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Editor’s Note

Emmie Brown EDITOR IN CHIEF

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Contents 20 GOING DOTTY FOR BLAKE STREET STYLE

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We hit up Boston this month to see how everyone’s weathering the crisp fall air

ADVICE FROM THE CEO OF PINTEREST Telling people how to create and run their own Internet start-up is a booming mini-industry. But here’s Pinterest co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann’s advice: “Don’t take too much advice.”

TRENDING NOW

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Statement jeans

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FASHION BULLETIN Fall’s top 5 sweater styles

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TRENDING 5

November’s hottest topics

12 30 JEWELRY BOX

FUTURE SHOP

We’re already paying with our phones, stores are accepting PayPal, and we’re ordering by app. What’s next? Glenn O’Brien ponders how we will buy in 2013.

Fall’s Best Watches

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CONFESSIONS OF THE MAN REPELLER “It’s not you, it’s the shorts.” The hilarious top fashion blogger Leandra Medine on how women’s fashion perplexes men

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PINTEREST TO-DO LIST 16

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Denim & Supply Ralph Lauren

7 for all MankindT

extile Elizabeth & James

Habitual,

You’ll always be true to your blues, but it’s time to spice things up. Try these fresh jeans styles on for size.

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9; gion, $29 True Reli jeans.com rand religionb

DKNY Jeans, $79; at Macy’s

Joe’s, $179; joesjeans.com

J Brand, $209; at Bloomingdale’s Paige Denim, $189; shopbop.com

Diesel, $168; at Diesel

3x1, $225; 3x1.us

Current/Elliot, $171; 310-274-8800

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h Textile Elizabet ; 78 & James, $1 . piperlime.com

Denim & Supply Ralph Lauren, $98; macys.com.

Habitual, $2 42; shopbop.co m

7 for All Mankind, $198; 7for allmankind.com.

AG Jeans, $144; agdenim.com. om

3x1, $225; 3x1.us

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Big Star, $98; buckle.com

ublic, $178; Rock & Rep les.com da blooming


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baby, it’s cold outside

Free People, $128

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Color Block

This summer trend has carried itself into the fall. Get your bold on! From Left J. Crew, $98 Madewell, $105 Boy. by Band of Outsiders, $250 Club Monaco, $249

Quirky Animals

This isn’t your grandma’s cat sweaterdon’t be afraid to rock it! From Left: Mulberry, $198 Topshop, $76 Zoe Karssen, $130 J.Crew, $98

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Turtleneck

A classic never dies. Carven, $894 Joe Fresh, $29 J. Crew, $95 Derek Lam, $850

Print

Embrace your inner animal with this wild style! From Left ASOS, $27 Sea, $336 Chloe Sevigny $345 Stella McCartney, $580

Cableknit

Dress up this basic style witha bold statement jean and lots of jewelry! LL Bean, $40 Nili Lotan, $425 Peter Jensen, $337 A.P.C., $415

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The top five most tweeted trends of November are profiled.

1: Hurricane Sandy, or “ Frankenstorm” as she came to b e known, d evastated the Northeast as t he largest Atlantic hurricane i n history. B illions o f dollars i n damage w as s ustained, a nd m illions were left out in the cold without power for weeks on end. The powerful storm transformed some of Atlantic C ity’s streets into r ivers and inundated parts of Lower Manhattan, water forming whitewater cascades i n Ground Z ero and swamping N ew York’s fi nancial district. P art of M anhattan’s storied skyline went dark as power failed for more than 250,000 customers s outh o f M idtown, some o f a n estimated 7.5 million people on the eastern seaboard who lost power.

2: On November 6, the 57th presidential election took p lace. T he n ation was divided a lmost ing a winner as it was just too close to call. An unexpected h igh voter turnout among blacks, Latinos, single women, and young people swung the vote for Barack Obama by a margin of j ust over 4 million votes. That he could get re-elected despite h is d ismal record i s a tribute to h is graphics of America. Apparently bad economic times are not enough t o sway t he e lection. It seems that b read a nd c ircuses trump t he old-fashioned concept of hard work.

