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PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE STEFANO DE LUIGI ~ ADAM FERGUSON BOOGIE ~ COREY ARNOLD ADAM PANCZUK ~ BEN SULLIVAN DANNY WILCOX FRAZIER DAVID FLANAGAN ~ JAMES BRICKWOOD JESSICA TREMP ~ LEE GRANT LISA WILTSE ~ MARTIN MISCHKULNIG MEGA CULLEN ~ REBECCA & ALEX WEBB TANYA LAKE ~ TOBY DIXON

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Milan, Italy www.stefanodeluigi.com

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stefano DE LUIGI


stefano DE LUIGI

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stefano DE LUIGI

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stefano DE LUIGI

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stefano DE LUIGI

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stefano DE LUIGI

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stefano DE LUIGI

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DETAILS

WELCOME

EDITOR Andrew Johnstone - aj@takephotomag.com ART DIRECTION Design is Kinky Studio - hello@takephotomag.com

Image by Issue 01 Contributor: Tamara Dean

CONTRIBUTORS Tamara Dean, Andrew Quilty, Stephen Dupont PHOTOGRAPHERS Stefano De Luigi, Adam Ferguson, Boogie, Corey Arnold, Danny Wilcox Frazier, David Flanagan, James Brickwood, Jessica Tremp, Lee Grant, Martin Mischkulnig, Megan Cullen, Alex & Rebecca Webb, Adam Panczuk, Tanya Lake, Ben Sullivan, Toby Dixon, Lisa Wiltse, Andrew Quilty, Tamara Dean, Stephen Dupont

WELCOME TO TAKE. PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE

ISSUE 0NE ~ 2011

STEFANO DE LUIGI ~ ADAM FERGUSON BOOGIE ~ COREY ARNOLD ADAM PANCZUK ~ BEN SULLIVAN DANNY WILCOX FRAZIER DAVID FLANAGAN ~ JAMES BRICKWOOD JESSICA TREMP ~ LEE GRANT LISA WILTSE ~ MARTIN MISCHKULNIG MEGA CULLEN ~ REBECCA & ALEX WEBB TANYA LAKE ~ TOBY DIXON

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01

Full disclosure. I don’t really know a lot about photography. I have no idea what the hell an ISO is, wouldn’t use film if you paid me and think the manual settings on my camera were created by the devil to make life difficult.

But alas I don’t have the skill, the commitment, or in fact the courage that documentary photographers all seem to have. So I’ll remain on the fringes and, rather than becoming one of them, I’ll instead do what I tend to do best, I’ll help share their work, via Take. What can you expect within these pages?

Cover Image: Stefano De Luigi

205/19A Boundary St, Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011, Australia www.takephotomag.com / hello@takephotomag.com Ph: +61 (0) 2 93600690 Published by DESIGN IS KINKY - www.designiskinky.net Distribution SPEEDIMPEX - www.speedimpex.com.au

What I am though is a total groupie of photographers and their work. Like many people I have spent years flicking through the pages of countless photography books. Staring slack-jawed with amazement at images of outstanding beauty, at moments of time captured by individuals whose courage and talent I remain in awe of. I particularly enjoy documentary photography. The work of Magnum photographers such as Robert Capa, Steve McCurry and Trent Parke. The amazing Oculi group and the VII Photo Agency. All of whom capture real images in an increasingly false and manipulated world. In recent years I have been lucky enough to meet quite a few documentary photographers, and my appreciation of their skills has become even stronger. I wanted to be one of them, to belong to what, to an outsider, feels like an exclusive club. To roam the more unique and interesting parts of the world with nothing but a camera and a cheeky grin.

Images that are raw and exciting by themselves without using Photoshop to add to them. Shots that capture unique moments. Shots that you can sense have interesting back stories, even if you don’t know what they are. Real images captured by photographers whose innate sense of timing and unique view of their world turns rolls of film, or pixels, into art. There will be very little text in Take. We are not big fans of analysing peoples work and prefer to let the shots speak for themselves. Each artists history is unique and interesting, and rather than confine their past to a page we hope that our gallery style features act as a jumping-off point for you to explore their work and find out more about them. I’d like to thank the contributors on this issue; Tamara Dean, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Dupont, whose advice on photographers and support made this Take a reality. I hope you enjoy the first issue of Take and look forward to hearing your feedback.

