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D o s s i e r. Emma Parke Wolfe Final Collection BA (Hons) Fashion Atelier


Collection

Abstract.

T h i s c o l l ec tion l ooks to use aesthetic beauty as its main conce pt, with particu l ar ref eren ce to f a c es ; th e rel ation ship between b eauty and mathematics. Each feature play s a d i f f eren t ro l e i n th e s tr u c tu re o f a fac e. Pro p o r ti o n is a r unning th em e. U mberto Eco dis cus s ed the relations hip between p ro p o r ti o n an d b ea u ty i n his book ‘On B eauty’. He des cribed how Grecian ideal s tatues were bu i l d wi th h ar mo n i o u s p ro p o r tion s as it w as seen as a s ign of beauty. If s omething was cons idered aes th eti cal l y h arm o n i o u s, i t w as al so in har m ony with the earth, planets and nature, and therefo re b eau ti f u l . T h e r ati o Phi ( 1.618) is used in many mediums of art for ms to create beauty. Ph i i s a meas u remen t o f a es th eti c beauty, al so know n as the div ine proportion. Leonardo Da Vinc i u s ed th i s p ro p o r ti o n th ro u g h o u t h is work, inc l udin g paintings and anatomical drawings. It is als o p res en t i n th e f aces h e p a i n ted , for ex am pl e the M ona Lis a’s portrait us es the proportions of phi , an d s h e i s co n s i d ered b ea u tiful . D a Vi n c i i l lustr ated the pl aton ic s olids In Luca Paciloi’s De Div inia Proporti o n e: p u bl i s h ed i n 1 5 0 9 , th e b ook is th e fir st to l ook in de pth at the div ine proportion in relatio n to s o l i d s an d arch i tec tu re. T h e in tr ic ate sketch es of s olid and s k eletonic s hapes are beautiful a n d h ave g reatl y i n f l u en c ed th e s hape an d ang l e of th e frames us ed in this collection. I n th e l a s t d ec ade Dr Ste phen M arquardt has als o us ed Phi to, s omewhat con trover s i al l y, create a p er f ec tl y p ropor tional fac ial m as k . To create his mas k he has us ed the s ame go l d en tr i an g l e, p en ta g o n a n d dec agon sh apes as used by Da Vinci in De Div inia Proportione. M arq u ard t i s s earch i n g fo r a w ay to c reate per fec t fac ial proportions ever y time with the res ult of b eau ty, i n ai d o f h i s res ea rch i n to pl astic surger y. T h e p ro bl em wh en usin g m ath ematical s tructures to create facial beauty, is p hy s i cal ref l ecti o n o f th e f a c e dow n th e m iddl e is n ever actually s y mmetrical. No two s ides are th e s ame h owever th e f eatu res are m ir rored ac ross the face. T his conce pt of ref lection and a-sy mmetr y i s p res en t th ro u g h o u t th e c ol l ec tion in som e of the collar des igns. In portraiture, the p er s o n i s n o t u s u al l y p a i n ted f a c e-on . I t is bec ause th at a-s y mmetrical as pect of the portrait is what mak es i t i n teres t in g o r b ea u tiful to l ook at. Por tr aits are generally pres ented as polis hed master p i eces i n a f r ame. T h ro u g h o u t th is c ol l ec tion I have us ed frames as a running des ign s trateg y. Fr ames are u s ed to p res er ve b eautiful th in gs; beautif ul things are framed and dis played. M a rq u a rd t has buil t a fr am ework of facial beauty us ing Phi with which he can rel y o n . As h as L eo n a rd o Da Vin c i wh en he ex pl ores the s k eletonic framework of Div ine s ol i d s. B o th are p l ay i n g w i th d i m en sions, as does th is c ol lection.


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Look Two

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Look Three

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Frame dress

Box hem coat

Look Four 72

Frame hood jacket

Look Five

Mirror collar jacket

Look Six

Square top

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Contents.

