Fine Print 2017-2018

Page 1

Fine Print 2017-2018


Fine Print 2017-2018

Contents Fine Print 2017-2018 4 Mission 5 School History 6 School Colors, logo, crest, seal, and Jester 7 Academics 8 Graduation Requirements 8 Academic Support 10 Learning Support 11 Evening Study Hall 11 Proctored Evening Study Hall 11 Academic Review 11 Managing Assessments 12 College Counseling 12 Re-Enrollment 12 Academic Integrity 12 Attendance 13 Student Life 16 Community Living 16 Key Traditions and Events 16 Dress Code 20 General Safety 22 Fire Drill Procedures 22 Campus Emergency Protocol 24 Student Life Support Systems 26 Advisors 26 Residential Faculty 27 Dormitory Affiliates 27 Teaching Fellows 27 Proctors 27 Wellness Advocates 28 Health Services and Counseling 28 Health Services 28 Health Center 29 Health Center Procedures 29 Counseling Center 29 Counseling Services 30 Confidentiality 30 Eighteenth Birthday 30 Health Insurance 30 Medication 31

Student Welfare Committee 31 Athletics 31 Grades 32 Movement Requirement 32 Swimming Proficiency Graduation Requirement 32 Gym Useage 32 Code of Conduct 33 Fundamental Rules 34 Open Flame Policy 34 Smoking 34 School Jurisdiction 34 State and Federal Laws 35 Violation of a Fundamental Rule 35 Conduct Review Committee 35 Disclosure of Disciplinary Information 37 Reporting to Colleges 37 After Withdrawal 37 Non-Retaliation Policy 37 Safe Harbor Policy 38 Bullying 39 Sexual Misconduct 42 Sexual Harassment 43 Sexual Assault 44 Sexual Intimacy 50 Guidelines for Use of Technology 50 Device Use Guidelines 53 Residential Life 58 Dorm and Quiet Study Expectations 58 Daily Expectations 59 Teas 59 Study Hall and Breakfast Check-in 59 Ninth Graders 60 Sophomores 60 Juniors 60 Seniors 60


Emma Willard School

Campus Leaves 62 Signing In and Out 62 Standard Schedule of Leaves and Requisite Permissions 62 Capital Region 63 Closed Weekends 63 College Visits 63 Dinner with Family Members 64 Late Returns 64 Travel Plans 64 Jetlag Policy 64 Transportation 64 Concerts 64 Running Off-Campus 65 Dormitory closures 65 Violations of Emma Willard Residential Rules 66 Late Returns 66 Local Trips off Campus 66 Weekends 66 Meal Check-in violations 66 Sign-in/Out Violations 66 Social Probation 66 Daily Needs 68 ID/Smart Card System 68 Allowance 68 School Store 68 Dining 68 Laundry Room 69 Alcoves 69 Student Possessions 70 Items of Great Value 70 Lost and Found 70 Personal Property Insurance 70 Summer Storage 70 Student Rooms 70 Contents 70 What to Bring 71 Pet Policy 71 Decorating 71 Room Inspections 71 Guests on Campus 72 Parents/adults 72

Friends 72 Fathers, Brothers, and Other Male Family Members 73 Overnight Weekend Guests 73 Food Deliveries 73 Day Students 74 Absences or Delay 74 Lockers 74 Meetings 74 School Closings 74 Staying Overnight 74 Time on Campus 75 Transportation 75 Cars 75 Television 76 Student Activities 76 Emma Willard School Council 77 2017-2018 Student Leadership 78 2017-2018 Proctors 79 2017-2018 Wellness Advocates 80 Club Leadership 81 Places at and Around Emma Willard 82 Where to Turn for Answers 85 Directions 87 Academic Calendar 88 Daily Schedule 90 Alma Mater 91 Calendar of Vacations Back Cover

3


Fine Print 2017-2018

Fine Print 2017-2018 Welcome to Emma, where we believe in every girl there is the undeniable potential to change our world! We are a community of vibrant people where everyone is encouraged to be yourself. Be your best self. As such, we live in deep mutual respect for one another, the community, and campus we each hold dear. This handbook will help guide you through the programs, opportunities, and, of course, rules, policies, and traditions of the Emma Willard School community. As you read through this, we hope to answer many of the questions you may have about academics, security, school rules, dormitory living, safety, athletics, and other useful topics about Emma. However, every single situation that may occur in your time at Emma cannot be captured in a single document. At times, we will need to deviate from the normal procedures to deliver you and your fellow community members the best possible experience. Fine Print is given to every student and their family on Opening Day. Copies are available in the Student Life office, the Health Center, the Dean of Students and Wellbeing’s office, and the READY Center. An online version can be accessed through the student portal of the school website. Should larger changes to Fine Print be required during the year, as sometimes happens in such a lively community, we will be in touch with all members of the community, including parents, about any policy changes. Please enjoy reading through Fine Print. If you have any lingering questions, please do not hesitate to ask them of our Student Life office. They are here to help you as you join this exceptional community.

285 Pawling Avenue Troy, New York 12180 518.833.1300 Fax: 518.833.1815 emmawillard.org 4


Emma Willard School

Mission Statement Honoring its founder’s vision, Emma Willard School proudly fosters in each young woman a love of learning, the habits of an intellectual life, and the character, moral strength, and qualities of leadership to serve and shape her world.

5


Fine Print 2017-2018

School History

For 200 years, Emma Willard School has been a leader in girls’ education and recognized as one of the nation’s leading college-preparatory boarding and day schools for girls. Emma Hart Willard founded the school in 1814 on the bold principle that young women had the intellect and the moral right to benefit from as rigorous an education as the best available to young men. In 1910, the school moved to its current campus on Mount Ida in Troy, New York. At the heart of the Emma experience are three things. First, a deeply personalized living and learning experience. We seek to bring out what is exceptional about you through a focused and rigorous academic curriculum, a wide variety of cocurricular opportunities, outstanding student support systems, and a strong residential life program. Second, we have a distinctive worldview. We believe in service and the ability of each girl to serve and shape the world around her. Third, we have an authentic community. Every Emma Girl is encouraged to use her distinct personality and intellect. We don’t want you to grow into someone else, we want you to become more wholly yourself.

School Colors When the French hero, the Marquis de Lafayette, made his historic trip up the Hudson River to New York State’s capital in 1824, he called on esteemed educator Emma Hart Willard in Troy. Legend has it that he presented her with a bouquet of pink roses. The Marquis and Mrs. Willard went on to form a lasting friendship. Emma Willard School’s Alumnae Association, founded in 1892, adopted a pale rosy pink as its signature color, based on the gift of the Marquis. Over the last decade, the school has adopted the rich red we now sport on the playing fields and in school publications. In addition, it is tradition for each class to adopt the class color—either purple or green—of its “big sister” class. These colors are used for all class activities and projects. Odd-numbered classes are represented by purple (as are all odd-numbered alumnae classes), while the even-numbered classes use green (as do all even-numbered alumnae classes). 6


Emma Willard School

School Logo We call this the “Emma Signature.” Our logo, which was inspired by Madame Willard’s own signature, is what we use on all official Emma materials.

School Crest An updated version of the Willard family crest, the school crest serves as the student and alumnae “logo” and can be found on class rings. The crest bears the motto Gaudet Patientia Duris—patience rejoices in adversity.

School Seal The school’s official “corporate” seal bears the lamp of learning and a likeness of Mrs. Willard, with the words Semper Fidelis—always faithful.

The Jester One of the most popular characters in the long-standing annual student performance of Revels, the jester serves as the school’s athletic mascot.

7


Fine Print 2017-2018

Academics Graduation Requirements Listed below are the requirements by department. Virtually all students elect more courses in some disciplines than the requirements demand. Arts • For entering 9th graders, successful completion of 2 units of arts electives; 1 of these units must be completed by the end of 10th grade; at least one course must be performing, and at least one course must be a visual arts course. • For entering 10th graders, successful completion of 1 unit of arts electives at Emma Willard; at least one course must be performing, and at least one course must be a visual arts course. • For entering 11th graders, successful completion of 1 unit of arts courses at Emma Willard with no distribution required among the arts. Athletics and Physical Education All students must take physical education classes or their equivalent in team sports or dance all year during 9th, 10th, and 11th grade. 12th graders are required to take 10 weeks of physical education classes or the equivalent. All students must complete a swimming and water safety proficiency test. English Successful completion of four years of English. During 9th, 10th, and 11th grades, a student must take year-long English courses. In 12th grade she must choose two English electives, one per semester. History & Social Science Successful completion of three year-long courses in history and social science or their equivalents, including one year of United States history taken at the 11th- or 12th-grade level. Foreign Language Successful completion of the third (300) level of a single foreign language following an initial placement test at Emma Willard. This does not apply to students for whom English is a second language. Mathematics Successful completion of the mathematics sequence through the third level following the sequence: Algebra I (M-125), Algebraic Geometry (M-225), and either Algebra II and Trigonometry (M-325) or Algebra II and Trigonometry with Non-Routine problems (M-326). 8


Emma Willard School

Science Successful completion of three units of laboratory science: one year of Physics of Matter and Motion (S-101), one year of Chemistry (S-200 or S-201), and one year of Biology (S-310). AP courses fulfill the chemistry and biology requirements. For students entering 10th or 11th grade, successful completion of two units of laboratory science during their high school career: one year of physical science (chemistry or physics) and one year of life science (biology), determined on an individual basis. Students admitted for the spring semester will be excused from the corresponding requirement (e.g. admitted in January of ninth grade, excused from S-101) and will work with the department chair to determine current and future coursework.

Your Schedule Emma Willard is committed to students gaining experience in making academic choices. The following are typical schedules for each grade: A 9th Grade Program • Arts semester courses • English I • Classical Mediterranean History and a spring semester regional history course • Foreign language • Mathematics • Physics • Physical education class, unless exempted through dance class or interscholastic teams A 10th Grade Program • Arts semester courses • English II • A fall semester regional history course and Contemporary World History • Foreign language • Mathematics • Chemistry • Health • Physical education class, unless exempted through dance class or interscholastic teams

9


Fine Print 2017-2018

An 11th Grade Program • Arts semester courses • English III • United States history • Foreign language • Mathematics • Biology • Physical education class, unless exempted through dance class or interscholastic teams A 12th Grade Program For graduation, a 12th grader must complete any distribution requirement she has not fulfilled and choose one elective each semester from the English department. She also must fulfill a 10-week physical education requirement either through gym class or an acceptable substitution. Further, a 12th grader must minimally carry 2.5 units per semester, 5 units for the year.

Academic Support At Emma, girls excel and their ambitions are as varied as their talents. Both in and out of the classroom, we encourage the aspirations of each girl through an innovative, rigorous curriculum that meets the needs of the individual learner. We explore values and reward intellectual risk taking. For many students, the move from their previous academic setting to the academic expectations of Emma can be challenging. Success in this environment requires responsibility, initiative, and self-motivation. There are numerous systems and areas of support available to all students. Many of these areas of support ask the student to work closely with her faculty. Peer groups are also available for help in all areas. Students are expected to show a growing level of competence in personal time management, study skills, and organization. • Proctored study hall. An opportunity for all new students and any student who needs help with focus when studying to have a faculty-monitored, two-hour study hall. This is required for all new students during the first quarter. 10


Emma Willard School

• Teacher availability & dorm affiliates. On-campus faculty members are on duty in the dormitories and library one evening per week, MondayThursday, and are available to provide extra academic help. • Peer tutors & learning centers. The Math Learning Center in Weaver is staffed throughout the day by math and science faculty and peer tutors and is open to all students; peer groups offer extra help in many more academic disciplines. • Advisor. For each student, her advisor is the first line of support and assistance. Learning Support. Our experience suggests study skills are learned rather than innate, and not all students have acquired the necessary skills for effective study or time management prior to attending Emma. Teachers help students develop the habits and strategies that will allow them to maximize their study time. The Coordinator of Learning Support serves as a resource for students who would like to develop their study skills, providing one-on-one meetings and connecting students with appropriate community resources. Evening Study Hall. Quiet study times are held in the dormitories during the evening to provide a quiet and structured environment for study. Evening quiet study runs from 7:15-9:15 p.m., Sunday through Thursday. (See page 58 for specifics of evening quiet study.) Rooms and corridors must be quiet during this time. Proctored Evening Study Hall. In the fall semester, all freshmen, new sophomores, new juniors, and students on academic review are assigned to proctored evening study hall to assist them in developing study skills. Students who have been assigned to proctored evening study hall will be re-evaluated periodically during the first semester and thereafter, as necessary. Students may be placed in proctored evening study hall at any time, based upon teacher, houseparent, advisor, or SWC input. Academic Review. Academic review is a support structure put in place to ensure that students experiencing academic difficulty receive the support they need to improve. At the end of each marking period, relevant members of the learning team meet with the advising team leaders to review the work of students whose performance merits notice. A student who receives one grade of No Credit or two grades of C- or below within a marking period will be discussed and may be placed on academic review. If a student is placed on academic review, her advisor is notified so she/ he can speak to the student, and her parents are notified by the Academic Dean. For example, a student struggling in math may be assigned weekly meetings with a teacher, and weekly check-ins with the math learning center. A student who is placed on academic review at the spring mid-semester may not be invited to return for the following year until the faculty has reviewed her 11


Fine Print 2017-2018

year-end progress. Any student with one spring semester or year grade of C- or below may have her invitation to return withdrawn. A student’s placement on academic review is assessed at the end of each marking period. At that time, a student may be placed on or removed from academic review. Managing Assessments. At some point during the year, most students will find themselves with three or more major evaluations due on the same day. A major evaluation is a quiz or test requiring review and lasting twenty minutes or more, a paper of more than one typewritten page, a lab report, a presentation, or a project. In such cases, a student should not engage in all three evaluations on the same day. Instead, she should ask the teacher assigning the third or last evaluation for a postponement of one or two days. She should request this postponement when the third evaluation is first announced. The teacher is obligated to grant the postponement after the student explains her situation and should do so readily. This policy is intended to support students in doing their best work, in balancing their workloads, and in managing their levels of perceived stress. It is also an opportunity for them to learn to advocate for themselves. College Counseling. By choosing to attend Emma Willard, School a student has signaled her intention to attend college. For all students, standardized testing begins with the PSAT sophomore year. Formal college counseling begins in junior year. The goal of the college counseling program is to help students gain admission to colleges and universities that fit their intellectual and personal abilities, interests, and aspirations. Re-Enrollment. A student’s eligibility for course registration, room selection, and student leadership positions is contingent upon satisfaction of all outstanding financial obligations to the school and completion of the re-enrollment process by the pertinent deadlines. Families seeking financial assistance must complete their applications by February 1 in order to be eligible for financial aid. If a student fails to complete the year in satisfactory academic and/or social standing, or if her parent(s) are not supportive of the school’s policies or goals, Emma Willard School reserves the right to nullify the contract and return the enrollment deposit. Academic Integrity. The exchange of ideas is an essential part of education. We encourage students to do research and discuss their work with students and teachers, but remind them that if their education is to be meaningful and valuable, each student’s work must ultimately be her own. Integrity in academic matters is the foundation of an academic community. Cheating and plagiarism are therefore strictly forbidden. For clarification of rules for citing sources, please refer to A Writer’s Reference (8th Edition) by Diana Hacker, St. Martin’s Press, 2010, ISBN#9780312601430. This publication is recommended to each student by her history teacher and available for purchase 12


Emma Willard School

in the school store or through local school districts. It is the responsibility of the student to know and to work within the study guidelines prescribed by each teacher. If there is ever doubt as to what is appropriate, the student should consult her teacher. Each teacher will set her or his own guidelines about collaboration for each specific assignment. Cheating includes but is not limited to: • Intentionally using or giving unauthorized aid on any work for which a grade is given; for example, tests, quizzes, exams, term papers, lab reports, or computer programs. • Passing information, either general or specific, about a test or quiz to any student who has not yet taken it. • Plagiarism—taking someone’s ideas or words and presenting them as your own in a graded assignment. Cheating and plagiarism are violations of the first Fundamental Rule (see page 34) and will be met with a disciplinary as well as an academic response.

