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Septem ber 2010

Emmanuel Episcopal Parish Newsletter

Parish Newsletter Rector’s Ruminations September 2010 Where to Find It: Rector’s Ruminations

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Children and Worship

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Jan Wells

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Storybook Theology

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“Where there is no vision, the people perish” (Proverbs 29:18) to which I would add without a plan, the vision fades and becomes merely a dream forgotten… th

Kids & Faith Formation 6 Calendar

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Birthdays

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Anniversaries

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Prayer List

7

Noramise Update

8,9

New Aumbry Crafted

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Grief Recovery

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Dinner Kitchen

11

Redemptive Suffering

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On May 14 and 15 , the Vestry gathered to review various aspects of our ministry, revisit our vision and mission statement with an eye to developing a ministry plan for the next several years. Since May, we have continued the process of strategic planning resulting in the following priorities: Outreach: to continue our current commitment and find new opportunities to serve the greater Orcas community as “The Village Church,” which ministers to the entire island Worship: to recognize that our ministry begins with prayer in finding ways to balance our liturgical heritage with new forms and expressions of worship (Ad)ministration: to appreciate the importance of staff, programs and facilities as gifts and necessary components in supporting our mission, “to love God and God’s creation with all our heart, soul, mind and strength and care for our neighbors as ourselves” Evangelism: to invite new members and families to join our parish family by exercising “radical hospitality” and nurturing young families Pastoral Care: to envision members of the parish family as a “pastorate of all believers” sharing agape love within the Church and larger community through service, generosity and what we termed “hands on” ministry Given these priorities, I am inviting your thoughts and ideas as to the priorities themselves and how we can best follow our vision and realize our mission. As the elected leadership of the parish, the Vestry needs your participation and support as we further define and refine the priorities, develop specific strategies to continue current efforts and plan new ministries and programs. In short we need your help and ideas because we shall be asking for your support in terms of prayers, giving, participation and the ongoing identification of the parish/community needs and opportunities for shared ministry. How to help in the planning process? Beginning with the obvious, communication is critical. Discussing with one another our shared ministry, considering plans for committees and groups within the parish that you are currently a member of or would like to join, talking with members of the Vestry and with me as to your thoughts, ideas, hopes and vision, and how those might be translated into plans that can be complemented, supported and evaluated in light of our mission statement. th

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Our September 15 and October 20 Vestry meetings will be primarily devoted to the planning process for next year and the next several years. The Vestry needs your help and support and prayers. In Christ, +Craig


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Hints for Being with Children in Worship Summer is coming to a close and soon we will be seeing more young faces among us. Children belong in the faith community. Young and old, we are called to gather together to participate in the worship, witness, and service of the community of faith. Below are some tips as we worship with the young. Recognize your role as models for children in worship Express your appreciation for children, and their presence in church, through your facial expressions and body language Greet the children around you, just as you would greet adults; ask them about their week or how they are Bend down to their eye-level as you speak to children Help children feel included by getting to know them by name Make sure that children have copies of the worship bulletins Invite children to sit with you, and help them find the hymns and scripture readings Pass the offering plate to children Listen to what children have to say; ask them what they enjoy about worship and belonging to church Above all, express your gladness at having children in worship. Free yourself from worrying about their behavior and be open to receive their ministry. - Cheryl


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“I Am Jan” Jan Wells’ Journey Through Stroke

Photo contributed by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin

“I’ve been meaning to ask Robert what happened that night,” Jan Wells remarks, referring to the date of October 9, 2008, when she suffered a right-brain stroke and began a journey to recovery that finds her, nearly two years later, unable to use her left arm and hand, able to walk only with assistance, yet as filled with interest in and enthusiasm for life as she ever was. “I am Jan. I’m a warm rock in the sun.” Jan and her late husband, William Wells, moved to Orcas Island nearly thirty years ago, and began attending Emmanuel Parish in 1999. When Jan first met Rector West, she informed him that her ancestors had come to the United States to escape the influence of the Anglican Church. He responded, “That’s all right; we have room for another Presbyterian.” From that time to 2000, when William died, Jan was chief caregiver for her husband, who suffered from Parkinson’s disease. Jan remembers the last four years as very difficult: “Toward the end, he got very frightened.” One day, William punched Jan in the mouth, loosening a tooth. At that moment she decided to move him to a nursing home. “It was the hardest thing I ever did,” she recalls. The following Sunday, in church, she cried through the entire service, but she reasoned, “If you can’t cry in church, where can you cry?” At the same time, Jan was battling breast cancer. She remembers Rector West as very empathic and explains that there is a big difference between empathy and sympathy: “People with empathy do the right thing.” As example, she cites a book she is currently reading: My Stoke of Insight, by Jill Bolte-Taylor. “When she [Bolte-Taylor] was in the hospital after her stroke, her mother crawled into her bed and held her.”| “I am Jan. I’m a wind that blows prayer flags in Tibet and Kamakura [Japan].” Jan’s chief caregiver and domestic partner, Robert Herrup, slept first in a sleeping bag in her hospital room and then on an air mattress on the floor of their bedroom during the weeks following the stroke. Jan remarks on Robert’s incredible patience: “I hope I had this much patience with my husband. I am very lucky to have Robert. I feel like I landed on my feet.” Robert is supported in his care of Jan by part-time caregivers Amy Cole, Kate Agape-Lichter and Valerie Tincknell. ….continued on next page


