements of an arrangement constantly change. The melodic element may start in the piano, move to saxophones, and then to the brass. With all the other elements shifting (not necessarily at the same time), there is an almost limitless number of ways to combine elements to create a unique arrangement. “Jazz Arranging Techniques” is a comprehensive guide to the tools and techniques of jazz arranging. Adopted by colleges and universities around the world, this is the authoritative book for jazz arranging, providing the theory and arranging techniques that can be used with the sounds of the Garritan Jazz and Big Band Library. These book provides examples of techniques used in small and large ensembles and further explains how to create voicings, notate rhythm-section parts, articulate horn lines, adjust the balance and blend, etc., with a sequential approach. In addition to numerous scores, illustrations and recordings, the book also incorporates exercises and assignments. Multiple recordings are provided on the accompanying CD for listening and score analysis. Jazz theory and harmony, principles of jazz voice leading, voicing techniques, rules governing music calligraphy, chord symbol nomenclature, and jazz notation and articulation are presented in a very systematic (step by step) approach. For information about “Jazz Arranging Techniques” visit www.lindsayjazz.com Gary Lindsay

Miami, FL www.lindsayjazz.com 34


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KINDS OF JAZZ

Jazz provides many musical opportunities for creative expression in a variety of styles. Although there is no set form of jazz ,there are many subcategories within the various styles. Below are some of the most common styles of jazz. This is not a comprehensive list, it just scratches the surface: • Dixieland: Louis Armstrong, Original Dixieland Jazz Band, Jelly Roll Morton, Earl Hines, Sidney Bechet, Johnny Dodds, Bix Beiderbeck and Kid Ory • Big Band/Swing: Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington • Bebop: Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk • Cool jazz: Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck • Free jazz: Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, John Coltrane (Ascension album) • Jazz-Rock Fusion jazz: Miles Davis, John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock • Modern Jazz (contemporary and avant-jazz): Wynton Marsalis, Pat Metheny, Joe Lovano, Joshua Redman, and Don Byron • Latin Jazz: Afro-Cuban and Brazilian.

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Playing the Jazz & Big Band Instruments Garritan Jazz and Big Band provides stellar tools to transform high-quality jazz and big band sampled sounds into stunningly realistic performances. Garritan Jazz and Big Band offers an easy, intuitive and standardized control system to enable you to play and shape many articulations in real time. The controls are streamlined so you can quickly get comfortable with your sounds and focus on making great music. The controls for one family of instruments generally carry over to other sections so that you feel at home with the entire library. With little practice, you can perform several tasks simultaneously, as a real jazz musician does, so you can hear the musical results in real time. This chapter introduces you to the performance controllers that offer you a wide range of possibilities for musical expression.

BASIC CONTROLS FOR ALL WIND INSTRUMENTS:

nMod Wheel (cc1) Controls Volume & Expression

YNote Velocity Controls Attacks and Accentuation

[Key Switching IMPORTANT! Make sure you always move the Mod Wheel up in order to hear volume. Record a nudge of the Mod Wheel at the beginning of every MIDI sequence in order to start with the correct initial volume.

Change brass mutes and some articulations In Real-Time

ZSustain Pedal (cc64) For tongue/slur articulations

Note: “cc” = continuous controller – usually followed by the controller’s number (e.g. cc64.)

THE BASIC REAL-TIME CONTROL SYSTEM: Use your right hand to control the notes you play and note accents; Mod Wheel to control dynamics and expression; and the sustain pedal to switch between tonguing and slurring for horns or standard sustain for instruments like piano. In addition to these four basic controls, Garritan Jazz and Big Band has many advanced controllers for things like Automatic Variability, Vibrato, Portamento, note length, air flow noise, keyclicks, tone quality, flutter tongue/growl, falloffs, doits, and other features. With this approach many playing techniques can be handled in real time in much the same manner as a real wind player. 36


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1. MOD WHEEL CONTROL CC1

Shaping Dynamics & Playing Expressively One of the things that make an ensemble sound great is the wide range of dynamic contrasts. Every phrase and the notes themselves have unwritten dynamics that the player interprets. Without dynamics, music would lack nuance and depth of expression. The Mod Wheel controls volume (plus volume-related changes in timbre) and provides dynamic and expressive control. You need to use the Mod Wheel to get the most out of Garritan Jazz and Big Band. The Mod Wheel is a controller normally mounted at the left side of the keyboard and played with the left hand. With Garritan Jazz and Big Band, the Mod Wheel simultaneously controls both Volume (ppp to fff ) and Timbre (brightness or EQ) for all non-percussive instruments. Especially with the brass instruments, louder levels produce a brighter sound. GET TO KNOW YOUR MOD WHEEL! If you don’t hear any sound when you load Garritan Jazz and Big Band, don’t worry. By default the volume is at its lowest level and you must move it up for the instruments to be audible. The Mod Wheel controls dynamics and volume. Make sure you always move the Mod Wheel up in order to hear the instrument. Think of it as having to start the air flowing and the reed or lips buzzing in the instrument before you hear a sound. In the case of a sequencer, make sure to record a nudge of the Mod Wheel at the beginning of every MIDI track so that the instruments will start with the correct initial volume upon playback. Remember that the mod wheel is NOT a “set and forget” controller. It is intended to be used as an expressive controller that is in nearly constant motion shaping the volume and timbre of a passage.

You will discover that using the Mod Wheel Control adds a new dimension of feeling and expression to your performances, making them all the more believable. Try experimenting with the Mod Wheel to develop control over the dynamics. As you play a melody, attempt a gradual crescendo or decrescendo, instead of going suddenly from soft to loud or loud to soft.

As shown above, Mod Wheel Control allows you to simulate a surging crescendo/diminuendo

EXERCISE: Play a melody with your right hand only and notice how there is little variation at all. It doesn’t sing as it should. Now imagine how you would sing the tune. Where is the peak of the phrase? Where would you make a crescendo and a diminuendo? Now, as you play the melody, attempt those crescendos or decrescendos with the Mod Wheel. Listen to the effect as you make gradual changes, adjusting the dynamics to suit your musical sensibilities. 37


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Note: With the Kontakt2 Player version of J&BB mod wheel (cc#1,) isn’t the only way to control volume/timbre. Expressive instruments will also respond to breath control (cc#2) or MIDI expression (cc#11.) It is not necessary to take any steps to activate these alternate controllers – they are always available. One important caveat: You must use only one of these controllers at a time. 2. NOTE VELOCITY

Attack and Accentuation Virtually all keyboards made today support a feature called “Note Velocity” which refers to how fast (or hard) you press a given key. With Jazz and Big Band, the harder you press down a key, the harder and sharper the attack; the softer you hit the key, the gentler the attack. Hitting a note even harder will give the tone that extra punch. Applying proper accentuation brings clarity and emphasis to the notes being played. It can also shape the rhythm and flow of a piece of music. There are many types of accents: strong accents, normal accents, staccato accents, to name a few. The degree of force you apply to the keys will vary depending on the instrument selected and the musical context. With brass and winds, accents are made by “tonguing” harder to emphasize certain notes. Whenever you feel that a note should be accented, do it by striking the key harder. Keep in mind that this only works when the sustain pedal is “up.” This is the position for tongued notes. It is important to note that this control relates to attack strength (for the most part) independent of volume. Many instruments in Garritan Jazz and Big Band (brass and winds especially) have volume controlled by the Mod Wheel. So, don’t always try to play notes louder by banging on the keyboard, or the result may be a heavily accented note that you did not intend. Percussive instruments (including the piano and bass pizzicato) do use note velocity for volume and volume-related timbre changes, in addition to attacks, and the Mod Wheel won’t do anything for those instruments. 3. SUSTAIN PEDAL CC64

Control of Tongue and Slur Articulations In wind instruments the tongue is used to release the air flow that energizes the vibration of the reed or lips. One of the things that makes a Jazz phrase sound idiomatically correct is the distribution of tongued and slurred notes. In Jazz and Big Band the sustain pedal is given the switching function between tongued and slurred notes. The default position (sustain pedal up) gives tongued notes. Depressing 38


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the sustain pedal, while the user plays with deliberate note overlaps, creates slurred transitions between notes by smoothing those transitions. Recording sustain pedal data at the proper locations in your tracks can result in much more realistic simulations of tongue/slur articulations. Remember, the “pedal up” tongued notes use velocity to control the strength of the attack. Recording shorter note values can create more detached tongued notes. The slur is achieved by holding the sustain pedal down for the desired group of notes while making sure there are at least small overlaps between the slurred notes. Whenever the sustain pedal is depressed, the attack portion of the sample is removed to create much smoother transitions between notes. To get an idea of what the slur function does, consider the following illustration. This is how waveforms of a musical phrase look when played on a typical sampler:

Notice how disconnected the notes are. Using the Sustain Pedal removes the attack portion of the sample and connects the notes for smoother sounding effect. The result is a phrase that more closely emulates the sound of the slur.

NOTE: The Kontakt Player defaults automatically to the correct pedal mode for the particular instrument type (e.g. wind instruments default to pedal mode 3.) The Notation version of the library uses pedal mode 2 for all instruments and moves the sustain pedal function to cc68.

OTHER CONTROLS FOR ALL WIND INSTRUMENTS Most additional controllers are represented by knobs on the instrument Graphic User Interface. Their function names are sometimes abbreviated.