Look One

Frame jacket

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L

ook one is a framed jacket with a mirror collar. This jacket is in-

spired by beauty and picture framing. This piece can sit on display as well as being a wearable piece. The collar is inspired by the symmetry of faces. Faces are symmetrical, however they never look the same when perfectly mirrored across the middle. The jacket is worn over a simple long sleeve cotton shirt with and emboss collar. This outfit is paired with a smart tapered trouser with cut out detail behind the knee.


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Look

One.


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T o i l e .


Toile Frame. The dimension of the frame in this toile are crucial to the size of the body. - The width of the frame is determined by the width of the body between the shoulders. 39cm. - The depth of the frame must is determined by the depth of the body between the shoulder blades and chest. 23cm - The length of the frame is less critical. For this garment it is measured at 35cm.

23cm

35cm

39cm

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- For the toiling process, the garments with frames will use standard 1x2cm wood and staple gunned together. Using staples will allow the wood to stay together strong enough to toile, but is also easy to pull apart if needed.


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Constructing The jacket bodice. This garment does not have much shaping to the body, therefore the only draping necessary is the collar. This collar appears symmetrical, however one side

Collar edge

A

(A) has a collar roll and the other side (B) is seamed into the bodice. Side A is

CB

draped first, and from this, B is flat patterned. As can be seen in the draft drawing:

Collar edge

Roll line

Neck

Back

Front

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CF

CB

A = blue B = red

B


A

B

This line of pictures shows a 360 degree view of the mirror collar.

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Once the collar is finished, the jacket can be stapled into the frame. Lining the CF and CB points to the same points on the frame. At the shoulder point, the excess to create room for the shoulder.

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fabric is manipulated into a pleat


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Final Garm ent.

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Final frame construction.

The bespoke picture frames are made in the picture framing workshop. Firstly, each measurement is made accurately, if one length of wood is too long, the frame will be off balance and unstable.

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Once the angles of wood are cut, they are pinned together using the under pinning machine. The wood is laid into the machine at right angles. It is secured using hydraulic pressure clasps. The machine shoots a right angular staple into the wood from underneath.

The wood is cut using a miter cutter. As can be seen above, the miter cutter has a large right angular blade. The blade cuts two angles at the same time.


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Treating the Oak with oil

Before oil treatment

After oile treatment

The Oak is then treated with oil. This darkens the wood slightly, brings out the grain and makes the wood look richer finish. 21


Making the Jacket. To ensure the jacket pattern fits the picture frame exactly, the paper pattern is pinned and taped together into the real frame.

The fabric used for this jacket is fragile and frays easily. The metallic threads spring out of seams and will pull apart leaving the jacket looking shabby.

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To avoid fraying and pulling at the seams, all cut pieces are fused at the edges with 1cm fuse tape.


After all of the pieces are the front panels are then fabric is lightly stretched ing the self fabric strengh,

cut and fused at the edes, basted onto canvas. The over the canvas to, givstucture and a clean front.

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Canvasing Front Panels.

The canvas is cut away over the shoulder for the self fabric falls over the natural shoulder. It cut down by 1cm and taped at the jacket edge to make for a clean line when the facing is bagged out.

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The canvas is also cut down along the hem and the sides. This is so the self fabric can fold over the canvas and sit nicely into the frame.


A Strip of lining on the straight is placed at the roll line to reinforce the pad stitching. The pad stitching starts at the roll line and continues round the revere to the jacket edge. As the revere is being pad stitched, it is rolled to give it memory and stay rolled back by itself.

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Assembling Garment + Facing

1.

The back lining and facing is assembled, followed by the front facing pieces that are stitched to the back facing at the shoulder seams.

2.

The same process is followed with the outer jacket. The back is assembled at CB, followed by the front and back panels stitched together at shoulder seams.

3.

Once the front and back panels of both outer jacket and facing pieces, the collars are stitched to the necklines.

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The pad stitched collar attaches to the outer jacket as an under collar.

4.

