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Emory & Henry College

LYCEUM FALL 2014


Emory & Henry College

Lyceum Program Note to E&H students

You are admitted free to all events (with the exception of Barter Theatre plays, for which your ticket price is discounted). However, for certain events reserved seating may be required. See note below under Advanced Reserved Seating. You must present your E&H ID both before and after each oncampus event for which you want Lyceum credit. When attending eligible Arts Array films at the Cinemall or plays at the Barter Theatre, retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for credit. Each event listed in this booklet carries one Lyceum credit unless otherwise noted in the event description. Please refer to the Lyceum policy described on the inside back cover.

More questions about Lyceum credit? Call the Centralized Student Assistance Office, 276.944.6105.

Note to E&H employees

You are admitted free to all college events. However, for certain events reserved seating may be required. See note below under Advanced Reserved Seating. Even if reserved seating is not required, you must show your college activity pass at the door for free admission to those events marked with an asterisk* (the events requiring an admission fee from the public). Questions about the events

requiring your activity pass? Call the Office of the Arts Coordinator, 276.944.6846 or 6866.

Note to members of the public

All Lyceum events are open to the broader community. Those marked with an asterisk* on the table of contents on the next page require an admission fee or advanced reserved seating. If there are questions about handicapped accessibility, call 276.944.6810.

Advanced reserved seating

Recital: Rachel Milligan, mezzo-soprano (Sept. 18); E&H Theatre Dept. Performance: Medea, Freely Adapted from the Medea of Euripides (Oct. 2-5); Theatrical Storytelling: Judith Black (Oct. 20); Concert: C Street Brass (Nov. 18); E&H Theatre Dept. Performance: The Spitfire Grill (Nov. 20-23); E&H Music Dept. Concert: Christmas at Emory (Dec. 7) Tickets are available at the Emory Train Depot two weeks prior to the performance, from noon to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, and at Van Dyke Center one week prior to each performance from 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. daily.

Subscribe to online Lyceum calendar

Did you know you can subscribe to the Lyceum and various other college calendars and they appear as a handy list in your personal calendar portal? We recommend subscribing so the most up-todate version is always available to you in your personal google calendar portal. It’s easy to do and convenient! Learn how at ehc.edu/gcal.

Cover: Top left: C Street Brass; Top right: John R. G. Roth, Faceted Conveyance, 2011, rigid foam, resin, sheet metal, machined aluminum, 14x21x13” (detail); Bottom left: Tom Berenz, Forest Wreck, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 62x70” (detail); Bottom right: Judith Black

For information about our programs visit www.ehc.edu.


Lyceum Events, FALL 2014 AUGUST 27

CONVOCATION Academic Convocation....................................................................... 2

SEPTEMBER 8 LECTURE Nutrition and You: Peak Performance for Everyone!........................... 2 9 PANEL DISCUSSION Emory Abroad: Students Share the Joys, Challenges and Benefits of International Education................................................................... 2 10 LECTURE The Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly.......................................... 2 11 LECTURE Is God a Mathematician?.................................................................... 2 16 PRESENTATION Building Global Villages: Reflections on Habitat for Humanity in Nicaragua............................................................................................ 2 *18 RECITAL Rachel Milligan, mezzo-soprano......................................................... 2 22 ARTALK Speculative Conveyance, John R. G. Roth, sculptor.......................2-3 25 LECTURE The Importance of the Other............................................................... 3 OCTOBER 2 PERFORMANCE I Am Domestic Violence...................................................................... 3 *2-5 THEATRE PERFORMANCE Medea, Freely Adapted from the Medea of Euripides, E&H Theatre Department.................................................................... 3 14 ARTALK Inconstant Certainty, Manda Remmen, sculptor................................. 3 *16 RECITAL American Portraits by Ataraxia Duo.................................................... 3 *20 THEATRICAL STORYTELLING Judith Black......................................................................................... 3 22 PERFORMANCE & TALKBACK The LGBTQ Community and the UMC: Part 1: Queer Monologues... 4 23 LECTURE The LGBTQ Community and the UMC: Part 2: Gay by Birth, United Methodist by Choice................................................................ 4 29 LECTURE The Five Myths of College Athletics: Where Do We Go From Here?.. 4 30-31 LITERARY FESTIVAL 33rd Annual Literary Festival: Karen Salyer McElmurray.................... 4 NOVEMBER 2 STALEY LECTURE 3 STALEY LECTURE 4 LECTURE 5 LECTURE 10 ARTALK 17 LECTURE *18 CONCERT *20-23 THEATRE PERFORMANCE DECEMBER 3 *7