COPYRIGHT © 2011 DESIGN IS KINKY PTY LTD No part of this publication can be reproduced in any form or by any means without the permission of the publisher.

Andrew Johnstone

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CONTENTS

Pg 01.

Stefano de Luigi

Pg 28.

Corey Arnold

Pg 60.

Lee Grant

Pg 90.

Tanya Lake

Pg 10.

Contributors

Pg 34 .

Danny Wilcox Frazier

Pg 66.

Martin Mischkulnig

Pg 96.

Ben Sullivan

Pg 14.

Adam Ferguson

Pg 42.

David Flanagan

Pg 72.

Megan Cullen

Pg 100.

Toby Dixon

Pg 22.

Boogie

Pg 48.

James Brickwood

Pg 78.

Alex & Rebecca Webb

Pg 106.

Lisa Wiltse

Pg 54.

Jessica Tremp

Pg 84.

Adam Panczuk

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CONTRIBUTORS

andrew QUILTY

EDITORS NOTE: Issue One contributor, Andrew Quilty, was actually part of the seed that sprouted the idea to start Take. It was during a conversation with Andrew, about his work being featured in our sister publication Empty, that I put forward the idea of doing a photography only issue. Whilst initially the idea was just for a one-off photo-only issue of Empty, the seed quite quickly started to grow and later that day a fully fledged new magazine, or at least the idea of one, had been born.

It’s a favourite line from an oft-quoted Australian author. The final sentence in Tim Winton’s, Breath, describing how his protagonist wishes to be remembered by his children – as someone ‘…who does something completely pointless and beautiful… in this at least he should need no explanation’.

When I put the idea to Andrew he was immediately excited and supportive and, along with our other contributors, gave me the confidence to move forward and turn the idea into reality.

Doubtless there are many visual artists who have at some point, upon completing a piece of work for which they feel vindicated for having produced but not knowing exactly why, who have subsequently been asked the question, ‘… but what does it mean’?

Andrew agreed to write up an intro for the first issue. An industry insiders view of what Take can, and hopefully will, mean to anyone interested in taking photos for the sheer joy that it can bring both the photographer and viewer.

Off the record - and this is by no means denigrating any artist that may have dabbled in the practice - myriad artists when speaking candidly will roll their eyes and recoil at the prospect of yielding to the never-ending need for some sort of verbose, over intellectualised, philosophical, art-fart diatribe that seems prerequisite in order to be seriously considered as art, as if all art has to be conceptual immodestly, overtly conceptual. Why can’t art speak for itself? Why does it have to portray some flimsy, esoteric notion rather than something that actually is, something that needs no explanation, something that can be judged by instinct rather than reason? Who hasn’t loved a song without knowing what’s being sung about? Is this not legitimate affection?

ANDREW QUILTY has been published in The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine and others. He has won a World Press Photo Award and a Walkley Young Australian Photojournalist of The Year Award. Quilty is based in Sydney and is a member of the Australian Photographic Collective Oculi.

Wouldn’t it be peachy if photographers and indeed all artists had the privilege of living and working under such spontaneous, uninhibited terms?

Whether or not you consider photography an art form, facing such impediments and queries regarding concept is, for photographers of all genres, a constant concern. While some are born story-tellers who choose a visual medium as a vehicle for their narrative, others, aesthetes for whom story-telling is of less importance are more likely to be exiled despite imagery that might be - based primarily on visual aesthetics and what they offer - of equal or even greater worth.

