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Douglas County

Empire Press VOL. 123, NO. 8

A legal newspaper for Douglas and Chelan counties

75 cents

Since 1888 www.empire-press.com

February 24, 2011

Community meeting crowds town hall BY KAREN LARSEN If numbers could solve problems, then Waterville Mayor Royal DeVaney is well on the way to getting the town buzzing again. About 70 people crowded into the town council room Feb. 16 for a meeting to discuss the future of the pool and ways for revitalizing the town. DeVaney opened the meeting by telling those gathered that the economic situation of the town is not good, and its long-term vitality is in question. “I don’t know how long, maybe six years, maybe ten years, I see Waterville looking like Withrow,” DeVaney told the group. He said he feels like townspeople aren’t working together as well as they did back in 1985, when he came to town. Those present at the meeting represented a wide range of age groups and walks of life. They also represented those whose families have been in Waterville for many generations and newcomers. DeVaney said he hopes that these various groups can work together to make the town blossom. Many people who spoke at the meeting had questions about pool finances, and about whether there may be a way to find money for the pool somewhere in the budget. People also suggested keeping the pool open during the fair to attract more visitors, charging more for pool passes and finding a way to reduce staffing costs, perhaps through volunteers. In the end, a committee was formed to look into forming a Parks and Recreation district. In this way, it would be possible to raise money for the pool through local tax levies.

■ SEE Meeting on page 7

Karen Larsen photo

The town council room was packed with about 70 people on the night of the meeting. Late comers had to participate from the hallway.

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

Students celebrate their heroes on Valentine’s BY ALEXIS KRUGER Waterville fifth grader On Feb. 14, the fourth-grade class of Waterville Elementary school held a Hero Day, to give students the chance to tell everyone about their heroes. The class teacher, Mrs. Petersen, introduced the classmates and signaled that it was time to start. Tayen Myrbo’s speech was excellent. Her heroes were her parents. She said: “My dad is like a hero because he is a life saver. Another hero I know is my mom because she can do so much at once. My mom and dad together are magical.” Another student, Cody Deshazer, said his hero was his dad. “Dear dad, you are my hero because you save lives. You are a firefighter and I want to be one too. I bet it is fun. You say I have to be 18 to join. I can’t wait until I am 18.” I have saved the best for last. Arturo’s presentation was about our principal Mrs. Nelson. He said, “Mrs. Nelson, you are my hero because you help me on being good and help people. Another reason you are my hero is that you give us lots of stuff for school. I got a backpack , pencils, and a binder from you when I needed one. You are the best principal I ever had in my whole life.”

■ For another student contribution, see Page 8

What’s this you see? The Douglas County Empire Press, in cooperation with the Waterville School, is launching a new student journalism program. Thirdgrader Jocelyn Kruger, sixthgrader Katja Wahl and fifthgrader Alexis Kruger will be contributing pieces often about the goings-on at the school. Welcome!

Inside For the record

Page 6

Housing market on upswing?

Page 6

Fairs breathe sigh of relief

Page 9

Ag experts assess cold snap

Page 10

Scout properties for sale

Page 12

G P

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Central Washington Grain Growers, Inc. 745-8551 — Waterville


8

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, February 24, 2011

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

Recreating a Roman city

By Jocelyn Kruger Waterville third grader The third grade at Waterville Elementary is building a scale model of a Roman city out of sugar cubes. Kayden Browning built a temple of Jupiter six sugar cubes high. Gannon Gormley built the villa, also known as a farmhouse. The bath house was made by Yadira Morales. Riley Voie built a library. They built many other things like markets made by Anita Woolard and an apartment made by Allison Tollackson. They pretended a sugar cube was 10 feet, so you can see many of the buildings are very large. To design the buildings they used Sketchup, a 3-D modeling program.

Left: Jocelyn Kruger stands next to Sketchup, a 3-D modeling program the students used to design their Roman buildings. Right: One of the sugar-cube Roman buildings designed by elementary school students.


The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, February 24, 2011

9

State fairs breathe a sigh of relief Cashmere Valley Bank By Doug Flanagan The supporters of Washington’s county fairs received some good news last week when state legislators approved a supplemental budget that will preserve the state’s “fair fund” for this year. The fair fund stands as it did at the end of legislative session last spring, with $1 million added to the existing account balance of $1 million, for a total of $2 million to be dispersed this spring. “This is very good news,” said Larry Nelson, the manager of Waterville’s North Central Washington Fair. “(Before the budget was approved), we really didn’t know what to think because the state is dealing with a (large) deficit. But it’s nice to see that the fairs are getting a little bit. Our supporters did a really good job.” The state typically allocates $2 million annually to a fair fund the state Department of Agriculture disburses to about 70 county, community and youth fairs across Washington. But earlier in the year, Gov. Christine Gregoire proposed a supplemental budget that would have taken away $1.2 million of the $2 million scheduled to be distributed this spring from the fund. A recent survey conducted by the Washington State Fairs Association revealed that 56 percent of respondents — representatives of 50 fairs from across the state — said their fair probably wouldn’t survive if the fair fund was cut or eliminated.

“The fair fund provides seed money that creates the foundation from which the total economic impact grows,” said Heather Hansen, executive director of Washington Friends of Farms & Forests and lobbyist for the Washington State Fairs Association. “The fund helps fairs attract exhibitors. Exhibitors attract attendees, attendees attract vendors. Vendors create jobs, sell goods and services, generate revenue and pay taxes. Without the fund, there (would be) fewer exhibits, fewer attendees and fewer vendors. The revenue generated at each step spirals downward.” Nelson joined a group of about 20 other fair managers from across the state to lobby legislators in Olympia on Feb. 10. “Olympia got bombarded by FFA and 4-H groups from different fairs,” Nelson said. “We had a pretty big voice. The word got out there. They had to look at other facts. The state receives $22 to $25 million (per year) in sales tax from the economic impact of the fairs; one of the legislators called that ‘budget dust.’” Fair supporters throughout the state still have more work to do, however. Gregoire’s proposed budget for the 2011-2013 biennium cuts the fair fund from $4 million per biennium to $1 million. “The next biennium budget poses some major problems for decision makers,” Nelson said. “We will lobby for fairs and see what happens.”

City seeks supporters for downtown makeover The first step toward sprucing up one of the oldest parts of town could be under way soon — if enough business owners and residents voice their support. Downtown East Wenatchee, a commercial core dating from the 1930s, could get fresh landscaping, sidewalk benches and lights, a makeover of a city parking lot and — maybe — tweaking of the streetscape to include diagonal parking. The only missing ingredient, said one city official, is community involvement. “Business owners have asked us to take the lead on this,” said Lori Barnett, the city’s community

development director. “There have been lots of good ideas but not nearly enough participation from the people who might benefit the most.” That includes business owners and residents of the old downtown who’ve mostly been quiet on the proposal, she said. The area being discussed includes up to 62 properties along a half-mile stretch of Valley Mall Parkway between the Wenatchee Valley Mall and the Douglas County PUD building. Two earlier meetings were held to gauge interest, but both were sparsely attended. Discussion was also held during Tuesday’s city council meeting.

The city estimates about 122 property owners, business managers and residents in the designated area could be involved in the planning process. “We need some commitment before we proceed,” she said. Calls for downtown improvement have cropped up at least twice in the last decade. In the early 1990s, Eastern Washington University conducted a survey of business owners and residents to determine what could be done to improve traffic patterns and attract more customers to the area’s businesses. “But not much came out of that effort,” said Barnett.

School lunch menu What’s cookin’? Mon Feb. 28

Breakfast Lunch

Tue

March 1

Pancakes, French toast, yogurt, fruit yogurt, fruit or juice, milk or juice, milk Chicken nuggets, cinnamon roll, applesauce, milk

Sloppy joes, tater tots, salad, fruit, milk

Wed March 2

Thurs March 3

Fri

March 4

Winter break No school!

A $25.00 fee will be charged on all returned checks. Menus are subject to change without notice. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

hopes shares will click

Shares in Cashmere Valley Bank are now traded online, marking a milestone in the hometown bank’s 78-year history. “We are now an over-the-counter stock,” said Ken Martin, the bank’s president. “It’s certainly a new league and a new day for the bank.” Martin broke the news by letter Feb. 11 to the bank’s registered shareholders. Online trading makes it easier for investors to buy or sell shares of the bank, Martin said. It also makes it easier for the bank, which is currently valued at about $97 million, to raise additional capital by issuing more shares, although Martin says the bank has no current plans to do so. According to the website otcmarkets.com, the stock was trading Feb. 16 at $21.30 per share. Martin said he discovered the news, himself, only recently, but the stock has been registered as an “over-the-counter” security since March 2010. It’s trading under the ticker symbol CVYF. Over-the-counter trading is not something the bank itself sought, Martin said. Rather, brokers register the stock once they perceive enough interest among investors to trade in it. Cashmere Valley Bank stock is known as one of the region’s most tightly held. The bank has fewer than 500 known, registered shareholders, of which more than 450 are local or have local ties, Martin said. He and Jenny Cravens, the bank’s chief financial officer, estimate that total investors could number between 575 and 1,500. Only about one-quarter of the bank’s approximately 4 million in outstanding shares are in brokerage accounts. This means that it isn’t likely that a single investor could acquire large blocks of ownership in the bank yet, but Martin said that it could happen in the future, if more shareholders decide to sell. According to federal law, a bank is only required to divulge the names of shareholders who own 10 percent or more of total shares, he said, but no single shareholder currently comes close to owning that much, Martin said. Online trading is a big shift from the “old way” of investing, which often relied on Martin to put interested buyers in touch with sellers. The bank has also had a relationship for the past decade with a Portland-based brokerage firm McAdams Wright Ragen, which specializes in Northwest stocks, Martin said. The firm registered the stock online and is now one of five that are marketing the stock. “I’m excited because for the first time ever it’s going to be more accessible,” said Martin, who’s still available to facilitate stock transactions. He urges investors to use the over-the-counter markets to get the best price on their shares.

Governor’s Council seeks volunteers The Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council is seeking volunteers to fill open positions on the Governor-appointed council. Members would hold a three-year term, and can be reappointed to a second term. If appointed, the council covers all expenses, including travel to meetings, meals and lodging. The purpose of the council is to ensure that people with developmental disabilities receive the support,

treatment and other services necessary to help them reach goals. The council is specifically seeking volunteers who either have developmental disabilities or are family members of those who do to fill these positions. The application deadline is March 31. For more information, call Linda West at (360) 586-3572 or email her at linda.west@ ddc.wa.gov. Application information is also available at ddc.wa.gov.

Send us your legals! Deadline: Noon Tuesdays for Thursday’s publication.

legals@empire-press.com


6

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, March 3, 2011

JITterbugs

OBITUARIES DEVIN LEROY ATWOOD Devin LeRoy Atwood, 36, of Snohomish, died Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011. He was a previous resident of Rock Island. Survivors include his wife, Shanda Mae Atwood of Snohomish; his mother, Dorothy Jean Atwood of Yakima; his father, Dixon LeRoy Searles of Snohomish; his stepfather, Charles Reed Atwood of Mountain Home, Idaho; his brother, Kevin Lance Atwood of Yakima; and his sister, Carissa Jean Wolfe of Biloxi, Miss. A celebration of his life was held Feb. 27 in Snohomish. Arrangements were by Bauer Funeral Home, Snohomish.

Journalists In Training

The North Central “SPELL IT!” spelling bee BY KATJA WAHL Waterville sixth grader This year at the North Central “SPELL IT!” spelling bee, Waterville middle school student Kelsey Browning won the right to serve as this year’s alternate for the seventh grade regional spelling bee. Many students from Waterville Elementary and Middle School competed at this year’s bee. The competitors were: ◆ Fourth grade: Ali Mires, Cody DeShazer and Braylen Bromiley ◆ Fifth grade: Alyssa Hanson, Jacob Stibal and Will Osborne ◆ Sixth grade: Dillon McCullough, Katja Wahl and Haylee Newcomb Everyone did great, and good luck to Kelsey!

Meet Katja Hi! My name is Katja Wahl, I am in the 6th grade. I have loved writing all my life. When I heard that our school was having a school reporter job, I just had to apply. My dad worked at the Wenatchee World for about 10 years and was a communications professional for 20 years. I have learned a lot from him. Since this is my bio I thought you would like to know some things about me. OK, I absolutely love American Girl dolls. I have one Julie Alice Allbright. She is a historical character, and they are collectibles. I also love fashion. I have sewn many clothes for my dolls, but that’s just a start. I hope that soon I will have my own fashion line. Most people who design fashion have an inspiration source or a role model. Mine is Kittzykk. I don’t know her real name but we are good friends on YouTube. I also love to act. I have been involved in Missoula children’s theatre for many years. This year I hope to get a bigger role. Well that’s my bio; I hope you will like my articles in the weeks to come.

JUANITA V. (RINKER) JONES Juanita V. (Rinker) Jones, 78, of Chelan, died Friday, Feb. 11, 2011, in Renton. She was born in Douglas, and had lived in Waterville, Mansfield, Quincy, Othello, and the Greater Seattle area before moving to Chelan in 1995. Survivors include her children, Paula Cabunoc of Tukwila, Brian Jones of Renton, Bradlee G. Jones of Algona, Bruce R. Jones of Auburn. Memorial services will be held March 26 at 1 p.m., at the United Lutheran Church in Waterville.