The Last Segregated Hour (part 1)..................................................... 4 Staley Lecture: The Last Segregated Hour (part 2)............................ 4 To Die or Not to Die ............................................................................ 4 Women in Medicine............................................................................. 5 Into the Woods, Tom Berenz, painter.................................................. 5 Mindfulness: A Strategy for Connecting Our Inner Wisdom and Improving Our Focus .......................................................................... 5 C Street Brass..................................................................................... 5 The Spitfire Grill, E&H Theatre Department........................................ 5

POETRY READING Felicia Mitchell..................................................................................... 5 CONCERT Christmas at Emory, E&H Music Department..................................... 5

*Barter Theatre Program.................................................................................................................................. 6 Arts Array Program........................................................................................................................................7-8 Lyceum Program.................................................................................................................. Inside Front Cover Lyceum Requirements...........................................................................................................Inside Back Cover .*Reservations and/or admission fee are required. See inside front cover.

Tom Berenz, Red House, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 41x43” (detail)

Ataraxia Duo Recital: Oct. 16

Into the Woods – Tom Berenz, painter Artalk: Nov. 10

C Street Brass Concert: Nov. 18


August

Lecture

Is God a Mathematician? Douglas Edmonds

Convocation

Thursday, September 11, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

Academic Convocation

Wednesday, August 27, 7 p.m. South Lawn, Memorial Chapel Rain Location: King Center Gymnasium

Why are mathematics so effective in describing the laws of nature? Could these laws be described without mathematics? Are mathematics invented or discovered? “What makes mathematics so effective when it enters science is a mystery of mysteries and [this talk] wants to achieve no more than explicate how deep this mystery is” (Bochner, 1981).

The academic convocation is held each fall to convene students and faculty at the beginning of the academic year in a spirit of hope and inspiration.

September

Presentation

Building Global Villages: Reflections on Habitat for Humanity in Nicaragua Jimmy Whited

Lecture

Nutrition and You: Peak Performance for Everyone!

Tuesday, September 16, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Monday, September 8, 8 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Faculty, staff and students share their experiences building two houses for Nicaraguan families in need.

Loreto Jackson, associate athletic director and director of the total athlete care and performance program at Clemson University, addresses nutritional concerns related to performance in athletics as well as daily functioning of the body. Jackson helps attendees understand what nutrients help them perform to their best ability at work, in the classroom and on the field.

*Recital

Rachel Milligan, mezzo-soprano Thursday, September 18, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Mezzo-soprano, Rachel Milligan, presents this recital of works for the voice by Hahn, Schumann, Poulenc, Rachmaninoff, Britten and Mascagni. Milligan is in her second year as adjunct faculty in the Emory & Henry music department and is a graduate with bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the prestigious University of Indiana’s Jacobs School of Music. In 2013, Milligan sang the title role in Bizet’s opera, Carmen, with the Undercroft Opera. Previously she has sung the role of Nancy in Albert Herrin, Siébel in Faust, and Young Sue in Indiana University Opera Theatre’s workshop of The Alamo. She was also a member of the 2013 Indianapolis Opera Ensemble’s young artist program, where she performed the role of Hänsel in Humperdink’s Hänsel and Gretl. She was a member of the 2011 Central City Bonfils-Stanton Foundation Young Artists. In 2010 she was a studio artist with Wolf Trap Opera, where she performed the role of Moth in Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Presentation

Emory Abroad: Students Share the Joys, Challenges and Benefits of International Education E&H Students

Tuesday, September 9, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge E&H students who have explored the world describe their experiences and the cultures they encountered. They will share the joys, challenges and personal and academic benefits that come from spending time abroad. After presenting on a variety of experiences, including short-term travel with E&H courses, semesters abroad, and summer volunteer work, students and the director of international education answer questions about learning, serving and living in a foreign country.