The facing and outer jacket are stitched together along the jacket and collar edge and bagged out. The left hand side of the jacket where there is no roll line is not pressed flat. This is to mimic the roll of the real revere on the opposite side.


The collar is pad stitched from the roll line down the collar fall only. This is because the collar stand shows from the front on side B, and therefore, so would the pad stitching.

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Final Jacket. The final Garment is both super glued and stapled into the frame. bias binding is attached around the outside of the jacket. Once the jacket is in the frame the bias binding folds over the staples to hide and conceal them.

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Paired with Grey trousers. Cout out toursers.

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The frame jacket is paired with grey wool straight leg trousers. The trousers have a diamond cut out behind the knee. Firstly, all pieces are bound. The back cut out panels are constructed separately and a small facing bags out the cut out edge. The diamond edges overlap at the sides to stable the structure. Creases are pressed down the front and back legs in keeping with the boxy concept.


And white cotton shirt.

A long sleeve shirt goes under the box Jacket. The shirt has an emboss collar. As can be seen in the picture below, the collar is assemble and attached to the neckline before the rest of the shirt is constructed. The shirt has a narrow cuff will a small 1cm wide cuff plaques. To match the white cotton, mother of pearl buttons are used to fasten the shirt front. A small slit detail in the hem at the sides.

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L

ook two is an open back framed dress. The frames are

placed around the arms and collapse into the body at the waist with hinges. The top frame corners sit at the dropped shoulder with a round neckline. The skirt fullness is created by slashing directly into the fabric at the front, inserting the frame and opening the slash to push the fullness around from the hinge point into a flared skirt.


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Look

Two.


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T o i l e .


Draping With the frame.

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After roughly measuring the angle at which the frame will hang from the body, this determined the angle at which to cut into the fabric. The frame is stapled into ether

side of the cut, with one hinge end closest to CF. When the frame opens, the fabric also opens; this pushes the flare onto the other side of the cut. The the direction at which

the hinge opens is crucial, if it stapled into the cut the wrong way round, the hinge will not open the correct way and will not sit against the body correctly.


Once the frame is stapled into the fabric, the frame is opened and placed on the side of the body, around the arm. The dress is draped around the positioning of the frame. The dress must hold the frame firmly in place on the body, but also allow the frame to manipulate its shape.

The frame must be positioned just off the shoulder, but not so far down that the arm is restricted. When the frame falls open, fullness is pushed to the front of the body, crating nice folds of flair. The bottom frame beam falls open and sits against the hip. A dart is positioned from the top frame corner, into the shoulder to create a smooth dropped shoulder.

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The back is open. An under dress is worn underneath to cover some of the side body. It will also and attach to a circle skirt to resolve the back.


Toile With the frame. Firstly, the slit that the frame is stapled into has no seam allowance because it is simply a slit into the fabric. Therefore it must be bound. As can be seen in the pictures to the right:

CB

Dart

rt

2

The slit is opened completely opened out straight and the binding is stitched continuously along the edge.

Da

1

The slit is cut into the fabric and stay stitched.

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CB

Fr am

eI

ns

er

t

CF

3

The binding is turned over and finished. The slitis bound and no fabric is lost in seam allowance.


These pictures to the right show the frame stapled into the dress bodice and back skirt attached. The edge of the fabric will rest inside the frame. The picture framing wood has a small ledge to hide the edge of the fabric.

The pictures below show the dress front once its slashed into and edges are bound. The shape is nice, even before the frame is stapled in.

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Final Garm ent.

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Constructing The dress. Back panel

This dress has very little sewing and relies mainly on the frame inserted into the fabric at the waist.

Firstly, the shoulder dart is closed, as can be seen in the photo to the right.

The back panel is bound finished at the hem and shoulder seams.

The neck facing is also finished with binding. Black tape is stitched onto the neckline to prevent stretching.

Then the back is attached to the front at shoulder seams and the neckline is bagged out with facing.

Neck facing

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Bagged out nackline


final col

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Constructing The dress. •

Making the waist cuts for the frames it delicate as the cut slit must be finished with no seam allowance.