DON SMITH

Police beat ■ CONTINUED from page 3 Bridgeport, burglary: 700 block of Columbia Avenue, door kicked in to caller’s residence; some clothing, 12 video games, two mp3 players, a camcorder, DVD player and an mp3 docking station were taken East Wenatchee, suspicious: 2800 block of Sunset Highway, caller observed a female hiding behind garbage cans; a deputy was unable to locate Bridgeport, harass/threat: Dezellem Hill Road, an individual made threats to kill the caller’s grandparents, case has been referred to the prosecutor

Feb. 26 Bridgeport Bar, burglary: Crane Orchard Road, someone attempted to force entry into a

garage door on a shop building, but did not get in, nothing missing East Wenatchee, recover stolen vehicle: McElmurry Lane N.E., black Ford F250 pickup stolen out of Yakima found parked Bridgeport, property: 1200 block of Columbia Avenue, caller reporting that she lost her cell phone, she believes at the library

Feb. 27 East Wenatchee, suspicious: 1700 block of 2nd Street N.E., caller has seen a male subject parking his car near her home, he acts as if he doesn’t want to be seen and leaves if he’s spotted; she believes it might be related to her pending divorce East Wenatchee, suspicious: 3200 Vine Street N.E., caller reporting a vehicle that is

Don Smith, 83, of East Wenatchee, died Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011. He was a longtime Wenatchee Valley continuously driving up and down the street; a and Orondo resident, where he was an deputy was unable to locate orchardist. Rock Island, disturbance: Cambridge Survivors include his wife, Myrna Avenue, argument between two adult females, one Smith of East Wenatchee; his children, of them broke a ceiling fan and a glass front door; Bill Smith and Ken Smith, both of East the victim declined pressing charges Wenatchee, Don Smith Jr. of Malaga, Feb. 28 Tom Smith of Three Lakes, Blake Smith East Wenatchee, malicious mischief: of Wenatchee and Liz Ann Rasmussen 1800 block of 4th Street S.E., someone ran over of Entiat; his brothers, Jarl Smith of caller’s mailbox Wichita, Kan., Corky Smith of Cave City, Rock Island, harass/threat: 5400 block Ariz.; and his sister, Maggie Philpot of of Penn Avenue, caller is receiving phone calls from Sulphur Springs, Ark. an unknown female who is attempting to locate Funeral services will be held at 3 someone; the harassing caller didn’t believe that p.m. Fridayw at Telford’s Chapel of the the reporting party didn’t know the person she was Valley in East Wenatchee. There will looking for; a deputy made contact and told caller be no1/18/11 visitation. to stop calling WB-lostfound-WA4x4.qxd:WB 4:21 PM Page 1

School lunch menu What’s cookin’? Mon March 7

Breakfast Lunch

Tue

March 8

Sausage, Breakfast biscuit, sandwich, fruit or juice, gravy, fruit milk or juice, milk Chicken burger, salad, tater tots, fruit, milk

Bean and cheese burrito, peaches, salad, milk

Time because of slow dial-up

Wed

Thurs March 10

March 11

Breakfast pizza, fruit or juice, milk

Bagels, fruit or juice, milk

Breakfast burrito, fruit or juice, milk

March 9

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6

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, March 10, 2011

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

Meet Jocelyn

Say hello to Alexis

By Jocelyn Kruger Waterville third grader

By Alexis Kruger Waterville fifth grader

Hello my name is Jocelyn Kruger. I am eight years old and in third grade. I go to Waterville Elementary school. The school created jobs to fit kids’ talents, and I got a reporter job. I would like to be a journalist when I grow up. I hope you like my articles.

Hello, I am Alexis Kruger and I am in the fifth grade at Waterville Elementary School District. I’m 10 years old and one of the three new reporters at Waterville Elementary. I enjoy it a lot. If you read one of the last papers, on the front cover and in the J.I.T.terbugs section, I was the one who wrote about “Hero Day”. My favorite thing about school is the classes. My favorite classes are P.E, Art, Music, Math, and Handwriting. I love to go outside and exercise with my friends, but I also like to sit back and relax with a good book. When I grow up I would like to be an actor and a writer.

Waterville students learning the value of work By Doug Flanagan In his book ‘The Leader in Me,’ renowned self-help author Stephen Covey writes about the most effective methods, in his opinion, of preparing children for their futures. Covey explains that the value of communication, cooperation, initiative, and unique, individual talent should be highly emphasized. After reading the book, Justin Grillo became inspired. Grillo, Waterville School’s third-grade teacher, knew that by using some of the principles outlined in Covey’s book, he could create a program that would help to enrich not only students’ learning experiences, but personal development. Earlier this year, Grillo spearheaded an effort to put some of Covey’s values into action at Waterville School with the implementation of a ‘student jobs’ program. “I’ve been interested in (Covey’s books) for a while, and one part of (‘The Leader in Me’) talks about how every student as a talent,” Grillo said. “Part of the (school’s) student council’s mission statement for this year states that ideas should be implemented to create opportunities that make the school a more exciting place to be, and I thought these creating these ‘jobs’ would be a great opportunity. “If a student can find his or her talent, they can feel more connected to the school and also become empowered when they understand there’s some value to their talents. They can make a difference in a positive way.” The program works fairly simply. Different types of ‘jobs’ are created, and if a student is interested in obtaining a position, he or she must go through a hiring process that really isn’t any different from the process an adult goes through for a ‘real’ job. The student must fill out an application, create and submit a resume, request a letter of recommendation, and interview with a hiring panel that consists of Grillo, Nelson and the school’s student

apply who council officers. had strong “We hire resumes and the people were really that we think excited about best fit those writing, so positions,” Grillo I said, ‘Let’s said. “We give have three them a chance reporters.’ It to go through depends on the the whole job.” progression.” Grillo said Nelson is that anybody pleased with the Photos provided can come up way the program Some of the students at Waterville School with a ‘job’ has blossomed with positions in the student jobs program. idea, but he recently. encourages “(The students to program) is submit their becoming very own ideas powerful,” she that match said. “There are their unique so many new talents, and jobs now, and he checks with kids are doing other teachers things and for ideas as participating in well. Currently, ways that they there are never used to do about a dozen in the everyday different routine of going positions. to school. The For example, amazing thing there’s a media about this is that specialist, who it’s not coming is in charge from the adults. of taking The students are pictures at taking ownership school events of it, and it taps and creating into what they’re slide shows interested in.” and using Of course, other forms of there can be technology at more than one applicant for a certain position, which town hall meetings. There are three reporters, who write about news means that some students will be events at the school and submit their rejected. But that can be a learning articles for publication in the Douglas experience as well, Grillo said. “We always encourage them to turn County Empire Press. The marketing specialist makes videos and updates out for another position,” he said. the school’s Facebook page. “We can tell they’re disappointed if There are also greeters, who lead they don’t get the job they want, but tours when guests come to the that’s life. That’s part of the process school; a couple of recess monitors; sometimes. I was worried about and an elementary office assistant. that at first, but there’s always the “The goal is to keep thinking about opportunities to add jobs. Originally talents that kids have to create space there was supposed to be just one for them to have an opportunity to reporter, but we had three people

use that talent at the school,” Grillo said. “It looks like (this project) will have an impact with the community, too. There’s an influence being spread with some of these jobs, especially with the reporters.” Most of the jobs are developed for students in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth grades. Grillo said the students with a ‘job’ perform their tasks when they have free time during the day to do so – before school, during recess, after school or during the evening from home. “The kids have the responsibility to take on these responsibilities,” he said. “It’s not like we’re telling them to get the job done or whatever. It’s their thing. They have to have the ability to be proactive and in charge of themselves.” Grillo said the students are excited about taking on the new responsibilities. “At first they didn’t really know what was going on, but now they really like it,” he said. “You can tell there’s a real sense of pride being felt by a student if he or she is selected. We put the student’s picture on a wall, and they wear badges that say their titles. It’s pretty neat. “What I like about it is the kids still have to take responsibilities after they’re selected. When they do it, they commit to it. The buy-in is much higher that way. We’re not just pushing kids into a position. They understand that they are talented and they can find a job that fits that talent.” Grillo said he’s eager to find out what direction the program will take in the future. “In the book, the school that implemented (a similar program) managed to find a position for every kid in school. I’m not sure how that would shake out,” he said with a laugh. “The main thing I want them to understand is that they have talents that are unique to them, and they can use those talents to better the community, themselves and those around them.”


The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, March 10, 2011

7

Spring surprise

Karen Larsen photos

On the morning of March 5, Waterville woke up to an unexpected coating of spring snow.

More community news

Robber sentenced to 12 months W A former bar manager who pleaded guilty to a Wenatchee robbery and an East Wenatchee attempted robbery was sentenced March 2 to 12 months in prison. The term given to Robert C. Beers, 40, by Chelan County Superior Court Judge T.W. “Chip” Small runs concurrently with a fourmonth sentence handed down Feb. 28 in Douglas County court. Beers, formerly bar manager at the Wenatchee Roaster & Ale House, pleaded guilty in Douglas County to trying to rob the East Wenatchee Fred Meyer store Dec. 19, and in Chelan County to demanding and receiving money from a salesperson at the Wenatchee Walgreens store half an hour later. He was also carrying a tablet of the sedative clonazepam when arrested, and pleaded guilty to a charge of unlawful narcotics possession. “Long and short of it, I had a nervous breakdown and made some foolish mistakes,” Beers told the judge. In court Wednesday, Beers’ attorney Keith Howard said prior to the crimes his client had undergone two painful hip replacements, a divorce, depression and the loss of the job he’d held for seven years.

He became dependent on pain medication, and later began using methamphetamine. And a DUI crash five days before the robberies left him in a neck brace. The note he gave to a Fred Meyer clerk demanding money was so badly scrawled the clerk couldn’t make it out, and Beers left the store without taking anything. At the Wenatchee Walgreens, he demanded and received money from the till. He cooperated with police and has been held in the Chelan County Regional Justice Center since his arrest. In court, Chelan County Deputy Prosecutor Doug Shae said Wenatchee Police Detective Jeff Ward told him that “Mr. Beers was probably the nicest person he ever arrested.” The 12-month sentence for second-degree robbery runs concurrently with a six-month Chelan County sentence for the narcotics possession charge. Beers will receive credit for time served in jail. Small wished Beers good luck in maintaining his sobriety. “You’ve just been through a heck of a lot,” the judge said, “but hopefully that means you can come through and be even stronger.”

Soroptimists host Apple Blossom royalty W Soroptimist of Wenatchee will host the Washington State Apple Blossom Festival royalty with a tea at noon on Thursday, March 17, at the Wild Huckleberry Restaurant, 302 S. Mission St. in Wenatchee. Reservations are required by March 14. Soroptimist of Wenatchee has a long history with the Apple Blossom royalty dating back to the 1930s when they started the tradition of designing a crown for the queen. Jewels for the crown were provided by members. They continued to support the Apple Blossom Festival in the 1960s by presenting the queens with velvet capes made by members. In the 1990s, they donated the gloves worn by the royalty and today a donation is given towards the purchase of their jewelry. The organization has received the Lehman Johnson award for its support of the royalty throughout the years. For more information, call Geneva McCoy Jardine at 884-6043.

Send us your legals! Deadline: Noon Tuesdays for Thursday’s publication.

legals@empire-press.com


6

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, March 17, 2011

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

Teacher wins Champion Award By Jocelyn Kruger Waterville third-grader Lynn Chambers, secondgrade teacher at Waterville Elementary, won the Numerica Credit Union’s School Champion Award for February. The award was presented at a Town Hall Lynn meeting. Chambers Chambers said, “It was a big surprise, because I didn’t know anything about it.” Alexandria Poppie turned Alexandria in an application about Poppie Chambers, nominating her. Poppie received $25, while Chambers was given a bag of goodies and a plaque.

Mon

March 21

D.C. trip in the planning stages By Alexis Kruger Waterville fifth grader

n CONTINUED from page 3 noticed a small fire in a nearby orchard; a deputy discovered a checkbook and some other items that had been reported stolen from Wenatchee, investigation is ongoing Waterville, suspicious: E. Locust Street, Post Office, report of juveniles hanging out in the post office, a deputy made contact, they’re just sitting there talking, not doing anything wrong

March 12 East Wenatchee, theft: S. Witte Avenue and 8th Street S.E., report of some kids taking caller’s firewood; she yelled at the kids and they put the wood back; a deputy contacted the childrens’ parents and the dispute is settled Rock Island, suspicious: 1700 block of Center Street, caller reporting someone moving things out of a house; a deputy made contact, and the owners are just moving out Bridgeport, theft: 1000 block of Douglas Avenue, two puppies taken from caller’s yard on March 8; caller saw the puppies in the community and reported it, both puppies were located and returned East Wenatchee, malicious mischief: 600 block of N. Lyle Avenue, resident struck with about six paint balls, not known who shot them Bridgeport, suspicious: 300 block of 22nd Street, caller reporting someone parked at the apartment complex she owns; when he saw the caller looking at him, he drove away

March 13

On Feb. 24 at 7:30 p.m., the parents of Waterville’s fifth through eighth grade students met in Tabitha Mires’ classroom at Waterville Elementary, to discus the Washington D.C trip planned for 2013. Mires explained where the kids would be going, stopping, eating, visiting, and when the kids would leave and get home. She said this time the kids would have to raise about $2,000 to go on the trip. Mires had some fundraisers already planned, but she still needed ideas to get money. The last time the school went the kids had a blast. Everyone is so excited.

What’s cookin’? Tue Wed Thurs

Police beat

East Wenatchee, suspicious: 2300 Canyon Hills Drive, caller reporting that the neighbors aren’t home, a window appeared to be open; a deputy checked the house and it’s secure

March 14 East Wenatchee, malicious mischief: 2300 block of Herndon Drive, someone threw some nails in the caller’s driveway, no damage done East Wenatchee, theft: 600 block of S. Lyle Avenue, someone stole a 20-inch bicycle from the caller’s carport East Wenatchee, vehicle prowl: 1700 block of 4th Street S.E., roofing tools taken out of the back of the caller’s pickup truck sometime between March 12 and 14 Bridgeport Bar, harass/threat: 200 block of Edson Street, caller is getting some phone calls that are for someone else and he wants them to stop; a deputy made contact to inform them of the wrong number and to ask them to stop calling East Wenatchee, suspicious: 2000 block of Valley View Blvd., caller reporting that they can hear a man yelling in the area; a deputy made contact and someone had knocked over the man’s garbage can and he was upset

Fri

March 22

March 23

March 24

March 25

Breakfast

Breakfast pizza, fruit or juice

Sausage, biscuit, gravy, fruit or juice

Spring Filter Sale

Breakfast on a stick, fruit or juice

Breakfast burrito, fruit or juice

Breakfast sandwich, fruit or juice

Sale Ends March 31, 2011

Lunch

Corndogs, french fries, salad, peaches

Spaghetti, garlic bread, corn, fruit

Beef burritos, salad, peaches

Chicken parmesan, corn, fruit

Pizza, carrot sticks, fruit, brownie

Top Quality Filters at Spectacular Savings

15% Off

Milk is served with all meals. A $25.00 fee will be charged on all returned checks. Menus are subject to change without notice. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Badger Mountain Ski Hill has closed for the season. Ski Hill management thanks all the helpers, lift operators, hosts, the Lion’s Club members, and skiers who came out to enjoy the snow. See you next year!