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3: She’s done it again! With the worldwide release of her fourth studio album, “Red,” Taylor Swift has taken the world by storm. “This album is about the other kinds of love that I’ve recently fallen in and out of," Swift writes. "Love that was treacherous, sad, beautiful, and tragic. But most of all, this record is about love that was red.” Whether she's plucking her mandolin, belting out U2-inspired arena rock, or harmonizing with Gary Lightbody of Snow Patrol or Ed Sheeran, she never sounds happier than when she's getting dumped hard enough to justify a good revenge anthem. Rock on Taylor!

4:

Hostess, the company that since the 1930s has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business a nd l eave u s bereft o f Ding D ongs, Sno Balls, H o Ho’s, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid’s palate, taste so good. But don’t f ear, i ts p opular b rands will l ikely find a second l ife after being snapped up by buyers.

5: Move o ver computers, y our sleek siblings a re t he p rized gift o f the holidays. The release of the iPad Mini, which essentially is a midsize between the iPad a nd i Phone, p rovides a cheaper a lternative for those unwilling t o fork o ut $ 459 for the full s ize iPad. Retailers h ave prepared f or a b ig t ablet season. Walmart, f or e xample, doubled its orders for iPads and other tablets gift c ard for $399 a s one of its specials on Thanksgiving night.

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We’ve scoured the interweb t o find out what j ewelry p iece i s making you tick this season. The answer: WATCHES! Here’s the style rundown: timepiece with an armload of blingy bracelets!

3.

Tone down this masculine look with some delicate bracelets.

1. Guess ‘Celia,’ $108; guess.com 2. Betsey Johnson ‘Fierce,’ $94; betseyjohnson.com

3. 1.

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2.

$68; shopbop.com


6.

Pair this chunky timepiece with some thin bracelets and you won’t miss a beat.

4. Michael Kors ‘Blair,’ $215; macys.com 5. Marc Jacobs ‘Serena,’ $275; marcjacobs.com

4.

5.

6. Burberry Tortoise Boyfriend, $180; nordstrom.com

This delicate style looks great with a bold statement ring.

7.

7. La Mer ‘Elana,’ $140; bloomingdales.com 8. Movado ‘Cheery,’ $188; movado.com

9. Swiss Made Leather Wrap, $210; nordstrom.com

8.

9.

12.

Wear this eye-catcher by itself, or if you’re feeling bold add in some monochromatic bracelets. 10. Betsey Johnson ‘Carrie,’ $88; shopbop.com 11. Michael Kors ‘Brielle,’ $199; michaelkors.com 12. Marc Jacobs ‘Talia’, $120; nordstrom.com

10. 11.

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We have a feeling Ellie Goulding might melt over this color combination, and it looks very dressy on nails too. Just perfect for the party season!

You’ll Need: black polish gold polish sewing needle

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Step 1:

Apply black polish.


Pinterest To-Do

Step 2:

Apply a second coat of black and let dry.

Step 3:

Drop 3 drops of golden nail polish over black nail polish as pictured. Do not let them dry!

Step 4:

Without letting the gold dry, quickly swipe through the three dots with a needle.

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Mae L.

jacket: Michael Kors sunglasses: Ray Ban

We visited New England’s capital this month and found tons of perfect fall looks.

from left:

Codie P.

coat: MiuMiu. turtleneck: J Crew hat: Miss Selfridge

Wesley T.

jacket: Alice B. skirt: Lenox bag: B-Low the Belt scarf: J Crew

Charlotte M.

sweater: Piper Lime hat: Lamb & Mars jeans: J Brand shoes: Chloe

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1. Josephine C.

jacket: Chanel bag: Bindya shoes: Armani

2. Taylor A.

fur: acne bag: Topshop pant: DKNY shoes: Lorenzo Mali

3. Paulie K.

jacket: Free People scarf: Jackson dress: Tennessee 22 shoes: Givenchy

4. Rachel C.

jacket: Band of Outsiders bag: Bindya shoes: Danielle Nicole

5. Aldina R.

top & skirt: BGBG

& Livi M.

coat: Burberry

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Photographed by Carter Smith top: Balenciaga ring: MiuMiu

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With i mpeccable s tyle a nd s avvy c areer c hoices, B lake Lively h as H ollywood, t he f ashion w orld, a nd h er f ans going absolutely dotty.