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Jan Wells’ Journey, continued “I am Jan. I’m an eagle flying over coastal islands.” rd

In the hospital, Jan brought back from memory, word by word, the 23 Psalm. She uses it as one of four in a cycle of prayers to comfort and center herself; the others are Saint Francis’s Prayer (“Lord, make me an instrument of your peace…”), the Lord’s Prayer, and “I am Jan,” a personal statement of being that came to her one day in the bathtub, a decade before her stroke. “I am Jan. I’m a dove calling on a tropical morning.” To deal with pain, Jan counts backward from 100 by 7’s. “I am Jan. I’m a turtle swimming out to sea.” Before her stroke, Jan loved to swim in Cascade Lake. She hopes to get back to swimming, using a wetsuit to keep her afloat and her right arm and leg to perform the sidestroke. Pre-stroke, Jan was also a pottery student of Jeanie Cole and Oddy Curtis, a watercolor student of Jean Putnam, and head garden volunteer for Emmanuel Episcopal. On this August afternoon, the container garden on her second-story deck on Lookout Loop is lush with geraniums, lobelia, and tomatoes in pots. A ceramic owl and frog—bold, elemental shapes-- perch on the rail behind us, reminders of her years as a sculptor. “I am Jan. I’m a hunter going forth with bow and arrow.” Jan is beautiful under a canvas hat this early August afternoon. A ceramic necklace accents her deep plum-colored sweater. She describes growing up in Port Chester, New York; her college years at Wellesley, where, although a botany major, she loved classes in art and music history. Before Orcas, Jan and William lived in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. “I am Jan. I’m a backpacker to Spider Meadow with Robert.” Jan continues to be inspired by her favorite activities—gardening and reading. She just finished War and Peace, and she is very interested in books on India, where her daughter did a residency. (Jan is the mother of two daughters and a son.) Jan is also working at recovering her singing voice. She and Robert practice singing with songs such as “You Are My Sunshine” and “Home on the Range.” “I am Jan. I’m a mature woman learning to walk after a stroke.” Jan is quick to acknowledge the importance of the help of others for her recovery. She does body work with Cheryl Danskin and Karen Russell and weekly massages with Anita Holladay. Soon, she and Robert hope to complete an intense physical-therapy regimen in Seattle or Bellingham. When Jan faces emotional difficulties, she seeks support and advice from Bishop Craig Anderson. “I am Jan. I’m a free spirit dancing above the flame.” Before I leave, Jan invites me to view her drawings and watercolor paintings. My favorite is of a gnarled tree trunk, bent and broken by decades of storms and the inevitable ravages of age. In its attenuated form, it is exquisitely beautiful. “I am Jan. I am nothing. I am everything. I’m an atom. I’m the universe. I am Jan.” Submitted by Margaret Payne


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Storybook Theology My favorite theologian is A.A. Milne, creator of much-loved Winnie-the-Pooh and friends. Remember when Kanga and Roo first came to the Forest? Rabbit didn’t like them because they were Different and because he didn’t want to expand his circle of friends. He planned a way to make them leave. Fortunately for everyone, the plan failed. Later, when Tigger came to the forest, the friends found him a little too energetic and devised a plan to change him into “ a Humble Tigger, a Sad Tigger, a Melancholy Tigger, a Small and Sorry Tigger”. Again, the plan failed. The plans collapsed as opinions changed - qualities were discovered which previously had been overlooked. Through these adventures and misadventures with the forest friends, Milne helps us realize there is something special in each of us that we need to keep. “Tigger is all right really,” said Piglet lazily. “Of course he is,” said Christopher Robin. “Everybody is really, said Pooh. “That’s what I think,” said Pooh. “But I don’t suppose I’m right,” he said. “Of course you are,” said Christopher Robin.