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Street photography might be of particular disdain to the notionally driven viewer or those news people for whom fact and information is de rigueur. ‘But what does it mean and why?’ I hear it ring in my ears like tinitus! ‘What’s the story behind it?’ Like a recorded message... Great proponents of street photography - Joel Meyerowitz, Robert Frank, William Eggleston and Richard Kalvar to name a few - are magicians for whom one precise moment in time, devoid of preconceived concept or intentional meaning can, without prompt, provide metaphor, social comment, testimony or even, very simply, a moment of considered observation frozen in time – self-interpretive, to be explored and enjoyed without explanation and for which reason may well be superfluous. So photographers, like other visual artists so often find themselves, having created work, trying to construe ‘meaning’ in their work in retrospect in order to give credence to it and indeed themselves. I dare say that in some cases it isn’t necessary. Not once can I recall being asked to submit work for a publication of any kind based purely on the quality of the work without the need for an explanation or justification but rather, quite unpretentiously for the work itself. Photography and photography alone. Art for art’s sake. Make of it what you will. This negative space is no more. Welcome to TAKE. Andrew Quilty


andrew QUILTY

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CONTRIBUTORS

tamara DEAN

EDITORS NOTE: When the first kernel of an idea to create Take hit my tired brain I instantly thought of asking Tamara Dean to be one of our contributors. Not only am I a big fan of her work, but Tamara is also a good friend and I knew that her passion for photography and experience in the industry would be invaluable. My respect for Tamara and her work is so strong that, if she had not responded positively to the idea of Take, I may not have started the magazine. Thankfully she was immediately excited and supportive. I’m looking forward to working with Tamara on future issues and asked her to write a few thoughts about Take. Her response is below:

“As a long time supporter of Empty magazine I am extremely excited about Take. We are in great need of a high quality magazine which runs strong visual narratives given the few remaining forums which exist to view dedicated photographic images and stories. I feel honoured to have had some input into the first issue of Take and I look forward to being introduced to new and inspiring photographic works from here and abroad.” Tamara Dean

Sydney based TAMARA DEAN is a member of the Oculi photographic collective and staff photographer for the Sydney Morning Herald. Dean’s works delve into themes of ritual, intimacy and decay set within the contemporary Australian landscape. She has had three solo shows, ‘Ritualism’ 2009, ‘This too Shall Pass’ 2010 and ‘Only Human 2011.

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stephen DUPONT

CONTRIBUTORS

Ahmed Shah Massoud and friends in Baharak, Afghanistan, 1998.

EDITORS NOTE: I was a little nervous when I first met Stephen Dupont. Anyone familiar with Stephens work will understand why. His shots are exceptional, creating artwork out of generally very dangerous situations. It was those situations that made me nervous. What do you say to a person who was not only injured in a car bombing, but had the presence of mind to continue shooting photos whilst still bleeding? However, I didn’t need to worry. Stephen is a very nice person. Extremely passionate about photography and dedicated to photo journalism and it’s role in todays media. He’s a man with many amazing stories and it’s a pleasure to have his support and contribution for this, and future issues, of Take. I asked Stephen to write a few words about his views on photography and Take:

“Significant changes are taking place in the sphere of ‘photography’ not to mention an over saturation of imagery courtesy of the world wide web. You can’t not be overwhelmed with the visual mine field. Sure every photo tells a story, but it’s the very few photographs and their creators that excel with purity and magic. These moments of life stand out, you feel them and absorb them and you remember them forever. Photography becomes unique again and you’re inspired and moved by it. We hope this magazine brings a little window into some incredible pictures and essays, a piece of history, a very special publication.” STEPHEN DUPONT was born and is based in Sydney, Australia. Over the past two decades, Dupont has produced a remarkable body of visual work; hauntingly beautiful photographs of fragile cultures and marginalized peoples. His images have received international acclaim for their artistic integrity and valuable insight into the people, culture and communities that have existed for hundreds of years, yet are fast disappearing from our world.

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Stephen Dupont


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Sydney, Australia www.adamferguson.com

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adam FERGUSON


adam FERGUSON

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adam FERGUSON

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adam FERGUSON

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adam FERGUSON

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adam FERGUSON

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adam FERGUSON

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Brooklyn, USA www.artcoup.com

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BOOGIE


BOOGIE

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BOOGIE

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BOOGIE

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BOOGIE

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Take Issue One - Preview