Pitch Bend Wheel: This control can be used to bend the pitch of a note at its start or while it is sustaining. It is especially useful for trombone and guitar. For most wind instruments the pitchbend range defaults to +/-2 semitones to give the user subtle control over scoops, bends, and other important effects, while avoiding such artifacts as formant displacement. Note that the Notation folder instruments have a consistent default pitchbend range of +/-12 semitones for compatibility with various notation software. Pitchbend range settings can be changed at the pitchbend range box on the interface. Pitch Bend Defeat: cc19 can be used to turn off pitch bend so that bend data can be applied to only one of two overlapping notes, if desired. 39


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Portamento Control: This control is related to Pitch bend above and will allow you to slide from note to note. This is particularly helpful with some instruments, such as the trombone. There is a knob that adjusts the portamento for instruments that use this function. Portamento (cc20) can be assigned to an external MIDI fader or drawn as graphic data in the user’s sequencer of choice. Its default setting is “off.” In general, slides between smaller intervals require greater values than slides between larger intervals. It is best to draw the data manually (for any specific notes that require slides) in your sequencer or to assign this feature to a separate hardware controller (cc20) for real-time control. You can also add varying amounts of portamento for smooth portamento effects (play two notes in a row and one will glide into the other). NOTE: Portamento is only active in sustain pedal down mode. Vibrato Control: There are two controllers that affect vibrato. Aftertouch (sometimes called “Channel Pressure”) controls the intensity of the vibrato from no vibrato (Aftertouch = value of “0”) to exaggerated vibrato (Aftertouch = high number value.) Because both components of the vibrato are independently controllable the user can apply vibrato in a much more flexible and realistic fashion. The speed of the vibrato is controlled using cc17. Note that some keyboards from M-Audio have no Aftertouch function but the user can assign cc131 to a programmable slider which, in turn, will send Aftertouch data out to your computer. Air Flow Noise: cc12 controls the sound of the air column moving through the instrument. This can be used for many things, from creating a “breathy” sound to subtly adding a little “grit” to the tone when used in small amounts. This sound is tied to the amplitude portion of the Vibrato control so that the air flow will pulsate in synchronization with the speed of the Vibrato. The default setting is “off” for most instruments. Key Click/Valve Noise: cc13 controls the level of the noise produced by the key or valve mechanism of the wind instrument. HINT: A little of this goes a long way. Use it mostly for subtle enhancement of exposed solo work. These types of noises are rarely heard in section work where they are masked by other things. The default setting is “off” for most instruments. Flutter Tongue/Growl sound: cc18 controls the level of the flutter tongue or “growl” effect. The default setting is “off.” Length Control: The default length is the natural release length of the sample. As you adjust controller cc21, the length of the release portion of the sample can be varied over a useful range. This can be used along with MIDI note length data and velocity strength to give a wider variety of articulation types ranging from very short and light to accented and forceful. Automatic Variability Control: These controls automatically introduce random variability from note to note. There are two knobs in the Player for instruments that use this feature. VAR 1 controls random 40


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variations in intonation (cc22) and will introduce random tuning changes from note to note. In other words, each time a note is played it will be slightly detuned. Lesser values give subtle variations, greater values are more drastic. VAR 2 (cc23) introduces random variations in timbre (EQ) from note to note. The combination of these controls can help the user avoid the dreaded “machine gun” effect when a note or group of notes repeatedly trigger the same sample. See the chapter on Kontakt Player Operation for additional information on this feature. Tone Quality control: cc26 controls the basic warmth of the tone quality. It is set by default to a useful value. cc27 allows the user to modify the center frequency of this EQ function, if desired. Be careful not to modify the center frequency while a note is being sustained or you may get unnatural “sweep” artifacts. It is best set to a value for an entire track or modified to a fixed value between notes to affect all following notes. Breath noises: All wind instruments have samples of the player taking a breath, which can be inserted at phrase breaks in your tracks to add another touch of realism. There are a variety of breath types mapped to the top two octaves of the keyboard. They include quick “catch” breaths and more leisurely slow breaths to be applied to different situations. These use velocity to control volume. Mono Mode in Horns: All horns are programmed to be monophonic-only instruments. They only play one note at a time, as with real horns being played with normal techniques. Limiting the polyphony to a single voice makes the creation of convincing solo parts much easier, as it eliminates the possibility of accidental note overlaps. In fact, the tongue/slur programming would not work properly without this.

SPECIAL FEATURES IN SAXOPHONES: KEYSWITCHING Switching Instruments for doubling purposes A folder of combination instruments is available for several of the standard saxophones. Keyswitches can be used to change between e.g. tenor sax, flute, clarinet, and soprano sax without the need to load separate instruments into separate tracks. This is especially convenient for notation applications. Here’s an example:

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SPECIAL FEATURES IN BOTH TRUMPETS AND TROMBONES: KEYSWITCHING Change Brass Mutes In Real-Time Keyswitching allows you to quickly and easily change the type of mute being used for trumpets and trombones. With a simple touch of a key located on the keyboard below the normal range of the instruments, you can rapidly switch between different mute patches on the fly without having to load multiple instruments. These keyswitch instruments are identified by a KS next to their name. When you press a key in the Key Switch area, the instrument will change to the desired mute. All patches initially load using the first keyswitch as the default (no mute – “open”) and any keyswitch remains active until another keyswitch message is received. In the Kontakt player, the keyswitched notes are displayed on the player keyboard using the color pink.

Although it may be tempting to use your mouse to trigger one of the displayed Keyswitches in the Kontakt player, it is seldom recommended. The player’s graphic representation of keys, wheels, and knobs are primarily there for convenient testing. You must never use the mouse to trigger a key switch you want to record to a sequencer track or notation staff – the mouse action will not be recorded! When recording a track or entering notation, use your external MIDI keyboard to record the key switch note or manually enter the key switch note into your tracks. KEYSWITCH TIPS • Always put the keyswitching note for the particular instrument *before* the first note of the articulation you want to play, not at the same time! • Remember that when you hit "play" on the sequencer, the Jazz and Big Band library will play the last keyswitch you used. When using a keyswitched instrument, make sure you begin each track with a keyswitch note, even if you wish to use the default keyswitch. • If you transpose your score, you must be sure NOT to transpose the KS notes!! Any transposition to these notes will change (or eliminate) their function. Shakes: A hidden layer in the sustain pedal data (cc64, values 49-95) can be used to switch to a special layer designed to aid in playing or constructing convincing shakes (lip trills.) Real shakes can be played in a variety of ways with differences in the speed of the lip trill and the width of the interval of the lip trill. We didn’t want to limit the user to static recordings of shakes that would always result in the shakes 42


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of the same speed and interval for all situations. Instead, a special, switchable layer has been added that gives the user control over many of the characteristics of a shake so that they can be uniquely tailored to do what the user needs. “Scripting” will soon add considerable ease of use for this feature. For now, the user must do the shake construction manually with the supplied controls. The controllers that have been specially tailored for shakes are: velocity = attack strength/volume trim; c28 = attack speed; cc20 = Portamento; and Pitchbend Range = 6 semitones. A detailed explanation of how to use this feature will be included in a tutorial on the www.garritan.com site. Plunger Mute: There are four instruments in the library (two trumpets and two trombones) that use filtering to simulate plunger mute effects. cc16 controls the “open/close” action of the mute. Default load is “open” (value 127.) This is another feature where a detailed explanation will be supplied in the User’s Guide.

ADDITIONAL FEATURES IN JUST THE TRUMPETS: Release Effects: Trumpets in a Jazz context often release notes in unusual ways. The three most common are: “Falloffs,” “Doits,” and “Kisses.” In Jazz and Big Band these effects can be chosen with cc15. They are switched as follows: Value 0-32 Value 33-64 Value 65-95 Value 96-127

off Falloffs Doits Kisses

The Falloffs and Doits apply to a 2 octave area of the trumpet range. The Kisses apply to only the high concert Bb and above. Notes that lie outside the specified range will give no effects. This is not a malfunction. See the chart for range information. The strength of the release effects can be controlled with cc29. Trumpets load with a default value of “60.” NOTE: The above features apply to the trumpets but similar effects can apply to the trombones as well. Since trombones usually accomplish falloff and doit-like effects with the slide, pitchbend is used for this purpose in Jazz and Big Band. Trombones do not tend to use kisses on high notes so that feature has been omitted for trombones. NOTE: The order of brass instruments in JABB (Trumpet 1, Trumpet 2, etc.) is of no particular significance. The instruments vary in tone and should be auditioned to determine the one most appropriate for a particular application. As an example: Each one of the trumpets could be used for the lead trumpet part (within range considerations) and each will sound somewhat different from the others. Sections are best constructed with a combination of different trumpets rather than multiple instances of the same trumpet. This will help avoid phasing and other undesirable effects. 43


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CONTROLS FOR THE RHYTHM SECTION BASSES The library contains two upright acoustic basses, one arco upright acoustic bass, two fretless electric Jazz basses, and two fretted electric Jazz basses. It should be noted that Upright Bass #2 is contributed by the inimitable Chuck Israels! Controllers for the basses include: Velocity Pitchbend Sustain pedal cc12 cc13 cc18 cc20 cc21 cc22 cc23 cc26 cc27 cc28

volume +/-2 semitones default setting standard sustain Fundamental intensity (strength of the “bottom end” of the instrument sound) Intensity of finger noises like clicks and snaps – velocity sensitive Attack speed (affects the sharpness of the attack) Portamento (controls slides between notes) Length (controls the length of the decay of the notes) VAR 1 (adds random variations in tuning from note to note) VAR 2 (adds random variations in timbre from note to note) Midrange EQ (a midrange tone control) Midrange center frequency (adjusts the character of the midrange tone control) High frequency EQ (a high frequency tone control)

Additional controllers for the upright acoustic basses: Keyswitches for open strings (only open strings sound) finger slide noises can be inserted using notes beyond the upper range Special mapping: C5-E5 of the instrument

Additional controllers for the arco upright bass: Mod wheel Velocity Sustain pedal cc19 Key switches:

C-1 D-1 G-1

Volume/timbre Attack strength legato Pitchbend defeat Arco Automatically alternating up and down bows Playable tremolos

Additional controller for the electric basses: Key switches:

C0 D0 Special mapping: C5-E5 44

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KEYBOARDS Keyboard choices include a Steinway piano, a vintage electric piano, and an accordion. The Steinway Jazz Piano is included in two versions: A full version and a “lite” version for those who need to conserve memory. Both pianos have a brightness control to adjust the high frequency content of the instrument for adapting to different mixing situations. The pianos use the following controllers: Velocity Sustain pedal (cc64) cc20 cc21 Pitchbend range

Volume/timbre Standard sustain Brightness Release Length “0” default setting

The Vintage Electric Piano is one of the most popular suitcase-style instruments. The tremolo effect modulates between stereo speakers in the support base of the keyboard. It uses the following controllers: Velocity Sustain pedal (cc64) Pitchbend range cc22 cc23 cc26 cc28

Volume/timbre Standard sustain “0” default setting Tremolo level Tremolo speed Midrange intensity Brightness

VIBRAPHONES Vibraphones are available in both hard and soft mallet choices. Both use the following controllers: Velocity Sustain pedal (cc64) Pitchbend range cc20 cc21 cc22 cc23

Volume/timbre Standard sustain “0” default setting Attack speed Brightness Tremolo intensity Tremolo speed

GUITARS There are two guitars: acoustic and electric. The acoustic guitar is a 10 string model that is recorded in stereo. The electric guitar is recorded monaurally. Both guitars have been programmed with the future implementation of scripting in mind to create realistic strumming and other techniques. Controllers for guitar are as follows: 45


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Velocity Sustain pedal (cc64) Pitchbend Aftertouch cc13 cc17 cc20 cc21 cc22 cc23 Keyswitches: C0 D0 Special mapping: C7-D#8

Volume/timbre Standard sustain +/-2 semitones default setting Vibrato intensity Finger noise intensity Vibrato speed Portamento Length VAR 1 VAR 2 standard plucks harmonics slides, taps, slaps

TIP: The guitars (especially the electric guitar) can be used with amp, tube, distortion, and other audio plugins to greatly modify the basic sound of the instrument. The instruments in J&BB are recorded “direct” to give the user the flexibility to modify the sound with such plugins. These plugins are often included with sequencing software or are available separately from third party developers.