The wisdom of Milne as discerned by me: Not wanting to leave the safety of the group: Response to plan:

“Then we all say ‘Aha!’” “All three of us?” “Yes.” “Oh!” “Why, what’s the trouble, Piglet?” “Nothing,” said Piglet. “As long as we all three say it. “But I shouldn’t care to say ‘Aha!’ by myself.

Evangelism: “You can’t stay in your corner of the Forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes.”

Liturgy: “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is to go where they can find you.”

Hospitality: “It’s so much more friendly with two.”

Prayer: “Don’t underestimate the value of Doing Nothing, of just going along, listening to all the things you can’t hear, and not bothering.”

Connecting: “They walked on, thinking of This and That, and by and by they came to an enchanted place on the very top of the Forest called Galleons Lap, which is sixty-something trees in a circle; and Christopher Robin knew that it was enchanted because nobody had ever been able to count whether it was sixty-three or sixty-four, not even when he tied a piece of string round each tree after he had counted it. Being enchanted, its floor was not like the floor of the Forest, gorse and bracken and heather, but close-set grass, quiet and smooth and green. Sitting there they could see the whole world spread out until it reached the sky, and whatever there was all the world over was with them in Galleons Lap.” I may be simple minded, but A.A. Milne says it best for me. Submitted by: Catherine Clemens


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Kids, Faith Formation and You

Photo submitted by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin

To help children exercise their special gifts of ministry is a task we’re all given. One very specific way is to engage them with the stories of faith expressed in Scripture and in our own lives. As part of our intergenerational context for faith formation, you are invited and encouraged to come read or tell stories with the children as part of our Sunday mornings together. No experience is needed. If you have an animated, clear reading voice and a willingness to share with the children, there’s an opportunity in our season ahead to be part of the stories that shape our lives. Secondly, anyone wishing to be part of the artistic aspects of the children’s ministry and willing to share a Sunday now and then or possibly an afterschool time, we welcome you to share your creative gifts. It may be an ongoing project or a one-time experience, and can range from painting to cooking, origami to book making, music or drama. Please contact Cheryl for more information. We’re gearing up for a new season of learning and growing!


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Emmanuel Parish Calendar September 2010 September 2

12 n – 2 pm

Rector’s Forum & Eucharist

September 4

9:30 am

Centering Prayer

September 5

10 am

Church service and picnic

September 9

12 n – 2 pm

Rector’s Forum & Eucharist

September 11

9:30 am

Centering Prayer

September 12

8 & 10 am

Church services

September 14

10 am

Staff meeting

11 am

Tai Chi (this class is free to church members)

1:30 pm

Tai Chi

12:30 pm

Clergy Council Lunch

5 pm

Vestry Meeting

September 16

12 n – 2 pm

Rector’s Forum & Eucharist

September 18

9:30 am

Centering Prayer

September 19

8 & 10 am

Church services

5 pm

Third Sunday Potluck

11 am

Tai Chi

1:30 pm

Tai Chi

6:30-8 pm

Grief Recovery Group

12 n – 2 pm

Rector’s Forum & Eucharist

5 pm

Dinner Kitchen

6:30-8 pm

Grief Recovery Group

September 25

9:30 am

Centering Prayer

September 26

8 & 10 am

Church services

11:30 am

Worship Committee

11 am

Tai Chi

1:30 pm

Tai Chi

6:30-8 pm

Grief Recovery Group

12 n – 2 pm

Rector’s Forum & Eucharist

6:30-8 pm

Grief Recovery Group

September 15

September 21

September 23

September 28

September 30

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September Birthdays 12 Lori Oakes 16 Emery Emmes 16 Nancy Malott 16 Cathy Clemens 17 Jon Wilkins 18 Jenny Hovelman 26 Ken Brown 26 Marilyn Andrews 27 Karen Eberle 28 Judith Cook 28 Effie Johnson 30 Midge Lofland 30 Lynn Emmes September Anniversaries 11 Ian & Kim Wareham 18 Ed & Barbie Benshoof 21 Noel & Pat Jeffrey 27 Don & Fran Pritchett 27 Andy & Mandy Troxel Prayer List Gary Watson Lynn Sauter Erv Harlacher Doug Lois Baney Bob Schliebus Kitty Baxter Cheryl Parker Meyer Kim Adams Dr. Bruce Williams Michael Moriarty Alice Donaghue Keller Opal Ferguson Andrea Groberg John. John Michael, Melia & Chris Faye Muffett Rob Lucas John Fox John & Jimi Russell Kyle Palmer Jay Longfellow Don McLean Carol Tully The Laliberte family Dean Louise Tucker Judy Wheeler Jennifer Wong Chet Linowski Sharon Heller Valerie