The cut is marked out onto to dress with chalk and a stay stitch is sewn around it to prevent fraying or stretching.

The slit is finished with bias binding as explained in the toile stage.

Firstly a small piece of binding is attached at the point of the slit to reinforce this part as it is the most likely to rip, fray or stretch.

Lastly the final long strip of binding is sewn along the whole slit, across the back, and also down the skirt back. As can be seen in the photograph on the right.

This binding is only sewn on one side because the dress will be stapled to the frame through the binding. The other half will then fold over, hiding the raw edge and staples.

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Fr am

eI

ns er

t

CF

CB

Da

rt

CB

Dart


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Hinges On the frame.

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To attach the hinges onto the frame corners a small pilot hole must be drilled first. Using a Pillar drill the four small pilot holes are drilled to prevent the wood from splitting when the nails are hammered in. A small bit of super glue is also put underneath the hinge to reinforce the joint.


These pictures to the left show the dress before the frame is stapled in. Bias binding cut from the self fabric is attached to the dress before frame is attached. Once the frame is attached the binding folds over the staples, hiding the from view. The Picture to the left shows the frame attached to the dress. Both super glue and staples are used to secure the joint. The picture below shows the under skirt. As this dress only attaches to he frames and is not resolved at the back, there must be an under skirt to cover the back. The under skirt is a semi circle with two extra quarters of fullness to mirror the front of the dress. the skirt fastens at the side and the dress is placed over the top.

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Final Dress.

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L

ook three is a large jacket with a box hem. The hem is shorter

than the knee at the front and drops sharply toward the back. The hem is not a wooden frame, however it has been cut to mimic the shape and hang line a frame. The collar also has a mirror collar, similar to look one, however this collar is mirrored in more detail. The box hem jacket has no sleeves and is pared with small shorts that just show from under the jacket at the front.


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Look

Three.


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T o i l e .


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CF

Fold line

CB

Draping Boxy jacket.

This garment is one large box. It is tailored around the neckline and shoulders, and hangs in a sharp stiff box-like bodice. The front sits just above the knee and graduates down towards the back to a very low dropped hem. A boxed hem attaches to the hem (explained on next page) this gives structure to the box, ensuring it does not loose its shape and the hems do not collapse with the wight of the sides.

For the bodice to keep its shape, the front, back and side bodices are interfaced. In the final garment, this will be canvassed on the whole front panel, and side panel. However the back panel will only be canvassed below the armhole. The jacket would be too bulky if the whole back panel were canvassed, and it is only the bottom half that will benefit for it.


Collar edge

Roll line

Neck CB

ar

ll Co ge

ed

The same mirror collar from toile three is drafted onto this jacket. The two jackets are very similar in construction, however their shapes are two extremes. This will help the collection flow. This garment is a statement piece, however, Toile three is a wearable version of this toile. Therefore the two garments help each other in being key elements to the collection.

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Box hem Net. To

Inside layer

Box hem

create the box hem

Outside jacket

on this jacket, there must be an extra layer on the inside of

the jacket to

hold the flat hem in place. The box diagram to the right shows the inner structure of the box hem within the jacket.

Red indicates the flat hem suspended from the hem of the jacket. Approximately 4cm wide.

Blue indicates the inside

layer connects to the inside of the red hem, and widens to attach to the inside of the jacket; suspending the red hem.

Yellow main

indicates outside

the

jacket.

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This diagram to the right is the jacket draft with colour indications of the box hem net. The hem could be grown on or the pieces can be cut separately.

Fold line

red box hem up. This

CF

layer used to hold the

CB


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Final Garm ent.

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Single Layer

The coated cotton used for this coat is too thin on its own. As can be seen in the sample boxes to the right, one layer of cotton is see through. Doubling up the cotton prevents transparency and will add wight to the garment. All pieces are cut double layer, including the facing and collar piece.

Double Layer

Assembling The collar.