By Brooke Hauser

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who is 25, blonde, and famous---but there’s something about Lively that’s hard to begrudge. In an industry of jaded starlets and faded Bright Young Things, her joie de vivre is refreshing, and her excitement infectious. When I met Lively three years ago, she was still adjusting to her growing fame. A quick study, she had aced the art of speaking in sound bites and didn’t reveal much of herself. Grateful as she was for the show that launched her career, she had tired of being chased by paparazzi and teenage fans eager to

“I don’t drink. I have never tried a drug... It’s just something that I genuinely don’t have a desire for.”

spot the star with her ten boyfriend, Penn Badgley, saying coolly, “I don’t ever respond to ‘Serena’---that’s not my name.” These days, she is better known for being Blake---and for living a life so glamorous it makes Serena van der Woodsen’s seem provincial. Lively has been a model in ads for Chanel,

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cardigan: Michael Stars shorts: Ecru bracelets: Seasonal Whispers

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top: Lanvin shorts: BCBG bracelet: Chan Lu

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“I’d rather have a little bit of cellulite and go do a food trip and try every ice-cream place in the South.”

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Telling people how to create and run their own Internet start-up is a booming mini-industry. But here’s Pinterest c o-founder a nd C EO Ben Silbermann’s a dvice: “Don’t t ake too much advice.” “Most people generalize w hatever they d id, and say that w as t he strategy t hat made i t work,” Silbermann s aid. I n reality, t here’s very little w ay o f knowing how various factors contributed to success or failure.

I n an interview w ith Hunch co-founder and investor Chris Dixon at S XSW today, it was remarkable how often t he c onversation hit upon ways t hat Pinterest b ucked Silicon Valley’s c onventional w isdom. A nd yet, t hese d ays the visual s ocial curation s ervice i s one of t he fastest-growing a nd m ost i nfluential of start-ups. S ilbermann i s in s ome ways a stereotypical start-up founder. He

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moved to Silicon Valley because he wanted to be a part of the excitement (in fact, he says one of his inspirations was reading about Kevin Rose and Digg on TechCrunch). He worked at Google before starting a company. He’s a soft-spoken young guy who’d obviously be more comfortable working on his product than speaking to a large audience. Still, on many important decisions, Silbermann and Pinterest zigged where others zagged.

TIMELESS BEAUTY

Pinterest was hard for investors to understand at first (these days, because it deviated from the trends of the moment. “When we first started, people were obsessed with this idea of real time, and everything was real-time text feeds,” Silbermann said. Pinterest, on the other hand, isn’t about speed or dense information. “To me, [Pinterest's image-dominated] boards are a very human way of looking at the world,” Silbermann said. By contrast, “You never see a

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tweet older than 48 hours, unless it’s ironic. I wanted to create a service that’s a bit timeless.” Pinterest’s big idea is “helping people discover things that they didn’t know they wanted,” Silbermann said, so beauty and simplicity are its highest product goals.

CULT OF THE ENGINEER

Or here’s a more personal example. Engineering is the hallowed skill and occupation of Silicon Valley. Silbermann is not an engineer, so at Google he worked in online sales and operations. “I left, not because I didn’t love the company, but because of my particular background, it would have been really hard to built products,” he said. When he and his co-founders got together, they first worked on iPhone apps with expensive contract developers. And today, Pinterest’s small team of 20 people is not driven by engineering. The company is split into three divisions: Engineering, design and social — with “social” a combination of

A screenshot of a user’s Pinterest boards, Silbermann’s equivalent of a “profile page.”


quantitative people and community people, who try to understand how and why people use Pinterest, how social groups form and how social norms propagate. “I kind of think of engineering like the chefs at a restaurant,” Silbermann said. “Nobody’s going to deny chefs are integrally important, but there’s also so many other people who contribute to a great meal.”