Attendance

Our school day begins for most at 8:00 a.m. Students are required to arrive at school on time and attend all classes, Morning Reports, study halls, advisor meetings, and other academic and school community commitments. Full learning requires being in class and participating. Planned Absences. Any time a student knows she will miss school for any reason, she must complete an Absence Request Form at least seven days prior to the absence. The goal is for a student to work with her teachers to plan how to best make up her missed learning opportunities. The Absence Request Form is available from the student life and academic offices, as well as the student section of our website under “Forms and Downloads.” Not submitting the Absence Request Form in a timely manner may result in the absence being considered unexcused. Procedures for typical absences are as follows: Illness. Boarding students must be excused by the Health Center. Day student parents must call the attendance voicemail hotline (518-833-1503 available 24-hours a day) or e-mail ewsattendance@emmawillard.org by 9:00 a.m. the day that the student is ill. A doctor’s note may be required. Doctors’ Appointments. For boarding students, doctors’ appointments are processed by the Health Center. All boarding students are required to sign out with the nurse on duty in the Health Center when leaving campus for any medical appointment. 13


Fine Print 2017-2018

Serious Family Illness. Parents should notify the Director of Student Life or Academic Dean as soon as possible. Religious Holidays. Each student who anticipates missing classes in order to observe an important religious holiday should indicate these dates through the Religious Holidays Permission form available through the Magnus Health Portal. Students should fill out a Request for Absence Form at least seven days prior to the absence to plan for missing work with her teachers. Excused Absences. Typically, absences will be excused in the case of student illness or serious illness in the student’s family, for an important religious holiday, or for a wedding, graduation, or death of a family member. Unexcused Absences. Unexcused absences are tracked cumulatively through each semester, and an escalating series of penalties is applied as deemed appropriate by the Academic Dean in consultation with the Dean of Students and Wellbeing. • 1st unexcused absence—conversation with advisor • 2nd unexcused absence—conversation with advisor, advisor informs parents • 3rd unexcused absence—conversation with advisor, update parents, involve Director of Student Life and Academic Dean in discussion of appropriate outcomes (see next page). Please note that any in-class work missed due to an unexcused absence may not be made up for credit. This includes tests, quizzes, or other graded work completed in class. In addition, students who are absent without excuse from non-academic commitments and required events may also be subject to disciplinary measures. Whether the absence is excused or unexcused, a student will want to check with teachers on how best to complete missed work as soon as possible. Attendance Trends. Regular attendance to all commitments is essential for successful learning, but can also present as a challenge for some students. Both excused and unexcused absences are tracked cumulatively through the school year. As trends in absences are identified, for example, frequent absence from a particular commitment, a series of communications to the student and her parents will be employed as deemed necessary by the student’s advisor, Academic Dean and Director of Student Life and Dean of Students and Wellbeing. • 1st communication of a trend—advisor, student and teacher/coach are asked to meet to discuss the student’s recurring absence from the commitment. • 2nd communication of a trend—advisor informs parents about the trend • 3rd communication of a trend—advisor updates parents, involve Director 14


Emma Willard School

of Student Life and Academic Dean in discussion of appropriate outcomes (see below). Outcomes. When trends or unexcused absences are alerted to the Director of Student Life and Academic Dean, the conversation with the student and parents will center around how to help the student set aside time to make up the learning she has missed by missing the commitment. Outcomes from these conversations may include proctored study hall, or campusing.

15


Fine Print 2017-2018

Student Life Community Living What makes Emma special is the true sense of belonging to something bigger than oneself. Beloved time-honored traditions—Revels, Ring Week, and the Senior Triangle—create feelings of anticipation, excitement, and community. Friendships are forged and lifelong connections are made that educate our girls far beyond the classroom. At Emma, all members exercise responsibility for their selves and others, so this community of support and positivity can be created for all. Learning to live responsibly within our community is part of the educational experience and curriculum at Emma Willard School. No one in the community is expected to be perfect, but each member is expected to learn from her experience and demonstrate an increasing awareness of the positive impact she and her choices can have on our community. This will foster an atmosphere of trust and safety where everyone feels valued and respected. Everything we do at Emma, whether working with a teacher, playing on a team, or living in a dormitory, offers participants the opportunity to experience and learn about the community as you learn about yourself and others. Just as the academic faculty works together to assess academic learning and issues in our community, healthcare and residential faculty have related programs and activities to help students learn how to live in a healthy, productive way in our community.

Key Traditions and Events Traditions abound here at Emma. Senior Triangle, Maypole, Ring Week, Morning Reports, Senior Tea, Revels... You quickly find you are part of something wonderful. You’ll revel in being a part of our school community from Freshman Retreat to Commencement, when the entire school shows up on the lawn to hug the Senior Class before they leave campus. Whether you’re a “die-hard” (four-year senior) or an incoming sophomore, Emma traditions are yours to share. They inspire immediate connection and define friendships. They are tools for engagement, tears, laughter, and love. Advisor/Advisee Dinners occur formally at least three times during the year— on Opening Day, at Eventide, and in the spring. These family-style dinners give students the opportunity to sit down to a meal with their advisors and her/his other advisees. Athletic Desserts in the fall, winter, and spring honor the accomplishments of Emma Willard School athletes and their teams. These are opportunities for coaches to thank their team members and to summarize their seasons. 16


Emma Willard School

Morning Reports are held on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Fridays. These mandatory all-school meetings are convened in Kiggins Auditorium in Slocum Hall. Presided over by designated members of the student body, this meeting is an opportunity for the community to gather together for announcements, birthdays, special messages, and various student performances. Students sit with their halls (including day students, who are assigned to halls), and proctors take attendance. Monday Morning Reports includes an inspirational message by a faculty member or student. To make an announcement in Morning Reports, time must be reserved through the Assistant Director of Student Life. Principal’s Play Day is a surprise holiday announced by the Head of School. It may occur any time in the school year. Senior Teas bring the senior class together two or three times during the year for conversation and activities. The Senior Triangle, the grassy center of the inner campus, belongs to the seniors and alumnae. No one else is allowed to step on it without permission from a senior or an alumna. The Serving and Shaping Her World Speaker Series brings innovators, leaders, inventors, authors, musicians and other vibrant and dynamic individuals to campus. Emma Girls enjoy visits ranging from a day and a half to a week-long Executive-In-Residency. Recent speaker series guests have included author Alexander Fuler; Ferguson Response founder and activist Leslie Macfadyen ‘94; TED strategist Courtney E. Martin; scientists Meg Lowman; School of Leadership Afghanistan founder Shabana Basij-Rasikh; and global think-tank 17


Fine Print 2017-2018

founder Tabi Haller-Jorden ‘75. August Opening Week of school is a time for all students and faculty to learn about and form our community for the coming year. New students have the opportunity to meet teachers and returning students as we together begin to create community through classes and other fun activities. October Senior Dinner is a special time when faculty and seniors come together for a formal meal planned by the seniors and served by sophomores. Parent Days is a time set aside to welcome parents to campus to attend classes with their daughters, and to get to know their daughters’ faculty, advisors, and friends. This is a great time to learn about what life is really like at Emma. December Peanuts and Shells is a week-long tradition celebrated during the holiday season, where inexpensive gifts are anonymously given and received. The week culminates in a party during which the gift-giver, the Shell, reveals her identity. Eventide includes seasonal music and readings, culminating in a candlelight ceremony around the Senior Triangle and a reception and sing-along in LyonRemington Hall. Revels is the senior class production portraying the Yuletide celebration of a medieval manor family. The players include a jester, Morris dancers, marshals performing an authentic sword dance, and a Mummers play. As is the custom in the 100-year-old tradition of the play, the role of each senior is kept a closelyguarded secret from auditions in September until Revels night. The atmosphere of Revels week is festive and makes the holiday season a particularly memorable time at Emma. Students attend the Friday night performance of Revels in formal attire. February Emma Hart Willard’s birthday, February 23, 1787, is celebrated annually by the community and by alumnae around the world. Ring Dinner for juniors is organized by the senior class. At this time, juniors receive their school rings amid much ceremony with a dinner served by freshmen. April After several months of preparation by the junior class, students celebrate and enjoy their Prom. Any profit from the ticket sales goes to a charity selected by the junior class. Honors Convocation is held annually to celebrate the induction of a small number of seniors into the national Cum Laude Society and to recognize the outstanding

18


Emma Willard School

community contributions of those young women who are recipients of the EW Award. May May Day is a traditional spring celebration featuring intricate maypole dancing by freshmen and the appearance of the senior May Queen and her court. Awards Night honors student achievement in each academic discipline, in community service, and in athletics. Students participate in a Room Lottery. Rising seniors have priority in the assignment of rooms. The second Senior Dinner brings the faculty and seniors together to share memories at year’s end. The elegance of the meal is enhanced by junior servers. Seniors are given roses and inducted into the Alumnae Association at this dinner. Flame Ceremony celebrates the annual passing down of knowledge and experience as student leaders officially hand off their responsibilities. It is a time of farewell for the seniors and of welcome for the new student leaders. Senior Retreat takes seniors off campus for three days during the week prior to graduation. Life skills courses are offered and members of the class have an opportunity to spend a relaxing time with one another before graduating. Commencement weekend begins with rehearsals on Friday as seniors practice for Baccalaureate and Commencement exercises. Baccalaureate begins at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday in Alumnae Chapel and features a faculty speaker chosen by the seniors. Following Baccalaureate, seniors and their families and friends join the faculty for dinner, a concert featuring senior talent, and a commencement party. Dance music and presents for each senior (prepared by their sister class) make this a very special occasion. At Commencement the next morning, the seniors wear all-white, full- or tealength dresses/suits and carry a single red rose as they process to the ceremony. Following the ceremony, they stand on the edge of the Senior Triangle and are congratulated by the faculty.

All students are required to attend Opening Convocation, Revels, Reunion, Honors Convocation, Commencement, advisor/advisee dinners, Awards Night, Flame Ceremony, community gatherings, special lectures and other special events throughout the year.

19


Fine Print 2017-2018

Dress Code We know for many girls, your sense of style says a lot about who you are to the world. As such, we do not have uniforms here at Emma, but we do maintain certain basic dress codes. During the academic day (8:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.), students should treat the school as they would any serious academic environment. Earphones are not permitted in academic buildings during the academic day. While styles may change, not all current fashions are appropriate in the classroom. Students should dress modestly at all times. In order to reduce confusion, the following specifications regarding these policies have been established: Academic day (8:00 a.m.-3:20 p.m.) Students are permitted to wear: • Shirts, sweaters, sweatshirts, turtlenecks, or blouses • Dress pants, slacks, khakis, jeans, or corduroys that are neat and in good repair (no paint, rips, or tears) • Leggings may be worn. They must be covered by either a skirt or shirt/ sweater long enough to cover the front and back • Dresses and skirts that reach the end of a student’s fingertips when standing • Shorts that are neat and in good repair (no paint, rips, or tears), hemmed and reach a student’s finger tips when standing • Religious wear Students are NOT permitted to wear: • Clothing that is sloppy, tattered, or in disrepair • Clothing that depicts offensive symbols, inappropriate language, or drug, alcohol, or sex references • Athletic or dance wear including sweatpants and warm-ups, except during those activities or class meeting times • Yoga pants, spandex, Harem pants • Spaghetti-strapped tank tops, tube tops, halter tops, or anything that is low-cut or reveals the midriff area • Pajamas of any kind At all hours: • Spandex shorts may not be worn in the dining hall at any time • Shoes must be worn at all hours of the day • No slippers in the dining hall • No cleats in any building Exceptions: • Pajamas may be worn in the dining hall at brunch on Saturday and Sunday • Athletic teams may wear athletic jerseys or shirts on team spirit days If a student is in violation of a guideline of the dress code, she will be asked to 20


Emma Willard School

change and the violation will be reported to the Director of Student Life. Times Outside the Academic Day. When students are not in class, they are free to dress more casually. In the dining halls, appropriate pajamas may only be worn during brunch. In the residence halls, bathrobes must be worn to and from the showers. Formal Occasions. Dresses, skirts, and appropriately dressy slacks must be worn at plays, concerts, special dinners, lectures, convocations, and graduation. Students will be reminded of occasions when more formal attire is expected. Sunbathing. Sunbathing is permitted at the rear of the campus only, behind the Alumnae Chapel and beyond. Sunbathing in the gym courtyard is not allowed. Students are not permitted to sunbathe in the inner campus during the academic day, nor in front of the campus facing Pawling Avenue at any time. Casual Days. Throughout the academic year, clubs may sponsor days on which the student body may wear more casual attire, such as sweatpants or pajamas, to classes. The club will announce a casual day on the preceding academic day. Dress on sports teams’ spirit days must follow dress code guidelines.

21


Fine Print 2017-2018

General Safety Our Security force consists of people who oversee our safety and patrol the inner and outer campuses. Students are expected to report any disturbances or strangers on campus to Security immediately. In an emergency, students are encouraged to use the red security phones located throughout the campus.

Fire Drill Procedures During orientation and the first two months of school, fire drill procedures are practiced and reviewed with all students by the Director of Student Life and the residential faculty. At least twelve drills are held—at various times of the day and night—prior to December 1. The following procedures shall be followed for both daytime and evening fire drills held on campus. Daytime Drill (8:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.) When the fire alarm sounds in a building occupied by students/employees: 1.

Students exit the buildings through the closest exit, in a quiet and orderly manner. Employees remain behind until all of their students have exited the building. 2. Students and employees walk to and enter the chapel. 3. Students sit with their hall. 4. Proctors will take attendance by hall. Attendance sheets are given to the adult at the front of the room as soon as possible. 5. Any missing students will be cross-checked against the practicum list, the daily attendance sheet, the Health Center, list and the sign-out board from Student Life. 6. The chapel shall be kept quiet and orderly during this time to facilitate accounting for students and making any necessary announcements. 7. Once the all-clear bell sounds, students and teachers may return to their classes. Evening Drill (3:30 p.m.–8:00 a.m.) When the fire alarm sounds in a building occupied by students/faculty: Students who are in their rooms are expected to do the following: 1. Put window shades up 2. Wear close-toed shoes 3. Take a towel 4. Wear a coat/jacket/sweatshirt 5. Leave lights on 6. Leave the door open 7. Evacuate the hall and dorm by way of the hall fire exit and proceed directly to the chapel where attendance will be taken by proctors. At the exit, the 22


Emma Willard School

first student out the door should take the attendance clipboard and proceed to the chapel and begin taking attendance. Residential faculty should complete the following tasks before leaving the building: 1. Check each room 2. Close room doors after room check 3. Residential faculty should join students in the chapel and help maintain order and quiet. 4. Students sit with their assigned halls. Each pew will be labeled with the hall’s name so students will be able to find their places. 5. Attendance sheets are in the chapel and are given to the Director of Student Life or her delegate as soon as possible. Proctors will use these sheets to take attendance as they do for Morning Reports. 6. Attendance sheets will be given to the Director of Student Life or her delegate to confirm all students are accounted for. 7. The chapel shall be kept quiet and orderly during this time to facilitate accounting for students and making any necessary announcements. (Note: In the event there is a fire in the chapel, these procedures will be followed in Kiggins auditorium.)

23


Fine Print 2017-2018

Campus Emergency Protocol If you witness any emergency threatening life and limb on campus at any time and it is safe to make a call, immediately call security (x1332) or student services (x1500). Security will activate the lockdown alert. Summary: No matter where you are: • Get safe. The safest place is where you are unless it is an exposed/ unlockable location. A classroom, dorm room, or office with lockable doors and few windows is ideal. If you can do it safely, run for one of these spaces. • Flee to safety (as described above) when you can, fight and defend yourself if you need to. If you are directly confronted with a dangerous intruder fighting for your life may be your only choice. Let it be your last resort. • Call security – If you don’t hear the lockdown siren, call them and let them know of the issue. If you do hear it, stay quiet and safe. • Wait – remain calm and wait for personal notification that the situation is over. * You may need to wait until the authorities release you from your hiding place. See details below. If the emergency is outside your building: • Remain calm. • If it is safe to do so, flee to the safest, most secure area that you can reach. When safe, call to let security know where you are. • Administrators, faculty, staff and students should clear all halls immediately. Students should be directed to the nearest classroom, dorm room, or similar space with lockable doors. • Turn off all the lights, close and lock all the windows and doors. Barricade doors if not lockable. • Get all the students and occupants on the floor and out of the sight line from doors and windows. • If it is safe to do so, move to a core area of the building and remain there until an “ALL CLEAR” instruction is given live by: - a police officer showing a badge - the Head of School - the Dean of Students and Wellbeing - the Head of Operations - your houseparent if you are in the dorm • Stay sheltered until you are released, even if hear instructions to the contrary over the intercom. • When released, please precisely follow the instructions given by the person who released you.