Box 548 Othello, WA 99344 (509) 488-5222

1429 Pioneer Way Moses Lake, WA 98837 (509) 765-0988

Box 969 Coulee City, WA 99115 (509) 632-5547

803 West 1st Ritzville, WA 99169 (509) 659-0510

www.eiijd.com


The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, March 17, 2011

7

AP photos

Left: A young Japanese survivor of the earthquake and tsunami searches her family home for any belongings she can find in the leveled city of Minamisanriku, in northeastern Japan. Above: A man shops in a convenience store where shelves on food aisles are left empty in Ofunato, Japan.

Quake: Aftermath shakes island nation to the core n CONTINUED from page 1 “Fortunately, due to where we were at the time of the earthquake, we were not in any immediate danger,” VanWinkle wrote. “It’s hard to explain the level of devastation that has taken place here. (There’s been) a huge loss of human life and thousands of displaced people. We just hope that they can find everyone still waiting to be rescued, and I’m feeling very thankful that all my family and friends are safe.” VanWinkle stayed in his office after the quake hit. He couldn’t get through to Nobuko on his cell phone, but he was finally able to make contact with her on a landline. Nobuko and their children, as well at the teachers in the school at the time, hid under desks in the classroom as books and other items began to fall off the shelves around them. After the shaking had subsided, they went to a park next to the school, where they waited for things to settle down. They were able to return to their home in Saitama-city, Saitame prefecture, shortly thereafter.

Meanwhile, VanWinkle had begun to find his way home. After the quake hit, all train service was immediately suspended, and the streets were filled with traffic and people walking home or trying to get a taxi. Some of VanWinkle’s coworkers who couldn’t get home were allowed to stay the night in the office building, but VanWinkle went out at around 7 p.m. to try to get a taxi. His attempts to do so failed, so he returned to the office. At about 1 a.m., some subway lines had resumed service, so he took a subway from his office in Tsukiji to Shinjuku station, hoping to take a taxi from there. The station was filled with hundreds of people waiting for train service to resume. VanWinkle caught a taxi at about 3 a.m. and returned home by 6 a.m. “The trip home was three hours longer than normal due to the traffic,” he wrote. VanWinkle wrote that as of Saturday morning (Japan time), the area was still experiencing aftershocks.

“Earlier this morning, there was another magnitude-4 quake centered in Ibaragi prefecture, which shook our house pretty good,” he wrote. “There have been small aftershocks occurring at 10- to 30-minute intervals all day yesterday and today. “Basically, we are staying indoors. We have clothes, food, water and other items packed in backpacks by the door in case we have to evacuate our house. “Also, there was an explosion at a nuclear power facility in Fukushima prefecture, apparently a result of damage by the quake. “The government is evacuating people living in a 20-kilometer radius of the facility. “Currently, there have been reports that people in Fukushima, a group of people evacuating damaged areas in a bus, and about 150 people who were or are awaiting rescue help in a hospital have been exposed to nuclear radiation. “The situation is currently being evaluated, but this is also obviously a concern for us, although are living approximately 300 kilometers away. “Right now all we can do is watch the news to see how things develop.”

VanWinkle is the son of Orondo residents Jerry and Yvonne VanWinkle, who are teachers at Waterville School. He has lived in Japan for the past eight years and works for a Japanese advertising/marketing company. On Tuesday, Yvonne told the Empire Press that Jason, Nobuko and their children are currently staying with Nobuko’s parents. “What a tremendous relief we felt when we learned that he was at home with his family,” Yvonne said. “We have been talking with Jason about whether or not he should come ‘home.’ I use quotation marks because Jason’s home is really in Japan now. “Jason is able to work from home, so he and his wife and children are all together. We know Jason’s Japanese family — they are such wonderful, loving people — and we are comforted in knowing that Jason and his family are with them. “We have realized, since Jason moved to Japan, that his generation is truly an international one. “We will rest much easier when all the threat of radiation is past. Until then, thank goodness for the internet.”

Project: Past food production documented n CONTINUED from page 1 As a part of a tour of regional libraries, Warner showed a 12-minute version of the video to a group of interested people at Waterville Library March 8. She told the group that she was trying to give them a sense of what the video would be like, and trying to seek feedback for what topics are most engaging, and what might be some additional topics that could be addressed in the video. The video is made up of narratives of older people describing the ways that they remember family and community food production in their childhoods. It is accompanied by photos that have been scanned from existing collections as well as some

photos that have already been collected from community members. These photos are carefully handled, scanned, and returned to the family or person who owns them. Additional interviews for the video will be conducted in April and May, some of them by Warner and others by those cooperating on the project, such as members of the Douglas Community Historical Society. Some of the voices will bring the narrative up to today, showing trends that are helping to strengthen the region’s food system. Warner said the ending of the video would feature voices of children talking about their involvement in food production through school gardens, hunting and fishing trips or raising animals.

The video will include voices and photos of cultural groups prominent in this area, like Hispanics and local Indian tribes, in their native languages if possible. In addition to the story of helping to feed ourselves, Warner said she hopes the film will tell something of the story of how communities have worked together and reached out to members in need. Warner is currently working to put together an editing team, which will include students from Wenatchee Valley Technical Skills Center, as well as some high school students. Local musicians will be brought together to create original music for the soundtrack. Warner said that the final video will be shown for the first time at the NCW Community Success Summit to be held November 16.

She hopes the video can lead to actions that will help strengthen our regional food system. All photos and interviews that become a part of the project will be archived, even if some do not become part of the entire video. In this way, the stories they tell will be available for other uses. The video seen by those who attended Tuesday’s program is also available online at http:// gatheringourvoice.org/ foodways-byways/. Warner is working together with the library system to hold an event in which photos can be directly scanned and returned to their owners. Those who are interested in learning more about the project are invited to contact Warner at 881-1812 or through the web-site at irisncw.org.


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Community

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 7, 2011

Community Calendar

Community news

Your connection to events from Friday through April 14

Friday Community ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10:30

a.m., for kids and families, East Wenatchee Library, 271 9th St. N.E., East Wenatchee, 886-7404 ◆◆YWCA Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser: 5 to 8 p.m., Café AZ’s, 212 First St., Wenatchee, 430-3714

Government ◆◆Bridgeport Brush Collection: 3 to 4 p.m., continues 9 a.m. Saturday until dumpster is full, 1013 Jefferson Ave., Bridgeport, 686-4041

Saturday Community ◆◆Douglas County 4-H

Fundraiser: 5:30 p.m., NCW Fairgrounds, 667-6540

Monday Community ◆◆Rock Island Food Bank: 9:30 to

11 a.m., 1 Freemont, 662-6156 ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10 a.m., Waterville Library, 105 N. Chelan St., 745-8354

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and locations vary, 745-8537 ◆◆Douglas County PUD: 1:30 p.m., Bridgeport office, 884-7191

Schools ◆◆Eastmont School Board: 5:30 p.m., Cascade Elementary, East Wenatchee, 884-7169

Tuesday Community ◆◆Port of Douglas: 8:30 a.m., 3306 Fifth St. S.E., East Wenatchee, 884-4700 ◆◆Chelan Food Bank: 8:30 to 10 a.m., 200 Gala St., 662-6156 ◆◆Child Support Workshop for Employers: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Division of Child Support office, 515 Grant Road, East Wenatchee, (360) 664-5043 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and locations vary, 745-8537

◆◆Port of Douglas County: 8:30 a.m., 3306 5th St. S.E., East Wenatchee, 884-4700 ◆◆Douglas County Sewer District No. 1: 8:30 a.m., 692 N. Eastmont Ave., East Wenatchee, 884-2484 ◆◆East Wenatchee City Council: 6:30 p.m., City Hall, 884-9515 ◆◆Mansfield City Council: 7 p.m., City Hall, 683-1112

Wednesday Community ◆◆Storytime: 10 a.m., toddlers through early grade levels, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆NCW Resource Conservation and Development Council: 10:20 a.m., 232 E. Wapato, Chelan, 422-2750 x 128 ◆◆Broad Readers Women’s Book Club: 7 p.m., Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission:

Time and place vary, 745-8537 ◆◆RiverCom Board: 9 a.m., 129 S. Chelan Ave., Wenatchee, 662-4650 ◆◆NCW Economic Development District: 9 a.m., 232 E. Wapato St., Chelan, 665-6907 ◆◆Douglas County Fire District No. 2 Commission: 5 p.m., 377 N. Eastmont Ave., 884-6671 ◆◆Douglas County Regional Planning Commission: 5:30 p.m., 140 N.W. 19th St., East Wenatchee, 884-7173 ◆◆Bridgeport City Council: 7 p.m., City Hall, 686-4041

Thursday Community ◆◆Bridgeport Food Bank: 1 to

2:30 p.m., 1300 Foster Rd., 662-6156 ◆◆North Central Regional Library Board of Trustees: 1 p.m., 16 N. Columbia St., Wenatchee, 663-1117, ncrl.org ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆Friends of the Library: 6 p.m., Bridgeport Library, 1206 Columbia Ave., 686-7281

Bridgeport

Brush collection event this weekend The City of Bridgeport, in collaboration with Zippy Disposal, is hosting a free brush collection at the City Shop at 1013 Jefferson Ave. The dumpster will be open for your household brush that is smaller than three inches in diameter on Friday from 3 to 4 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. until the dumpster is filled. No garbage bags, garbage, commercial or orchard brush will be accepted. Proof of residence within Bridgeport city limits will be required. For more information, call 686-4041.

Passenger bails out in high-speed pursuit In the middle of a highspeed chase April 1, a passenger in the fleeing car bailed out, struck his head and rolled along the street. The passenger, Julian H. Rodriguez, 25, of Union Gap, suffered a possible skull fracture and hip injuries, said Harvey Gjesdal, Douglas County sheriff. Rodriguez was taken by ambulance to Central Washington Hospital. A hospital spokeswoman said the following morning that he was discharged after treatment. When Rodriguez left the car, it was traveling 35 and 40 mph, Gjesdal said. The pursuit began about 10 a.m. when a sheriff’s deputy began chasing a speeding Ford Explorer westbound on Rock Island Road, Gjesdal said. The car at one point was going 85 mph. The passenger bailed near North Mary Avenue off Grant Road. One deputy stayed with the passenger while another stopped the driver, 24, in the 700 block of Gale Avenue. The driver was arrested on suspicion of driving while his license was suspended, suspicion of possessing drug paraphernalia and with eluding a police officer.

CASA invites bowlers to fundraising event Bowlers are invited to sign up for the annual Rock ‘n’ Rowl for Kids bowl-a-thon. Bowling will take place from noon to 8 p.m. April 16 at Eastmont Lanes, 704 Grant Road. Chelan-Douglas CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) sponsors the fundraiser, with proceeds used to recruit and train new advocates for abused and neglected children in the two-county area. Bowlers should put together a team of five players — families and children are welcome — and collect donations in advance. Each team bowls for one hour. Bowlers who collect at least $50 in donations will receive a free T-shirt. For more information or to register, call 662-7350 or email arleneg@nwi.net.

Easter egg hunt April 17 The City of East Wenatchee and Fred Meyer are hosting a community Easter egg hunt April 17 at Eastmont Community Park for kids up to age 10. The event begins at 2 p.m., and will go either until 4 p.m. or when the eggs run out, whichever comes first. Tickets cost $1 each, and each ticket is good for five eggs. Face painting, mini pumper truck rides and goodie bags will be available at no cost. Kids can also have their photos taken with the Easter Bunny for $2. For more information, call 886-6108 or visit eastwenatchee.com.

Pangborn gets ready for new parking plan Is parking a pain at Pangborn? Relief is on the way. Beginning May 1, a betterdesigned parking system complete with numbered spaces, improved security and self-pay kiosks that accept credit cards could be in full operation at Pangborn Memorial Airport’s 300-car lot.

“We’re aiming to make parking more convenient for the traveler,” said airport director Greg Phillips. “This has been a long time coming.” Seattle-based Republic Parking will run the new lot operation. Republic manages 350 parking facilities in 90 cities across North America, Latin America and Europe. The company has more than 70 airport contracts in the U.S. alone. Republic was tops last fall in a bid-review process that drew interest from 16 firms, said the airport director. Phillips said past parking concerns have included unclear signs about how and where to park, confusion over how and where to pay and security for cars left for a night or a week. For years, the facility has operated on an honor system that asked travelers to pre-pay using envelopes and drop boxes. Republic will number and repaint parking space lines and, in some places, slightly reconfigure spaces to make finding a slot easier. They’ll install self-pay kiosks that accept cash, credit and debit cards. The kiosks will also be protected from the weather and located at the airport’s three entrances. Republic employees will patrol the lot and be available to answer questions. Parking fees will not change. The first two hours are still free, said Phillips, and then $6 for a 24-hour period. But travelers’ convenience is only part of the payoff with the new parking system, added Phillips. “It’ll also improve collections — make sure everyone has paid — and bring more revenue for the airport.” Estimated receipts will depend on the number of travelers and their length of stay. The airport’s parking lot rarely fills up, even during busy holiday periods. “But it comes close,” said Phillips, “as more people decide to fly.”

CHURCH DIRECTORY Waterville Federated Church Corner of Columbia & ash • 745-8785

Pastors Daniel & sheila miranda Sunday School 10 am • Worship 11 am Pastor Daniel’s sermon series on Satan is entitled

United St. Joseph Catholic Church Lutheran Church 101 E. PoPlar, WatErvillE 745-8205

“Know Your Enemy.”

Thursday, April 21 7 p.m. maundy Thursday service

Sunday, April 24 9 a.m. brunch 10:30 a.m. easter Worship & Cantata

Nursery care provided for children 5 and under

sermons online at www.watervillefederated.com “Many churches made ONE in Christ Jesus”

Sunday Mass................. 10 a.m. Confessions..................... 9 a.m.

Reverend Gary Norman

662-4569

Waterville Chelan and Walnut 745-8655

Pastor James M. Robinson Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School during worship *Sunday School is Sept.-May

Come worship the risen Christ! We are a Bible believing fellowship affiliated with Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ

Good Friday Worship Services:

April 22nd 12 O’clock noon: Community Worship St. Joseph Catholic Church Federated Church at United Lutheran Church

************************************

United Lutheran Church Traditional Good Friday Service 7 PM ************************************

Easter Worship April 24th 10 AM


Corner

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 7, 2011

College life

Community news Douglas county

Feds award local agencies U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has awarded “Partners in Conservation Awards” to the region’s three PUDs and 21 other regional or state agencies. The award recognizes excellence in meeting natural resource conservation goals in collaboration with others in 2010. This includes protecting wildlife, restoring watersheds and conserving water. Among the recipients: The Chelan, Douglas and Grant County PUDs, along with Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Yakama Nation and the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board. The awards were announced in December. Randy Smith, president of the Chelan PUD board, received the award March 28, because PUD officals weren’t able to attend an awards ceremony.