Artalk

Lecture

Speculative Conveyance John R. G. Roth, sculptor

The Grand Saga of the Monarch Butterfly Lincoln Brower

Monday, September 22, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Wednesday, September 10, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

John Roth’s beautifully crafted sculptures reflect his interest in the anthropomorphic aspects of machinery, vehicles and buildings. He uses decorative and functional details from Industrial Age factories and mines, public utility buildings, machines and marine vessels that make the fanciful familiar, calling into question considerations of past and future while contemplating the present. This Artalk is

The migration of Monarch butterflies is one of the most spectacular stories of any living animal. Join us for an evening with Dr. Lincoln Brower, world expert on Monarch butterflies, for a lecture and slide presentation of his 50 years of biological research on Monarchs, and the current efforts to protect these remarkable butterflies.

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Artalk

in conjunction with his exhibition in The 1912 Gallery from Tuesday, Aug. 25 through Monday, Sept. 23.

Inconstant Certainty Manda Remmen, sculptor

Lecture

Tuesday, October 14, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

The Importance of the Other Stephen Hunt (’71)

Thursday, September 25, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Manda Remmen is assistant professor of art at Emory & Henry. Her organic, poetic works range from wall pieces to free-standing sculpture to installation, in materials such as fabric, dirt, soil, plants, wood and paper, often embracing the environment. She is interested in how culturally, and individually identity is defined by a narrative. The recording of group history is fascinating to her because of what is passed over in its singular perspective. Each event from the past leaves evidence, proof of a defining moment. This evidence varies in scale from the intimate, traces left by rain falling on one square foot of ground, to the global when viewed from a satellite, the palimpsest left on the earth when boundary lines shift through time. The Artalk is in conjunction with her exhibition in The 1912 Gallery from Tuesday, Sept. 30 through Saturday, Nov. 1 (except Oct. 8-13).

Whatever we do, from academics and sports to life and work, requires us to understand – not just casually appreciate – the point of view, values, interests and goals of others. Nothing prepares better for embracing and owning this truth than the combination of a liberal arts education and international experiences that immerse one in situations where one’s own experience and opinions must be adjusted, and few things are more powerful than doing so and then realizing that you are still the same person – just stronger, more mature, aware and confident. Dr. Hunt draws on a career in international relations and diplomacy as well as research to illustrate how embracing challenges and making opportunities is the key to success.

*Recital

October

American Portraits by Ataraxia Duo William Gibbons (’03), piano Kristen Queen, flute

Performance

I Am Domestic Violence Wambui Bahati

Thursday, October 16, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Thursday, October 2, 4:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Ranging from works by Aaron Copland and Philip Glass to new works commissioned by the Ataraxia Duo, this program explores the wealth and variety of American music for flute and piano from the turn of the 20th century to the present day. Each of the artists currently teaches in the Texas Christian University School of Music. Gibbons’ doctorate and masters in musicology are from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Queen holds a master’s of music in flute performance with academic distinction from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s in wind performance and literature of the flute from Northwestern University.

Actress Wambui Bahati presents her powerful one-woman play about the struggles of domestic abuse victims. She presents the roles of men, women and children in this engaging and informative performance. A talk-back follows the show.

*Theatre Performance

Medea Freely Adapted from the Medea of Euripides by Robinson Jeffers E&H Theatre Department

*Theatrical Storytelling

Thursday-Saturday, October 2-4, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, October 5, 2 p.m. Studio Theatre

Judith Black

Medea is a Greek tragedy, based on the myth of Jason and Medea, and was probably produced for the first time at the Greater Dionysia Festival in the spring of 431 B.C.E. The play is set in Medea’s home in Corinth. Central to the plot are Meada’s desire for bloody revenge against her husband for marrying another woman and the threat he is to her power. Perhaps misunderstood by his contemporaries, for what they thought were haphazard plots and unheroic heroes, Euripides was busy blending new elements into their “traditional,” to create new genre of theatre such as tragicomedy and romance, and delving into the emotional lives of his characters as a precursor to modern realism.