24


Emma Willard School

If the emergency is inside your building: • Remain calm. • If it is safe to do so, flee to the safest, most secure area that you can reach. When safe, call to let security know where you are. • Administrators, faculty, staff and students will clear all halls immediately. Students should be directed to the nearest classroom, dorm room, or similar space with lockable doors. • Turn off all the lights, close and lock all the windows and doors. Barricade doors if not lockable. • Fight only if directly confronted by an intruder. • Get all the students and occupants on the floor and out of the sight line from doors and windows. • If it is safe to do so, move to a core area of the building and remain there until an “ALL CLEAR” instruction is given live by: - a police officer showing a badge - the Head of School - the Dean of Students and Wellbeing - the Head of Operations - your houseparent if you are in the dorm • Stay sheltered until you are released even if hear instructions to the contrary over the intercom. • When released, please precisely follow the instructions given by the person who released you. If you are outside: • Remain calm • Move away from the threat or the sounds of active conflict • Warn others to take immediate cover • Look for a safe building, high walls, large trees, parked cars, etc. These are all good places to seek safe shelter. • Call security (x1332) as soon as is safely possible Points to remember: • There may be more than one (1) active emergency. • There may be more than one (1) active intruder. • Do not touch anything in the area of a crime scene. • Prepare a plan of action in advance – predetermine possible escape routes for yourself and always know where the exits are located. • Important note – Our campus offers many advantages in this respect. The woods, faculty housing, basements, if you can get away from the classroom, get away from the classroom. • DO NOT go to a Shelter-in -Place site (ie. The whole school would not gather in the Chapel or gym during this type of a threat) • When fleeing, get as far away from the scene of the emergency as quickly and as safely as possible – DO NOT CARRY ANYTHING WITH YOU! 25


Fine Print 2017-2018

• • • •

If police arrive, do exactly as they tell you. Keep your hands empty and visible at all times. They will assume that you are part of the problem until they know that you are not. Do not give them a reason to doubt your innocence. Individuals in classrooms should move away from the sight line of the door. Individuals in the dining hall should move into the kitchen area and the doors should be locked. Students/resident faculty in the dorms should go to/remain in their rooms or in their houseparent’s locked apartment if possible. When released, please follow the instructions of the person who has released you. Do not unlock your door for anyone during the height of the crisis.

Student Life Support Systems At Emma you will develop relationships that will last for a lifetime. This includes relationships with your fellow students as well as the classroom and residential faculty who will share in your personal Emma experience. Faculty advisors, residential faculty, dormitory affiliates, teaching fellows, and student proctors are the primary individuals who act to support a student in her academic and personal life at Emma Willard School. This immediate network is further enhanced and supported by an involved and caring Health Center staff, as well as the Director of Cognitive Development and the Director of Student Life. Collectively, this team develops a good overall understanding of each individual student. Advisors. Upon her arrival at Emma, each student is assigned an advisor. This advisor is the first person for parents and teachers to contact when there is a concern about a student. Each student touches base with her advisor regularly through both formal and informal meetings, including a scheduled group meeting time on Friday afternoons. Formal advisor-advisee dinners, informal gatherings, and frequent conversations help build this important relationship. Advisors of boarding students have regular communication with the residential faculty for insight, 26


Emma Willard School

particularly when a student is experiencing difficulty. Freshmen are assigned an advisor for their first year, from a team of faculty and staff who are focused on the needs of new students. After freshman year, students will have a different advisor who is part of a grade-level team. Advisee groups stay in their grade levels (sophomores, juniors, and seniors) and travel together from one grade to another. Should a student need to change an advisor, she should speak with the Lead Class Advisor for her grade level to carefully consider her options. Residential faculty. The residential faculty is a group of professionals who live in the dormitories and fulfill other roles in the community. Each residential faculty member is responsible for specific halls within the dormitories and is a resource for students about all aspects of life within and beyond Emma Willard School. Residential faculty members welcome frequent communication with parents and generally act as the parents away from home during all times—both difficult and wonderful—when an adult is needed. Among many other roles, the residential faculty gives permissions, creates and implements residential programs and policies, oversees dining room activity, and provides many forms of care. Kellas 3T

Denesha Jones

Kellas 2L

Charis Kotfila

Kellas 3L

Evangeline/Denesha

Kellas 2S

Charis Kotfila

Kellas 3S

Evangeline Delgado

Hyphen 2

Katie Wilson

Hyphen 3

Abby McOsker

Sage 2S

Katie Wilson

Sage 3S

Abby McOsker

Sage 2X

Lindsey Stapleton

Sage 3 Zoo

Melissa Salmon

Sage 2L

Lindsey Stapleton

Sage 3 Long

Jenn Ulicnik

The Bridges

Elizabeth Martin

Kellas 2T

Stacey Dodd

Cluett

Gemma Halfi

Dormitory Affiliates. Each faculty member and teaching fellow is assigned to a hall as a dormitory affiliate. She/he spends one night per week from 7:00-10:30 p.m. on the halls overseeing study hall, serving as an adult resource (frequently in her/his academic area), and completing evening check-in. Teaching Fellows. In addition to teaching two classes and coaching a sport or teaching a movement class, each fellow works as a dorm affiliate during the week and on weekends. As such, she is an integral member of the residential life program at Emma. Proctors. Proctors are seniors who are chosen by the Director of Student Life and proctor advisors to lead, support, inspire, and guide the student body throughout the academic year. There are fourteen boarding proctors, one for each residential hall in the main dorms) and eight day student proctors, all 27


Fine Print 2017-2018

of whom participate in a training program before the opening of school and meet weekly throughout the school year. From decorating their halls and the day student lockers to supporting school policies, proctors are an omnipresent force at Emma Willard. Each boarding proctor works closely with her residential team, where she provides student feedback and helps to establish appropriate support systems for the students on her hall. Day student proctors work closely with the Director of Student Life to insure that day student needs receive appropriate attention and support. (For a listing of proctors, see page 79.) Emma Wellness Advocates. The Emma Wellness Advocates serve the entire Emma community to promote the practice of empowering students to live a healthy life. These students go through comprehensive and continuous training in consultation with the Health Center, READY Center and the faculty/staff advisors. They work to promote the wellbeing of the community by developing creative and appropriate programming (such as workshops, outreach, and events) to support our students’ journeys towards making informed and healthy lifestyle choices. Students will gain an enhanced understanding of health and wellness topics and techniques for educating and engaging effectively with their community. (For a listing of Wellness Advocates, see page 80.)

Health Services and Counseling Headed by the Director of Health Services and the Director of Counseling, the Keenan Colton Kelsey Health and Wellness Center at Emma Willard School promotes a collaborative approach to the overall health of our community by providing proactive educational programming and professional medical care. Through a staff of registered nurses, counselors, and the support of professional pediatric services, the Health and Wellness Center is responsive to student needs 24 hours a day. The Center offers a coordinated network of care that facilitates and supports optimum individual and collective growth in the multiple dimensions of health: intellectual, physical, social, spiritual, and emotional. The Health Clinic is managed by the Director of Health Services, and treatment is rendered by on-campus registered nurses, visiting pediatricians, and offcampus specialists. Counseling Services are coordinated by the Director of Counseling, and treatment is rendered by two full-time clinicians as well as off-campus providers. Services provided include: Groups • Chat and Chocolate: volunteer group sessions for discussion of studentgenerated topics 28


Emma Willard School

• •

Mindfulness groups: a weekly meeting for community members to begin or continue a practice of mindful meditation. Support groups generated by the needs of students in any given year.

Educational Materials: books and pamphlets available for student education Meditation room: a quiet space for community members to use in maintaining their health Health Center The Health and Wellness Center is located on the ground floor of Hyphen Hall, at the Archway. Monday through Thursday 7:30 a.m.–10:00 p.m. Friday 7:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Saturday/Sunday Clinic 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Emergencies (518) 833-1505 during the above hours (518) 833-1332 Security (518) 817-2679 Security Cell Health Center Procedures. Prior to arrival at Emma, each new student is required to complete online medical forms. This will include proof of all required immunizations, signed by her healthcare provider, as well as a comprehensive medical history. Students who have not submitted the required health forms will not be permitted to participate in any movement activities, move into their dorm, or attend classes. The health records permit Health Services to render treatment and, when necessary, to release pertinent information to facilitate healthcare. Returning students’ medical records must be kept current. All students must receive an annual physical from their healthcare provider and must provide documentation of this examination. A boarding student who is admitted to the Health Center as an in-patient is excused from classes. Both her advisor and her houseparent are informed, and when appropriate, assignments are obtained for her while she is in the Health Center. For non-emergency medical care, students should visit the Health Center before classes, during a free period, or before evening quiet study hours. Any day student who needs to miss classes to attend an urgent medical appointment and wants an excuse from classes must sign out in the student life office. The Counseling Center is an important resource for our community, allowing students to bring their concerns, fears, or burdens into a confidential setting where they can discover and develop healthy ways of dealing with emotional issues. There are many reasons why a student might consider consulting one of the school counselors: issues at home, with friends or on the dormitory hall, 29


Fine Print 2017-2018

difficulty managing depression or anxiety, disordered eating, etc. The Counseling Center provides: • Flexible and accessible appointment scheduling. • Availability of off-campus professionals when necessary or desired. Counseling Services. Our clinical counselors work in the Health and Wellness Center during the week, where they meet with students. The counselors have a local network of psychiatric services and professionals to whom they may refer students and their families for regular emotional support outside of Emma. Emergency services are available on weekends. Confidential appointments with the school counselors may be made through the counseling area of the Emma Willard School website or by speaking with one of the nurses. Confidentiality. Most often the entirety of the counseling relationship remains completely confidential. There are circumstances when it is appropriate to expand confidentiality to include other adults in a student’s life. The most common circumstance involves the Student Welfare Committee (SWC). The role of the school counselor in SWC is primarily to listen, not to share confidential material. The intent of this process is for the counselor to have a broad perspective to better help the student. The counselor must balance the privacy of the student without sacrificing the need to be a contributing member of the community. When there are issues of safety to self or others, legal requirements including child protective issues, court subpoenas, and unprofessional or illegal behavior of a staff member, the counselor has a professional obligation to share appropriate information. Except in an emergency, these situations will also be discussed with the student. The counselor will handle any conflict between the needs of the student, needs of Emma Willard School, and legal responsibilities as sensitively and professionally as possible given the realities at hand. Eighteenth Birthday. As a condition of continued enrollment, students and parents/guardians agree that when any student turns eighteen while enrolled at Emma Willard School, Emma Willard School shall have the right to communicate with the student’s parents/guardians regarding any matter regarding the student. This agreement includes, but is not limited to, information about academics, discipline, medical, behavior, conduct, social, educational, and all other matters. Once the student turns eighteen, the student and their parents/ guardians will receive a reminder and agreement about this obligation. If a student or their parents/guardians refuse to sign the agreement, the student may be required to withdraw. This policy also applies to students, including post-graduates, who are eighteen when they initially enroll at Emma Willard School. Health Insurance. Health insurance is required of all students in order for them 30


Emma Willard School

to register at Emma Willard School. Upon request, a student health insurance plan is available for a fee through Emma Willard. This plan is required of all students whose permanent home address is outside of the United States, and for US residents who do not provide insurance information on their medical forms. If at any time during the school year a health insurance plan changes, copies of the new insurance cards must be sent to the Health Center. If a health insurance plan lapses, the Health Center must be notified. The student will then be enrolled in the student health insurance plan. Medication. For the safety of the community and each individual student, all medications must be dispensed through the Health Center. No medicines should be mailed directly to students or kept in student rooms. The Health Center may give permission for students to keep some medications with them (inhalers, EpiPens, etc.). Emma Willard School is not responsible for student health or safety related to medications obtained from anywhere other than via the Health Center. Students found in possession of medication without the knowledge and permission of the Director of Health Services or Director of Counseling will be referred to the Director of Student Life. A student found dispensing prescription medication to other students will be subject to disciplinary action. Student Welfare Committee. When a student is struggling at Emma, whether emotionally or academically, our healthcare, residential, and academic staffs meet to assess how they are doing. The Student Welfare Committee (SWC) is charged with the responsibility to monitor the wellbeing of each student, ensuring that each individual has the support she needs to thrive in this community. The SWC comprises a number of individuals who have experience in student welfare and who come from both the Wellness and Academic areas of the school. When efforts to help the student become a healthy part of the Emma Willard School community are not successful, the head of school, with the recommendation of SWC, reserves the right to place the student on medical leave or ask the student to leave the school. Any reinstatement would be at the discretion of the head of school. Details of the medical leave policy are available on our website.

Athletics Emma Willard’s campus provides the ideal setting for active students interested in athletics and recreation. With wooded trails on campus and plenty of open green space, students can spend time catching up with friends and staying healthy by playing Ultimate Frisbee or going on a run with classmates through our beautiful campus. There are a variety of team sports on offer in the Fall, Winter and Spring while afterschool activity offerings include Zumba, fitness walking, soccer, lifeguard training, badminton, tennis, ultimate frisbee, sports conditioning and yoga. 31


Fine Print 2017-2018

Grades Physical Education Courses are graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Movement Requirement All students in grades 9-11 must participate in a movement experience for the entire school year. Seniors must participate for ten weeks. In addition, all students must successfully pass a swimming proficiency test. Students may satisfy their movement requirement through participation in interscholastic sports teams, physical education classes, aquatics classes, or dance. Swimming Proficiency Graduation Requirement All Emma students are required to complete this requirement. Testing takes place at the beginning of each semester. We believe that swimming is an essential life skill that every Emma graduate should be able to demonstrate. All students attempt a swimming and water safety test. If a student is not able to complete the test, she will be placed in a swim instruction and water safety course. Students remain in swimming education until they complete the swimming and water safety test. Students must be comfortable in deep water to attempt this test. Gym usage. Students, faculty, and staff have access to the gym at all times during the day, although priority of the gym, its partitioned spaces, and the equipment is given to in-season sports teams and after school PE classes. Team sports and after school PE classes are typically in session Monday-Friday from 3:45 -5:45 p.m. during the school year. The Athletic Trainer (AT) is located in the Athletic Treatment Room on the second floor of the gym. The AT takes care of sports injuries, and will first examine the injury and determine if the athlete is well enough to participate in her game or practice. The AT does taping for joints and muscles to help prevent further injury and to reduce pain. The AT also may have a student do rehab exercises in place of practice. The proper rehab will help you heal faster than rest alone. The AT occasionally travels with a team (i.e. sectional games). The AT is available to all students, faculty, and staff, but student athletes on a current sports team will be given priority.

32


Emma Willard School

Code of Conduct At Emma, trust, honesty, and clarity have a direct impact on the quality of student life. To maintain the tight and trusting community we have at Emma, all community members are expected to follow our Code of Conduct. This includes both students and the adult members of our community. A student will be apprised of and involved in significant communication between the school and her parents/guardian. In disciplinary matters, the student involved will be informed of the dissemination of information regarding her case. It is expected that, when all other options have been exhausted, a student will have the aid of an appropriate adult in the community in resolving a concern with a faculty member or administrator. The student’s right to critical examination of school decisions, actions, and policies brings with it the responsibility to be accurate, respectful, and active in resolution of a concern. Just as students expect a certain quality of life at Emma Willard School, students are expected to aid in the growth of this positive atmosphere. The role of discipline at Emma is to educate students and to maintain a safe, academically rigorous, challenging, and satisfying environment. Our disciplinary system responds to unacceptable student behavior because the community believes it is through facing the consequences of their actions that students learn about themselves. Discipline, even when it takes the form of punishment, benefits individuals by making them aware of how their behavior affects themselves and others. Disciplinary responses take into account both the needs of the individual and the needs of the school community. In deciding upon a disciplinary response, Emma Willard follows the Code of Conduct while also recognizing the legal responsibility of the school in the realization of such decisions. Behavior at Emma Willard School is guided by the Code of Conduct, and all students are expected to abide by the standards of the school as outlined in the code.

33


Fine Print 2017-2018

At the beginning of each school year, in advisor groups, each student is asked to read, discuss, and sign the Code of Conduct, thereby acknowledging her understanding of the expectations the school has for her and she must have for herself.