Wenatchee

Police find escaped inmate in bathroom A 20-year-old Malaga man who ran away from jail March 15 was arrested March 26. Roman M. Shrader was found hiding in the bathroom of an apartment in the 1100 block of Fifth Street, said Cpl. Guy Miner, a spokesman with the Wenatchee Police Department. Police received an anonymous call that day saying Shrader was at that residence. He was arrested without incident and was booked into the Chelan County Regional Justice Center on suspicion of second-degree escape. Shrader, who was classified to work as part of a minimum-security crew, ran away while he and three other minimumsecurity inmates were taking garbage to a dumpster in the county parking lot. Shrader had been serving

time for driving while his license was suspended and possession of marijuana less than 40 grams. He had been scheduled for release June 4.

Three arrested on gun charges Wenatchee police say they confiscated three pistols April 1 from three young Wenatchee men who were not legally allowed to possess them. “We got three guns out of bad hands,” said Sgt. Stephyne Silvestre, a spokeswoman for the department. Three officers with the department’s Special Services Division stopped to talk to the three men after one officer recognized one of them as being in a gang, she said. Officers saw the men making nervous hand movements and asked if they were armed. They arrested the men without incident about 10 p.m. near the intersection of Russell and Ferry streets. Two of the men, ages 18 and 20, were arrested on suspicion of being in possession of a pistol while being under age 21. The 20-year-old also was arrested on suspicion of being in possession of a stolen firearm. A 23-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Renaissance Faire returns for fourth year The fourth annual Wenatchee Renaissance Faire is set for April 16 and 17 at the Wenatchee Valley College campus. Festivities will kick off with the opening of Merchants Row at 10 a.m. Entertainment is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. with singers, dancers, storytellers, musicians, and actors. Other events will feature face and shield painting, workshops, demonstrations and games. Cost to attend is free for children five and under,

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and for WVC students with a student ID; $7 for adults and $5 for children for a single-day pass, or $12 for adults and $8 for children for both days. For more information, visit their website at wenrenfaire. com.

Students qualify for tournament A pair of Wenatchee High School students have qualified to compete at the National Speech and Debate Tournament June 13-18 in Dallas, Texas. Anna Dye qualified in the international extemporaneous category and Colton Smith qualified in the domestic extemporaneous category. Holly Thorpe is firstalternate in the original oratory category.

Knowledge Bowl students place at state The Wenatchee High School Knowledge Bowl team placed sixth recently at the state tournament in the Tri-Cities. Team members are Alan Bucknum, Casey Harrison, Mikael Hernandez, Karsten Lorentz, Ballad Pitts and Sean Richards.

Wenatchee

YWCA hosting spaghetti dinner

HOURS:

Monday-Thursday 8:30am to 4:30pm Friday 8:30am to Noon

745-8461

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Carol D. Cowling C.P.A

•Taxes •Bookkeeping •Individual & Business 745-8121

206 N. CHELAN • WATERVILLE

Whitworth University Merrill Merchant of East Wenatchee recently earned a bachelor’s degree in music with summa cum laude honors from Whitworth University.

Wenatchee Valley College The Eta Rho chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society at Wenatchee Valley College recently elected officers and inducted 56 members. Phi Theta Kappa is a society of honor students for two-year colleges. Officers: Anna James Miller, president; Patrick Deskin, vice president of leadership; Graciela Verduzco, vice president of membership; Melinda Irwin, vice president of service; Casey Phillips, vice president of scholarship; Ron Lockman, treasurer; Nicholas Spindle, recording officer; and Sand France, vice president of communications and activities counsel representative. Inductees: Kelli Newell, Chase Lemons, Natalie

Barker, Tyler O’Reilly, Tricia Cleek, Emily Williams, Nicole Brenay, Brittney Lamb, Edward Aguigui, Annette Aguigui, Crystal Hughes, Nour Weintraub, Fernando Vazquez, Merrick Pickett, Margee Laney, Donald Voss, Michelle Hashberger, Janelle Davies, Richard Usher, Diana Fernandez, Robin Inman, Hillary Mong, Jacqueline Hernandez, Diana Sanchez, Eric Spurbeck, Alyssa West, Mariah Hamilton, Richard Davidter, Celeste Beaty, Chelsea Beaty, Kaitlin Parsons, Ashley Lowers, Laura Johnson, Nicole Aitken, Kaili Reavely, Samantha Reynoso, Katie Carroll, Aleina Wachtel, Mathew Troxler, Shelby Schmid, Ana Mendivil, Daria Ursol, Brian Wood, Marcia Stone, Caden Stockwell, Julia Bassett, Amy Aguigui, Theresa Bindley, Alyssa Goodrich, Laura Whitney, Mathias Jackson, Alyssay Mena, Shenae Gavin, Ladonna McGrew-Kramer, Phillip Smith and Allison Bakke

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

The Wenatchee Valley YWCA is hosting a spaghetti dinner fundraiser Friday at Café AZ’s from 5 to 8 p.m. Cost for the event is $12 per person and $20 per couple. Spaghetti, salad, garlic bread, iced tea and coffee will be served. Desserts and other beverages will be available at an additional cost. The café is located at 212 First St. in Wenatchee, in the lower level of the YWCA building at the corner of First and Chelan Streets. Proceeds benefit the YWCA Job Training Program. For more information or to make a reservation, call 4303714.

USINESS

Waterville Clinic & Ambulance

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Tips from the music teacher By Alexis Kruger Waterville fifth-grader On Feb. 28th, I met up with Waterville School’s music teacher, Mr. Chisholm, to talk about his choir. He says he enjoys leading the group. He also gave me some tips on music leading. “Only do music you love. If you don’t like the music, neither will the children,” he said. “If the group doesn’t like the song, you can see it in their performance.” Chisholm also pointed out, “All the kids hate the song when they’re learning it.”

IRECTORY

Telford’s Chapel of the Valley funeral Directors Rick D. Phillips George Norris Russell H. Edwards

Gaylen GaylenWillett Willett I NI NSDUE PREA NCE NDENT

Health Insurance Agent/Producer Health Insurance Agent / Producer

711 Grant roaD, east Wenatchee

884-3561 • www.telfordschapel.com

Authorized offer: Affiliatedto with: The Insurance Store Inc. • Senior Services of NCW Medicare • Supplements • AARP • BlueInsurance Cross Mutual of Omaha Medicare Advantage Plans • Cancer Care • Critical Care

Serving North Central Washington from One Location

Cell (509) 679-4619 Fax (509) 682-4617

CELL (509) 679-4619

FAX (509) 682-4617


4

Community

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 14, 2011

Community Calendar

Community news

Your connection to events from Friday through April 21

Friday Community ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10:30

a.m., for kids and families, East Wenatchee Library, 271 9th St. N.E., East Wenatchee, 886-7404 ◆◆Mansfield Food Bank: 11 a.m. to noon, behind the Mansfield Senior Center, 662-6156 ◆◆Waterville School Carnival: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., 745-8585

Saturday Community ◆◆Kids Arts Day: 10 a.m. to 4

p.m., Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center, 127 S. Mission St., 888-6240 or wvmcc.org ◆◆Wenatchee Renaissance Faire: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., continues Sunday, WVC campus, 1300 Fifth St., Wenatchee, 682-6865 or wenrenfaire.com ◆◆Kiwanis of Chelan-Douglas Counties Senior Celebration: 11:30 a.m., Wenatchee Valley Senior Activity Center, 662-7036

Government ◆◆Douglas County Republican

Party Banquet and Auction: Private reception with AG Rob McKenna, 5 p.m., Wenatchee Valley Golf and Country Club, 1600 Country Club Drive, East Wenatchee; Auction and dinner, 6 to 9 p.m., Wildcard banquet room at Kegler’s Casino, 560 Valley Mall Parkway, East Wenatchee, 884-3314 or 884-9545

Sunday Community ◆◆Fred Meyer Easter Egg Hunt:

2 to 4 p.m., Eastmont Community Park, East Wenatchee, 886-6108 or east-wenatchee.com

Monday Community ◆◆Rock Island Food Bank:

9:30 to 11 a.m., 1 Freemont, 662-6156 ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10 a.m., Waterville Library, 105 N. Chelan St., 745-8354

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and place varies, 745-8537

◆◆Douglas County PUD: 2 p.m., 1151 Valley Mall Parkway, East Wenatchee, 884-7191 ◆◆Chelan-Douglas Health District Board: 4 p.m., 200 Valley Mall Parkway, 886-6400 ◆◆Eastmont Metropolitan Park District: 6:30 p.m., Eastmont Jr. High School library, 884-8015 ◆◆Waterville City Council: 7:30 p.m., City Hall, 745-8871

Tuesday Community ◆◆Chelan Food Bank: 8:30 to

10 a.m., 200 Gala St., Chelan, 662-6156 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and place varies, 745-8537

Schools ◆◆Rock Island Elementary Blue

Ribbon Award Celebration: 6:30 p.m., Rock Island school gym, 884-5023

Wednesday Community ◆◆Storytime: 10 a.m., toddlers through early grade levels, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆Douglas County Civil Service: 10 a.m., 377 Eastmont Ave., East Wenatchee, 884-6965 ◆◆Storytime: 11:30 a.m., Bridgeport Library, 1206 Columbia Ave., 686-7281

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and place varies, 745-8537 ◆◆East Wenatchee Water District: 3 p.m., district office, 692 N. Eastmont Ave., East Wenatchee, 884-3569 ◆◆Brewster City Council: 6 p.m., City Hall, 689-3464

Thursday Community ◆◆Waterville Food Bank: 2:30

to 4 p.m., Senior Center, 413 S. Central, Waterville, 745-8237 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

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Seattle

Waterville teen still satisfactory A Waterville teenager who was airlifted to Seattle after an April 5 accident is still in satisfactory condition at Harborview Medical Center, a hospital spokeswoman said. David B. Miranda drove off Highway 97 about 14 miles north of Ellensburg and hit a tree, according to the Washington State Patrol. He was driving north at a high rate of speed at about 9:35 p.m., the agency reported. He was airlifted to Seattle with internal injuries.

Olympia

Student serves as page in Olympia Vivian Guzman, a Bridgeport High School sophomore, recently served as a page in the state Senate page program. She was sponsored by Sen. Vivian Linda Evans Guzman Parlette, R-Wenatchee. Guzman is the daughter of Carmen Guzman of Bridgeport.

Malaga

Malaga man killed in motorcycle crash A 38-year-old Malaga man was found dead near his wrecked motorcycle on the West Malaga Road early Sunday. A jogger discovered the body of Bryan E. Hageman near Shaw Road at about 6:30 a.m. The jogger called 911 and then began CPR, but could not revive him, said Chelan County Sheriff’s Sgt. Bruce Long. Hageman was pronounced dead at the scene. Long said deputies investigating the crash spoke to some of Hageman’s friends, and discovered he left a party in Wenatchee

USINESS

Waterville Clinic & Ambulance HOURS:

Monday-Thursday 8:30am to 4:30pm Friday 8:30am to Noon

745-8461

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Carol D. Cowling C.P.A

•Taxes •Bookkeeping •Individual & Business 745-8121

206 N. CHELAN • WATERVILLE

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between 4 and 4:30 a.m., so may have crashed his motorcycle up to two hours before he was discovered. The cause of the accident is still under investigation.

East Wenatchee

Community garden plots available Celebration Lutheran Church, 801 8th St. N.E., is leasing community garden plots for the entire season. Cost for a 9-by-17-foot plot is $15 or $25 for a 9-by-35-foot plot. For more information, call 884-3817.

Child car seat checks available through April In an effort to cut down vehicle accident injuries to children, the Washington Traffic Safety Commission is sponsoring free child car seat checks from 2 to 6 p.m. each Tuesday through April at the Douglas County Fire District station, 377 Eastmont Ave. The checks are by appointment only. Call 8846671 to schedule a time. Washington law requires that children be secured in an appropriate car seat or booster seat until they are 4 feet, 9 inches or taller and weigh more than 40 pounds. Children under age 2 should be in a rear-facing car seat. Children under age 13 should ride in the back seat of a vehicle when practical. Extra patrols in Chelan and Douglas counties will be looking for car seat violations this month.

Wellness Place gala set for April 16 Wellness Place of Wenatchee has planned a gala dinner from 6 to 8 p.m. April 16 at the Wenatchee Golf & Country Club, 1600 Country Club Drive. The event includes a buffet dinner and a no-host bar. Cost is $50 per person. Proceeds benefit Wellness Place. Dr. David Weber, retired chief executive officer from Wenatchee Valley Medical Center, will be the featured speaker.

During the event, Volunteer of the Year Wendy Skalisky will be honored for her work with the organization. Reservations are required. For more information and to RSVP, call 888-9933.

Authorities don’t plan to pursue charges Local prosecutors say they won’t put former Wenatchee resident Jason Bush on trial for two local murders anytime soon. “I don’t want to say we won’t, but that’s not anything we’re looking at anytime in the near future,” said Doug Shae, a deputy prosecutor in Chelan County. Jurors in Tucson, Ariz., sentenced Bush to death April 6 in the May 2009 killings of Raul Junior Flores, 29, and his 9-year-old daughter, Brisenia Flores, 9. “I have not discussed it with the authorities in Arizona but, I think they would be fairly reluctant to have Mr. Bush removed from their jurisdiction,” said Douglas County Prosecutor Steve Clem. In the Chelan County case, Bush is accused of stabbing Hector Lopez Partida, 29, seven times while Lopez was sleeping near the 700 block of South Wenatchee Avenue in July 1997. Bush is charged with second-degree murder in Lopez’s death. In the Douglas County case, Bush is accused of first-degree murder in the shooting death of Jonathan Bumstead, 18, of East Wenatchee, in the Palisades area in September 1997. Bumstead’s mother, Freda Bumstead of East Wenatchee, said last week she can accept that Bush likely will not stand trial locally for her son’s death but the situation is still hard to deal with. “You won’t understand unless you walk in our shoes, but it’s not going to bring Jonathan back, or anybody else that he killed,” she said. “There is always that missing feeling that will always go on.”