DRUMS The drums are recorded “in place” in true stereo using an ORTF microphone arrangement for all instruments except the bass drum. There are three distinctly different drum kits included, with specific purposes for each. There is the Classic Jazz kit which uses vintage single layer heads for the sound that is so closely associated with the great tradition of Jazz drummers; there is a Fusion kit that uses double layer heads for the tighter, drier sound that has become so popular in the last few decades; and there is a unique Brush drum kit (played with wire brushes) that will give the user the opportunity to do ballads and other brush grooves that were extremely difficult to accomplish with previous libraries. There are complete kits for convenient sketching and separate bass drum, snare, toms, hi hat, and cymbals for more detailed mixing treatment. Knobs on the interface can also be used with the complete kits to adjust the relative levels of the various instruments types in the kit. NOTE: The same Cymbal files are duplicated in each of the drum folders for user convenience. Keep in mind that all Cymbal files are nevertheless identical. The cymbal files contain a wide variety of cymbals choices for many possible uses. NOTE: The hi-hat is divided into closed, half open, open and foot closed samples. All of these are assigned to an exclusive group so that any sample in the group will be cut off by another sample in the group. For example, if you hit the open hi hat and then quickly hit the foot closed hi hat, the open hi hat will stop sounding as soon as the foot closed sample begins. 46


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There are three General MIDI kits: One for Classic Jazz, one for Fusion, and one for brushwork. The layout for the first two kits follows the General MIDI specifications with one exception: The snare drum on MIDI note 40 (E1) is an acoustic, not an electric, snare. The brush kit contains one exception as well: MIDI note 37 (C#1;) it has the brush stir sound assigned to it. The three General MIDI kits have identical percussion samples, only the bass drum, snare, toms, and hi hat differ. The brush kit uses the mapping for the snare as in the primary brush kit (see the section on the Brush Drum Kit below.) NOTE: See appendix for detailed mapping information. The Primary Controller for All the Drums is: Velocity

Volume/timbre

Other controllers: cc22 cc23 Pitchbend Note A0 Level knobs

VAR1 (Random variations in intonation) VAR2 (Random variations in timbre) +/-12 semitones used to “choke” cymbals volume control of the various parts of the kit (kick, snare, toms, hihat, cymbals, and percussion, when present)

The Brush Drum Kit: This is a special case. We think you will find the brush drum kit one of the most enjoyable instruments in the Jazz and Big Band library. It has some very intuitive and flexible features. Most of the previous attempts to sample brush drum kits have relied on recording the characteristic snare drum “stirs” at a variety of different tempi and left it up to the user to choose the particular recorded performance that most closely matched the desired tempo. Constructing a brush drum part was more like assembling an elaborate puzzle than playing music. The brush drum kit in Jazz and Big Band is completely different. The snare drum stirs are actually playable at any tempo and you will find playing the stirs easy and intuitive (not to mention FUN.) This kit contains two snare drums with stirs and hits, plus brush hits on toms, hi hats, and cymbals. Snare Drum Brush Stirs: C#1 (midi note 37) Velocity Aftertouch Note A0 Level knobs

initiates the continuous brush stir sound strength of the first brush push change of stir direction used to “choke” cymbals volume control of the various parts of the kit (kick, snare, toms, hihat, cymbals, and percussion, when present)

In Jazz and Big Band, stirs are best played from a keyboard that supports Aftertouch. A stir begins as soon as the C#1 note is depressed and held. The strength of the initial push of the brush stir is directly related to how hard the key is struck (velocity.) The stir will continue as long as the key is held but one of the most important characteristics of the brush stir is the figure 8 pattern used between hands and the brush direction change that takes place during this pattern. In Jazz and Big Band the direction change can be made at any time by briefly pressing harder on the held C#1. Press just long enough to simulate the direction change and then 47


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quickly reduce the pressure on the key (without releasing it.) With a little practice, and some full listening to real brush work, you will be able to simulate brush stirs with uncanny accuracy and ease. All of the data can be recorded to your sequencer tracks, so you will be able to edit the stirs with as much attention to detail as you wish. Because the stirs reside in the tracks as note and Aftertouch data many things can be modified including the tempo – at any time. If you decide that you want your piece of music to be 150BPM rather than 130BPM, just change the sequencer tempo data and the stirs will follow the tempo change. It will even follow continuous changes in tempo if you like. There are virtually no tempo limits, except those that would apply to a real player (if you push the tempo faster than a real player could manage the results will likely sound rather odd.) If you don’t have a keyboard with Aftertouch support, the Aftertouch data can be assigned to a hardware fader or knob. It could also be drawn directly into your snare drum track using the tools in your sequencer. Look for a section in the User’s Guide to illustrate the use of the brush drum kit. PERCUSSION: A wide variety of percussion instruments are available in the library. Most use three separate types of hits (open, muff, and slap) so the user can build rhythmic patterns with the instrument’s characteristic sounds. Percussion instruments are mapped so that instruments within specified types can be combined without mapping conflicts using just two MIDI channels. Instruments in the Drum and Gourd categories can be combined on the same MIDI channel without mapping overlaps. Instruments in the Blocks, Bells, and Misc. categories can be combined into a second MIDI channel without mapping overlaps. We also supply complete combination instruments for the convenience of the user. See the chart in the appendix for details. Percussion instruments can be loaded individually to give the user independent control over panning, levels, and other mixing decisions. CYMBAL “CHOKE” FUNTION: All instruments that contain cymbals use the “A0” key (MIDI note 33) just below the range of the instrument to damp or “choke” the sound of a sustaining cymbal. When the “A0” key is depressed it brings the ringing of the cymbal to an abrupt halt.

NOTE: Many of the percussion instruments use programming to introduce automatic random variations between hits. Each hit will sound somewhat different even if the velocity value is the same. GENERAL MIDI KITS: Classic Jazz, Fusion, and Brush kits are supplied that follow General MIDI conventions, although the Brush Kit departs from the standard so that the special brush stir features can be used. The departure affects MIDI note C#1. The C#1 is the brush stir sound. 48


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The Basic Instrument Interface The Kontakt Player allows you to load and customize Garritan Jazz & Big Band sounds to be used for playback. This section will familiarize you with the Kontakt Player interface. It can get a little technical but stay with it.

1. INSTRUMENT INFORMATION WINDOW This window contains the name of the instrument, the output assignment, the number of voices of polyphony being used, the maximum polyphony setting, the MIDI channel selection, and the size of the instrument in RAM.

2. GENERAL CONTROLLERS These are the general MIDI and audio controllers for the instrument which include solo, mute, tuning, audio output metering, panning, and level controls. Tuning, panning and level controls are adjusted by click and drag – horizontal movement for sliders, vertical for knobs; Use Shift+horizontal drag for fine gradation adjustments of sliders; use Shift+vertical drag for fine gradation adjustments of knobs.

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3. INSTRUMENT SPECIFIC CONTROLLER KNOBS The number of available instrument-specific controller knobs varies between instruments. Some instruments have no controller knobs and some have as many as twelve; it all depends on the programming of the instrument. These knobs load with default settings. The default can be changed by modifying the knob setting and resaving the instrument.

The following is a list of the abbreviations for the possible instrument controls to be found on the instrument interface: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 50

Porta = portamento Length = note release and decay VAR1 = random variability of tuning VAR2 = random variability of timbre FiltLv = filter level (tone control gain) Filtfq = filter frequency (tone control center frequency) VibSpd = vibrato speed ModWhl = mod wheel AirNs = air flow noise KeyNs = key click noise ValvNs = valve noise FingNs = finger noise Fluttr = flutter tongue Growl = throat growl Plungr = plunger open and close

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

RelLev = trumpet release effects level Bellow = accordion bellows noise Bright = tonal brightness Attack = attack envelope speed Release = release envelope speed Fund = strength of fundamental TrmLev = tremolo level TrmSpd = tremolo speed MidEQ = midrange EQ HFEQ = high frequency EQ Kick = kick drum level Snare = snare drum level Toms = tom tom drum level Hihat = hi hat level Cymb = cymbals level Perc = percussion level


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

The Woodwind Instruments The Woodwind section consists of several varieties of instruments, each with its own unique sound. These instruments include varieties of flutes, clarinets, and saxophones. PITCH RANGES  WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS IN JABB The chart below shows some of the typical ranges of the individual woodwind instruments as they correspond to a piano keyboard. These ranges are not absolute and virtuoso players can often play beyond the typical upper range of the instrument.

Flutes and Clarinets

Saxophones

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The Brass Instruments The brass instruments commonly used in a jazz or big band include the trumpet and the trombone. Sounds are produced by the vibration of the lips as air is being blown past the lips into a funnel-shaped mouthpiece connected to hollow metal tubing that terminates in a bell. The length of the tubing is modified by valves that re-route the air flow as part of the process to play different pitches. The vibrating lips of the player have the same function as the reeds in the saxophones and clarinets. PITCH RANGES  BRASS INSTRUMENTS IN JABB The charts below show the typical ranges of the individual brass instruments as they correspond to a piano keyboard. These ranges are not absolute and virtuoso players can often play beyond the typical upper range of the instrument. Good brass players can also play pedal tones. Pedal tones are notes that lie below the natural range of an instrument and take a great deal of control to produce. Mutes are typically used over a more restricted range partly due to the difficulty in playing the mutes in the extreme low and high ranges. Mutes are best applied to the middle register of the trombones and trumpets. Jazz and Big Band limits the mutes to approximately a three octave range. The trumpets have additional release effects that only apply to certain portions of the range of the instruments. The characteristic release “kisses” only occur on the highest notes (generally, above the high C (concert Bb.) “Falloffs” and “Doits” are restricted to a two octave range. “Falloffs” are a release technique where the player allows the pitch to rapidly fall downward, striking each note of the harmonic series during the descent. “Doits” are the reverse. The player creates a rapidly ascending effect through the harmonic series, often combined with a “half valve” technique to smooth the ascent. Trombones typically use the slide for similar effects, especially the falloffs, but the result is usually a rapid and smooth change in pitch without the individual notes of the harmonic series being struck. In Jazz and Big Band these effects are handled with pitchbend data. Tuba is only available in the Open horn, no mutes. It does not offer falloffs, doits, or kisses. See the charts below for details on trumpet and trombone ranges for open, muted, and release effects.