Fundamental Rules Rule 1. A student will be honest and will respect the property of others. Cheating, plagiarism, lying, vandalism, and stealing are forbidden. Rule 2. A student should not engage in any act of hazing, bullying, harassment, or intimidation. Rule 3. A student will not possess, use, buy, sell, or traffic illegal drugs or alcoholic beverages while under the jurisdiction of the school. Rule 4. A student will not tamper with fire equipment including fire boards and flashlights, fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, fire alarms, and any component of the fire suppression sprinkler system. Rule 5. A student will not violate a state or federal law.

Open Flame Policy. A student who kindles any form of flame in any school building will be dismissed from the school. This notice applies to matches, cigarettes, incense, fireworks, candles, charcoal, and/or any substance deemed flammable by the school. Smoking. Smoking by Emma Willard School students is not permitted while they are under the jurisdiction of the school. A student who is found smoking outside (on or off campus, while under the school’s jurisdiction) will face immediate disciplinary measures. Repeated infractions of this rule will result in suspension and, ultimately, a review of whether or not the student should continue at Emma. A student who is found smoking inside any school building will be immediately dismissed from the school, without any discussion, by administrative disciplinary procedure. Electronic cigarettes are also not permitted. School Jurisdiction. A student is considered to be under school jurisdiction at all times when school is in session (unless the student is under the direct supervision of her own parents), when traveling to and from the school, when participating in school-sponsored trips, and when temporarily off campus.

34


Emma Willard School

Any time a day student is off campus in the presence of a boarding student, she is considered to be under school jurisdiction and therefore responsible for adhering to all school rules and policies. State and Federal Laws. Emma Willard School does not condone violations of state or federal laws. Such violations will be grounds for disciplinary action. The use, possession, and trafficking of drugs and alcohol are illegal both in the state of New York and at Emma Willard School, and we will not knowingly permit the use, possession, trafficking, or other introduction of illegal drugs or alcohol. Because of the seriousness of this issue, dismissal from the school is the disciplinary response in the absence of unusual circumstances, as determined at the sole discretion of the head of school or her designee(s). Violation of a Fundamental Rule: Disciplinary Response. All reported or suspected violations of a fundamental rule will be investigated by the Director of Student Life who will determine the facts of the case and consult the faculty chair of the conduct review committee. If the student admits guilt, the conduct review committee will be convened. If the student and Director of Student Life cannot come to agreement in the question of guilt, the student will have their case heard by a panel of adults, including the chair of the conduct review committee, and will have the opportunity to bring a faculty and student advocate to the hearing. Whenever a student violates a Fundamental Rule, expulsion is one of the responses considered. Typically, dismissal from school is recommended by a CRC in cases of an egregious violation of a Fundamental Rule or a repeated violation of any of the Fundamental Rules. The school reserves the right to dismiss a student any time her behavior is deemed to have a sufficiently harmful impact on the community or is a threat to herself. In such extreme cases, the situation is addressed by the head of school, the Dean of Students and Wellbeing, and other members of the administration as the head of school requires. Emma Willard School believes that students who intentionally stay with other students while those students are violating a Fundamental Rule are, by this association, condoning the violation, and therefore place themselves in jeopardy of receiving the same disciplinary consequences as the student who violated the Fundamental Rule. Similarly, students are responsible for the activities that take place in their room, as well as for the contents of their room. Students should make every effort to dissuade their peers from engaging in activities that might jeopardize their own and their peers’ standing. Conduct Review Committee (CRC). The disciplinary response to a violation of the Code of Conduct is recommended by a CRC, a committee composed of three faculty members and four students. Once the Director of Student Life has called for a case committee to hear a Code of Conduct violation, the faculty and student chairs will, together, form that committee from the CRC pool. Service 35


Fine Print 2017-2018

on a case committee will rotate through the CRC pool. The CRC committee pool comprises students, chosen by application, and ten faculty members (excluding the faculty chair). The students are in equal numbers per class. The student chair joins the faculty chair of a CRC to form all case committees and serves on each case with the faculty chair.

CRC Procedure. When a case committee is convened, the Director of Student Life briefs the committee on the circumstances of the violation. The student who committed the violation is present for this briefing. The student who appears before a CRC may choose a student advocate and a faculty advocate to accompany her. Both may provide a character reference for her, and the faculty advocate remains with her throughout the meeting, helping her in any appropriate way. The student may also elect to have the school counselor with her for support, but not as a contributor at the meeting. The committee listens to the circumstances of the violation and considers precedents as well as the past disciplinary record of the student in recommending a disciplinary response to the incident. If an attempt to convene a case committee during the last week of each semester fails because of academic demands on student members, the disciplinary response for a violation of the Code of Conduct shall be determined by the Director of Student Life in consultation with the faculty and student chairs. This response is subject to review by the Head of School or her designee(s). CRC Recommendation. The faculty chair reports the committee’s final recommendation in writing to the Director of Student Life. The Director of Student Life, in consultation with the Head of School or her designee(s), then decides whether or not to accept the recommendation and informs the chair, the student, the student’s parents, advisor, and resident faculty member of the final decision. If the recommendation is not accepted, the Director of Student Life will meet with the committee to give an explanation. All meetings of the committee are confidential, although a summary of the proceedings is given 36


Emma Willard School

to the head of school and Director of Student Life. If the committee is unable to reach consensus in its recommendation, the matter will be referred to the Director of Student Life and the Head of School for a determination. Disclosure of Disciplinary Information. Emma Willard School’s disciplinary process is a means of educating both individual students and the entire Emma community. Accordingly, the school may share information regarding disciplinary matters with the school community for the purpose of furthering the education and learning of students and the school community overall. In doing so, we will be sensitive to the privacy needs of the individual students involved. Given the unique nature of boarding schools, students often encounter disciplinary responses that would typically be meted out by parents in a day school setting. Reporting Disciplinary Action to Colleges and Universities. Making mistakes is a natural, even necessary, part of a student’s personal growth and educational development, particularly in the early years of secondary education. This is especially true in a boarding school environment such as Emma Willard’s where student behavior is monitored closely and consistently. While we acknowledge the need to report significant disciplinary events to colleges, we also believe that routine discipline is a developmentally appropriate tool to be used without fear of long-term consequences. Emma Willard therefore shares with colleges only disciplinary information about a student’s probation, suspension, or expulsion. Reports of disciplinary action are made by answering “yes” to the appropriate statement(s) on the Secondary School Report and by inviting admission officers to call the director of college counseling for an explanation of circumstances. After Withdrawal. When a student leaves school for any reason prior to graduation, she must contact the Dean of Students and Wellbeing or the Head of School for permission before returning for a campus visit. Non-Retaliation Policy. As a community, we care deeply about each other’s wellbeing and about upholding the rules that help us to create a safe and welcoming community for each individual. Because of this, students must feel free to bring any concerns they might have about another student or adult to a trusted adult in the community. Any student who shares information about another student or adult being in violation of a school rule or engaging in unsafe or unhealthy behavior, including concerns about sexual assault, harassment, or discrimination, should not face retaliation of any sort from any community member. This includes verbal, physical, cyber, or any other type of retaliation. A student who retaliates against another student in violation of this rule will be subject to disciplinary action.

37


Fine Print 2017-2018

Safe Harbor Policy It is the School’s intention that its disciplinary policies not discourage students from seeking adult help whenever the health or safety of any student is in jeopardy. In these instances, the principle of safety far outweighs any need for discipline. Therefore, Emma Willard School has adopted the following policy: Any student who fears that she, or another student, is at physical or mental health risk (including situations of sexual assault or self-harm), or has overdosed on any drug (including alcohol) may approach any adult in the community to request help in obtaining medical attention. Additionally, any student who voluntarily brings her own use, addiction or dependency on alcohol or drugs to the attention of an Emma Willard employee and seeks assistance will be granted support without a disciplinary consequence. • Safe Harbor can be granted by any member of the Residential Faculty, the Director of Health Services, the Director of Counseling, the Dean of Students and Wellbeing, the Director of Student Life, and the weekend administrator on duty. A student may approach any adult in the Emma Willard community who should then bring the Safe Harbor request to any of the people listed above. • Whenever a student voluntarily seeks adult help for herself or another student under these circumstances, neither the student seeking help nor the student receiving help will be subject to disciplinary consequences as long as there is open and honest cooperation with the School. When approaching an adult, the student must clearly indicate that she is invoking the Safe Harbor policy. She need not say the words “safe harbor,” but her intent must be clear. The adult approached should immediately contact the Dean of Students and Wellbeing and the School Health Center in order to facilitate the process of getting medical attention for the student; if it is a medical emergency, the adult should immediately call for an ambulance at 911. Please know the following: 1.

Use of Safe Harbor will result in an intervention with the student who needs help in order to assess whether the student has a medical or emotional issue that needs further attention. This may include contact with the student’s parents. 2. Safe Harbor is not available in situations where the School has already begun a disciplinary investigation into this particular student’s behavior. In other words, a student cannot use Safe Harbor to save herself or another student from imminent disciplinary trouble. 3. A student who benefits from the Safe Harbor policy a second time may be indicating to the School that she is unwilling or unable to lead a safe life at 38


Emma Willard School

School. In such cases, the School may respond by asking the student to go on medical leave or withdraw for medical reasons, to the extent consistent with applicable law. This is not a disciplinary response, but an additional step intended to ensure that a student is in an environment where she has the support necessary to make safe and healthy choices.

Bullying Bullying, including cyber-bullying, is a violation of a fundamental rule and will not be tolerated. This includes, but is not limited to, harassment, intimidation, cruel humor, unwanted physical contact, etc. If Emma Willard believes that a student is engaging in bullying-related behavior, even if it is not a violation of other rules or policies, the student may face disciplinary consequences. These consequences may be educationally focused on community restoration and repairing damaged relationships. Emma Willard reserves the ability to give additional consequences in its sole discretion. Bullying is deliberate, hurtful behavior that involves an imbalance of power and can be repeated over a period of time. It inflicts physical and/or psychological hurt and, as a result, it can be extremely frightening for the victim. It is intentionally meant to humiliate and weaken the victim. Some examples of bullying behaviors are: Physical Bullying: • Hitting, kicking, or pushing someone, or even just threatening to do it • Stealing, hiding or ruining someone’s belongings • Making someone do something they don’t want to do 39


Fine Print 2017-2018

Verbal Bullying: • Name-calling • Teasing/taunting • Insulting • Intentionally using incorrect gender pronouns Relational Bullying: • Stonewalling or the silent treatment • Excluding from the group • Spreading rumors, lies, and gossip • Making friendships conditional • Eliciting other students to gang up on someone Cyber-Bullying: Cyber-bullying refers to the use of informational technology to carry out any of the bullying behaviors listed above. This may include sending or posting text, sound, or images. Some of the informational technology that may be used are: • Text messaging • Instant messaging • Email • Social media websites, like Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat • Websites/blogs • Chat rooms Cyber-bullying can be as simple as continuing to send messages to someone who has said they do not want further contact with the sender, but it may also include: • Threats • Sexual remarks • Pejorative labels, hate speech • Posting false statements as fact • Impersonations • Ganging up on victims by making them subject to ridicule • Posting/sharing photographs, video or audio of someone without their consent Students who believe they have experienced incidents of bullying and students who have witnessed or have other knowledge of incidents of bullying are encouraged to speak with an adult about their concerns, such as the Dean of Students and Wellbeing, the Director of Student Life, Resident Faculty, Advisors or a member of the Health Center or Counseling staff. Proctors and Wellness Advocates are also good resources for students who have questions or concerns about a suspected incident of bullying.

40


Emma Willard School

41


Fine Print 2017-2018

Sexual Misconduct Policy Emma Willard School provides a safe and supportive environment where students may learn and grow. All forms of sexual misconduct interfere with this goal and will not be tolerated. Emma Willard School will take appropriate action to prevent and correct behavior by both employees and students that violates this policy. Emma Willard School has a zero-tolerance policy regarding sexually inappropriate behavior of any kind between adults (faculty, administrators, staff, and other employees) and students, regardless of age, including all forms of sexual activity and sexual harassment. The faculty, staff, and other employees of Emma Willard School occupy a position of authority and influence over the students and must always ensure that this authority and influence are not abused. Sexually inappropriate interaction of any kind, between any member of the Emma Willard School faculty or staff and any student are improper, strictly prohibited, and a basis for immediate dismissal of the faculty or staff member from the school. Such relationships or activities may also constitute a crime. Any report of suspected abuse of a minor will be shared with law enforcement, and, when appropriate, may also be shared with child protective services and/ or the New York State Education Department. Any student who is, or has been, involved in a sexual or romantic relationship with any faculty or staff member is strongly encouraged to report the matter. Students and Wellbeing may report to any trusted adult on campus or directly to the Dean of Students and Wellbeing or Head of School. Any adult who receives such a report from a student shall immediately notify the Head of School, or in her absence, the Dean of Students or Head of Talent Management and Human Resources. To encourage such reports, Emma Willard School provides amnesty to student victims of sexual misconduct or bystanders who provide information in order to help student victims. Those students will not be disciplined for violations of fundamental rules, including drug and alcohol use, that may have taken place at the time of the sexual misconduct they are reporting. 42


Emma Willard School

Sexual Harassment Emma Willard School fosters a living, learning, and working environment that is free from harassment in a community that strives to treat every individual with sensitivity and respect. Emma Willard School will not tolerate harassment of individuals for any reason, including but not limited to, race, disability, sex, ideology, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, socioeconomic level, age, national origin, or religion. Emma Willard does not tolerate any form of sexual harassment in the workplace or within the school community. Sexual harassment is behavior that is uninvited and unwelcome that can be manifested in various ways. Harassment may include, but is not limited to, the following: Verbal and/or Written: • Repeatedly asking someone for dates and refusing to take no for an answer • Making inappropriate jokes and innuendos • Making unwelcome comments on an individual’s body • Using degrading words to describe an individual • Unwelcome sexual flirtation, advances, or propositions • Suggesting or demanding sexual involvement (accompanied or not accompanied by implied or explicit threats concerning one’s security or safety) • Inappropriate personal questions or language • Unsolicited letters or email considered offensive to the recipient • Posting offensive, threatening or harassing messages via text message, messaging apps, Internet sites, social networking sites, personal web pages, blogs, etc. Physical: • Unwelcome touching • Standing inappropriately close to someone so as to make them uncomfortable • Blocking someone’s path • Unwanted physical contact • Sexual assault • Restraining an individual Other: • Gestures or actions with sexual connotation • Staring, leering, whistling • Making phone calls, writing letters of a sexual or harassing nature • Following someone • Appearing uninvited at someone’s living space • Hanging around areas that are frequented by another person • Public display of sexually explicit, offensive, or demeaning photographs or other images 43


Fine Print 2017-2018

If you believe you are being subjected to harassment, talk to a member of the Residential Faculty, your advisor, the health center staff, a school counselor or other trusted adult as soon as possible. The Director of Student Life, in consultation with the Dean of Students and Wellbeing, will investigate all reports of harassment. The confidentiality of both the student reporting the harassment and the student(s) accused of harassing behavior will be honored as much as possible in the resulting investigation. It may be necessary to contact the parents of the students involved. A situation may also be reported to the appropriate authorities, such as Child Protective Services or law enforcement, if there is suspicion that the situation involves abuse or illegal activity. Any student who engages in harassment is in violation of our fundamental rules and is subject to disciplinary consequences, up to and including expulsion. Sexual Assault Any member of the Emma Willard community may experience sexual assault, regardless of gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, national origin, or ability. Any community member who believes she/he has experienced/is experiencing sexual assault is strongly encouraged to seek help by following the reporting guidelines below. In addition to incidents that may take place on campus to current members of the Emma community, individuals are encouraged to report sexual assault that may have occurred before joining the Emma community as well as incidents that may have occurred off campus. Former members of the Emma community, including alumnae and former faculty and staff, are also encouraged to bring their concerns forward and should follow the reporting guidelines included below. Understanding Sexual Assault: The US Department of Justice defines sexual assault as “any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape.” Forced sexual intercourse is referred to as rape; sexual assault does include rape. Rape: As of January 1, 2013, the FBI defines rape as “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.” Rape is often depicted as a violation that occurs by a stranger, but the majority of assaults are committed by someone the victim knows. Rapists often use tactics other than physical assault. Verbal threats and intimidation, emotional blackmail, grooming, and drugs/alcohol are instruments used by rapists. Date/Acquaintance Rape: rape (using the definition above) where the perpetrator is known to the victim. This can include peers in college, romantic 44


Emma Willard School

partner, a friend or friend-of-a-friend, team mate, coworker, or someone a person has simply met before. This term is used in situations where the perpetrator and victim knew each other before the assault, or may have been on a date or in an intimate situation of some sort, but where the victim did not consent to sexual intercourse with the perpetrator. The term “date rape” is associated in mainstream media with the use of “date rape” drugs such as GHB that temporarily paralyze the victim or make the victim lose consciousness for a period of time. However, many rapes occur without the use of drugs, and a majority of rapes are perpetrated by someone the victim knows. Grooming: used to describe the process by which adult sexual offenders obtain the trust of children and families and gradually find ways to get a victim alone and push boundaries towards sexual assault and rape. Grooming can also be used on adults. This can be a gradual pushing of boundaries in an intimate context. Examples of this include pressuring someone to take off his/her clothes then touching that person in places without consent and pressuring him/her to do sexual things that (s)he is not comfortable with, or repeatedly asking to engage in sexual acts after a person has denied consent. Grooming often occurs over a period of time, rather than all in one instance. The logic behind grooming is to lower a potential victim’s defenses by first gaining trust and then push someone’s boundaries in subtle and gradual ways. This process reduces the victim’s ability to recognize that his/her boundaries are not being respected, or that the perpetrator is doing something inappropriate. Consent: the Merriam-Webster dictionary defines consent as “to agree to do or allow something: to give permission for something to happen.” With regard to sexual activity, in order to ensure that both parties are willing participants, it is a good practice to obtain explicit rather than implied consent. Silence does not imply consent, and someone being naked does not communicate consent. Consenting to one behavior does not mean that consent is given at other points in time for that same behavior, and does not mean that consent is given for other sexual behaviors. It only means that consent is given for that behavior at that point in time. Some examples: making out does not automatically mean a person is interested in having sex, having consensual sex one time does not mean that person will always be interested in sex in the future. Consent may be revoked at any time; once a person says “no,” “stop,” or seems uncomfortable as communicated verbally or with body language, sexual activity should stop. Drugs and alcohol can impact and impair one’s ability to give consent. The age at which a person can give sexual permission (age of consent) vary by state. Mandated reporters: individuals who are legally required to report suspected child abuse or maltreatment when, in their professional capacity, they are presented with reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or maltreatment. New York State recognizes that certain professionals, including school officials, teachers, nurses, and counselors, are specially equipped to fulfill the important 45


Fine Print 2017-2018

role of mandated reporter of child abuse or maltreatment. All Emma Willard School faculty and staff are considered mandated reporters.