NOT KNOWING WHEN TO QUIT

Here’s another one. “Fail fast” is a common mantra in Silicon Valley. “If you’re not embarrassed by your first product release, you’ve released too late,” says start-up

But Pinterest had “literally dozens” of versions of its signature grid layout “that were fully coded and fully styled with productiondata” before they were released. Silbermann said, “The hard part about that idea of ‘minimum viable

adopters.” A decade ago, an early adopter was likely someone with a fast, expensive home Internet connection and a smartphone. But those luxuries are not just reserved for the techie elite anymore. “Now, everyone that I grew up with in Iowa has Facebook; they often have an iPhone or Android phone; so, to me, it makes sense that people would find these services,” Silbermann said. Once Pinterest did start growing — it had 16.1 million U.S. uniques in January, having doubled since November — it wasn’t because of celebrity users who brought in growth spurts, as with some other services like Twitter, but rather through networks of people like design bloggers, Silbermann said. MYTH OF THE EARLY ADAPTER I don’t want to get too cheesy, but If there’s one thing people know from many other founders? He other Internet start-ups, it’s the site’s success with women and homemakers. thoughtful and nice. But Silbermann has a more nuanced view of so-called “early product,’ for me, is you don’t know what ‘minimum’ is, and you don’t know what ‘viable’ is.” In the early days, Pinterest had “catastrophically small numbers,” Silbermann said. Nine months after launch, the site counted 10,000 users, with few of them active on a daily basis. Silbermann said he recently picked up Eric Ries’s “The Lean Startup,” and was grateful he didn’t read it at the time, because it might have convinced him to give up at that point. In fact, he’s not sure why he didn’t quit — probably because he was afraid of embarrassment, and doubted Google would hire him back, Silbermann said.


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We始re already paying with our phones, stores are accepting PayPal, and we始re ordering by app.What始s next? Glenn O始Brien ponders how we will buy in 2013.

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There was something intriguing about the stores and their merchandise from all over the world; for me, it was like a museum of things not from Cleveland, Ohio. The people working in the stores seemed worldly or otherworldly, registering as “You’re not from around here are you?”—as if they all had some exotic and possibly tragic story to tell about how they wound up at the cosmetics counter or the shoe department. I remember my grandmother saying that Veronica Lake had ended up

“beaming up” in Star Trek, and it made a fantastic swooshing noise. The sales slip was shot up to the credit department, approved and shot back. Fantastic! I knew as a child that when the future arrived, it would probably appear first in the form of shopping. Another futuristic miracle was a machine in the shoe department. I think it was what was then called a fluoroscope, which was a sort of live TV version of an X-ray, and it was an aid to fitting. You could try on

There was something intruiguing about the stores and their merchandise from all over the world; for me, it was like a museum of things not from Cleveland, Ohio. working in a department store, and how Vivien Leigh had gotten a job at Neiman Marcus as a kind of psychotherapy. To me, the stores were exotic people brand new, so somehow shopping seemed to be about the future, and every purchase seemed life-changing. Even the shopping process was futuristic. My grandma had what was called a chargea-plate. Actually, she had a purse full of them. These were small aluminum plates embossed with the customer’s name, address and account number, and when slotted into a sort of press, they stamped a sales slip with this info. When she said “Charge it!” the sales slip was inserted into the store’s pneumatic tube system. I was intrigued to read that there are several such systems still operating in New York. But at the time, it was practically like