Judith Black’s original stories offer non-traditional vantage points on people, places and events, in the hopes of creating a broader understanding of the past. The Boston Globe describes her as a “cross between Lily Tomlin and Woody Allen, the hard edge of feminist certitude cushioned by self-deprecating humor that never slides into self-hatred.” She is a member of the National Storytelling Network’s Circle of Excellence. Black has been featured ten times at the National Storytelling Festival, and served three times as teller-in-residence at the International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough, Tenn., in addition to appearing at storytelling festivals in Montreal, Canada, Indianapolis, Indiana, Nevada

Monday, October 20, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

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City, California, Harvard, Massachusetts, Burlington and Vermont, to name just a few. Her commissions have included the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Boston Museum of Fine Art, the U.S.S. Constitution Museum, The U.S. Department of Forestry, the Salem Theatre Company and National Public Radio.

33rd Annual Literary Festival

Performance and Talkback

Currently the Louis D. Rubin, Jr. writer-in-residence at Hollins University, Karen Salyer McElmurray is the author of novels and creative non-fiction works, including Strange Birds in the Tree of Heaven (1999), The Motel of the Stars (2008), and Surrendered Child: A Birth Mother’s Journey (2004). She has recently completed a new novel entitled Wanting Inez. McElmurray serves as a faculty member for the creative writing programs at Murray State University and West Virginia Wesleyan College. She has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Kentucky Foundation for Women. Her awards include the Lillie Chaffin Award for Appalachian Writing and the Associated Writers and Writing Programs Award in Creative Nonfiction. The festival includes a reading by McElmurray, three papers about her work, and a public interview with her.

Karen Salyer McElmurray, poet & teacher

Thursday, October 30, 2:30, 3:30 & 7:30 p.m. Friday, October 31, 2:30 & 3:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

The LGBTQ Community and the United Methodist Church – Part 1 Queer Monologues: Appalachian Gay and Lesbian Voices from within the United Methodist Church Presented by the Gay Straight Alliance in partnership with Alpha Psi Omega Theater Fraternity Frank Trotter Wednesday, October 22, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

The Queer Monologues tells the stories of gay and lesbian people in the Emory & Henry College community and their experiences with coming out within the United Methodist Church. The stories, collected and written as monologues by Katelyn Bland-Clark (E&H ’10), are performed by current students. A talk-back discussion is led by The Rev. Dr. Trotter, a retired United Methodist elder and active participant in the Reconciling Ministries movement within the United Methodist Church.

November Staley Lectures

The Last Segregated Hour Stephen R. Haynes

Sunday, November 2, 8:15 p.m. Monday, November 3, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Lecture

The LGBTQ Community and the United Methodist Church – Part 2 “Gay by Birth. United Methodist by Choice.” Frank Trotter

Dr. Stephen Haynes, author of The Last Segregated Hour: Church Desegregation and the Memphis Kneel-In Campaign, tells the story of a “dramatic yet little-studied tactic” of the civil rights movement: attempts by integrated groups to attend worship at white congregations. Sunday’s lecture explores the history of “kneel-ins” between 1960 and 1965; Monday’s presentation explores the kneel-ins in Memphis and includes an account of recent efforts at reconciliation between the white churches involved and kneel-in participants.

Thursday, October 23, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Trotter gives his personal testimony about his experience as a pastor in the United Methodist Church, which does not permit the ordination of homosexuals. He shares his decision to work from within the structure of the UMC as a part of the Reconciling Ministries Network in an effort to gain equality for LGBTQ persons in all facets of the life in the church.