How to Report Sexual Assault Students who believe they have been victims of sexual assault should seek help immediately from a trusted adult, including, but not limited to, any of the following: Dean of Students and Wellbeing, Shelley Maher 518-833-1365. smaher@emmawillard.org Head of School, Jennifer Rao 518-833-1301. jrao@emmawillard.org Director of Student Life, Emily Snyder 518-833-1321. esnyder@emmawillard.org Director of Counseling, Mary Moore 518-833-1506. mmoore@emmawillard.org Director of Health Services, Jennifer Bliss 518-833-1505. jbliss@emmawillard.org Students may also choose to reach out to professional services directly. Some options for professional support are listed below: Sexual Assault and Crime Victims Assistance Program at Samaritan Hospital 2215 Burdett Avenue Troy, NY 12180 518-271-3257 Hot Line New York State Hotline for Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence 1-800-942-6906 Troy New York Police Department 55 State Street Troy, NY 12180 518-270-4411 Students should call 911 if they need or witness a need for immediate police and/or medical attention.

46


Emma Willard School

Amnesty Policy. A student who is a victim of sexual assault and/or students who have information concerning sexual assault (bystanders) are strongly encouraged to disclose any information they may have to a faculty or staff member. To encourage such reports, Emma Willard School provides amnesty to student victims of sexual assault or bystanders who provide information in order to help student victims. Those students will not be disciplined for violations of fundamental rules, including drug and alcohol use, that may have taken place at the time of the sexual assault they are reporting.

47


Fine Print 2017-2018

Survivor Support: Survivors of sexual assault will be provided with appropriate medical care. The Emma Willard Health Center will coordinate referrals to an off-campus provider for care including but not limited to: emergency contraception, STI testing, HIV testing, Post-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV prevention, immunizations (hepatitis B, tetanus booster) as appropriate, crisis mental health counseling, ongoing mental health counseling. Emma Willard School partners with the Rape Crisis Center for Rensselaer County, located at Samaritan Hospital in Troy. The health center will provide transportation to the Rape Crisis Center, and a member of the Health Center staff will stay with the student for the duration of time off campus to provide support, both professional and emotional, as needed. Survivors are encouraged to have a sexual assault forensic exam as soon as possible after an assault is reported. More information about sexual assault forensic exams can be found here: https://www.rainn.org/articles/rape-kit. Students who have experienced sexual assault may benefit from reasonable accommodations. Such accommodations may include, and are not limited to, extra academic support, deadline extensions, housing rearrangements, reduced courseload, leave of absence. Non-Retaliation Policy. Students who have experienced sexual assault or bystanders who report sexual assault should not face retaliation of any sort from any community member. This includes verbal, physical, cyber, or any other type of retaliation. A student who retaliates against another student in violation of this rule will be subject to disciplinary action. Response to Sexual Assault: Emma Willard School treats all reports of sexual assault seriously, with the wellbeing of its students as the first priority. Employees involved in the response to a report of sexual assault will promptly assist the reporting party to obtain medical care and other necessary services. Emma Willard School will report sexual assault to the police, follow all mandatory reporting procedures, and promptly notify parents of sexual assault allegations. Whenever possible, survivors of sexual assault will be given the option of speaking to their parents/guardians before parents/guardians are contacted by administrators. Following allegations of sexual assault, Emma Willard School will conduct its own investigation in order to ensure the safety and security of the entire campus community and to determine whether disciplinary action is warranted. Emma Willard School’s investigation is separate from any investigation that might be conducted by law enforcement. Emma Willard School’s investigation will be coordinated with law enforcement in order not to interfere with their investigations. Whenever possible, survivors of sexual assault will be told when law enforcement needs to be notified. Matters of sexual assault will be handled at the discretion of the Head of School. Harassment complaints not

48


Emma Willard School

related to sex (e.g., harassment on the basis of race, religion, disability, etc.) will be addressed by the Conduct Review Committee. Emma Willard School will not force a student victim to make a sexual assault report, nor will a student victim be forced to participate in an Emma Willard School investigation or discipline process. Emma Willard School will, however, follow its mandatory reporting obligations, to the best of its ability, and will conduct an investigation of sexual assault that comes to its attention, whether or not a student victim chooses to bring a sexual assault complaint or participate in the Emma Willard School’s investigation. Emma Willard School will require the participation and cooperation of all non-victim students in a sexual misconduct investigation and disciplinary process conducted by Emma Willard School, including the student accused of misconduct. Any non-victim student who refuses to cooperate may face disciplinary action.

49


Fine Print 2017-2018

Sexual Intimacy Emma Willard School recognizes that healthy sexual development is an important part of adolescence, and therefore strives to provide education, counseling, and support services to help students address all aspects of sexuality, including sexual identity and expression. The services offered are intended to foster thoughtful decision-making. We expect students to abstain from sexual activity while on campus or otherwise under Emma Willard supervision. Sexual activity involving students of any age, even if consensual, is not allowed while under Emma Willard supervision (please see the section on Sexual Misconduct for a definition of consent). Just as a family would set expectations for what sexual behaviors are allowed in the family home, Emma Willard sets boundaries for sexual behavior in our community. When students engage in sexual activity, the school will work with the students to help the students reestablish healthy boundaries. Responses may include, but are not limited to, the following: • communication with the students’ houseparent and/or advisor • referral to health professionals • parental conference • limitations on dormitory room visits • consultation with the Dean of Students and Wellbeing Students are encouraged to speak with a counselor, nurse, or another informed adult should they have any questions about expectations regarding sexual activity.

Guidelines for the Use of Technology Using Technology Safely 1.

Students should never reveal any personal information unless they know their correspondent well, and even then, with care. Students should never reveal personal information about fellow students. Students should be aware that all information they put on the Internet is permanent. They have little control over how the information posted on the Internet is used. 2. Students should never get together with someone they “meet” online. 3. Students should not give away personal information online that would allow someone to find them. 4. Students should not respond to any threatening or suspicious messages. If a message is threatening or highly offensive, the student should report it to her residential faculty, her advisor, the school counselor, or Information Services. 50


Emma Willard School

Using Technology Responsibly Students are expected to behave responsibly in their use of technology and to abide by school policy and generally accepted rules of network etiquette. These include (but are not limited to) the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Students should not copy papers or sections of papers off the Internet and hand them in as their own. This is an example of plagiarism, which is strictly prohibited and covered in the Emma Willard School Code of Conduct. Students should be courteous and respectful in messages to others. They should not harass others through email, chat, electronic bulletin boards, blogs, or other apps. Students should use appropriate language. Vulgarities and obscene language are not appropriate in electronic communication. When corresponding, students should always try to do their best writing, and proofread and edit their messages. Students should avoid sending mass emails unless absolutely necessary. Students should not use other people’s devices or emails unless invited. They should not use the network to gain access to other computers unless invited. Hacking is prohibited. Students should be gentle with school technology equipment they use, especially fragile items like digital cameras. Students should not borrow, without permission, school technology equipment left in school spaces. When downloading software, students should limit themselves to freely distributed, purchased, or evaluation software. Students should only download software to their own computers. Do not engage in software piracy. Students should be mindful that their activities on the network can affect others. Students should not visit websites that peddle pornography, hate, or illegal activities. Students should not engage in commercial activity of any kind. Running a business using school equipment or the network is prohibited. Students should not reveal their passwords to others. Each student is responsible for all computing activities tied to her ID. Students should be aware of copyright infringement laws and not pirate music, video, or other media. Students should use social media in positive ways. A student’s social media presence is a reflection on her and, by extension, our community. Social media postings that condone drug and/or alcohol use, promote hate speech or intolerance, or harass or intimidate another community member may be in violation of fundamental rules and subject to disciplinary consequences. Students should be aware that their social media presence may be viewed by colleges, scholarship programs, and/or potential employers. 51


Fine Print 2017-2018

Email and Internet Usage Internet. The Internet is a helpful resource for learning and entertainment and offers exceptional opportunities to maintain friendships and close ties with family while at Emma. We seek to make sure every Emma Girl understands the joys and learning opportunities available on the Web, but also the risks involved in over-usage, sharing of personal information, and piracy. Students may use the computer labs, the local network, and the Internet as educational resources, to communicate, and for amusement. The following procedures and guidelines help ensure safe and appropriate use: • At the start of each school year, students will receive technology training. • Students are required to sign the guidelines indicating their understanding of the rules and expectations. • Students are responsible for their use of technology and subject to consequences when they violate the guidelines. Students do not have an expectation of privacy when using the school’s computer systems and the school reserves the right to access a student’s email account. • Students are responsible for checking their Emma Willard School email account and Schoology at minimum once a day. Usage. Upon enrolling at Emma, each student is provided with an email account and access to the Internet. Email accounts are made available during the summer prior to enrollment at Emma. Network account and Internet access are granted at the beginning of the school year after each student reads and signs an Internet usage agreement. School policy prohibits students from sharing their passwords, using indecent, vulgar, or obscene language on social media, using the school’s email system or social media to harass someone, or using the school’s system for commercial purposes. New students attend technology training sessions during Opening Week. Restrictions. We believe the Internet has the capability to supplement learning and meaningful connections outside Emma in significant ways. On school nights, access to the internet is turned off in the evening. The cut-off time Sunday through Thursday by class is 9th grade, 10:30 p.m.; 10th grade, 11:30 p.m.; 11th grade, 12:00 a.m.; 12th grade, 12:30 a.m. On Friday and Saturday the cut-off time is 1:00 a.m. When a student’s Internet usage verges on overuse or addiction, or is marked by consistent late night hours, the residential faculty member, advisor, and the Director of Student Life reserve the right to restrict or eliminate that student’s ability to access the Internet. Access. Our data network covers nearly the entire campus, including the dorm complex. Access is available primarily via wireless connection. Each boarding student has access to wireless internet in her room. Public computers are available in the Dietel Library. For more information about access and computer 52


Emma Willard School

specifications, please contact Information Services, located in the basement of Slocum Hall (helpdesk@emmawillard.org) or check out the website at emmawillard.org/life-at-emma-technology-services.

Device Use Guidelines In addition to their required laptops, many students choose to carry smartphones and tablets for personal and academic use during the day. These devices should be acknowledged as important tools for our scholarly and social activities. When used improperly, these tools have the potential to distract from full community engagement. These guidelines were designed through collaborative process between students and faculty with the purpose of protecting and strengthening the community of Emma Willard School. Enforcement: To allow all members of the community to make the best of their devices, these guidelines should be followed and enforced by all members of the community. A student whose device use is found to be in violation of these guidelines should be addressed in the moment. A student who chooses not to bring her device use into alignment with these guidelines will be asked to have a conversation with the Director of Student Life. Classes and Meetings: Devices should not be used in classes and meetings unless permission is given by the teacher or leader of that meeting. Kiggins: Devices are not permitted in Kiggins during Morning Reports or during assemblies except for the specific purpose of recording or photographing a special performance Dinning Hall: Devices are not permitted in the Lower Dining Room during regular school day hours (8:00 a.m.-3:20 p.m.) except for the specific purpose of a meeting. Devices are never permitted in the upper Dining Hall. Devices should never be used in audible ways in the Dining Hall. Ear buds are not permitted in the Dining Hall at any time. Sound Use: During the regular school and work day hours (8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.) devices may not be used in ways that emit audible sound (watching videos, listening to music, making phone or video calls), except in dorm rooms, the Student Center and parking areas. When using a device in an audible way in a student space, students should turn off sound or use ear buds when requested by other students using that space. Head Phones and Ear Buds: Students may use ear buds or head phones with their devices when working in a common area (hallway, library, classroom etc). Ear buds or head phones are not permitted when walking around campus or in the Dining Hall. 53


Fine Print 2017-2018

Walking: Out of respect for our community and for personal safety, members of the community refrain from using devices while walking both inside buildings and outside on central campus. Quiet use: Devices may be used around campus in ways that do not emit audible sound (texting, checking email, homework, etc) Except in those locations and times indicated above. Gym: Safety should be taken into consideration when using devices in the gym.

54


Emma Willard School

55


Fine Print 2017-2018

56


Emma Willard School

Campus Guide

57


Fine Print 2017-2018

Residential Life In a boarding community, students are asked to take personal responsibility as they live with a variety of peers and adults. This personal responsibility involves growth in life skills including communication, compromise, and compassion. To enable students in this effort, the residential program at Emma offers many opportunities for a student to learn more about herself and others. Residential Faculty. Adult professionals who live in the dorm and are responsible for the safety and wellbeing of the students on their halls. Also referred to as houseparents. Proctors on each hall and Wellness Advocates throughout the dormitories. Student leaders who meet with and are available to help peers. Hall meetings, teas. Varied opportunities for hall members to experience their living community together. Nightly check-ins. A time for residential faculty to meet briefly in person with each member of the hall. Dorm chores. Each hall, with their residential faculty, takes responsibility for cleaning their living spaces and larger community spaces. Freshman hall program. Every freshman is new to the boarding experience and this program asks them to explore roommate relationships, hall community building, international student presentations, personal responsibility, etc. Weekend activities. Many and varied opportunities to explore the Capital Region as well as visit other schools. Other hall activities. Residential faculty, along with proctors and Wellness Advocates, organize impromptu games and activities.

Dorm and Quiet Study Expectations Our dormitories are your home. Our girls are encouraged to make themselves at home and live in an environment of mutual respect and consideration. Living away from home in high school is a big responsibility. As such, all girls need to closely understand and follow all dormitory expectations. This will allow you and those around you as much privacy and freedom as possible within our halls. To make your living experience as comfortable as possible, students and the residential leadership team of proctors, Wellness Advocates, and residential faculty members work together within the framework of school rules.

58


Emma Willard School

Daily Expectations 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Corridors should be quiet. Music may be played quietly. Students are expected to be considerate of those who may be studying in their rooms. After 3:30 p.m. As a boarding school, Emma provides a rich community experience, which is enhanced by numerous daily activities shared beyond the classroom. For example, students and faculty eat in the dining room and encounter one another in a host of venues after the academic day has ended. To ensure that students are safe and accounted for outside the classroom, students are asked to follow this check-in schedule: Weekdays Breakfast

By 7:45 a.m. Required of grades nine through eleven Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday.

