Page 1

EMMETT WALKER mobile email

(415)-205-5761 ebwalker@syr.edu


EMMETT WALKER mobile

email

(415)-205-5761

ebwalker@syr.edu

website emmettbwalker.com

EDUCATION 2012 - 2017 Syracuse University School of Architecture (B.Arch) Abroad Semesters - London, UK and New York City, NY

Thesis Prize Jury Honorable Mention King + King Award Finalist Deans List

2012 CCA Summer Architecture Pre-College | Berkeley, CA 2008 - 2012 The Urban High School | San Francisco, CA

EXPERIENCE Summer 2016 STUDIOS Architecture | San Francisco

Architectural Internship; assisted with Schematic and Design Development across a number of projects in the Bay Area.

Fall-Winter 2015 Bergen Street Studio | Brooklyn, NY

Architectural Internship; assisted with presentation drawings and web design responsibilities.

Summer 2014 Ballistic Architecture Machine (BAM) | Beijing, China

Architectural Internship; assisted with schematic design on a number of commercial and residential projects in China.

Summer 2013 Calthorpe Associates | Berkeley, CA

Urban Design + Planning Internship; assisted with design development of Kingdom City, Jeddah, Saudia Arabia.

Summer 2011 Peter Walker and Partners | Berkeley, CA

Landscape Architecture Internship; produced physical models for The Barangaroo Shoreline Project in Sydney, Australia.

AFFILIATIONS AIAS Member Summer 2016 Published in “DESIGN ENERGY FUTURES�

A publication by the Syracuse School of Architecture created for the Shenzhen Low Carbon City climate summit

Member of The Nature Friends | San Francisco Chapter A hiking club started in Vienna in the late 19th century.

SKILLS Digital Programs Autocad, Rhino, Revit, Sketchup, Vray, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, VR Visualization, Microsoft Office Suites

Physical Hand Drafting + Drawing, Model Making, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting Travel

UK, Ireland, Czech Republic, Hungry, Austria, Switzerland, France, Germany, China, Australia, Mexico, Canada and USA


Optimized Density The Summit Elderly Housing Green Belt Faculty Housing Cayuga Winery MISC.


OPTIMIZED DENSITY

Riis Housing, East Village, NYC

Whether spreading out evenly across the land in individualized parcels or condensing vertically to make minimal contact upon earth’s surface; humans have always wanted to feel in touch with nature. From this urge, two top-down construction typologies were created: the suburban ranch upon land and the urban tower in the park. As time progressed, suburbia became the embodiment of the American Dream while cities became abandoned. Without the stimulus of a thriving and local middle class, American Cities became increasingly desolate. Despite the growing contrast between city and suburb, in the 40s and 50s many of our cities, especially in New York, faced heavy “slum� clearance to make way for towers in parks. The tower in the park still could not answer to the promise of land ownership in the suburbs and additionally sterilized the once unique urban communities. Soon the tower in the park became recognized for its negative connotation rather than for its innovative modernist planning principals. Today, the tower in the park is still a part of many urban environments. While other historical typologies have been adapted, the tower in the park remains unchanged. It lacks correspondence with its surroundings and isolates its inhabitants from the city ultimately becoming iconic for a sense of false optimism and even dystopia. While these modernist developments throughout American cities are extraordinarily prevalent, their lack of social interaction can become their upside. Optimized densification is the exploitation of under utilized space to create a more dynamic cooperative based density often times adding onto what is already exists. The pursuit of maximizing intelligently can help to relieve socioeconomic exclusivity, create a more ecologically sustainable lifestyle and influence social mixing. Though architecture can only have a limited influence on the social climate of a place like New York City, reenvisioning and optimizing the density of the tower in the park typology can lead to a more harmonious engagement between buildings and their surrounding context or population. Optimizing density could be the modern day American dream by providing affordable and stable living situations to increasingly dense metropolitan areas.