IRECTORY

Telford’s Chapel of the Valley funeral Directors Rick D. Phillips George Norris Russell H. Edwards

Gaylen GaylenWillett Willett I NI NSDUE PREA NCE NDENT

Health Insurance Agent/Producer Health Insurance Agent / Producer

711 Grant roaD, east Wenatchee

884-3561 • www.telfordschapel.com

Authorized offer: Affiliatedto with: The Insurance Store Inc. • Senior Services of NCW Medicare • Supplements • AARP • BlueInsurance Cross Mutual of Omaha Medicare Advantage Plans • Cancer Care • Critical Care

Serving North Central Washington from One Location

Cell (509) 679-4619 Fax (509) 682-4617

CELL (509) 679-4619

FAX (509) 682-4617


CoRnER

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 14, 2011

Community news Wenatchee Valley

Celebrate Arbor Day with tree giveaways The Greater Wenatchee Arbor Day Celebration will be held April 16 in six cities in Chelan and Douglas County. This year’s Wenatchee Arbor Day celebration is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Walla Walla Point Park. Tree seedlings also will be distributed from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m at: ◆ Cashmere — Clifford’s Hardware, 127 Cottage Ave. ◆ Leavenworth — Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery, 12790 Fish Hatchery Road

JITterbugs

◆ Entiat — City Hall ◆ Orondo — The Market

Place ◆ Manson — Manson Grange, 157 Wapato Way There will also be a packing night from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. April 14 at Ballard Ambulance, 1028 N. Wenatchee Ave., to help wrap trees for distribution. There will be door prizes and pizza. Anyone interested in attending should bring gloves and wear a jacket and shoes that will be good for standing for several hours at a time. For more information, contact Deanna Lorentzen at 884-1426 or Bill Sanborn at 661-4508.

advertise! weekly@empire-press.com

5

Journalists In Training

Beginning Band Fest! BY KATJA WAHL Waterville sixth grader The Waterville School beginning band is returning to the Beginning Band Fest in Chelan on May 11. A beginning band is a band that is under the middle school and competitive level. The Waterville beginning band consists of fifth and sixth graders. The band is made up of three clarinetists (Drew, Lexi, and Alyssa), one pianist (Katja), and two percussionists (Addy and Shaun).

Every year the band goes to the Fest and plays up to six songs. This year, the band is planning to play “Gentle Winds,” “Fighting Falcon,” “Brontosaurus” and “Stegosaurus” from Prehistoric Suite, “More Cowbell” and “Shine.” These might change if the band can’t practice them enough and if the other schools don’t like them. Waterville has one of the smallest beginning bands going to the festival. At the festival, bands play a wide range of instruments, including flutes, gongs, bells and saxophones.

SR 28-US 2/97-Eastmont Ave. Extension Intersection Rebuild Project Cascade Ave. Detour and Temporary Roundabout Plan How the Cascade Ave. Roundabout will work.

Easter weekend through Memorial Day, this detour route will be in operation.

>

lding a For the next two months WSDOT is bui abashian new intersection at the east end of the Od ing surface Bridge. In addition to a new concrete driv e the future a fourth leg will be added to accommodat direct access Eastmont Ave. extension that will allow congestion to residential East Wenatchee and relieve on Sunset Highway. routing traffic A detour utilizing 35th and 38th Streets, on when the down to Cascade Ave. will begin operati Friday, April current intersection is closed at 8 p.m. on traffic at night 22. Until then, expect flagger controlled ommodate while the detour route is widened to acc large trucks. t, will be in A temporary roundabout, shown at righ cade Ave. operation until the end of May at the Cas . Please - US 2/97 intersection as part of the detour t is onebou note that all movement around the rounda their uce way counter-clockwise. Drivers must red t and bou speed to 10 mph approaching the rounda on their left in then enter it after yielding to any traffic to drive a the roundabout. More information on how ress at the add roundabout can be found on the webpage bottom of this ad. ourage drivers To reduce back-ups and delays, we enc te during the to change their travel timing or their rou fic count closure, if possible. The average daily traf icles. veh through the current intersection is 23,000

For more information visit the project web page:

Washington State Department of Transportation

www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/SR28/US297intersection

or contact Project Engineer Bob Romine at (509) 667-2880, toll-free 1-888-461-8816, via E-mail: RomineR@wsdot.wa.gov or PO Box 98, Wenatchee, WA 98807


4

Community

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 21, 2011

Community Calendar

Community news

Your connection to events from Friday through April 28

Friday Community ◆◆Altar Society Bake Sale:

8 a.m., St. Joseph Church basement, 101 East Poplar, Waterville, 745-8400 ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10:30 a.m., for kids and families, East Wenatchee Library, 271 9th St. N.E., 886-7404 ◆◆Mansfield Food Bank: 11 a.m. to noon, behind the Mansfield Senior Center, 662-6156

Saturday Community ◆◆An Evening of Cowboy Poetry

and Western Music: 2 p.m., Columbia Breaks Fire Interpretive Center, Entiat

Monday Community ◆◆Rock Island Food Bank:

9:30 to 11 a.m., 1 Freemont, 662-6156 ◆◆Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group: 9:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Home Society, 1014 Walla Walla Ave., Wenatchee, 886-9027 ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10 a.m., Waterville Library, 105 N. Chelan St., 745-8354

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission:

Time and place varies, 745-8537 ◆◆Chelan-Douglas Regional Advisory Board: 12:15 p.m., 140 19th St. N.W., East Wenatchee, 886-6318 ◆◆Douglas County PUD: 2 p.m., 1151 Valley Mall Parkway, East Wenatchee, 884-7191

Schools ◆◆Eastmont School Board: 5:30

p.m., district office, 884-7169 ◆◆Mansfield School Board: 7 p.m., school library, 683-1012

Tuesday Community ◆◆Chelan Food Bank: 8:30 to 10

a.m., 200 Gala St., 662-6156 ◆◆Red Cross Blood Drive: 1 to

6 p.m., Quincy Community Center, 115 F St. S.W., 943-7802

◆◆Parkinson’s Disease Caregiving Partners Support Group: 2 to 3:30 p.m., 50 Simon St. S.E., East Wenatchee, 663-2768 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission:

Time and place varies, 745-8537 ◆◆Douglas County Sewer District No. 1: 8:30 a.m., district office, 692 N. Eastmont Ave., East Wenatchee, 884-2484 ◆◆East Wenatchee City Council: 6:30 p.m., City Hall, 884-9515

Schools ◆◆Orondo School Board: 7 p.m., district office, 784-2443

Wednesday Community ◆◆Storytime: 10 a.m., toddlers through early grade levels, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆Knitting Group: 10 a.m. to noon, Waterville Library, 105 N. Chelan St., 745-8354 ◆◆Guys and Dolls Book Club: 7 p.m., Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission:

Time and place varies, 745-8537 ◆◆Bridgeport City Council: 7 p.m. City Hall, 686-4041

Schools ◆◆Waterville School Board:

6 p.m., High school career center, 745-8584

Thursday Community ◆◆Bridgeport Food Bank: 1 to

2:30 p.m., Bridgeport Community Church, 1300 Foster Rd., 662-6156 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆“The Canoes of David Thompson”: Slide show presented by historian and author Jack Nisbet, 7 p.m., Performing Arts Center of Wenatchee, 888-6245

Waterville

Historic school burns on Badger Mountain The old Beaver Creek School on Badger Mountain burned to the ground April 13. Dale Jordan, chief of the Waterville Fire Department, said he does not know the cause. The fire was called in about 11 p.m. by either a nearby resident or a passing motorist. By the time firefighters arrived, “a lot of the walls were pretty well down and there was no roof or anything left,” Jordan said. The school was operating in 1910 and was still operating in 1940, according to reports. After the school closed, the building was used for many years by the Badger Mountain Ladies Club as a community hall, Jordan said. In recent years, there was no power to the building. He does not think the building had been used in at least 15 years. The old school was about 11 miles east of East Wenatchee on Badger Mountain Road. Responding to the fire were crews from Waterville and Douglas County Fire District 2 in East Wenatchee.

Douglas County

State’s wildfire season officially open Despite a cool, wet spring, April 15 marked the official start of wildfire season in Washington state. That means summer fire rules are in effect through Oct. 15 on 12.7 million acres of private and state land, said a state Department of Natural Resources news release. People working in the woods, including loggers, firewood cutters, road builders or off-road motorcyclists, must have approved spark arresters on all equipment and follow other fire safety precautions, the release said.

Those working in the woods must also have fire prevention and extinguishing equipment with them. Fireworks are prohibited and smoking is restricted to roads or other clearings. Regional precaution levels are updated at the DNR’s website, dnr.wa.gov, or by calling 1-800-527-3305.

Wenatchee

Riverfront Railway opening April 30 The miniature Wenatchee Riverfront Railway is opening its season. Rides will be available from 1 to 5 p.m. April 30 and May 1 at a cost of $2 for kids and $3 for adults. The small railroad chuffs along the Columbia River in Riverfront Park. Parking is available at 155 N. Worthen St., just below the pedestrian overpass. The full year’s schedule is available at wvmcc.org. For more information, call 663-2900 or 888-1097.

Teacher makes final four in Macy’s contest Wenatchee kindergarten teacher Amy Ferrell now has a one in four chance of winning $1 million to reinvent her life. Macy’s representatives told Ferrell on April 10 that she won the last voting round and will move onto the semifinals. Ferrell, 36, and her husband Chester are building a new family with five kids — two biological and three recently adopted from Ghana. If she wins, Ferrell will use the money to move her family of seven out of their 1,000-square foot home into a bigger place. A film crew will shoot a new video for the next contest, but more details are still under wraps. On April 11, Ferrell said that Clinton Kelly, host of television show “What not to Wear,” issued her a challenge, but she cannot reveal what it is yet.

Macy’s released two videos on Monday and will release two more April 25, at apps.facebook.com/ springmakeovervote. The video with the most online votes will make the final round.

Apple Blossom float wins in Tacoma The Washington State Apple Blossom Festival princess float earned the Royalty Award at the Tacoma Daffodil parade on April 9. Apple Blossom Queen Elenore Bastian and princesses Elise Shae and Maycee McQuin rode on the float.

Motorcyclist crashes bike on Highway 97 A Wenatchee man suffered a head injury April 15 when the motorcycle he was riding ran off the shoulder of Highway 97A and crashed down an embankment. Michael F. Holland, 57, was in satisfactory condition later that day at Central Washington Hospital, according to a hospital spokeswoman. The accident was about 10 miles north of Wenatchee.

University Women seek locals for honor The Wenatchee branch of the American Association of University Women invites the public to nominate women who live in Chelan or Douglas counties for its 2011 Honor Roll of Women. Nominees should be women who work for equality for women and girls, promote lifelong learning and strive for positive social change. Those selected will be recognized at the group’s annual salad supper May 19. Former recipients of the award are invited to attend. Nominations are due by May 10 and should be sent to Honor Roll of Women, AAUW, P.O. Box 4804, Wenatchee, WA 98807. For more information, call Radene Winkelman at 6628730.

CHURCH DIRECTORY Waterville Federated Church Corner of Columbia & ash • 745-8785

Pastors Daniel & sheila miranda Sunday School 10 am • Worship 11 am Please join us for our Palm Sunday & Easter Worship

Thursday, April 21 7 p.m. maundy Thursday service

Sunday, April 24 9 a.m. brunch 10:30 a.m. easter Worship & Cantata

Nursery care provided for children 5 and under

sermons online at www.watervillefederated.com “Many churches made ONE in Christ Jesus”

United St. Joseph Catholic Church Lutheran Church 101 E. PoPlar, WatErvillE 745-8205

Sunday Mass................. 10 a.m. Confessions..................... 9 a.m.

Reverend Gary Norman

662-4569

Waterville Chelan and Walnut 745-8655

Pastor James M. Robinson Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School during worship *Sunday School is Sept.-May

Come worship the risen Christ! We are a Bible believing fellowship affiliated with Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ

Good Friday Worship Services:

April 22nd 12 O’clock noon: Community Worship St. Joseph Catholic Church Federated Church at United Lutheran Church

************************************

United Lutheran Church Traditional Good Friday Service 7 PM ************************************

Easter Worship April 24th 10 AM


Corner

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 21, 2011

Community news Wenatchee

Red-light camera hearing moves to May A hearing to determine if red-light cameras can legally go before Wenatchee voters for approval has been continued to May 20. On April 6, Chelan County Superior Court John Bridges granted a motion for continuance in the case, which had been scheduled for a hearing April 13. The motion for continuance was filed by Matt Erickson, organizer of a petition drive to gather voter signatures on a red-light camera initiative. He was asking for more time to prepare his case. Erickson hopes to put on a future ballot an initiative that would require voter approval of red-light cameras in the city. Three are now operating. They are at Kittitas and Mission streets, Chelan and Orondo avenues, and Chelan Avenue and Fifth Street. In early March, the city of Wenatchee sued to block the initiative. At another hearing on Tuesday, the city was asking for an order of default against all parties except for Erickson, stating that they have not filed a response to the original complaint, said city attorney Steve Smith. Erickson said April 12 that he had hoped to gather the needed 2,270 signatures by early April. He declined to say how many signatures have been gathered. Erickson said he hopes to have enough signatures by May 24, which would allow time for the initiative to be placed on the August ballot. More information about the initiative is available at FoundationForLiberty.org.

Cops find pot when man threatens dog A complaint about a man threatening to shoot a dog sparked an investigation April 11 that led to the arrest of a 38-year-old Wenatchee man on suspicion of growing marijuana. Chelan County sheriff’s deputies said that a counselor at Mission View Elementary School called them that day to report that children said a man threatened to shoot their dog because it was fighting with his dog. The incident happened as the children were walking to a bus stop on Stemilt Loop Road, said Lt. Maria Agnew. Deputies searched the man’s home April 12 and found a BB gun. Agnew said the suspect admitted that he threatened the children’s dog with that gun. While at the house, deputies discovered 24 marijuana plants and some dried marijuana, Agnew said.

The man was booked into the Chelan County Regional Justice Center on suspicion of attempted manufacture/ delivery of a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance and harassment.

McClure, expelled from WestSide since the stabbing, told Allan he hopes to earn his GED and study to become an emergency medical technician. Allan warned him to take greater responsibility for his own mental health. “I hope that this experience turns on a light that says ‘Hey, I need to be following what my doctor has recommended,’ ” Allan said.