Trumpets

Trombones

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Bass Trombone

Tuba

The Rhythm Section A good rhythm section is the backbone of a Jazz band. The rhythm section usually consists of bass, drums, piano and guitar. They play different roles than the other instruments of a jazz band. The rhythm section will maintain a steady rhythm or tempo, establish the style and feel of the piece and define the harmonic framework of the music.

PIANO AND GUITAR The piano and guitar typically function as percussive instruments in a jazz band and often provides rhythmic energy to the music. In jazz bands one often hears the pianist and/or guitarist play short wellplaced and punctuated chords. Both will often “comp” or construct chords on-the-fly from charts or chord symbols. With piano, unlike classical music, the pedal is not often used, except for special effects.

ACOUSTIC BASS A bass player is necessary for a good jazz band and provides the rhythmic and harmonic foundation for the band. Jazz acoustic bass technique is very different from orchestral playing. The bass often plays legato especially in swing music where a bass line will “walk” in even, smoothly connected notes that follow the beat of the music. Playing large leaps with too much separation is often avoided. Bass players will either play written parts or construct bass lines from chord symbols.

DRUM KIT The drummer in a jazz band establishes and maintains beat and tempo of the music. The drummer also establishes the form of the music (A-B-A, or A-A-B-A, etc) and provides the cues for the other players to follow. The hi-hat and ride cymbals are very important to the drummer in Jazz with the hi-hat often foot closed on beats 2 and 4 and the ride cymbal establishing a swing pattern. 53


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Notation Version of Jazz & Big Band The Jazz & Big Band Library contains a separate Notation folder with instruments that are programmed with important differences which make them more compatible with the way most notation programs handle MIDI data. Notation instruments have the letter “n” at the beginning of their names to differentiate them from the standard instruments. The biggest general difference: All instruments in the notation version use the Kontakt Player’s standard sustain pedal mode. Most of the differences in programming are a consequence of this fundamental difference in pedal modes. The programming differences are: TONGUE/SLUR – controlled by cc68 rather than cc64. This difference applies to all woodwinds and brass instruments. Please note that instruments which normally use standard sustain pedal (e.g. Piano) continue to use cc64 for the sustain function. PITCHBEND RANGE – defaults to +/-12 semitones for all instruments. KEYSWITCHES – All notation version keyswitches consistently reside in the bottom octave of the MIDI spec (between C-2 and B-2) for all instruments. NOTE: The cc7 and cc10 Option in the Kontakt player should be active to allow notation programs to control relative MIDI volume and panning.

Putting It All Together for a Real-Time Performance The basic system is to use your right hand to control the attack of each notes; Mod Wheel, in the left hand, to control dynamics; and the sustain pedal to connect the notes. It couldn’t be easier! With the more advanced controls you can fine tune your performance. Some keyboards supply an array of assignable sliders and knobs which can be used for the many additional MIDI controllers used in this library. With this approach you play your articulations in real time in much the same manner as a true player does. Using both hands and feet to perform the different tasks simultaneously requires some coordination. The key is to start simple and to realize that you do not have to do it perfectly the first time. The best way to learn is to practice playing just the notes with one hand. Learn the fingerings for the notes and apply the accents, where appropriate. Once you are acquainted with the notes and the accentuation, gradually add the other controllers. For example, play a melody with the right hand, and then gradually ride the Mod Wheel for expression. Then add the sustain pedal for legato phrasing. Soon you’ll develop coordination, and by combining the different controls in real-time you’ll have an unlimited amount of expressive capabilities. Once you get the hang of it, you can play almost anything that comes to your musical imagination. Create ensembles of your choosing with individual instruments. By using the real-time performance controls to expressively play each instrument, when you put it all together the result will be extraordinary. 54


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Building Sections from Individual Instruments With Garritan Jazz & Big Band, you can build instrumental sections, one instrument at a time, exactly the way you want. This is a unique and intuitive approach to jazz arrangement using samples. When you create a section from separate instruments performed individually, with variations in timing and expression, you can achieve a very realistic performance. You can assign instruments of a section to different MIDI channels so that you can have individual parts for each player. Or, you can assign multiple instruments all to a single MIDI channel to create automatic ensemble unisons. When you start building sections from separate instruments, with all the instruments playing individually, it will sound incredibly realistic. To learn more see the Ensemble Building tutorials on the www.garritan.com website.

Directory of Instruments in Garritan Jazz & Big Band The following directory gives the name and a brief description of the Garritan Jazz & Big Band instrument sounds contained in Garritan Jazz & Big Band. There is also a chart of the available controllers for each instrument. MW Vel Vel (vol) Tng/Slr Sus (sus) AF KC RFX Vib Fltr/Grl PBd Port Lgth VAR 1 VAR 2 TQ Trm Brth Sk Brsh Plgr KS KC Lev

Mod Wheel Expression Control Note Velocity for Accents and Attack Note Velocity for Volume control Sustain Pedal tongue/slur control Sustain Pedal for normal sustain control Air Flow or bellows noise Keyclick, valve, or finger noises Release effects such as falloffs, doits and kisses Vibrato Flutter tongue/ Growl effect Pitchbend disable Portamento control Length control Automatic Variability of intonation Automatic Variability of timbre Tone Quality adjustment Tremolo Breath sounds Shakes Brush stirs Plunger mute Key Switching key “choke Individual level controls for combination instruments

For detailed information about the controllers, please refer to the chapter entitled “Playing Jazz & Big Band” in this guide. 55


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THE RHYTHM SECTION INSTRUMENTS nki name: 01 Brush Drum Kit 02 Brush Drum Kit Brush Cymbals Brush HiHat

Wire brush hits on 15” high hat hits; A Zildjian on top and Paiste on bottom.

Brush Snare Drum 1

Wire brush stirs and hits on a Yamaha 4x14” maple snare drum.

Brush Snare Drum 2 Brush Toms Sgl-layr-hd Bass Drum 03 Classic Jz Drum Kit 14inHiHat2 15inHiHat Cymbals Sgl-layr-hd Bass Drum Sgl-layr-hd Piccolo Snare Sgl-layr-hd Snare Sgl-layr-hd Toms 04 Fusion Drum Kit 14inHiHat1 Cymbals Dbl-layr-hd Bass Drum Dbl-layr-hd Piccolo Snare Dbl-layr-hd Snare

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Description: Wire brushes, snare #1; combines bass drum, snare, toms, hi hats, and cymbals into a single instrument. Wire brushes, snare #2; combines bass drum, snare, toms, hi hats, and cymbals into a single instrument. Wire brush hits on the various cymbals in the brush kit.

Controls: Vel (vol); Brsh; VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); Brsh; VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2

Vel (vol); Brsh; VAR 1; VAR 2 Wire brush stirs and hits on a Gretsch 5x14” maple snare drum. Vel (vol); Brsh; VAR 1; VAR 2 Wire brush hits on Gretsch tom toms; 16 x 16” floor tom, 9 x 13” rack Vel (vol); VAR 1; tom, 8 x 12” rack tom; Remo coated heads. VAR 2 Bass drum hits from the classic kit; 20” x 14” Gretsch with various heads. Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Single layer heads for snare, toms, and kick. Does not use General MIDI Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR mapping on all notes. 2; KC; Lev 14” high hat hits. Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 15” high hat hits; A Zildjian on top and Paiste on bottom. Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Selection of ride, crash, splash cymbals and some unusual additions like Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR garbage can lids and saw blades. See Appendix B. 2; KC Bass drum hits from the classic kit; 20” x 14” Gretsch with various heads. Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Smaller higher pitched snare hits. Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Hits on the classic jazz kit snare drum; Ludwig 5 x 14” snare with Remo Vel (vol); VAR 1; Renaissance Diplomat head. VAR 2 Hits on the classic kit toms; 16 x 16” Gretsch floor tom, 9 x 13” Gretsch Vel (vol); VAR 1; rack tom, 8 x 12” Gretsch rack tom, Remo coated heads. VAR 2 Double Layer heads for snare, toms, and kick. Does not use General MIDI mapping on all notes. 14” high hat hits; A Zildjian Newbeats. Selection of ride, crash, splash cymbals and some unusual additions like garbage can lids and saw blades. See Appendix B. Bass drum hits from the 14 x 22” Gretsch with various heads and pillow muffles. Smaller higher pitched snare hits. Hits on the Ludwig 5 x 14” snare with Remo pinstripe head.

Dbl-layr-hd Toms

Hits on Gretsch fusion kit toms; 16 x 16” floor tom, 9 x 13” rack tom, 8 x 12” rack tom; Remo Pinstripe heads.

GM Classic Jazz Drum Kit GM Classic Jazz Drum Kit Lite

General MIDI layout using Classic Jazz Kit sounds in the first octave and a half. Uses less memory than the full version

Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE RHYTHM SECTION INSTRUMENTS nki name: GM Fusion Drum Kit Lite GM(mod) Brush Drum Kit GM(mod) Brush Drum Kit Lite

Description: Uses less memory than the full version General MIDI layout using Brush Drum Kit sounds in the first octave and a half Uses less memory than the full version

Bata

Bata drums are double-headed drums from Cuba.

Bongos

Quinto

A set of two small connected drums typically held between the knees and played with the fingers. Cajónes is a wooden hollow box-like instrument used in Andean, Cuban, and Flamenco music. The most important hand drum in Latin music. A tall narrow singleheaded drum usually grouped in sets of varying sizes. A Brazilian friction drum. Sound is produced by rubbing a small stick on the drum’s inside membrane. A goat skin covered drum shaped like a large goblet and played with bare hands. A small hand-held Brazilian instrument consisting of a round wooden frame, with six pairs of metal discs fit along the sides. A smaller conga drum primarily used for soloing.

Super Tumba

The largest of the conga drums.