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The front and back bodice pieces are assembled first, along with the front and back facing pieces. The under collar is stitched to the bodice, and the under collar is stitched to the facing.


Although this fabric would not usually be used to tailor with, canvas is placed the under collar to give it memory and keep a nice shape.

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Box Hem.

The bottom box is stitched together, The buckram is cut down at the seam allowance as it is to thick to stitch in the at the seams. CB

2.

Buckram

1.

To create the box hem, the hem is firstly assembled separately to the jacket. A piece of buckram is sandwiched between two pieces of coated cotton. A third layer is placed over this to prevent the buckram from showing through.

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CF

Fold line

3.

The inside support walls, indicated in Blue, are stitched onto the box hem, indicated in Red. The sides of the support walls are stitched together at side seams before the whole hem is attached to the jacket.


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Box Hem.

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Once the box hem is separately assembled, it is then attached to the bottom of the jacket. It is carefully bagged out and pressed into a box. The inside support walls are hand stitched to the inside of the jacket.


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final collection.

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final collection.


Final jacket.

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Paired with Shorts.

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The jacket is paired with a standard pair of blue cotton shorts. The bottom of the shorts only just show slightly below the jacket.

A hook and bar is used to fasten the short above the zip. Using a hook and bar is a nice fastening to use for a fly that does not have anything showing from the front.


And white cotton shirt.

To match the white cotton, mother of pearl buttons are used to fasten the shirt front.

A small slit detail in the hem at the sides .

A short sleeve raglan shirt goes under the Jacket. The shirt has an emboss collar. As can be seen in the picture below, the collar is assemble and attached to the neckline before the rest of the shirt is constructed. 71


L

ook four is a framed hood jacket. The jacket has a relaxed shape with a dropped shoulder and curved back. The frame in the hood has small hinges at the corners which allow the frame to sit on top of the head, or back on the shoulders. The concept for this collection is beauty and facial aesthetics, the jacket represents this by

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framing the face.


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Look

Fo u r.


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T o i l e .


Drafting Framed hood jacket.

bodice of toile 1 Jacket three

bodice is slashed The shoulder is drafted into 2 The 3 into from the hem to the a dropped shoulder and the back of the arm hole, and pivoted out to add fullness to the bodice. The new hem is drawn slightly lengthened at the back.

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armhole is also dropped. A new neckline is drawn to accommodate for the hood. The jacket edge is trimmed down to the CF. This is because the jacket cannot overlap at CF with the frame at the neckline.

CF Fold line

Fold line

CF Fold line

Fold line

CF

CF

This jacket is drafted from the bodice of toile three. The three diagrams below indicate the adjustments made to from toile three, to create this toile five. The red lines indicate the adjustments.

final jacket bod4 New ice for toile five.


Fold line

CF

CB

This diagram shows the final bodice draft. The back panel is straight from the hem and curves into a dropped shoulder at the armhole. This is drafted to match the dropped shoulder on the front.

This picture shows a dart at the shoulder. As a result of flat patterning the drop shoulder, once toiled, it seemed a little rounder than the original design. Adding this 2cm dart horizontally to the sleeve, gives the shoulders a smoother shape and a better fit.

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Sleeve draft Dropped shoulder. The diagrams to the right show the dropped shoulder armhole. The shoulder points cross over at the top in different directions because the shoulder is dropped. To create the sleeve draft the points must be levelled out and squared off.

• Dropped shoulder armhole.

• To draft the sleeve the silhouette lines are drawn first. They start from either side of the armhole at the widest point.

• Keeping the lines at the same length, the shoulder points are levelled out and squared off. The cap height is logically guessed.

Red = Front over arm Blue = Back over arm Green = Under arm

• The pitch line is then drawn as a guide for the new silhouette lines to follow. Starting straight and bending at the elbow line to follow the pitch. • The side seams are then displaced to hide underneath the arm.

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• The overarm seam lines are drawn from the crossed over shoulder points. They meet at the sleeve hem and square off. These lines are exaggerated out to create volume.