WestSide student pleads guilty to attack A 17-year-old student pleaded guilty April 13 to second-degree assault in a knife attack on a fellow student at WestSide High School. Steven J. McClure was sentenced to 15 to 36 weeks in juvenile detention by Chelan County Superior Court Judge Lesley Allan. He was initially charged with firstdegree assault and set to be tried as an adult, facing a maximum sentence of 10 years. Instead, McClure will be barred for 10 years from any contact with his victim, a longtime friend who suffered a 2-inch cut to his forearm that required 16 stitches. “I’m sorry for committing this crime, because (the victim) did not deserve what I did,” McClure told the judge. “I should’ve just gotten up and walked away.” The assault took place Feb. 15. The victim told police he asked McClure, “I heard you didn’t get your girlfriend a Valentine, are you OK?” He said McClure told him to leave in 10 seconds or be stabbed, then counted down from 10 to one, pulled a 9-inch knife from his backpack and attacked him. Prosecutor Doug Shae and defense attorneys Keith Howard and Stephanie Sellers said McClure was dealing with mental health issues and had not been following his doctor’s orders at the time of the attack. The attorneys recommended juvenile custody to help McClure receive appropriate care. McClure has been held for 57 days in the Chelan County Juvenile Center; he’ll receive credit for time served.

Chelsea Stevens of Wenatchee and Cynthia Hervin of Tonasket were recently recognized as members of the 2011 AllWashington Academic Team during a March 24 ceremony in Olympia. Stevens is a student at Wenatchee Valley College’s Wenatchee campus. Hervin is a student at Wenatchee Valley College’s Omak campus. Each will receive a $750 in All-Washington Academic Team scholarship.

HOURS:

Monday-Thursday 8:30am to 4:30pm Friday 8:30am to Noon

745-8461

D. C Carol D Cowling C C.P.A •Taxes •Bookkeeping •Individual & Business 745-8121

206 N. CHELAN • WATERVILLE

Waterville School’s Town Hall By Jocelyn Kruger Waterville third grader

Births

A Wenatchee teenager who suffered a skull fracture after a fight at Pioneer Park on April 13 was released from Harborview Medical Center in Seattle two days later, Wenatchee Police Sgt. John Kruse said. Kruse said police believe the 16-year-old boy used brass knuckles during the fight with an 18-year-old man. Police recovered the brass knuckles, and a witness provided a video of the fight. The two were fighting over a comment one made about the other’s relationship with his girlfriend, Kruse said. After the fight, the 16-year-old went to a friend’s house and collapsed and lost consciousness, and was taken to Central Washington Hospital and then flown to Harborview, he said. Kruse said police have not interviewed the younger boy, and are still investigating but do not anticipate charging anyone at this time.

Waterville Clinic & Ambulance

Journalists In Training

Beginnings

Teen in fight released from Harborview

B

JITterbugs Waterville Elementary does something called Town Hall. Town Hall is organized by the student council Lexy Deishl, Tyler Worthen and Drew Koenig. First, we start flag salute then agenda. They do goal drawing and spirit couch, then they do classroom sharing. This means all the classes share something that they are doing. They also announce new jobs. They sometimes introduce people and hand out awards. At the end Mr. Day plays the school song and sings along with the kids and I enjoy it just as much as any one else, if not more.

WVC students named to academic team

USINESS

5

Central Washington Hospital, Wenatchee Jeff and Rosie White, East Wenatchee: Son, Harper Woods, March 16. Moises Gonzalez and Sendy Pamela Gonzalez, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Valerie, March 16. Travis and Angie Willms, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Addison Christine, March 18. Sean and Nichole Clarke, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Emily Nichole, March 21. Danielle Babst and Ryan Schall, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Kloey Breann, March 23. Lino and Nelisa Martinez, East Wenatchee: Son, Orlando, March 23. Chad Smith and Winter Galvan, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Xana Rain, March 25. Kyle and Anna-Lisa Parrish, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Kylie Rae, March 25. Steve and Kayla Leighton, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Madilynn Grace, March 29. Ismael and Ana Gonzalez, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Emily, March 30. David and Erica Forster, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Kaitlyn Grace, March 30.

Marriage licenses Carl Winston Knowles, 22, and Jessica Megan Reid, 19, both of East Wenatchee Kevin Lane Strickland, 42, and Ashle Tineal Wallis, 26, both of East Wenatchee

Serving the nation Army Pvt. Morgan Olin recently graduated from the multiple launch rocket system crewmember advanced individual training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. Olin, a 2009 Eastmont High School graduate, is the son of Rhianon Olin of East Wenatchee.

D

IRECTORY

Telford’s Chapel of the Valley funeral Directors Rick D. Phillips George Norris Russell H. Edwards

Gaylen Willett

INSURANCE Health Insurance Agent/Producer Authorized to offer: Medicare Supplements • AARP • Blue Cross • Mutual of Omaha Medicare Advantage Plans Cancer Care Critical Care

Gaylen Willett

711 Grant roaD, east Wenatchee

884-3561 • www.telfordschapel.com

Serving North CentralIWashington N D E P E N(509) D E 679-4619 NT from One Location (509) 682-4617 Health Insurance Agent / Producer

Affiliated with: The Insurance Store Inc. • Senior Insurance Services of NCW


6

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 28, 2011

More community news

JITterbugs

Journalists In Training

Waterville’s Parent-Teacher Organization carnival By Katja Wahl Waterville sixth grader A few weeks ago the Waterville ParentTeacher Organization held a schoolwide carnival. Every class had to come up with a game or activity to try to make their class money. There were a bunch of games including a cake walk, pickle toss and Waterville Idol. Everyone had a great time. The kids from the sixth grade even got to work at their two booths, the pickle toss and the lollipop pull. The activity that made the most money was the jail, which was the fourth grade’s activity. The fourth grade made just over $1,000.

Four held after drive-by homicide Quincy Quincy police say rival gangs and their continuing retaliation against each other are to blame for the April 22 drive-by shooting that left Adan Beltran, 25, of Quincy, dead. Immediately after the 4:30 p.m. shooting in the 500 block of D Street Southeast, witnesses gave a description of the car and a license plate, helping police in Douglas County to locate and stop a 1985 Oldsmobile Delta after a high-speed chase, said Quincy Sgt. Paul Snyder. Four people — a 20-year-old Wenatchee man, and four juveniles from Quincy, ages 15, 16 and 17 — were arrested and booked on suspicion of second-degree murder and drive-by shooting, Snyder said. All three juveniles were booked into Grant County Juvenile Detention Center, and the adult was booked into the Grant County Jail. They were expected to have preliminary hearings earlier this week. Snyder said Beltran was outside on the street when the car with four occupants drove by and fired about two rounds at him. He said police believe they know which of the suspects was the shooter, but will not release that information yet. “We’re pretty sure, but we’re still finishing interviews,” he said. Two pistols were found inside the vehicle and will be sent to a crime lab for DNA evidence to determine if any of the suspects handled them, he said. Ballistics tests may also determine if either of the weapons was used in the shooting, if a bullet is recovered from Beltran during the autopsy, he said. He said police are still trying to determine exactly why Beltran was targeted, but said he is a member of the West Side 18th Street gang, and the four others belong to a rival gang known as the Marijuanos 13th Street gang. “A gang problem is not just a problem for the police, it’s a problem for the whole town,” he said. He said if witnesses don’t come forward to report what they saw, police won’t be able to do their job. “We’ve had more witnesses come forward this time than we have in the past,” Snyder said. “Because of that, it led to the quick identification of the vehicle, and allowed us to get it out to Douglas County,” he said. Snyder said Quincy police have dealt with the three juveniles many times, and all of them have an extensive record and are known gang members. Anyone with information on the case is asked to call Quincy Detective Sal Mancini at 787-4718, Ext 505.

College life Wenatchee Valley College Bertha Chavez and Pablo Gonzalez, both of East Wenatchee, graduated from Wenatchee Valley College’s Hispanic Orchard Employee Education Program in the field of beginning and advanced viticulture.

Central Washington University The following Douglas County students were named to the winter quarter honor roll at Central Washington University. To be eligible, a student must earn at least a 3.5 grade-point average in at least 12 graded credit hours. East Wenatchee: Joni Brown, Rachel Browning, Marco Carreno, Laura DeTorres, Mark Giles, Aurelia Gomez Gonzalez, David Gutierrez, Thomas Higuchi, Joanne Johanson, Caitlin Koenig, Everett Lamers, Molly Mayer, Trisha Morris, Bailey Norval, Rebecca Palmer, Edgar

Perez Jr., Jaimee Vergine, Savannah Warrington Brewster: Margarita Arevalo Garcia, Ana Najera Martinez Bridgeport: Mackenzie Roberts Rock Island: Tovi Funner Waterville: Sunnie Wright

University of Washington The following Douglas County students were named to the winter quarter dean’s list at the University of Washington. To be eligible, a student must earn at least a 3.5 grade-point average in at least 12 graded credit hours. East Wenatchee: Kent Benedict, Stephanie Chang, Rebecca Chestnut, Robert Graham, Heather Haas, Danyel Hacker, Hunter Jeffers, Kyle Jensen, Michael Paiva Brewster: Ruth Ortiz Rock Island: Sara Martin Waterville: Julia Day

Weddings Wright, McCaw Mandy McCaw and Brandon Wright exchanged wedding vows Aug. 6, 2010, at the Highlander Golf Course in East Wenatchee. Rev. Vern Watterud officiated the ceremony. She is the daughter of Clyde and Pam McCaw of East Wenatchee. His parents are Lynn Wright of East Wenatchee and Pam Wright of East Wenatchee. The couple were attended by Sarah Rinker of Cashmere, sister of the bride; Chelsea Wright of East Wenatchee, sister of the groom; Chelsea Donnor of Portland, Ore.;

Lynn Wright, father of the groom; David Wright of East Wenatchee, brother of the groom; and Jared Meskimen of Sylacauga, Ala. A reception followed at the golf course. The newlyweds honeymooned on Kauai and Oahu, Hawaii. They have settled in East Wenatchee. Both graduated from Eastmont High School in 2005 and from Gonzaga University with bachelor’s degrees in business administration in 2010. The couple work in sales in East Wenatchee.

Randy Dawson photo

Mandy and Brandon Wright

Beginnings Births Central Washington Hospital Gerardo and Rocio Gonzalez, East Wenatchee: Son, Oliver, March 30. Roberto and Elvia Perez, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Jocelyn, April 1. Jose Luis Mendoza and Sonia Leyva, East Wenatchee: Son, Jose Luis Jr., April 3.

Carlos and Leslie Padron, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Marley Starr, April 4. Kevin and Erin Hamilton, East Wenatchee: Son, Parker Joseph, April 5. Darin and Becky Konrad, East Wenatchee: Son, Eric James, April 7. Miguel Pulido and Margarita Barragan, East Wenatchee:

Daughter, Aliannie D’Janaie, April 9. Brandon O’Neal and Lindsay Francis, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Gemma Elizabeth, April 10.

Marriage licenses Justin Lee Hurd, 25, and Kathleen Renee Weddle, 22, both of East Wenatchee

School lunch menu Mon May 2

What’s cookin’? Tue Wed Thurs

Fri

May 3

May 4

May 5

May 6

Breakfast

Sausage, biscuit, gravy, fruit or juice

French toast, yogurt, fruit or juice

Breakfast sandwich, fruit or juice

Breakfast burrito, fruit or juice

Breakfast on a stick, fruit or juice

Lunch

Teriyaki dippers, rice, green beans, fruit

Chicken burger, tater tots, salad, fruit cocktail

Sub sandwich, fruit, salad, cookie

Tacos, veggies, fruit salad

Cheeseburger, tater tots, salad, fruit cocktail

Milk is served with all meals. A $25.00 fee will be charged on all returned checks. Menus are subject to change without notice. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.


The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, April 28, 2011

7

Vote: Contest ends Friday School: Students share memories of days gone by n CONTINUED from page 1

students and staff members produced and uploaded onto Youtube earlier in the year. (The school entered a video into last year’s competition, but was not selected as a finalist.) The six finalists were charged with producing another video, which The White House posted on whitehouse.gov/ commencement last week, along with short essays about why each school deserves the prize. Voters can rate the finalists on a scale of one to five, with one as the lowest rating and five as the highest. Votes must be cast by 9 p.m. Friday. The top three schools will be announced May 2. Obama will choose the winner later that week. “I am optimistic,” Sattler said. “The staff is very excited just to have this opportunity. It’s kind of a small-school Cinderella story. Who thought that we would ever be in the running to have the president come to town? We’re very excited about it. We viewed the six videos, and I think we have a top-three video. I hope the public will view it that way as well.” For the latest video, five seniors were charged with telling the story of Bridgeport High School: a rural, 200-student school that created a college-bound culture against all odds. The students relied on a crew from MTV to train them how to shoot scenes with television cameras and edit their 10 hours of film down to three minutes. “The kids did all the work, shooting and editing the film,” Sattler said. “It was quite the process. They did an excellent job. They said that they had never worked so hard in their lives. They were at the school at 7 a.m., and on two of the three nights I’m pretty sure they didn’t walk out of the building until 11 p.m. “Now we’re waiting, but we’re not sitting around. We’re encouraging folks to get out and vote, spread the word, trying to use connections around the state and the nation.” Sattler believes Bridgeport’s video has a strong chance to move into the top three because of the nature of the story that it tells. “I think we have a compelling video,” he said. “Bridgeport has battled adversity. It’s a poor community, with a high Hispanic rate, and migrant issues. We battled (the Adequate Yearly Progress measurement). But we still have implemented a model program. We’re getting kids to be successful.” On the video, principal Tamra Jackson said, “Bridgeport High School is a very unique high school for our students to attend. It’s very rural. “Our population is 90 percent Hispanic, (and) our students come from poverty. The parents do what they can do to support these kids, and here at school we try to fill that gap. Our students are prepared to go on to college from here and to go into the world.” Sattler said the implementation of college-level courses several years ago helped Bridgeport’s students achieve higher academic standards. In 2003, the school implemented what it calls a ‘college in high school’ English class, and saw three students sign up. “The next year, the numbers tripled,” Sattler said. “We thought, ‘Hey, the kids want this.’ Every year we expanded. We went to history, biology, Advanced Placement Spanish, psychology. “When we wanted to offer AP classes, that meant teachers had to have a master’s degree in the particular subject area, so we had professional development going on. This year we’ll graduate students with 60 college credits. They’ll be close to having an (associate’s) degree.” Sattler said that last year, 109 Bridgeport students took an Advanced Placement test. “And that’s not counting the kids taking the ‘college in high school’ classes, so it is growing,” he said. “I’m finding that kids are demanding the higher, rigorous courses. They want these college classes. That’s evident by the enrollment numbers for those classes.” A positive buzz has spread throughout the community as news of the school’s participation in the White House contest has gotten around. But Sattler knows that even if the school is not selected, in some ways, it has already won. “I’ve been taking calls from community members, alumni, former staff members, and there’s kind of a renewed sense of ‘Wow. We’ve got something going on here,’” he said. “The staff is well deserving, too. They’ve put in a lot of work to turn this program around over the past 10 years or so, and it feels like it’s culminating now because of this. “It’s been an incredible experience. It’s something to hang your hat on. Being in the top six in the nation is something to stand up and be proud of.”

n CONTINUED from page 1 The school closed in 1945, Doneen said, and that’s when he started attending classes in East Wenatchee. “I guess it just wasn’t feasible to have a country school anymore,” he said. He remembers the Beaver Creek School with eight grades and one teacher. He said there was a barn nearby where kids who rode to school could keep their horses. “There were some kids who rode horses 10 miles to school,” said Doneen, who lived near the school and walked.