Surdu

Large cylindrical drums with two heads typically played with a large mallet while the free hand muffles the drum. A custom instrument consisting of a wooden box struck in various ways.

Cajones Conga Cuica Djembe Pandeiro

The Box Timbales Tumba Udu Cabassa Guira Guiro Maracas Shakers Shekere

A set of two open-bottomed metal drums mounted side by side on a metal stand and played with wooden sticks. A large conga drum with a rich low tone often used in Cuban music. A percussion instrument made of clay that possesses distinct tonal qualities which range from subtle bass tones to tabla-like tones. An instrument consisting of loops of steel ball chains wrapped around a wide cylinder that produces rhythmic scraping sounds. An instrument made out of metal that is cylindrical in shape with many small round indentations. A Latin percussion instrument made of a hollow gourd with a grooved or serrated surface, played by scraping with a stick. A Latin percussion instrument consisting of a hollow-gourd rattle containing pebbles or beans and often played in pairs. Calabash gourds strung with beads, used for percussion.

Jam Block

A hand shaker consisting of a hollowed small gourd with shells or beads attached to it A percussion instrument, consisting of a pair of short, thick wooden dowels hit together to produce a high-pitched sound. A modern versions of wood blocks made of plastic rather than wood.

Woodblock

A hollow block of wood struck with a stick to produce percussive sounds.

Clave

Controls: Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2; KC; Lev Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 57


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THE RHYTHM SECTION INSTRUMENTS nki name: Agogo Bells Bongo Bells Cha Cha Bells Timbale Bell Castinets Handclaps Fingersnaps Jawbone

The small bell often mounted on the timbales. Typically associated with Cha-Cha and Salsa style music. Oblong bells specially designed to be mounted on your timbales. Hand tuned from Middle C to the 4th an octave above. A pair of hollow pieces of wood usually held between the thumb and fingers that produce a clicking sound. The clapping together of the hands and the snapping of fingers.

Whistles

The jawbone of an animal used as a percussion instrument that when struck, the teeth rattle. A percussion instrument consisting of a hollow tube filled with small pebbles that make the sound similar to falling rain. An instrument consisting of a small drumhead with metal discs in the rim, usually played by shaking and striking with the hand. Percussion instruments consisting of a piece of metal in the shape of a triangle open at one angle. Small wind instruments for making whistling sounds.

All Drums

Combination of all drum percussion instruments

All Gourds, Blocks, Bells, Misc.

Combination of all Gourds, Blocks, Bells, and Misc. percussion instruments

Fretless Bass 1 KS

G&L L1000 fretless electric bass.

Fretless Bass 1 KS Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Fretless Bass 2 KS

Fretless 1972 fretless electric bass.

Fretless Bass 2 KS Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Jazz Fretted Bass 1 KS

Fender Fretted electric bass with flat wound strings.

Jazz Fretted Bass 1 KS Lite Jazz Fretted Bass 2 KS

Uses less memory than the full version

Rainstick Tambourine Triangles

Jazz Fretted Bass 2 KS Lite Upright Bass 1 KS Upright Bass 1 KS Lite Upright Bass 2 KS

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Description: A multi-chambered steel instrument that is beaten like a cow bell and frequently heard in samba and salsa music. A large handheld bell also called a campana.

G&L 2000 Fretted jazz electric bass. Uses less memory than the full version Upright acoustic bass, standard “walking” plucks; made by HammondAshley. Uses less memory than the full version

Upright Bass 2 KS Lite

Chuck Israels’ French Mirecourt upright acoustic bass, circa 1880’s, standard “walking” plucks. Uses less memory than the full version

Upright Bass 2 Arco KS

Chuck Israels’ upright acoustic bass played in arco style with a bow.

Controls: Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); VAR 1; VAR 2 Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS MW; Vel; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE RHYTHM SECTION INSTRUMENTS nki name: Upright Bass 2 Arco KS Lite

Description: Uses less memory than the full version

Controls: MW; Vel; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS

Accordion Accordion Lite Steinway Jazz Piano Steinway Jazz Piano Lite

Petosa jazz accordion, right hand keyboard plus one octave of bass keys. Uses less memory than the full version Steinway Model B Grand Piano, chromatic with 2 dynamics. Uses less memory than the full version.

Vintage Electric Piano

Fender Rhodes, circa 1970’s, suitcase model with stereo tremolo speakers in the base. Uses less memory than the full version

Vel (vol) Vel (vol) Vel (vol); Sus (sus); TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ; KS Vel (vol); Sus (sus); Trm; TQ

Vintage Electric Piano Lite Vibraphone Hard Mallet Yamaha Vibraphone played with custom made hard beaters. Vibraphone Hard Mallet Uses less memory than the full version Lite Vibraphone Soft Mallet Yamaha Vibraphone played with Jackson soft beaters. Vibraphone Soft Mallet Lite Vibraphone KS

Switches between hard and soft mallet

Vibraphone KS Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Uses less memory than the full version

Acoustic Guitar KS

Oribe nylon 10-string guitar, 1971; range extends down to the “A” below Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; the traditional “E.” Additional open strings are included. VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Acoustic Guitar KS Lite Uses less memory than the full version Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Electric Guitar KS Gibson ES-175 Handcrafted Electric Guitar. This model is regarded as Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; one of the most popular guitars of the jazz world. VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Electric Guitar KS Lite Uses less memory than the full version Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Electric Guitar Mellow Gibson ES-175 Handcrafted Electric Guitar. This one is EQ’d for a more Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; KS mellow sound. VAR 1; VAR 2; KS Electric Guitar Mellow Uses less memory than the full version Vel (vol); Port; Lgth; KS Lite VAR 1; VAR 2; KS

THE WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS nki name: Bass Clarinet Bass Clarinet Lite

Description: The Bass Clarinet plays one octave lower than the conventional clarinet. Uses less memory than the full version

Bb Clarinet 1

Buffett R-13 wood clarinet; 1st Player.

Bb Clarinet 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Bb Clarinet 2

Buffett clarinet; 2nd Player.

Bb Clarinet 2 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth 59


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS nki name: Bb Clarinet 3

Description: Buffett clarinet; 3rd Player.

Bb Clarinet 3 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Flute

Armstrong Alto Flute, circa 1970

Alto Flute Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Flute 1

C Flute; made by Muramatsu. 1st Player.

Flute 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Flute 2

C Flute; 2nd Player.

Flute 2 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Flute 3

C Flute; 3rd Player.

Flute 3 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Piccolo

Yamaha ebony piccolo, circa 1970.

Piccolo Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Sax 1

Eb Alto saxophone; made by Buffet

Alto Sax 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Sax 2 Alto Sax 2 Lite

Eb Alto saxophone; made by Selmer, Balanced Action. Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Sax 3

Eb Alto saxophone; made by Selmer, Mark VI.

Alto Sax 3 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Sax 1 KS

Bari Sax 1

Keyswitched combination of instruments: Alto Sax 1; Flute 1; Bb Clarinet 1; Soprano Sax 1 Keyswitched combination of instruments: Alto Sax 2; Flute 2; Bb Clarinet 2; Soprano Sax 2 Keyswitched combination of instruments: Alto Sax 3; Flute 3; Bb Clarinet 3; Soprano Sax 1 Baritone saxophone; made by Bundy.

Bari Sax 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Bari Sax 2

Baritone saxophone; made by Bundy; different microphones than Bari Sax 1. Uses less memory than the full version

Alto Sax 2 KS Alto Sax 3 KS

Bari Sax 2 Lite Bari Sax 1 KS

60

Keyswitched combination of instruments: Bari Sax 1; Alto Flute; Bass Clarinet

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS nki name: Bari Sax 2 KS Bass Sax 1

Description: Keyswitched combination of instruments: Bari Sax 2; Alto Flute; Bass Clarinet BBb Bass Saxophone; made by Selmer.

Bass Sax 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Bass Sax 2

BBb Bass Saxophone; made by Selmer; different microphones than Bass Sax 1. Uses less memory than the full version

Bass Sax 2 Lite C Melody Sax 1 C Melody Sax 1 Lite

C Melody saxophone; made by Buescher; different microphones than C Melody Sax 1. Uses less memory than the full version

C Melody Sax 2

C Melody saxophone; made by Buescher.

C Melody Sax 2 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Contrabass Sax 1

EEb Contrabass Saxophone; made by Orsi.

Contrabass Sax 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Contrabass Sax 2 Contrabass Sax 2 Lite

EEb Contrabass Saxophone; made by Orsi; different microphones than Contrabass Sax 1. Uses less memory than the full version

Mezzo Soprano Sax

F Mezzo-soprano Saxophone; made by Conn.

Mezzo Soprano Sax Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Sopranino

Eb Sopranino Saxophone; made by Orsi. Smallest instrument of the saxophone family recorded for this library. Uses less memory than the full version

Sopranino Lite Soprano Sax 1 Soprano Sax 1 Lite Soprano Sax 2 Soprano Sax 2 Lite Subcontrabass Sax

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Bb ‘Straight’ Soprano saxophone; made by MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; Conn. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Bb ‘Curved’ Soprano saxophone; made by Conn. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Bb Subcontrabass saxophone, also known as the MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; “Tubax”; custom made by Benedikt Eppelsheim. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth

Subcontrabass Sax Lite Tenor Sax 1

Bb Tenor saxophone, made by Selmer Mark VI

Tenor Sax 1 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tenor Sax 2

Bb Tenor saxophone; made by Selmer.

Tenor Sax 2 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth 61


Userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tenor Sax 3

Description: Bb Tenor saxophone; made by Yamaha.

Tenor Sax 3 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tenor Sax 4

Bb Tenor saxophone; made by Selmer; a mellower sound. Uses less memory than the full version

Tenor Sax 4 Lite Tenor Sax 1 KS Tenor Sax 2 KS Tenor Sax 3 KS Tenor Sax 4 KS

Keyswitched combination of instruments: Tenor Sax 1; Flute 1; Bb Clarinet 1; Soprano Sax 1 Keyswitched combination of instruments: Tenor Sax 2; Flute 2; Bb Clarinet 2; Soprano Sax 2 Keyswitched combination of instruments: Tenor Sax 3; Flute 3; Bb Clarinet 3; Soprano Sax 1 Keyswitched combination of instruments: Tenor Sax 4; Flute 1; Bb Clarinet 1; Soprano Sax 2

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth: KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; KS

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Bass Tbone Open (no mute) Bass Tbone Open Lite Bass Tbone Straight Mute Bass Tbone Straight Mute Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Bass Tbone Cup Mute

Bass Trombone played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Bass Tbone Cup Mute Lite Bass Tbone Harmon Mute Bass Tbone Harmon Mute Lite Bass Tbone Bucket Mute Bass Tbone Bucket Mute lite Bass Tbone KS Bass Tbone Lite KS

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Bass Trombone played with the MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Harmon mute. Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Bass Trombone played with the Bucket MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; mute. Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Keyswitched combination of open and MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; all mutes. Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS

Tbone 1 Open (no mute)

Trombone; made by Holton.