As can be seen in the toiled bodice, the extra fabric added at the back when the pattern was slashed into, has taken the garment off balance. The back is now pushing the front forward. This works well as it pushes the centre fronts over each other to create a nice line at the front. The three piece sleeve sits well into the armhole and pitches nicely. The armhole is low to allow the frame hood to be pulled up onto the head.

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CF

Hood Framed hood jacket.

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CF

Fold line

CB

The frame for the hood is the same size as the two frames in toile two. The frame is made first and the hood drafted to the measurements of the frame. The frame is attached to the front edge of the hood, this edge being the crucial length. As the frame is square, all lengths are the same. From the bodice CF to the side of the hood must be equal to the distance from the side of the hood to the CF of the hood (at the top). The rest of the hood size does not rely on strict measurements.


The hood is firstly stitched into the bodice neckline before the frame is attached. The frame is staple gunned onto the hood edge at the front.

This frame has hinges on two corners (the same as the frames in toile two). The corners with the hinges are placed at the sides of the head.

This allows the frame to hinge backwards, lifting the frame and hood off the head. When the frame is hinged open, it rests on the shoulders and is cushioned by the volume of hood fabric.

When the frame is swung shut to its original shape, it lifts the hood back onto the head. The top of the frame can rest on the head to keep the hood up, or it can be pulled over the head and hang at the front. 81


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Final Garm ent.

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Bodice Bodice and sleeve. Firstly the bodice is assembled at side seams. The three piece sleeve is made up and stitched into the armhole. On the jacket toile the sleeve was collapsing slightly at the top of the dropped shoulder. a small amount was pinched off of the sleeve cap height for a nicer fit into the armhole.

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Using a three piece sleeve allows the sleeve to bend with the natural curve of the arm. The outer edge seam is curved to create a sleeve that also bends out around the arm. As can be seen below.


Hood. The hood is attached to the jacket neckline before the frame is attached.

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Lining Bodice and hood.

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Wrong side

Satin lining

After the main bodice is constructed, another bodice is made for the lining. The wrong side of the fabric is used for the bodice and a black satin lining is used for the sleeves. This to make the garment easier to slip on and off because it must go over the head. The two bodices are bagged out to finish the hood and front jacket edges.


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Attaching frame Into hood.

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The frame is both stapled and super glued into the hood. This garment, unlike the other framed garments, does not need bias binding to hide the staples. The hood is stapled onto the frame from the inside. The hood edge is then turned over the the staples, hiding them from view.


Final jacket.

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Paired with White trousers.

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The hooded jacket is paired with white silver trousers. The trousers are creased down the front and back leg.

This fabric has a paper like texture and has no drape. This works well with the design of these trousers because it keeps a sharp shape.


All Trouser edges are bound with white cotton. The outside waistband is stitched to a layer of collar canvas and held together between white cotton. This give the waistband strength and structure.

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L

ook five is a simple wearable jacket. The front is very square and box-like, also mimicking the frames in other garments. Where the front is very straight, the back of this garment is curved and less rigid.

The collar is a mirror of its elf however, one side has a collar fall and the other is just represented by seams.


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Look

Five.


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T o i l e .


Draping Simple jacket. The jacket bodice is very simple. The front and side are one panel with no suppression. At the back side seam, the bodice curves into the body towards the hem. The back panel is straight and narrow to create a boxy shape at the back. Although the jacket is very simple, it is the most wearable.

The bodice is simple, however the collar is very complex The collar uses the same technique as toile one. The right side has a collar fall which tapers away toward the left side. The left side mirrors the right in seams only. This jacket has a standard two piece sleeve.

A = blue B = red

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Fold line

CF

CB


Collar edge

B

Roll line CB

A

e

dg

re

lla Co

Neck

As can be seen in this pattern and toile, the collar has a fall on side A, but does not on side B. This is the same collar construction as in toile one. However, this collar also reflects the revere, which is grown onto the facing.