Lecture

To Die or Not to Die? Brynn Welch Adam Wells

Lecture

Tuesday, November 4, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

The Five Myths of College Athletics: Where Do We Go From Here? Travis Freezell

The day of the dead is a Mexican tradition in which people believe that the spirits of the dead come back to this world to visit their families and take the aroma or the essence of the food, flowers and objects that their relatives placed for them on an altar. Is there a life after death? What is death? Dr. Welch and Dr. Adam Wells will explore together these fascinating questions in their presentation. Spanish students set up an altar in tribute to Gabriel García Márquez.

Wednesday, October 29, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge College athletics has never been more popular but has also never been more misunderstood by an adoring public. This talk examines the five greatest myths about contemporary college athletics and the impact of those myths upon the future of college sports.

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Lecture

brass quintet, C Street Brass’s recent Wop de Wop EP release, in collaboration with DJ and Producer Jakeisrain, blends different genres of classical music with current electronic dance music. They call themselves a “community of 5” and are as comfortable with baroque music as they are with dubstep. Living their dream, they explore, discover and grow together through their music.

Women in Medicine Cathy Schubert

Wednesday, November 5, 7:30 p.m. Hermesian Room, Byars Hall Dr. Cathy Schubert (E&H ’95), associate professor of clinical medicine at Indiana University, shares experiences from her journey through medical school to balancing her current roles as wife, mother and practicing physician, answering the question of what it’s like to be a woman in medicine.

*Theatre Production

The Spitfire Grill E&H Theatre Department music and book by James Valcdq, lyrics and book by Fred Alley, based on the film by Lee David Zlotoff.

Artalk

Into the Woods Tom Berenz, painter

Thursday-Saturday, November 20-22, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, November 23, 2 p.m. Studio Theatre

Monday, November 10, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

This American musical introduces Percy to the audience as she contemplates her imminent release from a five-year prison sentence, through her journey to the small Wisconsin town of Gilead, and the “new start” both she and the small town experience. The development of the musical by collaborators Valcq and Alley follows the popularizing of the film version by Lee David Zlotoff in 1996. By 2001, the play had opened Off-Broadway and won the Richard Rodgers Production Award, administrated by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Directed by Kelly Bremner with music direction by Jeremiah Downes. Design and Technical Direction by Daniel L. Wheeler.

Tom Berenz’s work consists of explosive paintings that play between two and three-dimensional space as he creates colorful, balanced, yet disjointed compositions. He is on trend with the current styles in the world of painting. References to familiar scenes, such as landscapes or still lives, that are easy to relate to are present in his work, but the subject matter is blown into fragmented abstraction in bold, acidy hues. While it is easy to see him rooted in American abstract expressionism, Berenz gives a thoroughly contemporary spin to his dynamic paintings. Berenz is assistant professor in the art department at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. This Artalk is in conjunction with his exhibition in The 1912 Gallery, Tuesday, Nov. 11 through Friday, Dec. 12 (except Nov. 26-Dec. 1).

Poetry Reading Felicia Mitchell

Lecture

Wednesday, December 3, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Mindfulness: A Strategy for Connecting Our Inner Wisdom and Improving Our Focus Alan Forrest

Dr. Felicia Mitchell, poet and professor of English at Emory & Henry reflects on and shares poems from her new collection, Waltzing with Horses (Press 53). The reading highlights poems grounded in Mitchell’s long relationship with her adopted home of Southwest Virginia.

Monday, November 17, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge Mr. Forrest discusses how to integrate mind training into our personal routines and lives. Mindfulness is simply the intention and activity of paying attention, in present time, in a particular way and with nonjudgmental awareness to whatever is going on within and around oneself. This presentation focuses on ways to cultivate the flow and ease of engaging one with their internal sense of compassion and wisdom. Using simple and profound levels of being present, we can learn how to access our capacities for experiencing and expressing insight, self acceptance and loving kindness.

*Concert

Christmas at Emory E&H Music Department

Sunday, December 7, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel An annual “Merry Christmas” celebration for the campus and community is presented by the vocal and instrumental ensembles and soloists studying in the music department. The Emory & Henry College Memorial Chapel decked with candlelight and sounds of the season is the setting.