Tbone 1 Open Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 1 Straight Mute

Trombone 1 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 1 Straight Mute Lite

62

Description: Controls: Conn Bass Trombone. Plays one octave MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; lower than a conventional trombone. Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Bass Trombone played with the MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Straight mute. Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk


Userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tbone 1 Cup Mute Tbone 1 Cup Mute Lite Tbone 1 Harmon Mute Tbone 1 Harmon Mute Lite Tbone 1 Bucket Mute Tbone 1 Bucket Mute Lite Tbone 1 KS

Description: Trombone 1 played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 1 played with the Harmon mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 1 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 1 Lite KS

Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 2 Open (no mute)

Trombone; made by Holton.

Tbone 2 Open Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 2 Straight Mute

Trombone 2 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 2 Straight Mute Lite Tbone 2 Cup Mute Tbone 2 Cup Mute Lite Tbone 2 Harmon Mute Tbone 2 Harmon Mute Lite Tbone 2 Bucket Mute Tbone 2 Bucket Mute Lite Tbone 2 KS

Trombone 2 played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 2 played with the Harmon mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 2 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 2 Lite KS

Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 3 Open (no mute)

Trombone; made by Holton.

Tbone 3 Open Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 3 Straight Mute

Trombone 3 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 3 Straight Mute Lite Tbone 3 Cup Mute Tbone 3 Cup Mute Lite Tbone 3 Harmon Mute

Trombone 3 played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 3 played with the Harmon mute.

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk 63


Userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tbone 3 Harmon Mute lite

Description: Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 3 Bucket Mute

Trombone 3 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tbone 3 Bucket Mute Lite Tbone 3 KS Tbone 3 Lite KS Tbone 4 Open (no mute) Tbone 4 Open Lite Tbone 4 Straight Mute Tbone 4 Straight Mute Lite Tbone 4 Cup Mute Tbone 4 Cup Mute Lite Tbone 4 Harmon Mute Tbone 4 Harmon Mute Lite Tbone 4 Bucket Mute Tbone 4 Bucket Mute Lite Tbone 4 KS Tbone 4 Lite KS Tbone 5 Open (no mute) Tbone 5 Open Lite Tbone 5 Straight Mute Tbone 5 Straight Mute Lite Tbone 5 Cup Mute Tbone 5 Cup Mute Lite Tbone 5 Harmon Mute Tbone 5 Harmon Mute Lite Tbone 5 Bucket Mute Tbone 5 Bucket Mute Lite

64

Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version Mellower tone and more extended range. Good for solo work. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 4 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 4 played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 4 played with the Harmon mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 4 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 5, made by Edwards, .500 bore. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 5 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 5 played with the Cup mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 5 played with the Harmon mute. Uses less memory than the full version Trombone 5 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tbone 5 KS Tbone 5 Lite KS Tbone Plunger Mute Tbone Plunger Mute Lite Tbone Plunger+Str Mute Tbone Plunger+Str Mute Lite Flugelhorn 1

Description: Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version Features playable open/close plunger. Separate shake layer not present. Uses less memory than the full version Features playable open/close plunger. Separate shake layer not present. Uses less memory than the full version

Flugelhorn 1 Lite

Flugelhorn in Bb; made by Getzen Eterna; principal instrument. Uses less memory than the full version

Flugelhorn 2

Flugelhorn in Bb; derived instrument.

Flugelhorn 2 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Flugelhorn 3

Flugelhorn in Bb; derived instrument.

Flugelhorn 3 Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Flugelhorn 4

Flugelhorn in Bb; derived instrument.

Flugelhorn 5

Flubelhorn in Bb; derived instrument.

Tpt 1 Open (no mute)

Trumpet in Bb with extreme range extension to the “triple high C” (concert Bb) for the open horn; made by King-Golden Flair. Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 1 Open Lite Tpt 1 Straight Mute Tpt 1 Straight Mute Lite

Trumpet 1 played with the Straight mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 1 Cup Mute

Trumpet 1 played with the Cup mute.

Tpt 1 Cup Mute Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 1 Harmon Mute

Trumpet 1 played with the Harmon mute. Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 1 Harmon Mute Lite Tpt 1 Bucket Mute Tpt 1 Bucket Mute Lite Tpt 1 KS

Trumpet 1 played with the Bucket mute. Uses less memory than the full version Keyswitched combination of open and all mutes.

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Plgr MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Plgr MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS 65


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tpt 1 Lite KS

Description: Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 2 Open (no mute)

Trumpet in Bb with range extension to the “double high C concert”; made by Calicchio. Uses less memory than the full version

Tpt 2 Open Lite Tpt 2 Straight Mute Tpt 2 Straight Mute Lite Tpt 2 Cup Mute Tpt 2 Cup Mute Lite Tpt 2 Harmon Mute Tpt 2 Harmon Mute Lite Tpt 2 Bucket Mute Tpt 2 Bucket Mute Lite Tpt 2 KS Tpt 2 Lite KS Tpt 3 Open (no mute) Tpt 3 Open Lite Tpt 3 Straight Mute Tpt 3 Straight Mute Lite Tpt 3 Cup Mute Tpt 3 Cup Mute Lite Tpt 3 Harmon Mute Tpt 3 Harmon Mute Lite Tpt 3 Bucket Mute Tpt 3 Bucket Mute Lite Tpt 3 KS Tpt 3 Lite KS Tpt 4 Open (no mute)

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Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 2 played with the Straight MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 2 played with the Cup mute. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 2 played with the Harmon MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 2 played with the Bucket MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Keyswitched combination of open and MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; all mutes. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Trumpet in Bb with range extension to the MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; “double high C concert”; made by Bach. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 3 played with the Straight MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 3 played with the Cup mute. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 3 played with the Harmon MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 3 played with the Bucket MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Keyswitched combination of open and MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; all mutes. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Trumpet in Bb with range extension to MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk the “double high C” (concert); made by King-Golden Flair.


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tpt 4 Open Lite Tpt 4 Straight Mute Tpt 4 Straight Mute Lite Tpt 4 Cup Mute Tpt 4 Cup Mute Lite Tpt 4 Harmon Mute Tpt 4 Harmon Mute Lite Tpt 4 Bucket Mute Tpt 4 Bucket Mute Lite Tpt 4 KS Tpt 4 Lite KS Tpt 5 Open (no mute)

Tpt 5 Open Lite Tpt 5 Straight Mute Tpt 5 Straight Mute Lite Tpt 5 Cup Mute Tpt 5 Cup Mute Lite Tpt 5 Harmon Mute Tpt 5 Harmon Mute Lite Tpt 5 Bucket Mute Tpt 5 Bucket Mute Lite Tpt 5 KS Tpt 5 Lite KS Tpt Plunger Mute Tpt Plunger Mute Lite Tpt Plunger+Str Mute

Description: Uses less memory than the full version

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 4 played with the Straight MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 4 played with the Cup mute. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 4 played with the Harmon MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 4 played with the Bucket MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Keyswitched combination of open and MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS all mutes. Uses less memory than main KS MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; instrument. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Trumpet in Bb with range extension to MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; the “double high C” (concert); made PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk by King-Golden Flair. Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 5 played with the Straight MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 5 played with the Cup mute. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 5 played with the Harmon MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Trumpet 5 played with the Bucket MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; mute. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Keyswitched combination of open and MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS all mutes. Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk; KS Features playable open/close plunger. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; Separate shake layer not present. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth Uses less memory than the full version MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk Features playable open/close plunger. MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; Separate shake layer not present. PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth 67


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

THE BRASS INSTRUMENTS nki name: Tpt Plunger+Str Mute Lite

Description: Uses less memory than the full version

Controls: MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

Tuba

Bb Tuba

Tuba Lite

Uses less memory than the full version

MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk MW; Vel; Tng/Slr; AF; KC; RFX; Vib; Fltr/Grl; PBd; Port; Lgth; VAR 1; VAR 2; TQ; Brth; Sk

MULTIS The “Multis” folder contains preset combinations of instruments for the user’s convenience. Various setups of sections and instrument groupings are provided including jazz trio; large big band;; etc (see table below for a complete list). Loading a Multi can give you a quick “head start” to setting up a group of instruments. MULTIS Multi name: Accordion Trio Big Band Rhythm Section Lite Big Band Rhythm Section Fusion Quartet Jazz Piano Trio Lite Jazz Piano Trio Jazz Quintet Jazz Sextet Sax Section KS Sax Section Lite Sax Section Trombone Section KS Lite Trombone Section KS Trumpet Section KS Lite Trumpet Section KS Vibraphone Quartet

Instruments Included: Upright Bass 1 KS; Acoustic Guitar KS; Accordion GM Classic Jazz Drum Kit Lite; Upright Bass 2 KS Lite; Steinway Jazz Piano Lite; Electric Guitar Mellow KS Lite 03 Classic Jazz Drum Kit; Upright Bass 2 KS; Steinway Jazz Piano; Electric Guitar Mellow KS 04 Fusion Drum Kit; Fretless Bass 1 KS; Vintage Electric Piano; Tenor Sax 1 KS GM Classic Jazz Drum Kit Lite; Upright Bass 2 KS Lite; Steinway Jazz Piano Lite 03 Classic Jazz Drum Kit; Upright Bass 2 KS; Steinway Jazz Piano 03 Classic Jazz Drum Kit; Upright Bass 2 KS; Steinway Jazz Piano; Tenor Sax 1 KS; Flugelhorn 1 03 Classic Jazz Drum Kit; Upright Bass 2 KS; Steinway Jazz Piano; Tenor Sax 1 KS; Tpt 5 KS; Tbone 4 KS Alto Sax 1 KS; Alto Sax 2 KS; Tenor Sax 1 KS; Tenor Sax 2 KS; Bari Sax 1 KS Alto Sax 1 Lite; Alto Sax 2 Lite; Tenor Sax 1 Lite; Tenor Sax 2 Lite; Bari Sax 1 Lite Alto Sax 1; Alto Sax 2; Tenor Sax 1; Tenor Sax 2; Bari Sax 1 Tbone 1 KS Lite; Tbone 2 KS Lite; Tbone 3 KS Lite; Tbone 4 KS Lite; Bass Tbone KS Lite Tbone 1 KS; Tbone 2 KS; Tbone 3 KS; Tbone 4 KS; Bass Tbone KS Tpt 1 KS Lite; Tpt 2 KS Lite; Tpt 3 KS Lite; Tpt 4 KS Lite; Tpt 5 KS Lite Tpt 1 KS; Tpt 2 KS; Tpt 3 KS; Tpt 4 KS; Tpt 5 KS 03 Classic Jazz Drum Kit; Upright Bass 1 KS; Vibraphone KS; Electric Guitar Mellow KS

ADDENDUM TO THE TRUMPETS: We have included one additional feature: The trumpets now have an additional controller for adjusting the level of the release effects. This has a knob on the player interface for the trumpets and is cc29 for automation purposes.