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shoes, then stick your feet into the bottom of the machine and see the bones in your toes right through the shoes, so it wasn’t even necessary to press on the toe of the shoe to determine if you had enough room. I would spend ten minutes wiggling my toes in this thing, probably absorbing even more radiation than I got from drinking milk containing strontium-90, fallout from all the H-bomb testing that was still going on in the atmosphere. I still wonder if the problems I’ve had with my feet—and I’m a Pisces—had something to do with nuking them in the kids’ shoe department at Higbee’s. But who knew? It seemed like a good idea at the time. And it was at that same department store that I got hooked on antiquarian books. I still have leather-bound Byron and Trollope volumes that were bought with Grandma’s charge-aplate from Higbee’s. But then came plastic. I remember being amazed when my stepfather took out his wallet and I noticed that it was designed to accommodate dozens of credit cards—and all the slots were full. The poor guy had a master’s degree from Wharton, but he was a terrible financial manager of his personal finances. Somehow, he had become as entrenched in deficit spending as the United States


Shopping mall of the futu re .

government. It s eemed that h is p lan was to die in a s much debt a s he c ould i ncur. Of course he was paying heroic interest, but his was a generation of heroes that had fought a world war. They were gamblers and risk takers whose wartime experience must have led them to e xpect t o win. I r emember w hen I was in college the old man took me to the track and handed me money. “Go bet,” he said.

My ex was a catalog hoar something, I w

shopping. I never saw him happier than when he w as a t this e arly d iscount b ig b ox s tore called Uncle Bill’s. If only they’d had a beer garden. I think for my parents’ generation the future of s hopping s eemed to lie i n quantity discounts. T here i s a lost g eneration of shoppers w ho t alked about Sam Walton t he way people once spoke of Marcus Aurelius, and they talked about their shopping c lub the way

de r...That was one

anted to pick it up and f

“Couldn’t I just keep the money,” I’d answer and see a disappointed look in his eye.I’m sure he thought that one day a horse would come in and wipe away all that interest he owed. And I think he believed that maybe he could make up f or a ll t hat debt b y devoted bargain

eel it.

ea r lier gen- e rati ons talked a bout t he countryc lub or t he D AR. I remember a girlfriend’s d ad p roudly showing m e the fifty pounds o f croutons h e just b ought f or a ridiculous price, a hundred quarts of motor oil and his lifetime supply of Band-Aids.

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Today, when we imagine futuristic shopping, it’s all about the Internet, but ten years ago, it was catalogs. I still get them every day, for reasons I can’t determine. I never buy from them. I guess the companies bought my name—and the catalogs go straight into the “recycling.” My mailbox eats a small forest every year. I thought it would stop when I got divorced. My ex was a catalog hoarder. She had filed reams of them, alphabetized so that she could order anything in the world without leaving the house. That was one irreconcilable wanted to pick it up and feel it. My present and hopefully future wife is She hated catalogs too. But then it turns out that she loves the convenience of shopping online. As a result, I am on very familiar terms with the UPS guys—I know their life stories. And this advancement in shopping probably doesn’t eat up as many trees. Maybe it uses a lot of gas, because if the item arrives and the lady of the house doesn’t like it or it doesn’t fit, it goes right back by UPS, no questions asked. Is that convenient? What amazes me, though, is when the online ordered groceries are wheeled in on a huge trolley -and I open a dozen corrugated paper boxes. What’s in this giant box? A piece of cheese! This one? A salami! They still

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haven’t figured out how to consolidate, so I’m guessing that you know whose company trucks roll out the future? Don’t get me wrong. I am not against shopping on the Net. It has revolutionized my book buying addiction, perhaps even enabling it. I used to spend countless hours at book fairs browsing and then stagger home with a semi-impossible burden of shopping bags. I still like book fairs, but now I browse in some bookseller’s booth, then go to the smartphone, and I generally find the book I’ve eyeballed, handled and admired priced far less elsewhere: click. Sorry physical bookseller. And I go home with two books. The rest arrives by mail days later. And booksellers are cheap. They rarely overpack anything. Nothing against shopping by app—if it turns you on, but I think the real future of shopping is live and in person. Why? Because I think people really look in the mirror and ask someone if it makes them look fat. They want the experience of the hand! Not to mention to get out of the house. I want to get out of the house too. There’s no room there because of all the books I bought online. When I walk around Manhattan I marvel at all the boutiques. The Lower East Side, Nolita and Brooklyn are filled with amazing new


SHOPPING TECHNOLOGY

1950s

Initial Concerns: Initial credit card materials made them easy to duplicate, so consumers and retailers feared identity theft.