At this stage, the main bodice has been constructed and the collar is finished with the facing. The jacket curves around and slightly under at the back. This pushes towards the front where there is no fit. The front creates a boxy clean silhouette. 97


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Mirror collar with collar fall on one side and mirrored in seam on the other. It can be very easy for this detail unnoticed from a far on the cat walk. The seamed side can fade into the fabric and disappear. The collar will be made in a different fabric from the jacket, however the difference in fabrics will be subtle, but still enough to notice the detail.


The front panel is pressed along the press lines to give the bodice a nice silhouette. For the real garment, this whole front panel will be canvassed between press lines. This will make the lines sharp and prevent the front hem from collapsing. A standard two piece sleeve is made for this jacket to keep the garment wearable.

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Final Garm ent.

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Canvassing Front panels. Firstly, the front panels are canvassed . Both sides are trimmed down along the collar edge, neckline and hem. On side A, a bridal is attached at the roll line and pad stitched across the revere. The canvas does not cover the whole panel. It is folded and cut down along the fold lines. These fold lines create the boxy shape of the front jacket. The canvas will define the folds and hold the shape of the box.

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A

Fold line

The collar is pad stitched from the roll line down the collar fall only. This is because the pad stitched side of collar side B will be on show.

Fold line

B


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The canvassed collar is stitched to the jacket neckline. The bridal is then pad stitched to the collar to prevent the collar stretching on the bias

The over collar it stitched to the neckline of the facing. The two sides will then be bagged out. The seamed in revere is attached to the facing .

B

As the revere is not grown on from the jacket bodice, it has no canvas. The canvas is cut slightly longer than the roll line so when the revere is folded, it gives a roll effect.

ide

Canvas is added to the facing where the fake revere is seamed in. This is because the revere facing is on the fold, and therefore is not grown on from the body.

gs

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Fac in


Mirror collar. Once the jacket and facing are bagged out, the mirror collar can be seen. The two piece sleeve in fit into the armhole and the jacket is pressed along the fold lines at the front.

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Lining and Fastenings.

The jacket is fastened at two points along the centre front. The fastenings are magnetic. They are attached by cutting two slits into the fabric, pushing the magnet tabs through, and securing in place by bending the two tabs around a back piece.

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Once the fastenings are attached to the jacket and facing, the lining is attached. The lining is hand stitched around the armholes. A 2 cm pleat is left at the bottom to ensure the lining is not to tight and does not pull at the jacket.


Final jacket.

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Paired with

Red trousers.

Red Trousers The jacket is paired with red wool trousers. They are straight, cropped suit trousers that slightly taper toward the ankle. A sharp press line down the front and back of each leg gives the trouser some structure to match the concept.

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Each piece is firstly bound around side and crotch seams. The legs are assembled separately before the crotch seam. Then the fly is inserted into the centre front with a small squared flap. The waistband sandwiches a piece of collar canvas to give the trouser structure and stability.


And white cotton shirt.

To match the white cotton, mother of pearl buttons are used to fasten the shirt front.

A small slit detail in the hem at the sides .

A short sleeve raglan shirt goes under the Jacket. The shirt has an emboss collar. As can be seen in the picture below, the collar is assemble and attached to the neckline before the rest of the shirt is constructed. 109


L

ook six is a box shirt. Similar to look three the hem of this shirt is drafted into a box net. This box hem can be seen best from the front, and narrows down toward nothing at the back. The whole garment is very square with no sleeves and an emboss collar. Although this is a shirt, it has no button stand, the two side meed exactly in the middle and fasten on the edge.


111

Look

Six.


112


113

T o i l e .


CF

Press line

e Press lin

CB

This box top is a very simple construction, the front is square, with no suppression. It is draped to hang very straight and sharply away from the body at the waist area. The sides graduate lower towards the back and the pack panel is also square. The square shape of the bodice is held by press lines, as can be seen on the draft diagram to the right. These lines hold the boxy shape.

Press line

Draping Box Shirt.