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User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

The Garritan Community Learn, Share Music & Stay up to date

I welcome you to join the Garritan Community. Owning Garritan Jazz & Big Band gives you much more than a product. One of the most valuable benefits is membership into the Garritan community of musicians. The Garritan Forum is where Garritan users from around the world come to discuss everything related to orchestration, jazz and big band and topics related to music and sampling. It’s the perfect way to find the latest news and announcements, ask questions and share your music made with Garritan libraries. If you want to browse, share your thoughts, impart knowledge, listen to demos, learn, and interact with other Garritan library users - this is the place! You can also communicate privately with other musicians (PM), respond to polls, participate in real-time chats, read how-to tutorials, and get support and help from others. There is a wealth of information among the tens of thousands of posts in the forum and a convenient ‘search’ feature to find what you are looking for. The Garritan forum can be accessed at: http://www.garritan.com/forum.html. There is a special subsection dealing with Jazz and Big Band on the Garritan forums. You don’t have to register to browse posts, but before you can post, you will have to sign up. Registration is fast, simple and free; so please, join our community today! In addition to the official Garritan Forum, there are other independent Garritan Communities where you can find valuable information and interact with other users. I urge you to contribute and be a part of the Garritan Community where you will find an indispensable resource for musicians.

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User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Getting Help The first place to look for a solution to any problem you may be experiencing is this manual. Please read the manual before contacting support. Next, check the readme files which contain important information and all last minute changes that haven’t been available when printing this guide. Also, you may find an answer to your problem using the Kontakt Player’s on-screen help. You can access support by going to the Kontakt Player About screen, opened by clicking on the NI KONTAKT logo on the player. Choose the support tab of the About Screen to find a series of buttons directly leading you to the Native Instruments Online Knowledge Base and to the Online Support front-end. The front-end will ask you for all information about your hardware and software environment, to better assist you. In your description, you should include a description of the problem, the steps you have taken to try to remedy the problem, the specs of your computer, and a description of your software and hardware. IMPORTANT: For support & authorization for the Native Instruments KONTAKT Player, please contact: register@native-instruments.com or Native Instruments Tech Support at: (323) 467-2693 (US).

Garritan Jazz and Big Band is a dynamic library that is evolving and growing. Please check the support area of our website at www.garritan.com for the latest up-to-date information, troubleshooting, FAQs, helpful hints and tutorials. Another resource is the support forums. On the Forum tab of the About Screen is a button directly connecting you to the Garritan forum and the Native Instruments User Forums where you can discuss problems directly with other users and with experts from NI moderating the forum. Whenever you encounter problems, you should also check if you have installed the latest update. The version number of your software is displayed on the first page of the About dialog. Updates are released regularly to fix known problems and to improve the software. You can find a link to check for the latest update in the About dialog, in the Readme file or at www.native-instruments.com. Information and help are also available at the Garritan website. If you can’t find a solution to your problem by any of the above methods, please email us at support@ garritan.com. The best way to get the help you need is by giving us plenty of detailed information about the problem you are having. We do ask you to read this guide thoroughly and exhaust the other avenues of support before contacting us. REGARDING THIRD PARTY CUSTOMER SERVICE: Please do not call Garritan Libraries for technical support regarding the Kontakt Player or any other third-party application or program. All Kontakt support issues are handled primarily by Native Instruments. Please contact the respective companies for support. For the Latest… For the very latest news, tutorials, MIDI files, tips and techniques, updates, FAQs, and more, please visit our website at www.garritan.com. 70


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Acknowledgements Producing Garritan Jazz & Big Band would not have been possible without the combined help, talent and support of many extraordinary people. I am grateful to those who have contributed and would like to thank them all. This Jazz and Big Band library has been the vision of Tom Hopkins. Tom has played in jazz bands for over 35 years and this library has been one of his personal goals. Tom played brass for this library, recorded many of the instrumentalists, and programmed all of the instruments. Tom has transformed these samples into playable expressive instruments. I am extremely grateful for the musicians who have played for this collection. Thanks for enduring the relentless scales, sore fingers, numb lips and meticulous playing to produce these samples. Thanks the players: Chuck Israels (upright bass), Rich Cooper (trumpet), Jim Coile (saxophones and flutes), David Link (saxophones), Jay Easton (saxophones), Tracy Knoop (clarinet), Curt Berg (trombone), John Leys (bass trombone), Tom Hopkins (trumpet, flugelhorn, trombone), Ted Enderle (upright and electric basses), Denny Gore (electric piano), Alan Hashimoto (drums), Tom Bergersen (percussion), Karl Olson (vibes), Bruce Hamilton (additional percussion), Karl Garrett (acoustic guitar), Ged Brockie (electric guitar), John Bonica (accordion) and the other musicians who played in this collection. Thanks to Jeanott Welter for endless hours of tedious sample editing and looping. Thanks to Jim Bredouw for the use of his Steinway B piano for sampling. Many thanks to Chuck Israels for his inspiration and consultation throughout the project. And special thanks to Gary Lindsay for his insightful advice. Thanks to Mark Simon and David Burnett, for hosting the Garritan Forums on Northern Sounds to exchange ideas and support one another. I would also like to thank Stephen Croes, Dean of Music Technology, and Kurt Biederwolf, Chair of the Music Synthesis Department at Berklee College of Music, and Gary Lindsay, Director of Studio/Jazz Writing at the University of Miami who were very helpful in discussing many of the problems facing music students which led to the development of this library as a creative solution for students. Thanks to Michael Sandberg and James Mireau for graphic design and James Mireau for the cover art. Thanks to Jeff Hurchalla, David Viens, Sebastien Beaulieu, and Vincent Trussart at Plogue for the development of Garritan Studio. And thanks to Darcy Argue, Jeff Beal and David Maddux. A special thanks to Daniel Haver, Martin Jann, Frank Etling, Julian Ringel and everyone at Native Instruments for developing the fantastic sample engine that powers Garritan Jazz & Big Band. 71


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Appendix A: QUICK MIDI CONTROLLER REFERENCE GUIDE CC #

DESCRIPTION

INSTRUMENTS AFFECTED

Modulation

Controls the volume/timbre of “Expressive” instruments

All “Expressive” sustained instruments. Does not affect most percussive instruments.

2

Breath

7

MIDI Volume

All “Expressive” sustained instruments. Does not affect most percussive instruments. All if chosen.

10

MIDI Pan

11

Expression

12

Air flow noise

13

Fundamental (basses) Key click/valve noise

Alternate controller for volume/ timbre of “Expressive” instruments Turned off by default. Volume controller cc7 used for static volume changes (in contrast to modulation control cc1 which is used for dynamic volume/timbre changes). You must activate cc7 in the Kontakt player options panel. Turned off by default. Most instruments in JABB have suggested “start” positions for panning. If you wish an instrument to respond to automated panning adjustments sent by your controller or sequencer you must turn this option on in the Kontakt player options panel. Alternate controller for volume/ timbre of “Expressive” instruments Turned off by default. Can be used to add breathiness to the sound of an instrument. Strength of fundamental in tone Can be used to add mechanical noises synchronized to note changes.

15

Note release effects

16 17

Plunger mute control Vibrato Speed Control

18 19

Flutter tongue/growl Attack (basses) Pitchbend disable

20

Portamento

Attack Speed (vibraphone only)

21

72

USE

1

Brightness Kick drum level Length

Turned off by default. Uses value splits to switch between falloffs, doits, and kisses. At “closed” setting by default. Used along with Aftertouch (vibrato intensity) to control the application of vibrato. Roughens tone quality Attack envelope speed Turned off by default. Switches to a layer that does not respond to pitchbend. Allows the user to apply pitchbend to selected overlapping notes only. Adds portamento to notes depending on interval and controller data added. Continuously adjustable attack speed controller. Adjustable from hard to ‘bowed’ attacks. Defaults to hard attacks. High frequency control Volume Controls the length/decay/release time of the sample.

All if chosen.

All “Expressive” sustained instruments. Does not affect most percussive instruments. Air flow noise is included with all woodwind and brass instruments. Also, bellows noise in accordion All basses Supplies key click noises in the woodwinds, valve noises in the trumpets/tuba, and finger noise in basses. All trumpets.

Two trumpets and two trombones Woodwinds, brass, bass, and guitar.

Wind instruments All basses All instruments “expressive” instruments that sustain.

All “Expressive” sustained instruments. Used during legato/slurred passages which require portamento. Adjustable attack speed controller on the vibraphone KS patch. Piano Drum kits Controls the length/release time of most instruments in JABB.


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Appendix A: QUICK MIDI CONTROLLER REFERENCE GUIDE CC # 22

23

DESCRIPTION

Drum kits

Variability 1 (VAR 1)

Sets random variations in tuning from note to note.

Most wind, and some percussion instruments. Useful for repeated note passages to prevent the ‘machinegun’ effect. Vibraphone and vintage electric piano. To be used with cc23.

Variable tremolo intensity Tremolo Level (vibraphone and vintage electric piano) Variability 2 (VAR 2) Sets random variations in instrument Most wind, and some percussion instruments. Useful for repeated note passages to prevent timbre from note to note. the ‘machinegun’ effect.

27

28

Percussion level High Frequency Control

25 26

INSTRUMENTS AFFECTED

Volume

Tremolo Speed (vibraphone and vintage electric piano) High Frequency EQ (vibraphone) Tom Tom level Hi hat level Filter level Mid EQ Cymbal level Filter center frequency

24

USE

Snare drum level

Attack control 64

Tongue/slur and sustain (standard folders)

68

Tongue/Slur (Notation folder only)

Aftertouch Vibrato Intensity Brush stir direction change Velocity

Velocity

Pitchbend

Pitchbend

Variable tremolo speed

Vibraphone and vintage electric piano. To be used with cc22.