*Concert

C Street Brass

Tuesday, November 18, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel From fresh images to irresistible personalities—this concert will blow you away. A conservatory-trained

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Barter Theatre Program Emory & Henry College has an arrangement with the Barter Theatre in Abingdon whereby students may attend the following Main Stage and Stage II plays for a discounted price of $16, upon showing the E&H student ID. These plays carry Lyceum credit. When attending a play at the Barter Theatre for Lyceum credit, you must arrive 15 minutes before show time. Retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for Lyceum credit. Descriptions are found below. No more than two Lyceum-credit events in any semester may be Barter plays. on a date. She definitely knows better than to get involved with an actor, but sometimes a girl just has to do what she has to do. The morning after is hilarious, sweet, and a little bit awkward, especially when Janelle realizes she’s seen Darren somewhere before…but where? By Rick Whelan

Ring of Fire

Aug. 15–Sept. 6 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia It’s a journey through the life of Johnny Cash, as told by his music. The Man in Black was a man like no other, whether he sang about his love for June Carter Cash, his hard-living, hard-partying ways, or his deep and abiding faith. A multi-talented cast performs his best-known hits, like “I Walk the Line,” “Ring of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues” or “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” Created by Richard Maltby, Jr., conceived by William Meade, adapted by the Broadway Production by Richard Maltby, Jr. and Jason Edwards.

Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles

Sept. 25–Nov. 15 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia Expect suspense and laughs alike in this popular Sherlock Holmes tale. Brash Canadian Henry Baskerville has inherited a British manor…and a mystery. Strange things are happening on the moor and someone is trying to kill him. Could it be tied to the legend of a fearsome diabolical hound? Can you solve the case before the world’s most famous detective? Join us for this classic Victorian whodunit? Adapted by Richard Rose from author Arthur Conan Doyle.

Driving Miss Daisy

Aug. 29–Nov. 15 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia This sweet Southern comedy is set in Atlanta, Georgia, from 1948 to 1973. Boolie hires Hoke, a chauffeur, against his aging mother’s wishes, after she “destroys one three-week-old Packard, a two-car garage and a tool shed” when she was “just putting the car in reverse.” Follow the interesting relationship that develops between a black man and the Werthan family. A moving story of friendship told with humor, warmth and beauty as it gently raises questions about serious issues— aging, bigotry and Civil Rights. Critics call this funny, touching, totally irresistible comedy a delight! By Alfred Uhry.

A Modern Christmas Carol

Nov. 21–Dec. 28 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia This adaptation sets the familiar story in our own backyard. Mr. S is the CEO of MS Enterprises, a multinational high-tech corporation that makes ‘everything Christmas.’ He has decided to shut down his manufacturing plant and ship the jobs overseas, until he receives a late-night visit from an old friend who takes him on an incredible journey. It’s a Christmas story just as heartwarming as the original. Adapted by Richard Rose from Charles Dickens.

My Fair Lady

Sept. 13–Nov. 15 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia An unlikely love story with some of the greatest songs written for the Broadway stage and filled with witty dialogue and unforgettable characters. Sparks fly as cockney flower-seller Eliza Doolittle and the rich and arrogant Professor Higgins combine to create the ultimate makeover. Book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion and Gabriel Pascal’s motion picture Pygmalion.

Holiday Memories

Nov. 25–Dec. 21 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia “Imagine a morning in late November. A coming of winter mornings many years ago...” as we enter into the memories of Truman Capot’s boyhood, when he was sent to live with distant relatives in Alabama. His best friend is eccentric 67-year-old Miss Sook, who has never left the country, seen a movie, or told a lie. Capote’s autobiographical stories The Thanksgiving Dinner and A Christmas Memory have delighted readers for generations, and now they’re brought to life on stage just in time for the holiday season. By Truman Capote, the play is adapted by Russell Vandenbroucke.