114

e Press lin

Press line

CB

To the left shows the toiled top. The picture show how the press lines hold a nice shape in the bodice, and create a sharp line at the front. However the top is too short and will look nicer longer. The cut out collar also looks unresolved. In this toile there is no button stand, it simply meets at the CF. I think it would look nicer with a button stand. At the hem the facing is slightly falling down and creating a small ledge. I think if this ledge was made into a permanent box hem (similar to toile four) it would look interesting and work well with the boxy theme.


CF

CF

Press line

e Press lin

Press line

CF

Press line

3

CF

e Press lin

e Press lin

Press line

CF

Press line Press line Press line

e Press lin

Press line

CF

Press line CF

e Press lin

Press line

2

As can be sen in this diagram, the red lines indicate the adjustments made. The collar is no longer cut out, but it will be a separate piece seamed in with a slight edge so it is raised off the bodice. The armhole is now square, to keep with the box like theme. The hem is longer and a box net had been added to the front and sides only. This is the same method used in toile four.

This is the final pattern with all adjustments, the bodice and collar shapes are traced off separately, and seam allowance will be added. This is the same for the box hem, it will not be grown on.

CF

CF Press line

Press line

CB

CB

Press line

CF

Press line

Press line

e Press lin

Press line

e Press lin

Press line

e Press lin

Press line CF

CB

CB

1

The cut out collar will become a 3D collar but stay the same shape. The hem will be lengthened and a box hem will be added. The same hem method will be used as in toile four. The armhole will change to a square shape. CB

CB

CB

e Press lin

Adjustments from first toile.

115


Second Toile.

116

The second toile looks much better than the first, especially the increased hem length. The box hem also adds more support to the square silhouette and prevents the hems from collapsing. The square armhole could be lower, and once it has been bound finished, the top part at the shoulder will tuck under itself and create a nice roll.


Emboss collar. The emboss collar is created with a 1cm wide panel, joining the collar to the bodice and lifting it away from the body. The collar is lifted 1cm at the collar point and graduates down to nothing towards the shoulder and CF. The collar and joining panel are interfaced well to avoid the collar collapsing. This collar can be pressed outwards to raise above the bodice. Or as can be seen in the pictures, it can be pressed inwards to look opposite.

117


118


Final Garm ent.

119


CF

Press line

Press line

CB

e Press lin

Box Shirt.

The box shirt must keep a rigid structure, therefore, the cotton has been fused with a soft but crisp interfacing.

1 2

120

3

Firstly the emboss collar is made up and stitched into the neckline.

The bodice front and back are then attached at the shoulder and side seams. As can be seen to the right, welt seams are used for the side seams however a french seam is used for at the CB because a welt seam would cause too much wrinkling.

After the back and front are attached, the box hem can be assembled. The box hem is very similar to the hem of outfit three. However the front part of this hem is grown on , as can be seen on the pattern pieces (top left)


121


Finishing..

Centre front fastening

122

Due to the box hem on this shirt, the two sides at CF cannot overlap. Therefore the sides meet exactly at the CF, and are fastened together with large hooks and eyes. The hooks and eyes are secured and finished by a small stitch neatly looped around the metal .


Arm hole The square armhole is finished with a facing. The facing is stitched on, bagged out and hand stitched down.

123


124

Final shirt.


final

125


Paired with Shorts.

outfit six is paired pair of blue box The shorts are high and flared. The fly shorts is narrow and

with a shorts. waisted on the square.

As can bee seen in the diagram below, the shorts have three panels. The shorts are pressed together along the seem lines to create creases.

126

Back

The creases give the shorts the box line structure. Contrast binding is stitched along the waistband to match other garments within the collection.

Side

Front


127


final collection.


Beauty in 1.618  

A Technical Dossier documenting the making process of this collection. From draping - Pattern cutting - Toiles to Final garments.

Beauty in 1.618  

A Technical Dossier documenting the making process of this collection. From draping - Pattern cutting - Toiles to Final garments.

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