Quiet Study

7:15–9:15 p.m. Required Sunday through Thursday.

Evening Weekends Dinner

Students must be on their own halls on Sunday through Thursday, 9:45 p.m. for freshmen, 10:30 p.m. for sophomores Juniors, and seniors. Students are required to check in between 5-7 p.m. if on campus, with on-duty houseparent.

Evening 11:30 p.m Friday and Saturday for all students. Students must be on their own corridors for this check-in. After Revels, seniors have an extended curfew on Friday and Saturday nights until 12:00 a.m.. Teas. One night each week, teas are orchestrated by proctors and prepared and served by two students on each hall after quiet study hours (9:30 p.m.). Beverages, snacks, crackers, and cheese are supplied by the kitchen.

Study Hall and Breakfast Check-in The hours of 7:15-9:15 p.m., Sunday through Thursday, are quiet study time. Freshmen and new sophomores and juniors begin the first semester with the support of proctored study hall. With the exception of seniors, all other students study in their rooms during this time. Students wishing to listen to music while studying must use headphones, and the music should not be audible to anyone else in the room. There is a proctored study hall for those who cannot successfully study in the dorms or those who request a proctored study time. 59


Fine Print 2017-2018

Unless she is on academic review or social probation, a senior will not be required to be in her room for quiet study time. The Internet will shut off for all dorm residents at bedtime until 6:00 a.m. based upon a students’ grade. Proctors and residential faculty are responsible for maintaining quiet on the halls from 7:15-9:15 p.m. Family and friends are not to call during quiet study hours, and intra-campus calls should not be made during this time. Students who repeatedly fail to meet the expectations of quiet study time are referred to the Director of Student Life and may be required to attend proctored study hall. If students from different years room together, the standards for the younger student will apply. Ninth Graders • Breakfast check-in through mid-second semester • Quiet study at desk with door open • Internet access shut-off is 10:30 p.m. on weeknights • Check-in by 9:45 p.m. on the hall • Check-in in rooms by 10:15 p.m. • Lights out at 10:30 p.m. (Sunday through Thursday) • Room inspection once per week Sophomores • Breakfast check-in for first semester of the year • Quiet study at desk with door open during first semester; study away from desk (with door open) during second semester • Check-in by 10:30 p.m. on the hall • Check-in in rooms by 11:00 p.m. • Internet access shut-off is 11:30 p.m. on weeknights • Room inspection once per week Juniors • Breakfast check-in until Parent Days • Quiet study in room with door open during first semester • Check-in by 10:30 p.m. on the hall, in rooms by 11:00 p.m. • Internet access shut-off is 12:00 a.m. on weeknights • Room inspection once per week Seniors (including “senior privileges”) All Year • No breakfast check-in • May sign out during the academic day (after all classes are completed and with Student Life permission) and return by the beginning of next commitment. If a student intends to return after the end of the academic day, she must sign out with an adult in Student Life and check in with the on-duty houseparent upon her return to campus. 60


Emma Willard School

• May choose their location during study hall. Academic areas, art studios, the student center, 2e-café, gym, and other senior rooms are acceptable locations. • Check-in by 10:30 p.m. on the hall. • Internet shut-off is 12:30 a.m. on weeknights • Roaming hours during weeknights until 11:30 p.m. (only to other senior rooms). Must sign out with on duty houseparent and check in with visiting hall houseparent. Must not disturb underclasswomen or other dorm residents. After Revels • Extended curfew on Friday and Saturday nights until 12 a.m. • Leave campus during lunch. Must get permission and sign out with Student Life. • Have one dinner leave per week from Sunday through Thursday. Must return to campus by 9:15 p.m. Must have permission from on-duty houseparent and proper sign out. • Stay overnight at a day student’s home one night per week with a proper invitation from the day student’s parent and permission from houseparent. • Return at 9:15 p.m. on Sunday evening after being away from school for the weekend. • Go to one midweek concert per year with permission from a parent and the Director of Student Life.

61


Fine Print 2017-2018

Campus Leaves All leaves are granted according to the permission form signed by parents and students at the beginning of each academic year. The school does not grant any off-campus permissions to students whose forms are incomplete or nonexistent. Additionally, the school reserves the right to exercise its judgment in granting students permission to leave the campus. Students are not permitted to stay overnight in hotels or motels except in the company of an adult relative or with special permission from residential faculty, the student’s parent or guardian, and the Director of Student Life. RPI fraternities are strictly off limits at all times. Social visits to the RPI campus or other local colleges are also prohibited. Signing In and Out. Providing a written record of her plans when a student is going to be away from school and signing back in when she returns are essential to the safety and wellbeing of the boarders and to the smooth running of the dormitories. When signing out to leave campus, students must be absolutely precise about their destination, time of departure, means of transportation, and expected time of return. A student must always call the residential faculty member on duty to ask permission if she wishes to change her plans after she has left campus. Messages may not be left with Security or with other students. A student must sign herself (and herself only) in and out whenever she is away from campus. There are no exceptions to this rule. Standard Schedule of Leaves and Requisite Permissions Weekdays (Sunday night through Friday afternoon) 8:00 a.m.–3:20 p.m. Daytime leaves may be granted by an adult in Student Life. On Fridays, a student may leave after her last academic commitment with permission of the Director of Student Life. In all cases when a student plans to return before 3:30 p.m., she must sign out and sign back in at Student Life. 3:20 p.m.–5:00 p.m. Leaves of any other kind: sign out with residential faculty member on duty. 5:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. Evening leaves are granted by residential faculty members only under special circumstances. On Sunday nights, students must return from weekend leaves by 7:00 p.m. (Seniors by 9:30 p.m. once senior privileges are in effect). Weekends (Friday night through Sunday afternoon) 8:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Leaves of any kind: sign out; residential faculty member 62


Emma Willard School

permission required. 5:30–11:30 p.m. All evening leaves require residential faculty permission. Students taking an evening leave to the home of a day student require an invitation from the adult host/hostess. After Revels, seniors may return as late as 12am with prior permission from the residential faculty on duty. Seniors returning after 11:30 p.m. must check in with their houseparent and security upon return to campus. Residential faculty reserve the right to deny requests for off campus leaves. Capital Region. For reasons of safety and common sense, students should never leave campus alone—groups of two or more are recommended. When going to Troy or elsewhere in the Capital Region to shop, see a movie, or go to a restaurant, signing out in a general way (e.g., “to Troy”) is not acceptable; a specific destination must be given (e.g., Bruegger’s, Friendly’s, etc.). Students must use taxis or private transportation (with appropriate permission) when going to and from campus at night. Closed Weekends. These weekends fall at the beginning and end of long breaks so that boarding students can begin or end their vacations together, and they often accommodate special school traditions or events. No overnight leaves will be granted during closed weekends without special school permission from the Director of Student Life. The closed weekends for 2017-2018 are September 15-17 (all seniors for Revels auditions), and June 1-3 (all students for Commencement). College Visits. Students wishing to visit colleges should make every effort to do so during vacations or long weekends to avoid conflicts with school commitments. Approval to miss school commitments for college tours, interviews, and open houses is granted only to seniors and given only when the student has submitted the Request for Absence Form (with all required signatures) at least seven days in advance of the anticipated absence. If the absence involves an overnight visit to a college, a boarding student must also submit the normally-required, online Weekend Travel Form to her houseparent within the designated timeframe. The nature of the visit must conform to the permissions provided by the student’s parents at the beginning of the academic year. Students are responsible for academic work missed while away visiting colleges. If a student will be unchaperoned during an overnight visit, her travel form must include a contact at the college or place where she will be staying. Parents assume full responsibility for their daughter, and she remains subject to school expectations for appropriate conduct while away for this purpose. An invitation from an adult host/hostess is necessary for a student planning to take an overnight or weekend leave to a college. All such invitations for boarders should be submitted to your houseparent. 63


Fine Print 2017-2018

Dinner with Family Members. We always welcome time spent with parents or family members. Parents or faculty who invite a student out to dinner on a weeknight must plan to return to campus by 7:00 p.m. (before quiet study hours). Permission must be obtained from the student’s residential faculty member. A student also needs to check with their relevant instructor of an activity for example choir, orchestra, dance or a sport. Late Returns. Students must return from a weekend leave by 7:00 p.m. on Sundays. Permission to return late from a weekend must be secured in advance from the residential faculty. In the event that a student finds she is unable to return at the required time, she must call the school and speak to her residential faculty member. While residential faculty do not have the authority to excuse a student from classes, it is the student’s responsibility to notify her resident faculty member. If the late return results in a missed academic commitment, depending on the circumstances, the student may be subject to the penalties of unexcused class absences. A student must contact Student Life and provide details regarding a missed class(es). Travel Plans. A student must submit a travel plan for any kind of overnight leave. The form is available on the student section of our website, under “forms and downloads” and “weekend travel.” A student should complete the form promptly and thoroughly and submit it to her residential faculty member by check-in on Wednesday 11:00 p.m. Once forms have been completed, any changes should go through the residential faculty member. Regardless of her destination–-her home or a friend’s home–-a student must submit an invitation (either in writing, by telephone, or by email) from her host or parents to her residential faculty member. Jetlag Policy. Any student returning to school from more than 3 time zones away may utilize the jetlag policy after returning from a school vacation. Outside of school vacation returns, a student should discuss a return plan with their houseparent. Transportation. While the school provides transportation for specific weekend activities and events, with parent permission, students may take the local bus or contact local cab companies for additional transportation options. Information on cab safety and etiquette will be provided to each student. Uber and Lyft is another option for students over age 18, with parent permission. Concerts. Seniors may attend one mid-week concert during their spring semester, with parent permission, returning to campus by 10:30 p.m. or staying with a day student. Any student may attend a concert on a weekend (Friday or Saturday), with parent permission. Students must return by 11:30 p.m. or make

64


Emma Willard School

arrangements for an appropriate overnight visit. Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors must be accompanied by an adult chaperone. Running Off-Campus. Students wishing to go running or biking off-campus must be oriented to local routes and must adhere to safety procedures (reflective gear, helmet, have cellphone, and take ID card). Students may leave no earlier than 6:00 a.m. (7:00 a.m. during daylight savings) and must sign-out on their card with houseparent permission. While we recommend that students are in groups of 2 or more, they may go alone only if they have attended the training session. This rule is intended for students choosing to run or bike off campus for personal fitness or recreation, not to a physical education practicum or after-school physical education class. Dormitory Closures. Dormitories are closed during Thanksgiving, winter, and spring vacations. They remain open until noon on the day following the last day of classes and reopen at noon on the day preceding the start of classes. Students who must leave a day late or return a day early should plan to spend the night with a day student or family friends in the area.

65


Fine Print 2017-2018

Violations of Emma Willard Residential Rules Most violations pertaining to boarding life are addressed directly by the residential faculty. Chronic offenders meet with the Director of Student Life, who reserves the right to assign a response she deems appropriate, given the specifics of the violation and the student’s disciplinary history at Emma Willard School. Late Returns. In general, if a student is going to be later returning to Emma than she originally anticipated, she must call the residential faculty member on duty with her revised itinerary and/or schedule. Failure to call or notify a residential faculty member will result in disciplinary action. Local Trips Off Campus. Failure to return by the scheduled time will result in the student’s temporary restriction to campus (amount of time “campused” to be determined by the residential faculty). Weekends. Failure to return by the 7:00 p.m. Sunday evening return time or by the time to which the student and her residential faculty have agreed (in the case of a scheduled late return) will result in temporary suspension of weekend leave privileges. Meal Check-In Violations. Not checking in for meals may result in being assigned to breakfast check-in. Kitchen duty for breakfast check-in offenders begins promptly at 7:00 a.m. by which time the student serving this duty must have checked in with the on-duty resident faculty. The student is then to return to the dining hall at 7:30 a.m. for another check in with the on-duty residential faculty member. Sign-In/Out Violations. Students who fail to sign in and out correctly meet first with the residential faculty and face an escalating system of sanctions that culminates in a referral to the Director of Student Life. This progression is: First occasion: Warning Second occasion: Restriction to campus—“campused” Third occasion: Referral to the Director of Student Life Social Probation. It is crucial that students learn to be as mindful of the needs of others and the needs of the community as they are of their own. Each student must make appropriate choices about her conduct and behavior. Students unable to live with the standards associated with living in the community will be placed on social probation, a status that alerts the student, her family, and adult members of the school community to her questionable behavior. Social probation carries with it sanctions appropriate to the violation leading

66


Emma Willard School

to the probation. At a minimum, she must meet regularly with the Director of Student Life to discuss her ongoing improvement. In addition, her invitation to return for the next school year may be deferred.

67


Fine Print 2017-2018

Daily Needs Emma Willard School Identification/SmartCard System. All students are provided with an Emma Willard School identification/debit card (SmartCard) at the beginning of the school year. Students will use this card to access campus buildings, and it can be used as identification for both on and off campus and gives students’ access to their own personal spending account for on campus purchases and/or withdrawals for off campus purchases. A deposit of $600 for boarding students ($650 for senior boarding students) and $400 for day students ($450 for senior day students) is required at the beginning of each academic year and is billed to student tuition accounts in July. Funds remaining on a SmartCard at the end of the academic year are automatically rolled over to the next year and made available for student spending. Unless otherwise requested, funds remaining on a SmartCard when a student graduates or withdraws that are in excess of $5 are refunded to the student/family. The School requests a minimum balance of $100 be maintained. Expenses commonly debited to the SmartCard include academic supplies and activities, art and athletic charges, Health Center charges (medications, copays, etc.), various transportation charges, weekend activities, class dues, etc. Discretionary expenses (limits can be set by parents) debited to the SmartCard include student allowances, non-essential school store purchases, postage, etc. There is no charge to issue the original SmartCard. A $15 fee is charged to replace a SmartCard during the school year. SmartCard questions should be referred to the Business Services Office at (518) 833-1794 or via email to studentbilling@emmawillard.org. Parents and students may check the balance on the SmartCard at any time by going to mykidsspending.com. Allowance. The school recommends that students be given no more than $25 per week for incidental purchases and weekend entertainment. The school store will cash student checks at designated times. During orientation, the school will help students open checking accounts at local banks. Students are responsible for these accounts—repeated or deliberate occurrences of bounced checks may lead to checking accounts being closed. Residential Faculty will not hold cash or valuables for students. School Store. Located in Kellas basement, the school store is a hub of activity from 1:00-4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and offers cafÊ services in the early evenings. Dining. Eating here can be described in one word: Delicious! Well, maybe two words if you asked the girls: Pizza Friday! Our dining services staff is committed to principles of sustainability, and as the first Fair Trade School in the United

68


Emma Willard School

States, we locally source as much as possible. Kellas dining room serves both boarding and day students throughout the week. The kitchen provides three meals each weekday and brunch and dinner on weekends. Guests to campus (other than students, current faculty and staff, and alumnae) must purchase a meal ticket for meals in the dining room. Meal tickets are purchased in the Security office ($5/ticket). Meal hours are as follows: No dishes or eating utensils may be removed from the dining room. Students should bring their own mugs if they wish to take something to drink from the dining room. Exceptions may be made for the club or student leadership group meetings that happen during lunch hours, in which case all dishes must be returned promptly to the dining hall and meeting spaces must be kept tidy. The kitchen itself is off limits to students, except with permission from the director of dining services. Given that such a large number of people eat together, courtesy and consideration must be exercised by all. Dress in the dining room during the week should adhere to the dress code. Pajamas (in good taste) are permitted at brunch on weekends only. Laundry Room. There are washers and dryers located in Sage basement. Students are responsible for doing their personal laundry or taking their dry cleaning to the local cleaners (within a short walking distance from Emma). Students are also responsible for the cleanliness of the laundry room. Washers and dryers do not require coins. Alcoves. Each hall has (or shares with a neighboring hall) a community space that is referred to as an alcove. These spaces are frequently used for hall meetings, academic help sessions, birthday parties, and general relaxation after quiet study hours. A microwave and refrigerator are located in each alcove. Students share the responsibility of maintaining the alcoves, and the food that is they place in the fridge.