Wash, Rinse, Spin Dry

Sept. 21–Nov. 15 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia As a single mom with a job waiting tables, Janelle barely has time to play her music, much less go 6


Arts Array Film Program Emory & Henry College, Virginia Highlands Community College, King University, the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center and the Abingdon Cinemall sponsor art and foreign films, shown at the Cinemall Mondays and Tuesdays at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The films are free of charge with ID to students and employees of sponsoring institutions. When attending an eligible Arts Array film at the Cinemall, retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for Lyceum credit. Each of these films described below carry Lyceum credit. However, no more than two Lyceum-credit events in any semester may be Arts Array films. There will be a $2.75 surcharge for 3-D movies. Full descriptions at: www.vhcc.edu/artsarray.

Locke

The Railway Man

From writer/director Steven Knight (Eastern Promises) comes a “bold, evocative film” that takes actor Tom Hardy to a new level. Regarded as “a compelling portrait of a man in transit and in crisis,” by The Guardian newspaper.

Outstanding performances from Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman and Stellan Skarsgard highlight this true story of wartime torture and peace time reconciliation. “Wrenching, profound, and beautifully-made,” says the New York Observer.

The Unknown Known

The Immigrant

Academy-award winning documentary filmmaker Errol Morris (The Fog of War) adds another interesting and personal view into one of recent history’s most polarizing figures: Donald Rumsfeld.

1921. In search of a new start, Ewa Cybulska and her sister Magda sail to New York from their native Poland. When they reach Ellis Island, doctors discover that Magda is ill, and the two women are separated.

Monday & Tuesday, Oct. 6-7: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 1-2: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Oct. 13-14: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 8-9: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

The Grand Seduction

A Most Wanted Man

Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 15-16: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Oct. 20-21: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Adapted from the French-Canadian film, Seducing Dr. Lewis, Seduction is about a depressed town that needs to convince a doctor to take up residence so a much-needed factory will move in.

When a half-Chechen, half-Russian, brutally tortured immigrant turns up in Hamburg’s Islamic community, laying claim to his father’s ill-gotten fortune, both German and U.S. security agencies take a close interest.

Blue Ruin

Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 22-23: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Young & Beautiful

Monday & Tuesday, Oct. 27-28: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Written and directed by noted cinematographer Jeremy Saulnier, Blue Ruin perfectly describes the melancholy and utter tragedy of main character Dwight’s life. Winner of the International Critics Prize at the Cannes Film Festival.

Isabelle is on summer holiday with her family when she decides to lose her virginity to a German boy named Felix. But the experience leaves her cold. Isabelle’s secret life is eventually revealed.

Night Moves

Cold in July

Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 29-30: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 3-4: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Kelly Reichardt’s suspense-thriller Night Moves follows three environmentalists whose homegrown plot to blow up a controversial dam unravels into a journey of doubt, paranoia and unintended consequences.

A split-second decision can change a life. While investigating noises in his house one steamy Texas night in 1989, Richard Dane puts a bullet in the brain of a low-life burglar. Directed with a level of realism rarely seen in modern films.

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Get on Up

The Trip to Italy

In his follow-up to The Help, Tate Taylor directs 42’s Chadwick Boseman as James Brown in Get on Up. Featuring Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer.

Director Michael Winterbottom trains his camera on the idyllic Italian landscape and the gastronomic treasures being prepared and consumed while keeping the film centered on the pointed chemistry between the two leads.

Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 10-11: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 24-25: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

God’s Pocket

Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 17-18: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Begin Again

Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 1-2: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

When Mickey’s crazy step son Leon is killed in a construction accident, nobody in the working class neighborhood of God’s Pocket is sorry he’s gone. Philip Seymour Hoffman’s final lead role.

The latest film from writer-director John Carney (Once), Begin Again is a stirring comedy about what happens when lost souls, Gretta (Keira Knightley) and her long-time boyfriend Dave (Adam Levine), meet and make beautiful music together.