Neither knew when the school opened. Chapman remembered the heyday of the building in the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s. That’s when there were Grange meetings, square dances, ladies club meetings, weddings, anniversaries and rummage sales. She even remembered hearing about some bachelor parties there. “We did everything we could think of to support the building,” she said. The building never had indoor plumbing and people had to use outhouses.

There was a well and a water pump inside the building. Both Doneen and Chapman said they are sad that the building burned but noted that it had not been used in 15 to 20 years. “It had gotten to where, if anyone went in there and fell, they could have gotten hurt,” Chapman said. “The roof had deteriorated and windstorms had basically blown the windows out. “It was really ready to go down, but you hate to see a historical thing go down.” Dale Jordan, Waterville fire chief, said Monday that the fire is still under investigation.

Got an interesting Mother’s Day story or photo? Share them with our readers! We’re always looking for stories and photos with flair. Email us at weekly@empire-press.com, or give us a jingle at 886-8668.


6

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, May 5, 2011

JITterbugs Journalists In Training

The third grade achieves their goal! By Jocelyn Kruger Waterville third grader On April 15, Waterville School’s third grade class went to the Seattle Aquarium. The parents that came were Kara Ires, Mr. and Mrs. Johenson, Mrs. Kruger, Mr. Moreno, and Mrs. Tolkeson. The kids worked hard to get the money for the trip. To go, they sold Spooky Grams. Spooky Grams were candy they sold at Halloween. Then they sold hot chocolate in the winter. The third graders said the habits they used to make the trip happen Check out the video at were synergy, beginning with the http://youtu.be/ end in mind and being proactive. WC2mpBOtPCA Haily Moreno said, “It was really fun because you got to see fish you have never seen before.” The class saw fish, sea otters, seals, birds, starfish, jellyfish, and even a diver in the tank. The class went to Red Robin for lunch and got to eat and they were given balloons. After lunch the class went to the Pike Place Market. The students really liked the Golden Pig and the Gum Wall. The Gum wall is a wall with thousands of pieces of chewed gum on it. It was awesome! The trip was one of the best field trips ever.

Teacher appreciation week

Photos provided

Above: Waterville third-grader Gannon Gormley showing off the gum wall in the alley below the Pike Place Market. Below: The class in front of the Seattle Aquarium.

By Alexis Kruger Waterville fifth grader I have interviewed some students here at Waterville Elementary about their teachers. These are some of the nice words that were spoken about them. Johnna Hope said, “Miss Biram is the best teacher ever.” Joslyn Lucero agrees, “Miss Biram is nice.” Alex Poppie said second grade teacher Mrs. Chambers is cool, while Sauviah Myrbo says Chambers is awesome. Claire Ashley said “Mrs. Chambers is fun and cool.” Jocelyn Kruger said that Mr. Grillo is “proud of his class when he sees them do their best.” Tayen Myrbo thinks Mrs. Petersen is fun, and Paulina Mosqueda chimed in that Petersen is wonderful. Now on to my class, the fifth grade. Haley Henson says, “Mrs. Deishl is an amazing teacher.” According to Ethan Petersen, “Mrs. Deishl is the most funtastic teacher in the world.” The last one to speak in my class was Jesse Henry, and he believes Mrs. Deishl is an awesome teacher. In the sixth grade, Katja Wahl thinks Mrs. Flaget is fun. Haylee Necomb said, “Mrs. Flaget is the best and nice.”

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The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, May 5, 2011

7

Waterville drops two Town will try utility bill donation on Saturday Town Council

By Karen Larsen At the May 2 town council meeting, Mayor Royal DeVaney reported on a recent meeting by the swim pool committee. He said that six citizens attended the meeting. Councilwoman Joyce Huber, who attended the meeting as a representative for council, said the committee was not in favor of putting on a swimming pool levy this year. Members said that after looking at the budget, they felt funds were available to support the pool. On the other hand, members were in favor of allowing people to opt into giving a donation to the pool on each monthly utility bill. The group was also in favor of setting up a concession stand at the pool to help raise money. DeVaney told council that if the town uses the funds that the committee spoke of, it will be using money that may be needed for unexpected costs this year or in future years. There was some discussion about the planned arrangement of Deputy Clerk/ Treasurer Erica Browning serving as pool manager, with Clerk/Treasurer Marsha Peterson covering Browning in the afternoons when Browning is at the pool. DeVaney emphasized that this was just a trial, and

if the office work suffers, another plan for a manager will have to be implemented immediately. Council voted unanimously to print into the utility bills a solicitation for donations to the pool. Customers would then include their donation in their utility payment. They decided not to make a particular suggestion of a donation level. Peterson promised to give council a report of the number and total amount of donations each month. It was discussed that a high donation level might suggest willingness to support a levy, and the levy could perhaps be implemented at a later time.

Elections DeVaney said that June 10 will be the filing deadline for council positions No. 1, 3, 4, and 5 as well as the position of Mayor. All of these positions are up for election on the November ballot. The council positions are currently held by Wayne Hawks, James Koenig, Gert Snyder and Joyce Huber, respectively. DeVaney said that he intends to file for reelection.

Sheriff’s report Sheriff Gjesdal reported on activity over the month of April. The sheriff’s office received 19 calls, including

two attempted burglaries at Mitchell’s Floral and Hardware. Activity was down compared to March.

Projects Council accepted phases two, three and six of recycling center work covered by a Department of Ecology grant. These phases included completion of the recycling center pad and parking area by Moe Asphalt and work on the wall at the east and north side of the recycling center addition by Elite Woodworking. One more phase, wiring of the addition completed by Beckstead Electric, still awaits formal acceptance. Council voted four to one to choose Erlandsen for engineering services for Chelan Avenue to be done in 2012. Forsgren and Associates, as well as Shea, Carr, and Jewell also sent in qualifications for the work. Councilmember Bob Olin presented the dissenting vote. DeVaney reported a successful spring clean-up day April 23. He thanked all those who volunteered, including Ed and Linda Daling for providing refreshments. Town hall will be closed May 30 in observance of Memorial Day. The next meeting is scheduled for May 16 at 7:30 p.m.

Bridgeport: School erupts in cheers n CONTINUED from page 1 Nearly 100,000 people rated the schools on the White House website last week. “It’s amazing,” Sattler said. “It really is. It’s nice for our kids to be honored like that. We were very optimistic (that we’d be chosen to be a finalist), and we continue to be optimistic that we’ll be the chosen one. We don’t know that for sure, but we believe that we’ve got a good enough of a program to be selected.”

The other two finalists are High Tech High International in San Diego and Booker T. Washington High School in Memphis, Tenn. “I believe that you don’t get to this level without being good at what you’re doing,” Sattler said. “The three stories that are left are very compelling. “The school in San Diego is a high-tech prep school that offers multimedia classes and those types of things. The school in Memphis is a second-chance school for kids who come out of tough situations are

selected to attend. There are three great stories, but I think ours is the best. I believe we are the frontrunner because our story is that we’re a rural, public school, and we’ve got the challenges that we do.” Sattler and everyone at Bridgeport High School certainly believe that. Now they have to wait to see if Obama agrees with them. “Anxiety will be running high, because there’s nothing left that we can do,” Sattler said. “It’s out of our hands, but we’re hopeful.”

By Jim Rogers Waterville hosted Lake Roosevelt April 30 and lost both games 22-5 and 10-0. In the first game, Jacob Sayan pitched. Coach Damian Smith said, “He threw pretty well. Lake Roosevelt had 20 runs on 11 errors and 13 hits in three innings.” Waterville scored two runs in the fourth inning. Sayan had two hits and scored both runs. In the second game Cristian Munoz pitched the loss and had six strikeouts. Offensively Munoz and Trey Worthen had the only two hits in the game. The Shockers did not get a runner past second base. “I hoped the wins against Oroville the week before might bring confidence to the Lake Roosevelt games,” said Smith. “Lake Roosevelt played solid defense and their pitchers didn’t give much away. They can hit the ball throughout their lineup.” “Our defense was OK in two of the games, but we never put together innings with multiple hits.”

Confirmed: Bishop performs final act n CONTINUED from page 1 “We’re trying to get them started in that relationship now as young adults,” Haberman said. Members of the Confirmation class also attended a three-day conference at Camp Koinonia near Cle Elum. During his homily, Sevilla emphasized to the young people that they were being asked to find true freedom, which involves learning to follow rules in all of life, as well as in one’s spiritual life. The ceremony of Confirmation itself involves the bishop anointing the head of the person being confirmed with a sacred oil called chrism and pronouncing the words: “Be sealed with the gift of the Holy Spirit.” During a luncheon following the event, two of those confirmed — Zachary Feeney and Anthony Middendorf had similar comments to make, “Now I feel like I am part of the church,” Middendorf said. Robert Parcells said that at first he didn’t like the idea of going through the Confirmation process, but when he started going to the class, he began to warm up to the idea. “All in all it was a great experience,” Parcells said. Middendorf said that he found the class very enlightening. “I learned why we’re going to church and what the actions mean,” he said. Parents also felt that the day was an important rite of passage. “He (Zachary) needs to have a good foundation and there’s no better way to do that than with your family and with the church,” Nancy Feeney said. Zachary’s father, Ryan, said, “Finding faith is a lifelong journey and if you’re lucky enough you can find it early on. I’m very proud of him for beginning that difficult journey.” After the ceremony, Bishop Sevilla said he always finds it an inspiration to perform the sacrament. “It’s nice to meet young people and to see them committed to and deepening their relationship with God and the church,” Sevilla said.

Shooting suspects face murder charges in Quincy drive-by Ephr ata A Wenatchee man faces a charge of second-degree murder in the Quincy shooting of Adan Beltran, as do three juveniles police said were in the car. Roberto Murillo-Vera, 20, was also charged with drive-by shooting and unlawful possession of a firearm in the April 22 attack. The shooting left Beltran, 25, dead from a single gunshot wound, according to Grant County Coroner Craig Morrison. Beltran was shot in the 500 block of D Street Southeast.

Quincy police say the attack was gang-related. Murillo-Vera was accompanied by three juveniles from Quincy at the time of the murder, police said. The two oldest, Benjamin Lopez Jr., 17, and Alexis Hernandez, 16, were charged as adults April 25, said Grant County Prosecutor Angus Lee. His office will seek a judge’s approval to also try the 15-year-old as an adult. Murillo-Vera has been involved in similar attacks in the past. Last August he was sentenced to 366 days in prison for assisting two suspects in a Wenatchee

drive-by shooting in February 2010. In January 2009 he pleaded guilty to second-degree assault and unlawful firearm possession in a 2008 shooting in the 500 block of Peachey Street in Wenatchee. His wallet and ID were found at the scene, and he was sentenced to 20 months in prison. Murillo-Vera was identified by police as a local gang member. He also has two juvenile convictions for gunrelated crimes.


4

Community

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Community Calendar

Community news

Your connection to events from Friday through May 19

Friday Community ◆◆Preschool Storytime:

10:30 a.m., for kids and families, East Wenatchee Library, 271 9th St. N.E., 886-7404 ◆◆“Fairy Dust” Dance Formal: 7 p.m., Red Lion Hotel, 1225 N. Wenatchee Ave., 679-0957 ◆◆Blackwood Legacy: Southern gospel, 7 p.m., 605 First St., Wenatchee, 662-2818

Saturday Community ◆◆Troy Boyd Golf Tournament

Fundraiser: Benefit for Heather Best, 2:30 p.m. live auction at Willie’s Sports Bar, 921 Valley Mall Parkway, 886-7747 ◆◆“Celebration of Bells”: 7 p.m., Performing Arts Center of Wenatchee, 663-2787 or pacwen.org

Monday Community ◆◆Rock Island Food Bank:

9:30 to 11 a.m., 1 Freemont, 662-6156 ◆◆Preschool Storytime: 10 a.m., Waterville Library, 105 N. Chelan St., 745-8354 ◆◆The Compassionate Friends Support Group: 7 p.m., 1408 Washington St., Wenatchee, 665-9987

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and place varies, 745-8537 or douglascountywa.net ◆◆Douglas County PUD: 2 p.m., 1151 Valley Mall Parkway, 884-7191 ◆◆Chelan-Douglas Health District Board: 4 p.m., 200 Valley Mall Parkway, 886-6400 ◆◆Eastmont Metropolitan Park District: 6:30 p.m., Eastmont Jr. High School library, 884-8015 ◆◆Waterville City Council: 7:30 p.m., City Hall, 745-8871

Schools ◆◆Palisades School Board:

7:30 p.m., Palisades School, 884-8071

Tuesday Community ◆◆Chelan Food Bank: 8:30 to

10 a.m., 200 Gala St., 662-6156 ◆◆Attic Dusters Antique Club:

11:30 a.m., 1621 N. Wenatchee Ave., 663-1463 ◆◆Wenatchee Area Parkinson’s Support Group: 2 to 3:30 p.m., 206 Easy St., Wenatchee, 884-6833 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆NAMI, National Alliance on Mental Illness: 7 p.m., 900 N. Western Ave., 663-8282

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission:

Time and place varies, 745-8537 or douglascountywa.net

Waterville

◆◆Link Transit Board: 4 p.m.,

Operations Base, 2700 Euclid Ave., Wenatchee, 664-7600

On-farm tours of canola research trials

Schools ◆◆Waterville School

Kindergarten Orientation: 6 p.m., School library, child’s birth certificate and immunization records required, 745-8585

Wednesday Community ◆◆Peace Officers Appreciation

Luncheon: 11:15 a.m., 1225 N. Wenatchee Ave., 886-0894

Government ◆◆Storytime: 10 a.m., toddlers through early grade levels, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046 ◆◆Douglas County Civil Service: 10 a.m., Fire District No. 2, 377 Eastmont Ave., East Wenatchee, 884-6965 ◆◆Storytime: 11:30 a.m., Bridgeport Library, 1206 Columbia Ave., 686-7281 ◆◆Department of Revenue Tax Workshop: 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., 377 Eastmont Ave., 663-9741 or dor.wa.gov

Government ◆◆Douglas County Commission: Time and place varies, 745-8537 or douglascountywa.net ◆◆Wenatchee Valley College Board: 3 p.m., Wenatchi Hall, 682-6420 ◆◆East Wenatchee Water District: 3 p.m., 692 N. Eastmont Ave., 884-3569 ◆◆Brewster City Council: 6 p.m., City Hall, 689-3464

Thursday

The Washington State University Extension and the USDA-Agricultural Research Service are holding tours of existing on-farm canola research trials next week. The tour will begin at the Troutman farm May 17 at 10 a.m. and will continue until noon. To get to the canola test plots: ◆◆ From Waterville or Mansfield, take Bridgeport Hill Road to Highway 17. Turn right and go 7.5 miles. Turn left at Chalk-Hills Road N.E. and go 0.76 miles. Turn left onto Coleman Hill Road and go 2.44 miles. The canola test plots will be on the left. ◆◆ From Bridgeport head east on Highway 17. Once past Bridgeport Hill Road, the directions are the same as listed above. ◆◆ From Leahy Junction, head west on Highway 17 and go 6.29 miles. Turn Right on Chalk-Hills Road N.E. and go 0.76 miles. Turn left onto Coleman Hill Road and go 2.44 miles. The canola test plots will be on the left. Some the topics to be covered during the tour are seeding rate, herbicide comparison studies, and the use of Roundup-ready canola to control problem weeds, including feral rye. For more information, contact the Extension at 745-8531.