OPTIMIZED DENSITY


OPTIMIZED DENSITY


OPTIMIZED DENSITY


THE SUMMIT

Low Carbon City, Pingdi, China

The Summit proposes the adaptive reuse of an abandoned factory located in The Low Carbon City in the outskirts of Shenzhen to create a future oriented, innovative prosthetics testing and fabrication facility. In order to limit the proposal’s carbon footprint, The Summit seeks to make precise modifications to the existing structure, by minimizing the need for heavy construction yet maximizing the effects of these interventions. This manifests itself in a new armature for the building which acts as a showcase for the general public of the technological innovations within the building. Collaboration with Matt Hill

The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit


Exterior Perspective

The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit


THE SUMMIT

We used these axon diagrams to represent everything from mechanical systems to formal concepts.

The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit • The Summit


THE SUMMIT

In order to understand the relationship between these testing facilities and the public promenade, we used variety of different diagrammatic drawings ranging in resolution to illustrate this key armature. One of the more interesting examples of these drawings was our unrolled section and plan of the promenade itself. This technique specifically helped us to curate the sequence of this public museum which in turn defined the way in which the rest of the test facilities operated.

1/4 MILE TRACK

LAP POOLS

DEEP WATER TESTING


FINE MOTOR SKILLS

INCLINE TEST

DROP TEST

UNSTABLE TERRAIN

Unrolled Public Promenade


THE SUMMIT

Our project was one of 13 selected from 3 years of studios to be showcased at a climate convention for the Low Carbon City in Shenzhen. Along with being exhibited in a gallery, a publication was also created and sold of various works. This is the pulication...


555 LIVONIA

DOUBLE LOADED CORRIDOR Building Axon

East New York, NY

This project is the outcome of a semester focused on the housing crisis in New York City. In collaboration with Taylor Hagan, we created a elderly residential building that rethinks the importance of accessibility of social space for a community that has lost both physical and fiscal mobility. Taking NYC’s affordable vernacular of double loaded corridor towers, we designed a building that expands the corridor creating an atrium lined with ramps that function both as equal access circulation as well as social gathering and refuge throughout the building for its residents. Throughout the residence, this social space manifests itself as a library expanding the normative stacks to terrace and spiral up and along the ramps. On the ground floor, programs such as a health clinic and hospice, pharmacy and café meet the needs for both the building’s occupants and the general public of East New York.

CENTRALIZED ATRIUM Ramp Elevator/Stair

CIRCULATION

Circulation

Studio

INTERNALIZED PORCH

1 Bed 2 Bed Assisted 2 Bed

ROOM TYPE

Unit Mix

Collaboration with Taylor Hagan OVERALL

Livonia Elevation


3/32” = 1’0”

2 Bedroom Assisted Living

2 Bedroom

Long Section

Library + Residential Floor Plan (Level 4)

Studio

1 BR

2 BR Assisted

Section

2 BR


555 LIVONIA

555 Livonia was developed through a series of “prototype� iterations particularly illustrated through physical model. The models were used to address the human scale and as such include the relationships between units and public space within the entirety of the building. To the right are our 2nd and 3rd prototype models. Both studies show the implementation of modular unit types and their relationship between one another along a circulatory promenade. This methodology of creating human relationships eventually ended up developing into an entire building.


555 LIVONIA

One of the many mediums we used to visualize central atrium space in 555 Livonia was to create perspectives through 1/2 scale model of the space. Through this element of the project, we were able to develop the public spaces on ramps, unit entry ways and library functionality.