LYCEUM: FALL 2014

John R. G. Roth, Cleft Conveyance, 2010, rigid foam, resin, sheet metal, medium-density fiberboard, 14x66x24” (detail)

Rachel Milligan, mezzo-soprano Concert: Sept. 18

Speculative Conveyance John R. G. Roth, sculptor Artalk: Sept. 22

Inconstant Certainty Manda Remmen, sculptor Artalk: Oct. 14

Judith Black Theatrical Storytelling: Oct. 20

Karen Salyer McElmurrary, poet and teacher 33rd Annual Literary Festival: Oct. 30–31

Remmen, Jeffersonian Grid Series, Lynn Township

Building Global Villages: Reflections on Habitat for Humanity in Nicaragua Presentation: Sept. 16

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Lyceum Requirements The Lyceum Program is an Emory & Henry College academic requirement for graduation. Accordingly, you should view Lyceum events much as you would a class obligation.

Appropriate Behavior You must behave respectfully during any Lyceum you attend. You are expected to be seated no less than five minutes before an event is scheduled to begin. Avoid extremely casual attire when attending Lyceum events—especially those held in the Chapel. Any faculty or staff member may dismiss you from a Lyceum event for any behavior that distracts you or others from full participation in the event, including sleeping, talking, reading, doing homework, texting, and generally any form of rude behavior. If you seek credit for an Artalk, you are expected also to view the 1912 Gallery exhibit to which the Artalk relates.

Documenting attendance You must have your ID card with you and present it upon entering and leaving each on-campus event. (You are responsible for making sure that your ID card is properly bar-coded and for consulting campus security if recoding is needed.) If you arrive at an event late or leave it early, you will not receive credit for attendance. In the case of Barter plays and Arts Array films that are Lyceum-eligible (as indicated in this booklet), you must retain the ticket stub and present it to the CSA office for credit within a week of the event in question. No more than two credited events in any semester may be films, and no more than two may be Barter plays. You may not receive more than one credit for a multiple-performance event (e.g., a play), even if you attend several performances.

Calculating the requirement As a student enrolled in an undergraduate degree program at Emory & Henry, you are generally required to register attendance at five Lyceum events per semester, exclusive of summer school. If you extend your academic program beyond four years, you are not required to attend more than 35 Lyceums. If in a particular semester your enrollment falls below 12 credit hours (such that you are a part-time student), you are required to attend one event for each course in which you are enrolled that semester, up to five. If you are enrolled in student teaching, your Lyceum requirement for that semester is two events.

Seniors If you do not complete your Lyceum requirement, you will not be awarded a degree, even if you have met all other graduation requirements. You are exempt from any Lyceum obligation during your final semester before graduation—but only if you have already completed your Lyceum obligation fully. If you enter your final semester with a Lyceum deficit, you are advised to remedy it by attending as many Lyceums as needed during the first half of the final semester. Do not enter the final weeks before commencement with a Lyceum deficit.

Transfer Students Your total Lyceum requirement is tied not to the number of credits you have transferred in; rather it is tied to the number of semesters you are enrolled here. If there is a reduction in the usual 35-Lyceum requirement in your case, it will thus be because you spend fewer than eight semesters as a full-time E&H undergraduate. Your overall Lyceum requirement can usually be estimated using the following guideline: five Lyceums per semester for each E&H semester except the final one. Your specific requirement may be clarified at the time of graduation audit.

Academic Honesty As attendance at Lyceums is an academic

requirement, any attempt on the part of a student to present her or himself as having attended a Lyceum which she or he did not attend is viewed as a form of academic dishonesty and is dealt with accordingly. For example, submitting a ticket stub for a Barter play or an Arts Array film that one had not attended is a breach of the Honor Code and subject to Judicial disposition. Random checks may be conducted regarding attendance at such events.

Alternatives If you anticipate that extraordinary circumstances will make Lyceum attendance impossible during a given semester, you must, during the first two weeks of that semester, petition the Lyceum Committee to request an alternative way of satisfying part of the requirement. The alternative, which is usually far more time-consuming than attending Lyceums, involves reading published essays (as approved by the Committee) and writing critical reviews of them. No more than five Lyceum credits (total) may be obtained in the alternative fashion.

Please address questions regarding Lyceum policy to the Centralized Student Assistance Office, 276-944-6105.


www.ehc.edu/lyceum


Fall 2014 Lyceum: Emory & Henry College