69


Fine Print 2017-2018

Student Possessions Items of Great Value. Students are strongly urged to leave any valuable jewelry or other hard-to-replace items at home since the school cannot be responsible for the loss of personal possessions. We strongly encourage students to store valuables such as passports and large sums of money in the Student Life office. Each student receives a dormitory room key. A fee of $5 is charged for replacement keys. Lost and Found. The school’s lost and found is located on the ground floor of Kellas by the mailroom. Personal Property Insurance. While each student has her own room key, and each room is locked with a master key by the resident faculty during vacations, the school cannot guarantee the safety of cameras, tablets, jewelry, cash, or other personal items of value. Although we have a standard procedure for reporting missing items (report filed with the Director of Student Life and Security) and will help students locate their possessions, Emma Willard School does not assume responsibility for students’ personal items and carries no insurance covering student property. Parents have the option of insuring their daughters’ personal belongings. Summer Storage. Storage boxes of an approved size and reinforcement must be used for all storage. A total of three boxes per student may be stored at the school during summer months. International students may store up to six boxes. All boxes must be securely sealed and clearly marked with the student’s name and her rooming assignment for the following year. In addition, the school will store a student’s computer or printer in its original packaging and box. The school will take every precaution to assure protection of summer storage, but will not assume responsibility for any loss or damage.

Student Rooms Contents. We encourage our boarding students to personalize their dormitory rooms to help them feel at home. However, we do live in a historic structure, so much care needs to be taken when living in this space. Below are some guidelines to help create a home-away-from-home while maintaining the spaces that have been passed down to Emma Girls across generations. When you arrive, your room will include: twin bed, mattress (regular twin), desk, chair, bureau, and a light, which may be built into the desk. Students are expected to provide additional lighting (desk or bedside lamps, for example). Note: Halogen lamps are not allowed.

70


Emma Willard School

Students are responsible for the condition and care of their rooms and their contents. Graffiti of any sort is unacceptable; cleanup or repainting charges may be billed to the student’s SmartCard account at the end of the year. What to Bring. Bed linens, warm comforter or blankets, towels, washcloths, laundry bag, pillow, wastepaper basket, floor lamp and additional lighting, and eating utensils, (plat, mug, spoon and bowl) for evening teas. All additional lighting must use compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs or LEDs) rather than incandescent light bulbs, and students are expected to provide the CFL bulbs or LEDs. Warm clothes are essential in the winter months: sweaters, waterproof boots, warm winter jacket, hats, gloves, and scarves are all standard attire when the cold weather descends upon the campus. Bathing suits are also useful; free swims are offered throughout the year in Cheel Aquatics Center. Students may not have televisions, space heaters, immersion heaters, open burners, sunlamps, refrigerators, toasters, or other appliances deemed hazardous by the school. Pet Policy. Pets of any kind are not allowed to be kept by students. This includes both warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals. Decorating. Because of the damage that tacks and tape cause to wall surfaces, woodwork, and doors, they are not to be used. Each boarder has a bulletin board in the hall outside her room for her use. A minimum repair and cleaning charge of $50 will be assessed for the use of tacks, Fun-Tak found on walls or woodwork, tape found on walls, writing found in rooms or closets, or an unclean room at the end of the year. Posters affixed to the wall may cover no more than one-third of the wall area of the room so the fire hazard is kept to an acceptable minimum. Students may also use bulletin boards, which may be purchased at the school store. Tapestries cannot be hung on walls or from the ceiling because they present a serious fire hazard. For similar reasons, fabric must not be placed over lamps and wall-to-wall displays of photographs or magazine pages in student rooms or in the hallways are not allowed. Students are not permitted to decorate their rooms with paraphernalia connoting drug or alcohol use. Room Inspections. Weekly inspections of student rooms for both cleanliness and adherence to the decoration and fire codes are arranged by the residential faculty. These inspections, which ensure that rooms are maintained in clean and safe condition, are taken seriously. A student whose room does not meet the standards will find her activities restricted until it does. Every effort will be

71


Fine Print 2017-2018

made to arrange inspections so the occupant of the room is present. Minimum regulations for inspection are: bed on bed frame and legs, bed made, food in covered containers, room sink clean, belongings neatly organized, and surfaces and floors properly dusted or vacuumed. If warranted by concerns for the health and safety of a room’s occupant or other students, the Director of Student Life or their designee may inspect a student room at any time. If this is required, the student involved will be present, in addition to at least one additional adult, preferably the relevant residential faculty.

Guests on Campus Parents/Adults. Parents and adult guests (21 and older) may visit any time and are welcome at meals, but may not stay in dormitory rooms in respect for the space and privacy of our other boarding students. On a first-come, first-served basis, parents can be accommodated in the Gorham House guest rooms for a fee of $50 per room per night for one or two nights (contact Nicole Lynch at 518-833-1301 to check availability and make reservations). These rooms are not available during Opening Days, Parent Days, Revels week, or the week before and including Commencement, nor are they available for extended stays. Hotel accommodations in the area can be found on the school’s website at emmawillard.org/admissions/visit/accommodations. Friends. All guests under the age of 21 must sign in with security when they arrive on campus. The hostess’s name and the guest’s name, home address, and phone number must be registered on a form provided for this purpose. If the guest is a driver, then the school will ask to photocopy the guest’s driver’s license. Guests are welcome to visit the school during the week as well as on weekends, according to the following schedule: Monday through Thursday

3:30-7:00 p.m.

Friday

3:30-11:25 p.m.

Saturday

9:00 a.m.-11:25 p.m.

Sunday

9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

Students are responsible for the behavior and conduct of their guests and for introducing them to the expectations, procedures, and people. All guests are expected to abide by the rules of Emma Willard School. Guests are welcome to attend meals in the dining room, but must purchase meal tickets (at Security, $5) and always be accompanied by their hostess. Male friends are restricted to the first floor of the dormitories. 72


Emma Willard School

Fathers, Brothers, and Other Male Family Members. Fathers are permitted in the girls’ dormitory area when necessary. Other male family members are permitted in the dormitory area only with the permission of the residential faculty. All are expected to be mindful of their activities in an all-girls’ dorm; their hostesses are responsible for their actions.

Overnight Weekend Guests. Sisters and female friends/day students are welcome to stay overnight in a dorm room on weekends, with residential faculty approval. Guests, including sisters, must either be 13 years of age or older or currently in high school. Emma Willard Alumnae may not stay overnight with a student. To have a friend spend the night, a boarding student must submit a weekend guest form to her resident faculty and have the guest’s parent call or email with permission and any special instructions. As a courtesy, the hostess is expected to introduce the guest to the residential faculty on duty. With the exception of approved slumber parties, the policy for overnight visitors is one guest per occupant. There are no overnight guests in the dormitories during Revels weekend, and all friends and family members of graduating seniors must find other accommodations on the night before Commencement. Day students are also not allowed to spend the night in the dorms the night before Commencement.

Food Deliveries Food deliveries must arrive before 10:30 p.m. on weekdays (11:30 p.m. on weekends) and must come to the front loop by security. 73


Fine Print 2017-2018

Day Students Absences or Delay. Day student attendance at school will be noted by the record of their attendance at their first period class.

If a student is absent or late to school (this includes missing the bus), her parent must call the attendance hotline at (518) 833-1505 or Student Life office (518) 833-1500 no later than 9:00 a.m. Absence from a class because a student missed the bus will be considered an unexcused absence. Students who miss a class for any reason are responsible for obtaining homework assignments and making up missed classes. Day students are expected to remain on campus through the completion of their last academic/athletic commitment. If it is necessary to leave during the day for personal reasons, a student should see Student Life to gain permission for her leave. If a day student becomes ill during the day, she should go to the Health Center. From there she may call home and her absence will be excused. Day students must sign out with Student Life for any doctor’s appointment scheduled during the academic day. Lockers. Each day student is given a locker in which to store her books, school supplies, and other possessions. Day students must provide their own combination lock for their locker and are asked to keep their locker locked. Meetings. Day student meetings are organized and facilitated by the day student proctors. School Closings. Information regarding the closing or delayed opening of school because of inclement weather or other extraordinary circumstances will be available at schoolclosingsnetwork.com, by calling the Security office at (518) 833-1300 or by looking at the Times Union website or local television stations. Please do not assume that Emma Willard School is closed when public schools are closed. Staying Overnight. Day students may stay overnight in the dormitories on a school night with proper communication between a parent and Student Life. Requests for overnights should be made at least 24 hours in advance. The visiting student must check in with the appropriate residential faculty member at dinner and must adopt all boarding routines—quiet study hours, signing in and out, room check-in, etc. Day students may not drive cars while

74


Emma Willard School

they are living in the dormitories. Students should provide their own pillows and bed linens or sleeping bags. Day students may spend up to three nights at Emma each semester without charge, space permitting. Any additional overnights must receive special permission from Student Life, and there is a charge of $25 per night. The location of the visiting student’s sleeping quarters is determined by Student Life. During the week, all overnight guests must sleep in the one day student room (to be reserved with Student Life on a first-come, first-served basis). On Friday and Saturday nights, sleepovers in friends’ rooms and/or a slumber party are acceptable, with residential faculty permission. When staying with a boarder, the day student and host must complete and submit a guest form to the boarder host’s residential faculty member. With the exception of approved slumber parties, the policy for overnight visitors is one person per bed. Day student families should not assume a bed in the dormitories will always be available for day student overnight requests. In the event that no bed is available for a requested overnight, the day student and her family must be prepared to make other arrangements. Unauthorized day student overnights will result in the loss of this privilege for the remainder of the semester. The dorms are not available for day student overnightsuring the first week of school, the night of Revels, or the night before Commencement. Time on Campus. For safety reasons, it is essential we know who is on our campus at all times. For all students, this begins with their attendance at the first period of the academic day. On the weekends, day students spending time on campus should sign in and out with security. Transportation. Transportation to Emma Willard School is provided by many local school districts. Parents are also encouraged to explore car pool possibilities. Day students who drive to school must register their cars with Security and park only in designated student parking areas. Students may not use their cars to go off campus for lunch or errands during the day (except for seniors, once senior privileges are in effect and with permission of the Director of Student Life). A resident student may ride in cars with day students if her parents have explicitly given her permission to do so on her permission form. The student must check with Student Life (during the academic day) or with the on-duty residential faculty (after school and on weekends) about this approval. Cars. Students may ride in cars driven by faculty members or school and parentapproved drivers. At no time may a boarder drive any car without the explicit permission of the Director of Student Life. While under the jurisdiction of the school, students may not hitchhike—this includes traveling to or from school on weekend leaves. Resident students are not allowed to have cars on campus at any time; this applies to boarders who have signed out for weekend leaves.

75


Fine Print 2017-2018

Television. The Student Center, located in Sage, has a large screen TV, with cable and a DVD player, where students may watch TV or movies. Television is not permitted during the academic day (8:00 a.m.–3:30 p.m.), during evening study hours (7:30–9:00 p.m.), or after 10:30 p.m. on weekdays (with the exception of special programs, hosted by the residential faculty). After 11:30 p.m. on weekends, students must have special permission from residential faculty to be in the Student Center. Movie watching on DVD players or handheld devices and personal computer use for non-academic purposes are strongly discouraged during the academic day and forbidden during study hours.

Student Activities and Leadership Student organizations and clubs are an important part of every student’s Emma experience. Each fall there is an activity fair at which students may learn about organizations and clubs and join those of interest to them. Black and Hispanic Awareness (BHA) consists of students who meet to increase awareness of black and Hispanic cultures. This group annually sponsors multicultural activities. The Clock, Emma Willard’s student newspaper, is published five times a year. Foreign and American Student Organization (FASO) is composed of international and American students who wish to enhance cross-cultural awareness at Emma. FASO sponsors international events. Gargoyle is Emma Willard School’s yearbook. Junior Singing Group (JSG) is an a cappella singing group whose heads are chosen by election from the junior class and whose members are chosen by audition early in the school year. Triangle is Emma’s art and literary magazine and is produced once a year. Twelve Tones is a senior a cappella singing group. Members are selected through auditions held early in September. The heads are chosen from the class’s Junior Singing Group. Other popular clubs include: Agonies Campus Players Coding Club Dor Va Dor Emma Green Emmasaries F-Word FBLA

76

Fair Trade Fellowship of Christians in Universities and Schools (FOCUS) Mock Trial Model UN Phila Pride Alliance

Science Olympiad Student Organization for Animal Respect (SOAR) Tour Guides Quiz Team UNICEF


Emma Willard School

Emma Willard School Council School Council is a group designed to represent the student body. It carries two primary responsibilities: 1. To listen to and, when possible, to address student concerns; 2. To provide two-way communication between the student body and the school administration Composition. School Council has eight seats: • One at-large member, elected by the entire student body • Four class representatives (one from each class) • One peer educator representative • One proctor representative • One international student representative While there has always been at least one day student and at least one boarding student serving on School Council, there is no guarantee this will always be the case. If, by chance, one of those groups is not represented, then it will be the responsibility of School Council to ensure the unrepresented group has a voice. School Council chooses a president among its members each fall. Other officers (e.g., vice-president, secretary) may be chosen at the same time. School Council is advised by one or two faculty members appointed by the head of school. Elections. In the spring, the freshmen (rising sophomores), sophomores (rising juniors), and juniors (rising seniors) elect their class representatives at the same time they elect class officers for the following year. In addition, also in the spring prior to elections, those running for an at-large or international School Council position deliver a speech, or participate in a panel discussion, before the student body. Votes for at-large candidates are tabulated by present members of the council who are not candidates themselves and by the faculty advisor or the Director of Student Life. Only students may vote for student positions. Seniors do not vote. If, once votes are tallied, no clear winners emerge; School Council may schedule a run-off election. Class and at-large elections should be completed by the end of the third week in May. Early in the fall, the proctors and the Wellness Advocates choose their school council representative. A short time later, once the freshmen have had a chance to get to know one another, they elect their representative at the same time they are electing their class officers. Meetings and Expectation. School Council meets during lunch two days a week. The meetings are open to the entire school community. School Council tries to meet with the Director of Student Life and the head of school at least 77


Fine Print 2017-2018

once a semester. During the year, School Council members are expected to be in touch with their constituents, to listen to their concerns, and to keep them informed. They are also expected to attend all regular meetings.