Model Image Atrium


555 LIVONIA

LIVONIA AVE


THERMAL ENCLOSURE

LIBRARY STACKS

UNIT ENTRY

COURTYARD

DINING PHARMACY

KITCHEN


LONDON GREENBELT

Southbank, London, UK

This project was the outcome of a semester abroad in London. The project takes precedent from the United Kingdom’s long history of greenhouses as well as London’s Greenbelt that acts as way of constricting growth of its already sprawling fabric. The greenhouse aesthetically takes precedents from the repetitive steel and glass construction realized most notably in The Crystal Palace. The site is located in the Southbank, a place among great development pressures given its industrial history. Our chosen interaction straddles perhaps the most delicate section of the Southbank, an area where high rise office building meets historical double story row housing. The megastructure attempts to act as an undevelopable and tangible line forcing new development to go vertical thus protecting the Southbank’s historical past.

Collaboration with M. Baum, B. Miller, G. Granoff and T. Pau

Collaboration with J. Grannoff, B. Miller, T. Pau and M. Baum

Long Section


LONDON GREENBELT

Throughout the project there are a multitude programs which culminate in a Vertical continuation of the megastructure mimicking the surrounding office towers adjacent and marking the gateway to the project. Just as the rest of the rest of the greenhouse is supposed to be a blanket megastructure devoid of unnecessary articulation, Green Tower takes this same functional theology and manifests itself physically in a vertical mass.

London Greenbelt • London Greenbelt • London Greenbelt • London Greenbelt


OFFICE TYPOLOGY FLOWERS

ORCHARD

LIGHT WELL

CORN

The large atrium allows for maximum light to permeat for optimal growing.

SOUTH-WEST SLOPE

VEGGIES

The floor slabs angle towards the South-West in order to acquire maximum daylight.

MIRRORED FLOOR SLAB

FOREST

By mirroring the angled floorslabs, each floor alternates between South-West and South- East exposure.


NYC FACULTY THINK TANK

Greenwich Village, NYC

This project intends to act as a hybrid between faculty residency and international think tank located in the heart of Manhattan on one of the many iconic acute corners in the lower west side. The building is made up of a series of terraces inspired by the vernacular of the brownstones to create a similar condition between Public Street and shared private courtyard. Additionally, organization allows for unplanned networking amongst its inhabitancy.

Site Extrusion

Scaled To Context

Central Courtyard

Private Terraces


Section


CAYUGA WINERY

Lake Cayuga, NY

This project is focused on a way in which visitors could better view the landscape through an elevated glass tasting and event space while submerging the wine process underground to create a naturally insulating area for the wine process to happen.

East Elevation


Tasting

TASTING

Brewing BREWING

Aging AGING


MISC. Facebook Austin, TX These drawings come from a schematic design set while working at STUDIOS Architecture. The project was mostly interiors work to figure out way finding strategies in a pre-existing old industrial building in Austin. These drawings are just a few of many generated to experiment different materiality as well as minor spatial interventions.

TYPICAL FLOOR - AXON FACEBOOK AUSTIN - DOMAIN 8 August 22, 2016

LOOKING EAST

AIN 8 11

WRITABLE PLYWOOD

TYPICAL FLOOR - MICROKITCHEN FACEBOOK AUSTIN - DOMAIN 8 August 22, 2016

VIEW THROUGH SLATS CONCRETE FLOOR

BLACK ACCENT


Barangaroo Sydney, Australia I spent part of a summer with the Peter Walker and Partners (PWP) design team for the Barangaroo Development Project building models, to help establish the visual language for the new waterfront design for Sydney Harbor, and to understand the tidal fluctuation. Where the shore meets the water was clay as a way of creating different patterns with the balsawood blocks which represent sandstone. Though this work was early in my formal architectural education, it became a huge driving factor and inspiration to choosing to go to architecture school.

VIEW THROUGH SLATS

Scale: 1:50 m Materials: Foam Core, Balsa Wood, Flocking, and Scale People

TEXTURED FABRICS

SOCO PENDANTS

WIREFRAME PENDANTS

CORAL PENDANT

LOOKING WEST

14

S

ARTIST GRAPHIC

BLACK ACCENT


Emmett Walker Portfolio  

Architectural Porfolio 5-26-2017

Emmett Walker Portfolio  

Architectural Porfolio 5-26-2017

Advertisement