Controls brightness

Vibraphones

Volume Volume Intensity of EQ Intensity of mid EQ Volume Chooses the part of the audio spectrum modified by the Tone Control Volume Intensity of high frequencies

Drum kits Drum kits Many wind instruments Vintage electric piano Drum kits Many wind instruments

Special attack control for the brass shake layer Controls tongue/slur and standard sustain

Controls vibrato intensity

Drum kits Many wind instruments and vintage electric piano Trumpets and trombone Tongue/slur function for wind instruments; Standard sustain for keyboards, basses, and guitars. All wind instruments All wind instruments

Brush snare drums. Controls the direction change in brush pattern. Defines the rhythmic character of the stir. Controls “note on” velocity for all Controls the initial attack strength of all “Expressive” mod wheel controlled instruments in JABB. instruments in JABB. Note: For all “Percussive” (keyed, percussion, or non sustained patches) this controls volume/timbre. Allows a note’s pitch to be shifted in a controlled manner (usually to a maximum of two semitones up or down).

This controller is especially useful for instruments like trombone where note slides are common. This controller is used to create ‘scoops’ or ‘drops’ at the beginning or end of a note or passage. Can be used with trombone to simulate slide movements during sustained notes. Can be used along with cc19 to solve difficult portamento situations. 73


74

NOTE NAME A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A

MIDI NOTE #

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Bass Drum 1 Bass Drum 2 Side Stick/Brush Stir Snare 1 Hand Clap Snare 2 Low Floor Tom Closed Hi Hat High Floor Tom Pedal Hi Hat Low Tom Open Hi Hat Low-mid Tom High-mid Tom Crash Cymbal 1 High Tom Ride Cymbal 1 Chinese Cymbal Ride Bell Tambourine Splash Cymbal Cowbell Crash Cymbal 2

GENERAL MIDI DRUM KITS Side Stick Bass Drum 1 Bass Drum 2 Rim Shot Snare LH Snare RH Foot Closed Hi Hat Low Floor Tom Closed Hi Hat LH Closed Hi Hat RH Half Open Hi Hat Mid Tom Open Hi Hat Hi Hat Crash High Tom Crash Cymbal 1 Ride Cymbal 1 Ride Cymbal 2 Crash Cymbal 2 Ride Bell 1 Ride Bell 2 Ride Cymbal 3 Crash Cymbal 3 Sizzle Cymbal 1

CLASSIC JAZZ/ FUSION DRUM KITS

High Tom Crash Cymbal Ride Cymbal 1 Ride Cymbal 2 Sizzle Cymbal Garbage Can Lid (wire brush) Garbage Can Lid (brush handle) Garbage Can Lid (blastik)

Bass Drum 1 Bass Drum 2 Snare Stir (Aftertouch direction change) Snare LH Snare RH Foot Closed Hi Hat Low Tom Closed Hi Hat LH Closed Hi Hat RH Half Open Hi Hat Mid Tom Open Hi Hat

BRUSH DRUM KIT

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to

Appendix B: DRUM MAPS


NOTE NAME A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A

MIDI NOTE #

58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81

Vibraslap Ride Cymbal 2 High Bongo Low Bongo Mute High Bongo Open High Bongo Low Conga High Timbale Low Timbale High Agogo Low Agogo Cabassa Maracas Short Whistle Long Whistle Short Guiro Long Guiro Claves High Wood Block Low Wood Block Mute Cuica Open Cuica Mute Triangle Open Triangle

GENERAL MIDI DRUM KITS Stagg Crash Cymbal 4 Cracked Ride Cymbal 3 China Cymbal Splash Cymbal Ride Cymbal 4 Crash Cymbal 5 Sizzle Cymbal 2 (wood tip) Sizzle Cymbal 2 (nylon tip) Sizzle Cymbal 2 (mallet) Sizzle Cymbal 2 (finger) Sizzle Cymbal 2 (wood tip BS) Cymbal Scrape 1 Cymbal Scrape 2 Cymbal Scrape 3 Cymbal Scrape 4 Cymbal Scrape 5 Garbage Can Lid (stick) Garbage Can Lid (mallet) Garbage Can Lid (hard mallet) Garbage Can Lid (rubber mallet) Garbage Can Lid (car keys) Garbage Can Lid (hand) Radial Saw Blade Chrome Saw Blade

CLASSIC JAZZ/ FUSION DRUM KITS BRUSH DRUM KIT

User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Appendix B: DRUM MAPS

75


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Appendix C: PERCUSSION MAPS

76

MIDI NOTE #

NOTE NAME

36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F#

DRUMS Bata Low Open Bata Low Muff Bata Low Slap Bata Mid Open Bata Mid Muff Bata Mid Slap Bata High Open Bata High Muff Bata High Slap Bongo Low Open Bongo Low Muff Bongo Low Slap Bongo High Open Bongo High Muff Bongo High Slap Cajone Low Cajone Slap Cajone Stick Hit Conga Low Conga Open Conga Muff Conga Slap Cuica Low Cuica Mid Cuica High Djembe Open Djembe Muff Djembe Slap Pandero Open Pandero Muff Pandero Slap

GOURDS, BLOCKS, BELLS, MISC. Cabassa Short Cabassa Long Cabassa Snap Guira Short 1 Guira Short 2 Guira Long Guiro 1 Short 1 Guiro 1 Short 2 Guiro 1 Long Guiro 2 Short 1 Guiro 2 Short 2 Guiro 2 Long Maraccas 1 Short Maraccas 1 Long Maraccas 2 Short Maraccas 2 Long Shaker Short 1 Shaker Short 2 Shaker Short 3 Shaker Medium Shaker Long Shekere Low Shekere High Shekere Short 1 Shekere Short 2 Clave Jam Block Low Jam Block High Wood Block Agogo Bell Low Open Agogo Bell Low Mute


User’s Guide to

Garritan Jazz & Big Band

Appendix C: PERCUSSION MAPS

MIDI NOTE #

NOTE NAME

67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96

G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C

DRUMS Quinto Open Quinto Muff Quinto Slap Super Tumba Low Super Tumba Open Super Tumba Muff Super Tumba Slap Surdu Open Surdu Muff The Box Low The Box Mid The Box High Timbales Low Timbales High Timbales Edge Tumba Low Tumba Open Tumba Muff Tumba Slap Udu Long Udu Short

GOURDS, BLOCKS, BELLS, MISC. Agogo Bell High Open Agogo Bell High Mute Bongo Bell Low Open Bongo Bell Low Mute Bongo Bell High Open Bongo Bell High Mute Cha Cha Bell Open Cha Cha Bell Mute Timbale Bell Open Timbale Bell Mute Castinets Hand Claps Finger Snaps Jawbone Rainstick 1 Rainstick 2 Tambourine Short Tambourine Long Tambourine Hit Triangle 1 Open Triangle 1 Mute Triangle 2 Open Triangle 2 Mute Whistle 1 Short Whistle 1 Long Whistle 2 Short Whistle 2 Long Whistle 3 Short Whistle 3 Medium Whistle 3 Long

77


Garritan Jazz and Big Band - Reference Sheet - by Chris Bassett All WindsALL WINDS

Primary Controls

Expressive Controls

Tweaking Controls

cc1 (Mod)

Volume / Expression

Aftertouch

Vibrato

cc19

Pitch Bend Defeat

cc64 (Sus.)

Tongue / Slur

cc17

Vibrato Speed

cc20

Portamento Control

Velocity

Attack / Accentuation

cc12

Air Flow Noise

cc21

Length Control

Pitch Wheel

Bend (+/-2 Semitones)

cc13

Key Click / Valve Noise

cc22

Var 1 (Intonation)

cc18

Flutter Tongue / Growl

cc23

Var 2 (Timbre)

* Breath Noises in top 2 octaves of keyboard

cc26

Tone Quality (Warmth)

cc27

Tone Quality (adjust “sweet spot”)

BRASS Keyswitching (KS Patches) C = Open

D = Straight Mute

Brass Shakes cc64

(Values 49-95) Brass Shakes

Vel.

Trim Volume

cc28

Attack Speed

cc20

Portamento

E = Cup Mute

F = Harmon Mute

Plunger Mute Instruments cc16

Plunger Open / Close

Shakes Pitchbend = +/- 6 Semitones Trombone Pitchbend = +/- 6 Semitones

G = Bucket Mute

Trumpet Release (cc15) 0-32

Off

33-64

Falloffs (High Range Only)

65-95

Doits (High Range Only)

96-127

Kisses (High Bb and Above)

RHYTHM All Basses

Arco Upright Bass

Vintage Electric Piano

cc12

Fundamental Intensity

Sus. Pedal

Legato

cc22

Tremolo Level

cc13

Finger Noises

cc19

Pitchbend Defeat

cc23

Tremolo Speed

cc18

Attack Speed (Sharpness)

C1 (KS)

Arco

cc26

Midrange Intensity

cc20

Portamento

D1 (KS)

Alternate up / down bow

cc28

Brightness

cc21

Length

G1 (KS)

Playable Tremolo

cc22

Var 1 (Intonation)

cc23

Var 2 (Timbre)

cc26

Midrange EQ

cc27

Midrange Center Frequency

cc28

High Frequency EQ

Electric Bass

Vibraphone

Guitars

cc20

Attack Speed

Aftertouch

Vibrato Intensity

cc21

Brightness

cc17

Vibrato Speed

cc22

Tremolo Intensity

cc20

Portamento

cc23

Tremolo Speed

cc21

Length

cc22

Var 1 (Intonation)

All Bass Drums

C0 (KS)

Pluck

cc23

Var 2 (Timbre)

cc12

Fundamental Strength

D0 (KS)

Harmonics

C0 (KS)

Standard Plucks

cc28

Beater Head Slap Strength

C5 - E5

Finger Slide Noises

D0 (KS)

Harmonics

C7 - D#8

Slides, Taps. Slaps

Upright Acoustic Bass Sus. Pedal

Open Strings

C5 - E6

Finger Slide Noises

Piano cc20

Brightness

Brush Kit C#1

Continuous Stir

Velocity

First brush push strength

Aftertouch

Stir Direction Change



Garritan - Jazz & Big Band Manual