Orondo

Utley Foundation awarded NFL grant

Community ◆◆History of Hats: 2 p.m.,

Wenatchee Valley Museum, 888-6240 or wmcc.org ◆◆Waterville Food Bank: 2:30 to 4 p.m., Senior Center, 413 S. Central, 745-8237 ◆◆Arts and Crafts Program: 3 p.m., for all ages, Brewster Library, 108 S. 3rd St., 689-4046

Schools ◆◆Mansfield School Board: 7 p.m., school library, 683-1012

The Mike Utley Foundation of Orondo received a portion of the $1 million NFL Charities Player Foundation Grant Program for non-profit organizations. Utley founded the nonprofit to search for effective treatments for spinal cord injuries after he was paralyzed during an NFL game in 1991. The foundation will use the $12,500 windfall to support

rehabilitation scholarships, to purchase recreational equipment for paralyzed children and research. For more information, contact the foundation at 784-9605.

Emergency landing in Columbia River A 57-year-old Yakima pilot was treated for mild hypothermia Sunday but was not injured after making an emergency landing on the Columbia River north of Orondo. Randy Lervold took off in his single-engine experimental plane near Sun Cove and was heading for Yakima when he experienced engine trouble at about 1:25 p.m., said Douglas County Sheriff Harvey Gjesdal. He was able to gently set the small plane down in the river, about 100 yards from the cove, which is about 10 miles north of Orondo, the sheriff said. Gjesdal said the pilot told him he could barely feel the impact on his seatbelt. A boater in the area went out to retrieve the pilot and his airplane, which he towed back to shore, he said. He said the pilot was treated at the scene, and was not taken to a hospital. The Columbia River was about 46 degrees at nearby Rocky Reach Dam. Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board interviewed the pilot by phone on Sunday and gave him permission to remove the aircraft from the water.

East Wenatchee

Free DOR tax workshop May 18 The Washington State Department of Revenue is hosting a free workshop for new and small business owners from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. May 18 at Douglas County Fire District, 377 Eastmont Ave. in East Wenatchee. Participants will learn about Washington excise taxes, reporting

classifications, deductions, tax incentives, sales tax collection and record-keeping requirements. All receive a workbook and reference guide to Department of Revenue rules and regulations. To register, visit the Department of Revenue website at dor.wa.gov or call 663-9741. A complete schedule of workshops statewide and a short, streaming video version of the workshop in English and Spanish are also available on the website.

Eastmont may cut athletic director job The Eastmont School District may eliminate its athletic director position due to declining revenues, Superintendent Garn Christensen said May 6. Christensen said he is considering transferring athletic director Dan White to a teaching position, thus changing Eastmont High School’s administration to a four-person team that would share the athletic director duties. The district considered making the same change in 2010, but decided against it when cuts to the budget weren’t as drastic as originally anticipated. “It’s one of the things we’ve looked at as we continue to deal with reduction in revenue,” Christensen said. Christensen said the decision will be made “very likely in the next few weeks,” once the 2011-12 budget is finalized. White, who was recently named the District 6 Athletic Director of the Year for 2010-11 by the Washington Secondary School Athletic Administrators Association, is finishing his eighth year as the Eastmont AD. He was a history teacher and head baseball coach at Eastmont for 33 years before taking the post. But of EHS’ five administrators, White is the only one without administrative credentials.

CHURCH DIRECTORY Waterville Federated Church Corner of Columbia & ash 745-8785 Pastors Daniel & sheila miranda

Sunday School 10 am Worship 11 am Nursery care provided for children 5 and under www.watervillefederated.com

“Many churches made ONE in Christ Jesus”

United St. Joseph Catholic Church Lutheran Church 101 E. PoPlar, WatErvillE 745-8205

Sunday Mass................. 10 a.m. Confessions..................... 9 a.m.

Reverend Gary Norman

662-4569

Waterville Chelan and Walnut 745-8655

Pastor James M. Robinson Family Worship - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School during worship *Sunday School is Sept.-May

Come worship the risen Christ! We are a Bible believing fellowship affiliated with Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ

It happens to everyone. You know that something is missing in your life! AND You, are thinking

“It just might be God.” You are right!

See you Sunday at 10 AM Pastor Jim


Corner

The Douglas County Empire Press • Thursday, May 12, 2011

5

Community news Farm animals nudging their way into cities City Councilman Dave Bremmer’s daughter wants a pygmy goat. She can’t have one according to the city’s current code on urban farm animals, but that will likely change this year. At Bremmer’s suggestion, the city’s planning department has studied other cities’ increasingly more permissible standards for urban farm animals, especially chickens. Wenatchee in March revised its code to allow chickens, rabbits, goats, even horses on smaller lots. “In the last three or four years there has been a movement across the nation to allow folks to have these backyard farm animals, provided you can do so in a manner that does not pose a nuisance to your neighbors,” Lori Barnett, the city’s community development director, said Thursday. East Wenatchee’s city code currently requires residents to have 1 acre of land to own any kind of farm animal, including a half-acre per horse or one-quarter acre per goat. Wenatchee’s code now allows a horse on 10,000 square feet — less than a quarter acre — and up to four small farm animals on a half-acre or less. Barnett said she’ll likely present proposed code changes to the city’s Planning Commission at the group’s next meeting, June 7. Douglas County must also sign off on the code changes for homes that lie within East Wenatchee’s urban growth area, Barnett said. Planners will submit the changes to state agencies for feedback and will host a public hearing before bringing a proposal to the City Council this fall for a vote. If all goes as planned, Bremmer’s daughter could have her pygmy goat — or even a pot-bellied pig — by year’s end.

Wenatchee

Cowell scholarship deadline Friday The Building Industry Association of Washington is offering scholarships in memory of Mackenzie Cowell. The scholarships are intended for students who want to pursue careers in the building industry. The association decided to name the scholarship fund in memory of Cowell during the winter board meeting. Cowell, 17, went missing Feb. 9, 2010, after leaving the Academy of Hair Design. Her body was discovered four days later on the banks of Crescent Bar.

Her mother, Wendy Cowell, is a local builder and Realtor and has served as director of the BIAW, director of the National Association of Homebuilders and president of the local North Central Home Builders Association. Applications are available at North Central Home Builders Association, 2201 N. Wenatchee Ave. in Wenatchee, or at biaw.com. They must be postmarked by Friday.

Free advice weekly at community garden The WSU Chelan County Master Gardeners will answer gardening questions on Thursday evenings beginning today. Master Gardeners will be available from 6 to 7: 30 p.m. at the Community Education Garden at the northwest corner of Springwater and Western avenues. Demonstrations of specific gardening activities and techniques will be offered throughout the growing season. Today, Craig Robertson, entrance garden coordinator, will demonstrate how to install a water conserving irrigation system for newly planted shrubs. For more information, visit ncw.wsu.edu/mg or call 667-6540.

Chelan

Hospital locks down amid altercation An angry Mansfield man who at one point was holding a hammer, prompted a lockdown of the emergency room at Lake Chelan Community HospitalMay 6. Medical personnel at the hospital called for help from Chelan County sheriff’s deputies about 5:15 a.m. when the 46-year-old man threatened to kill his girlfriend if she did not give him the keys to his pickup, said Lt. Jerry Moore. The man came into the emergency room as a suicide risk, but checked himself out against doctor’s advice. “He begins threatening his girlfriend in front of the staff,” Moore said. The girlfriend, a 40-year-old Mansfield resident, was not injured. After the man went outside, the staff locked

the outside doors to the emergency room to keep other people from becoming involved in the altercation, said Kevin Abel, hospital administrator. Moore said the suspect went out to the pickup truck and retrieved a hammer from the bed of the pickup, then put it back and got into the cab of the pickup. Deputies arrested the man, without incident, at 6:25 a.m. in the parking lot. He was arrested on suspicion of being in violation of a protection order, which involved the girlfriend, and of making threats to do harm.

Beginnings Births Central Washington Hospital Tony and Nicole Daggett, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Shelby Mae, April 13. Jared and Jerra Kramer, East Wenatchee: Son, Benjamin Russell, April 13. Miguel Silva and Melissa Kimbrough, East Wenatchee: Son, Riley Alexander, April 14. Hector Vaszquez and Arvelia Howard, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Julianna Kai’Lynn, April 15. Nathan Goforth and Amanda Racus, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Cayleigh Rae, April 15. Keith and Brieanne Ledbetter, East Wenatchee: Son, Keith Robert, April 16. Phillip Lara and LaDawna Germain, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Leah Dawn, April 19. Robert Bryant and Tamika Lillis, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Imena Mae, April 22. Alejandro Jeronimo and Hurlinda Rios, East Wenatchee: Daughter, Bonita, April 23. Out of Area Jim and Shannon Rucker, Spokane: Daughter, Claire Jo, April 6. Local grandparents are Joel and Debbie Penfold of East Wenatchee.

Marriage licenses Joshua James Vines, 24, and Meagan Marie Greening, 23, both of East Wenatchee Tyler Ryan Berry, 24, and Natalie Gayle Stull, 20, both of East Wenatchee Kenneth Maurice McCandless, 70, and Deborah Suzanne Fajmon, 58, both of East Wenatchee Adam Nathaniel Thieman, 25, and Jennifer Anne Ward, 23, both of East Wenatchee Jacob Jeffrey Johnson, 25, and Shayla Danielle Darwood, 25, both of East Wenatchee

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JITterbugs Journalists In Training

School carnival hits the spot By Alexis Kruger Waterville fifth grader Here at the Waterville school carnival there is a lot to do. All I needed was one ticket to let the fun begin. You could have done the cake walk, Waterville Idol, Jail, Duck pond, purchased candy, thrown a football or basketball, played spin the wheel, and many other activities. The carnival was sooooo fun. You could have just run wild and hung loose. We would like to thank the Parent-Teacher Organization.

Reuse... Reduce... Reuse...Reduce... Rethink...Recycle!!! Rethink...Recycle!!! Glen Coordes Rinker Oak Harbor, WA

Glen Coordes Rinker passed on to Heaven, March 5, 2011, at the age of 94. Glen went peacefully, in his sleep, at Harbor Care, an “Advanced Assisted Living Home,” in Oak Harbor, WA, attended to his last by his oldest son, Richard and his wife, Sheryl. Glen was born in ‘Wheat Country’, in his family’s homestead ranch house, in Douglas, WA, on May 21, 1916, to Oliver “O.C.” and Amy Rinker, the oldest born of seven children. In his elementary school years, he attended a one-room schoolhouse in Douglas, graduating in 1935, from Waterville High School (four miles from Douglas). In 1940, Glen married a Wenatchee girl, Desire Phillippi, and they began their life together by making their home in Seattle, WA, which was during the War years. Both of their biological children, Richard Leon and Trudy Fay, were born in Seattle, however upon the World War’s completion, in 1945, they moved back to Waterville to raise their children. In 1950, they added Richard Lapthorn to their family. After the children’s raising, in l961, they moved back to Seattle, where Glen spent the next 20 years working as a mechanic in the heavy equipment industry, specializing in Caterpillar and John Deere. When Glen retired in 1981, he had risen to the position of Shop Foreman, with 15 mechanics under his charge. Glen and Desire then, at retirement, moved back to “Douglas County” and purchased their final home in East Wenatchee. Together they enjoyed their home until, after 67 years of marriage, Desire passed away in the summer of 2007. Glen then spent the remainder of his time here on the earth, enjoying “Assisted Living” homes in the communities of Moses Lake and Oak Harbor, WA. He spent, by his choice, his last two years, at Regency on Whidbey/Harbor Care, in Oak Harbor, WA, near his oldest son, Richard. Glen’s Legacy — He loved his family and friends, (many of them lifelong); his roots in Douglas County; and bowling, which he enjoyed for 56 years. A Special Tribute — Glen’s lifetime of sacrificial, unconditional loving of his family will forever be cherished and remembered by all of us who have had the pleasure of knowing him… He “was” and “still is”, truly, one-of-a-kind… Glen was preceded in death by his parents; five brothers and sisters, Ethel, Elizabeth, Johnny, Douglas and Juanita; an infant baby girl; and several cherished in-laws. He is survived by his children; remaining youngest brother, Arvene and his wife, Gwen; and other remaining cherished in-laws. A Memorial/Graveside Service, honoring Glen, will be held at the Waterville Cemetery on Saturday, May 21, 2011, at 1:00 p.m., followed by fellowship and refreshments at the United Lutheran Church of Waterville. Arrangements are in care of Heritage Memorial Chapel of East Wenatchee.

WNPA Community Service entry  

Contest entry for the Newspaper Community Service category for the WNPA

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