2017-2018 Student Leadership Senior Class President- Lucia Winter ‘18 Vice President/Secretary- Caroline Galt ‘18 Historian- Sam Earley ‘18 Junior Class President- Kiran Singh ‘19 Vice President/Secretary- Brighton Goh ‘19 Historian- Nicole Sue Kim ‘19 Sophomore Class President- Sophia Castillo ‘20 Vice President/Secretary- Yoosong Song ‘20 Historian- Cece Lagomarsino ‘20 Freshman Class To be selected School Council Senior Class Rep- Lillian Pickett ‘18 Junior Class Rep- Katherine Schultze ‘19 Sophomore Class Rep- Jolin Min ‘20 Freshman Class Rep- To be selected Wellness Advocate- To be selected Proctor- To be selected At Large- Cindy Yuan ‘19 International Rep- Linyun (Annabelle) Tang ‘18

78


Emma Willard School

2017-2018 Proctors Hall

Proctor

Kellas 3 T

Sharde Johnson

Kellas 3 Short

Victoria Gorman

Kellas 3 Long

Claris Dabah

Kellas 2 T

Ndidi Owunna

Kellas 2 Short

Hannah Cesaretti

Kellas 2 Long

Samantha Earley

Sage 3 Zoo

Janine Reidy

Sage 3 Long

Heather Loepere

Sage 3 Short

Nana Hayami

Hyphen 3

Tara Fedder

Sage 2 X

Caroline Yin

Sage 2 Long

Elizabeth Stepton

Sage 2 Short

Alanna Kim

Hyphen 2

Rhian Muschett

Day Student Proctors Michaela Benton Grace Gilday Liana Greenberg-Nielsen Kate Hinchliffe Izzy Mesko Grace Mitzen Grace O’Connor Nina Xie

79


Fine Print 2017-2018

2017-2018 Wellness Advocates Aira Agrawal Latifa Al-Khalifa Aisha Fade Gabby Gilbert Amber Hsu Judy Jiang Angella Kasande Eliza Lindberg Caroline McKeon Sally Mikadze Ann Nie Zoe O’Bryon Phebe Perdue Helen Quinn Khairat Raji Sarah Shamlian Audrey Toop

80


Emma Willard School

2017-2018 Club Leadership Agonies American Red Cross Club Amnesty International BHA Campus Players Chess Club Choir

Clock Coding Club

Dance Company Dor Va Dor Emma Genius Emma Green Emmasaries Embassadors (tour guides) F-Word Fair Trade

FASO FBLA FOCUS Gargoyle

Victoria Gorman ‘18 Liana Greenberg-Nielsen ‘18 Susie Yoon ‘18 Nichapa (Bam Bam) Lertviwatkul ‘19 Kaili Ebert ‘19 Ally Sukay ‘20 Laganeh (Aisha) Fade ‘19 Sefi Agbemadzo’19 Liana Greenberg-Nielsen ‘18 Victoria Gorman ‘18 Brighton Goh ‘19 Christine Somerville ‘18 Lillian Pickett ‘18 Ava Doyle ‘18 Michaela Benton ‘18 Olivia Pintair ‘18 Megan Pontin ‘19 Linyun (Annabelle) Tang ‘18 Coco Nishimura ‘19

Investment Club JSG

Abigail Mason ‘18 Abigail Ginsburg ‘19 Emeline Fromm ‘19 Katie Axelrod ‘18 Emiko Saso ‘19 Megan Pontin ‘19 Nadia Sabo ‘19 Abby Li ‘18 Elizabeth Stepton ‘18 Nanase Hayami ‘18 Sharde Johnson ‘18 Olivia Pintair ‘18 Heather Loepere ‘18 Cindy Yuan ‘19 Catherine Chen ‘18 Yue (Helena) Yu ‘18 Subin Hyun ‘18 Sarah Shamlian ‘18 Noreen Mian ‘19 Joy Yip ‘18 Abigail Mason ‘18 Gabby Bianco ‘18 Nghi Lam ‘18

Pride

Language Tutors May Day

MED Talks Mock Trial Model UN NAMI Orchestra

Phila

Primes

Quiz Team School 16

Science Olympiad SOAR Speech and Debate

Spilled Ink Triangle (art) Triangle (literature) 12Tones UNICEF

Natnaree Tangwiwat ‘18 Khairat Raji ‘19 Amy Jiang ‘19 Caroline Galt ‘18 Anna Schupack ‘18 Elizabeth Stepton ‘18 Subhadra Reddy ‘18 Kiran Singh ‘19 Anna Boggess ‘19 Isabella Mesko ‘18 Sadie Basila ‘19 Katherine Schultze ‘19 Jennifer Li ‘19 Kayleen McGinnis ‘18 Grace Kolosek ‘20 Lucia Winter ‘18 Nanase Hayami ‘18 Christine Somerville ‘18 Soo Young (Ashley) Kwon ‘18 Pawa Osathanugrah ‘18 Amelia Morton ’18 Julia Busby ‘18 Ava Doyle ‘18 Katie Axelrod ‘18 Fanqi (Cara) Yi ‘18 Caroline Galt ‘18 Heather Loepere ‘18 Gracelyn Goodridge ‘19 Subhadra Reddy ‘18 Katherine Fousek ‘18 Linyun (Annabelle) Tang ‘18 Sutton MacInnes ‘19 Emily Kibler ‘18 Abby Nguyen ‘18 Judy Jiang ‘19 Rachel Guo ‘19 Michaela Benton ‘18 Amelia Morton ‘18 Fanqi (Cara) Yi ‘18 Yiyi Zhang ‘18 Ndidi Owunna ‘18 Tara Fedder ‘18 Lillian Pickett ‘18 Ava Doyle ‘18 Natnaree Tangwiwat ’18 Prim Budsaratragoon ‘19

81


Fine Print 2017-2018

Places at and Around Emma Security is located in the front of Sage Hall, across from Student Life. Equipped with state-of-the art video cameras that provide comprehensive surveillance of the campus, the office is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. School Store. Located in Kellas basement, the school store is a hub of activity from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and offers cafĂŠ services in the early evenings. Hours may extend to the weekend during the 16-17 school year. The Health and Wellness Center is located on the ground floor of Hyphen Hall, at the Archway. A registered nurse is always available in the event of an emergency. The Laundry is the building next to the Elmgrove Avenue gate. It is home to the advancement and business offices. The William Moore Dietel Library is the central facility in the Snell Music/ Dietel Library/Maguire Art complex. The library collection contains books, eBooks, periodicals, CDs, DVDs, and the school archives. Reference books may not leave the library. Circulation is by self-service checkout. A printer/scanner is available for student use. Reserve materials are kept at the information desk and may be borrowed by asking the staff. The library has wireless Internet access and public computer work stations linked to campus printers. Emma subscribes to many databases for access to periodical articles, reference material, and primary source documents. The library also has an excellent network for inter-library loan of both books and periodical articles. The library Web page at emmalibrary.com has information about the library, with links to our online catalog, library blog, research guides, and online databases. The library is open: The library is staffed:

Sunday-Thursday

8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.

Friday-Saturday

8:00 a.m.-9:30 p.m.

Monday-Thursday

8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

Archives is staffed:

82

Friday

8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Sunday

7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

Monday-Thursday

1:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Friday

8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.


Emma Willard School

Mailroom. The student mail center is located in Kellas basement. Faculty, staff, and boarding and day students receive mail there and may buy stamps or send packages in the mailroom. The mailroom is open Monday-Friday, 7:00 a.m8:00 and 11:00 a.m-12:45 p.m Information Services manages computer networks and provides services and technical support for all members of the Emma Willard community. It is located in the basement of Slocum (helpdesk@emmawillard.org).

In and Around Troy Located along the Hudson River, Troy is a city of 55,000 people and is more than 200 years old. Troy was a major center for the industrial revolution in the 1800s—birthplace of the detachable shirt collar and home to stove manufacturers, textile mills, stagecoach and carriage builders, and more. Today, it is home to The Sage Colleges, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Emma Willard School. While Emma overlooks the city of Troy up on the “hill” of Mount Ida, students frequently make their way off campus, either on foot, by bus (the #286 bus to downtown Troy stops in front of Emma Willard School), by taxi, or with a faculty member. Here are a few popular destinations and helpful phone numbers. Breakfast, Lunch Spots & Inexpensive Dinner Options Bacchus, 33 Second Street, Troy (518) 687-0345 Bruegger’s Bagels, 55 Congress Street, Troy (518) 274-4469 DeFazio’s Pizza (gourmet pizza/take-out), 266 4th Street, Troy (518) 271-1111 The Whistling Kettle, 254 Broadway, Troy (518) 874-1938 Illium Café, 9 Broadway, Troy (518) 273-7700 Manory’s Restaurant (breakfasts), 99 Congress Street, Troy (518) 272-2422 Shalimar Indian Restaurant, 407 Fulton Street, Troy (518) 273-8744 Spill’n the Beans, 13 3rd Street, Troy (518) 268-1028 The Daily Grind, 46 3rd Street, Troy (518) 272-8658 Brown’s Tap Room, 417-419 River Street, Troy (518) 273-2337 Carol’s Pizza & Subs, 536 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 271-7700 Lee-Lin’s Chinese Food, 539 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 274-8816 McDonald’s, 66 Main Avenue, Wynantskill (1.3 miles from EWS) (518) 283-2089 Mr. Subb, Inc., 625 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 273-0648 Okinawa, 61 Main Avenue, Wynantskill (518) 286-2888 Finer Dining LoPorto’s, 85 Fourth Street, Troy (518) 273-8546 Plum Blossom, 685 Hoosick St., Troy (518) 272-0036 River Street Café, 429 River Street, Troy (518) 273-2740 83


Fine Print 2017-2018

Dry Cleaning Rainbow Cleaners, 10 Ford Avenue (across the street from CVS), Troy (518) 274-0981 Florists Pawling Flower Shop, 532 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 273-4132 Fleurtacious, 470 N. Greenbush Rd., Rensselaer (518) 283-7262 Shopping (groceries and sundries) CVS Pharmacy, 541 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 271-1706 Cumberland Farms, 625 Pawling Avenue, Troy (518) 273-6736 Hannaford Supermarket, 40 Main Avenue, Wynantskill (518) 283-0538 (just over one mile from EWS) Bakeries Bella Napoli, 721 River Street, Troy (518) 274-8277 The Cookie Factory, 520 Congress St., Troy (518) 268-1060 Placid Baker, 250 Broadway, Troy (518) 326-2657 Banks Bank of America, 59 Third Street, Troy (518) 266-0519 Key Bank, 130 Fourth Street, Troy (518) 274-1213 Pioneer Savings Bank, 78 Main Avenue, Wynantskill (518) 283-5905 First Niagara, 32 Second Street, Troy (518) 270-3232 and 86 Main Avenue, Wynantskill (518) 283-8600

84


Emma Willard School

Where to Turn for Answers Head of School Jenny Rao reports to the Board of Trustees and leads the Administrative Team in managing all aspects of school life, including curricular and co-curricular affairs, fiscal and staff management, enrollment and public relations, development, alumnae and parent relations, and long-range planning. Academic Dean Dr. Meredith Legg reports to the Head of School and is responsible for operational aspects of the academic program and hiring. She consults with teachers in matters of pedagogy, general school procedures, and classroom management, and oversees the academic and college counseling offices. Dean of Students and Wellbeing Shelley Maher reports to the Head of School and oversees all aspects of wellness, including athletics and movement, counseling and health services, leadership and advising and student life. Director of Enrollment Jamie Hicks-Furgang reports to the Head of School and is a member of the Administrative Team. She leads the Admissions team and is responsible for managing enrollment of new and current students. Executive Assistant to the Head of School Jacki Cioffi reports to the Head of School and oversees operations within the head’s office, including her calendar, and event planning logistics. Director of College Counseling Kent Jones reports to the Academic Dean and is responsible for coordination of college counseling services. Director of the Emma Fund Shelley Friel reports to the Director of Advancement. She is responsible for raising funding for The Emma Fund, which supports many aspects of student life on and off campus. Director of Student Life Emily Snyder reports to the Dean of Students and Wellbeing and oversees a Student Life program encompassing student leadership development, clubs and organizations, student activities, and new student orientation. She manages the Student Life Residential Faculty and facilitates the student disciplinary process.

85


Fine Print 2017-2018

Director of Business Services and Financial Aid Laura Bernard oversees the billing of student accounts, including SmartCard transactions. She also reviews applications for financial assistance and coordinates the work of the financial aid committee. Director of Health Services Jennifer Bliss, Registered Nurse, is responsible for all student health services and oversees our nursing staff. Director of Counseling Mary Moore, LCMFT, is responsible for all student counseling services. She oversees our counseling staff and makes referrals to private clinicians in the area when appropriate. Registrar Julie Fontana manages the academic schedule and coordinates students registration and scheduling, including course changes. Assistant Director of Student Life Matthew Slaughter reports to the Director of Student Life. He has operational management for student activities and clubs and organizations and freshman community service. Chief Financial Officer Virginia Arbour reports to the Head of School and is responsible for the school finances, campus technology, facilities, security, and auxiliary income efforts. Learning Support Coordinator Maureen Harrison reports to the Academic Dean. She monitors student academic progress and oversees academic support, study skills training, tutoring, and attendance. Parents may also contact the school through the parent email, parents@ emmawillard.org.

86


Emma Willard School

Directions to Emma Willard School From the East. Mass Pike (I-90) into New York State. Continue on I-90 (using exit B1) to exit 9, to Route 4 north. On Route 4, travel 1.5 miles to a right onto County Route 74 (Winter St. Ext.). Travel approx. 2 miles. When the road forks, bear left (leaving Route 74 and continuing on Winter St. Ext.) to end. Turn left onto Pawling Avenue (Route 66). Emma Willard is .8 miles ahead on the right, marked by a wrought-iron fence. From New York City. Exit 23 from N.Y. State Thruway to I-787 northbound to Route 7 east. Now see below “From All Points.” From Western New York. N.Y. Thruway (I-90) to exit 24. Follow signs for Route 90 east to Boston. Continue to signs for Route 787 north to Troy. Follow 787 north to Route 7 east. Now see below “From All Points.” From the North. Take Route I-87 south, exit 7, Route 7 east to Troy. Follow signs for Bennington, Vt. Now see below “From All Points.” From All Points Above. From traffic light at end of Collar City Bridge follow 7 east (Hoosick St.) to the 3rd traffic light. Turn right onto 15th St. and follow it to the end (approx. 1 mile). Turn left onto Route 2 east and proceed to Route 66 (Pawling Avenue) at the 2nd light, then bear right onto Route 66. After the 4th traffic light, Emma Willard will be on your left. Continue along front of campus to the main gate.

87


Fine Print 2017-2018

Academic Calendar 2017-2018 August 2017 21

Mon.

New faculty/staff orientation

22-23

Tues.-Wed.

Faculty and staff meetings

23

Wed.

Arrival of student leaders

24

Thurs.

New faculty/staff orientation cont’d

27

Sun.

Opening Day

29

Tues.

Opening Convocation, first day of classes

4

Mon.

Labor Day (school in session)

16-17

Fri.-Sun.

Closed weekend for seniors

7

Sat.

SAT

20-21

Fri.-Sat.

Parent Days

21-24

Sat.-Tues.

Fall Long Weekend; Boarders return by 9:00 p.m. on Oct. 24

25

Wed.

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.

28

Sat.

ACT

4

Sat.

SAT

17-26

Fri.-Sun.

Thanksgiving break begins at 3:20 p.m.; Boarders return by 9:00 p.m. on 11/26

27

Mon.

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.

2

Sat.

SAT

9

Sat.

ACT

15

Fri.

Fall Semester ends at noon for grades 9-11

16

Sat.

Revels performance at 1:00 p.m.; grade 12 vacation begins at the conclusion of the performance

September

October

November

December

88


Emma Willard School January 2018 3

Wed.

Faculty/Staff Professional Development

4

Thurs.

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.; Spring Semester begins

15

Mon.

MLK Day (school in session) - All School activity

9-12

Fri. Mon.

Winter Long Weekend begins at noon, Boarders return

13

Tues.

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.

23

Fri.

Emma Willard’s Birthday

February

March 10

Sat.

16-4/2

Fri.-Mon.

Spring break begins at 3:20 p.m.; Doors repoen at noon on 4/1; Boarders return at 9:00 p.m. on 4/2

3

Tues.

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.

14

Sat.

ACT

27-30

Fri.-Mon.

Spring Long Weekend begins at noon; Boarders return by 9:00 p.m. on 4/30

7-11, 14-18

Mon.-Fri.

AP Weeks

5

Sat.

SAT

28

Mon.

Memorial Day (school in session)

29

Tues.

Last Day of classes for seniors

2

Sat.

SAT; Baccalaureate

3

Sun.

204th Commencement

4

Mon.

Reading Day

5-8

Tues.-Fri.

Final Exams

10

Sun.

Dorms close at noon

15-17

Fri.-Sun.

Reunion Weekend

April

May

June

89


Fine Print 2017-2018

Daily Schedule 2017-2018

90


Emma Willard School

Alma Mater (Sung every Monday at Morning Reports and throughout the year)

Reared on the heights of Ida, Against the wide-arched sky, The sunbeams fall athwart thee, The moonbeams gently lie. Across thy open hilltop, The winds blow bold and free; O ye grey walls, protecting, We raise our song to thee! Come let us sing together, A song of grateful praise; In honor of our founder The joyous strains upraise. ’Twas she beheld the vision And wrought with steadfast will; ’Tis we with joyous labor That vision must fulfill! “Semper fidelis” singing To Emma Willard dear, Above the grey walls ringing Our song floats sweet and clear. O touch each fleeting moment With friendship’s alchemy. The days that lie before us, Our memories soon shall be!

Emma Hart Willard 1787-1870

Verse by Caroline Carter Davis, Class of 1904 Music by Mendelssohn

91


2017-2018 Calendar of Vacations Fall Long Weekend Saturday, October 21, 12:00 noonTuesday, October 24, 9:00 p.m. *Thanksgiving Vacation Friday, November 17, 3:20 p.m.Sunday, November 26, 9:00 p.m. *Winter Vacation Underclasswomen Friday, December 15, 10:00 p.m.Wednesday, January 3, 9:00 p.m. Seniors Saturday, December 16, 4:30 p.m.Wednesday, January 3, 9:00 p.m. Winter Long Weekend Friday, February 9, 12:00 noonMonday, February 12, 9:00 p.m. *Spring Vacation Friday, March 16, 3:30 p.m.Monday, April 2, 9:00 p.m. Spring Long Weekend Friday, April 27, 12:00 noonMonday, April 30, 9:00 p.m. *Dormitories will be closed during these vacations.