At first, credit cards were only good for certain retailers.

Proof we Adapted:

Credit card circulation in America in 2012:

1 in 7 Americans has 10+ credit cards:

48,900,000 171,000,000 269,000,000

ONLINE SHOPPING

1990s

I find that shopping now gives me hope for the future in the way it did when I was a kid. Some day I’m going to walk into a shop in Brooklyn, and a guy in a denim apron with muttonchop whiskers is going to give me a charge-a-plate, and I’m going to buy a handknit sweater, and my sales slip is going to get sucked up in a pneumatic pod, swoosh. Well, probably not. But I am encouraged by the new retail environment with all its beards, tattoos and piercings and one-of-a-kind items. I know that if I walk into a New Age cobbler shop, they are not going to irradiate my kid’s feet. Somehow, maybe, we have acquired some wisdom. I think in the future we may find whole communities of shops popping up, like little colonies of intelligence. I can imagine artisanal malls. Maybe they’ll be squatting in abandoned big box stores after all those have gone the way of the thirty-two-ounce sweet drink. Meanwhile, I’ve had an idea. What do you think of a bookstore/wine bar/shiatsu/shoeshine parlor?

CREDIT CARDS

2000s

piece of home-cured prosciutto from a Tamworth pig that had a name. And they made the merchandise. It’s Artisan World. And it’s got great personally imagined, handmade,

Facebook shopping is the future of social commerce, but not all consumers are convinced. Take a look at some other shopping platforms that received equal skepticism when they debuted.

Initial Concerns: No way for consumers to return items they did not like. Proof we Adapted:

Cyber Monday 2012 was the heaviest online spending day to date, bringing in $1 billion in online spending:

Shoppers could not try on or test the merchandise. More than 10 million retailers are currently active online:

ONLINE BANKING

Initial Concerns: identity

theft and fraud.

Proof we Adapted:

Other institutions have access to account info

Growth of US households banking online:

FACEBOOK SHOPPING

2010s

shops. These aren’t chains, they are mom-andpop operations. Well many are mom-and-mom operations, or pop-and-pop, too. There is something totally nineteenth century about them, and something totally twenty-first century. They are genuinely personal. It’s like walking into someone’s home. The dog or cat is lying there. There’s

Initial Concerns: shoppers They preferred buying were aprehensive about sharing through more trusted credit card info with a social retailer webstores. network. Proof we are Adapting:

Social commerce estiRetailers who sell through FB use the same security measures mated to reach $5 billion in 2013: as other online retailers:

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Fashion BloggerLeandra Medine on how women’s fashion perplexes men. “It’s not you, it’s the shorts.” On a s econd date l ast summer, a man really s aid this t o me, it w as f ollowed by, “You would be cute if you dressed nicer.” I’ll h ave you know t hose w ere premier designer shorts. There was no third date. Perhaps if i t were s lightly e arlier in t he year, I’d have been hurt, t ormented e ven, but because I’d started to d igitally chronicle my thoughts on the dichotomous nature of high fashion in a blog, it was okay. It w as n ow n ot a p roblem b ut a c oncept: how something so appealing to the female eye could read unattractive to a man, so I laughed, and quite hard at that. It was the first t ime my h ypothesis had been s o clearly proven correct.

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Medine blogging for The Man Repeller.

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Laurent have correctly predicted last fall that church-wear nun-chic becomes this season’s must. But if a man can get past it, or perhaps even begin to like it, and he doesn’t bat for his own team, if you know what I’m saying, this is your cue to do the victory dance. You’ve not only succeeded in maintaining full control over your style but may have actually landed a man more concerned with what’s inside your head than on it. Ultimately, you see, man repelling isn’t just about fashion and pretend-

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Trending