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We Are the World. We Are the Children. Team Noramise Lends Helping Hands in Haiti

It is a perfect Orcas evening, late July. The Parish Hall is filled to overflowing with islanders interested in the Noramise Project in Haiti. As they share fellowship and beautifully prepared summer salads, images of Haiti flash on the projection screen at the rear of the hall. When everyone has been served, local farmer, Steve Diepenbrock, takes the mic to announce: “These are the stories of what can happen if one person, two people…have a dream.” Tonight, ten islanders will share their stories, their dreams, in a report on their recent trip to Haiti, where they worked side-by-side with residents of the town of Limbé to plant gardens, clean-up public properties, and present day camps for children. Steve introduces the team members: island teens Jeffrey Blankenship, Emily Diepenbrock, Makala Forster, Connor Pamation, Stephanie Shaw, and Tika Thorson; young adult leaders Andrew Danskin and Mariah Vinson; and himself and Noramise founder and director, Rosedanie Cadet. Rosedanie speaks first, describing her return to Haiti in December 2009, nearly four decades after her family had immigrated to the US in quest of a better life and just weeks before the January earthquake. Observing life in Haiti, Rosedanie recalls crying every day: “Mainly, I cried for the children.” It was then that the seeds of the Noramise project were planted in her mind. The project became more urgent, when, two weeks later, back on Orcas, Rosedanie received news of the earthquake. In her heartbreak and anxiety for the suffering of the Haitian people, Rosedanie was drawn to Emmanuel Parish to participate in a Labyrinth Walk for Haiti. That dark January evening, in the center of the labyrinth, Rosedanie felt both a …..continued on next page


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Team Noramise, continued deep grounding on Orcas and a clear call to serve in Haiti. As she began designing the Noramise Project, she quickly attracted the interest and support of fellow islanders, including Steve Diepenbrock and Mimi Anderson, owners of Morning Star Farm, who had long wanted to take their sustainable farming practices on the road.

Photo Submitted by Andrew Danskin

Team members Stephanie, Tika, and Makala introduce the slide show. Accompanied by a soundtrack of American and Haitian music, we see the team arrive in Limbé, where, excited and weary from travel by plane and bus, they unload tools and materials for the work ahead. We see them at work in the fields, building and planting gardens with Haitian farmers. We watch them worship with Haitians on Sunday morning. We see them, side-by-side with Haitian youth, clean the grounds of the local museum. We observe them helping Haitian kids paint T-shirts at an arts and crafts day camp. We smile when we see the smiling faces of Haitian and Orcas kids kicking soccer balls at a sports day camp. We see slides of Team Noramise members cooking and eating and making music with Haitians. We watch them move gravel, wash clothes, carry water. Our hearts and imaginations are filled with the faces of Orcas and Haitian youth, especially the faces of the children, the smiles of the children. When the halfhour presentation ends, we leap to our feet to applaud. After the presentation, team members speak movingly of their experiences. They recall the pain of turning down Haitians asking for money, the wish that they had to give more, especially time and tools. They speak of the deep value of cultural immersion, of just “going there, plugging in, getting to work.” They describe the powerful fellowship of the nightly team meetings, where in community with Haitians, they reviewed the day’s activities, shared thoughts and feelings, and planned for the coming day. They speak of the very basic sense of accomplishment in learning to carry water in five-gallon jugs, encouraged by Haitian women with strong necks. They speak of the power of being surrounded by happy youth. They recall the singing of a male a-cappella group—“The voices just shook you. In the midst of destruction and chaos, they have so much heart.” After the presentation, John Clancy leads an auction, selling sponsorships for ongoing projects in Limbé, including building materials for an aquaculture project, seeds for the Bethesda School garden, construction materials for an art studio at Noramise House (a cooperative project with the Tambou Creole Artists Collective), and a privy for the First Baptist Church, among others. Islanders donate generously. Team Noramise--some veteran members, some new-- will return to Haiti to continue work with Haitians to develop sustainable practices in gardening, waste management, and economic development. The Noramise Project has recently gained 501C3 status under the umbrella of AW.I.S.H (A World Institute for Sustainable Humanity), an international nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide models and support for life sustaining activities that integrate solutions to poverty and the environment while fostering self reliance. To donate and learn more about the Noramise Project, please visit the website at www.Noramise.org. Submitted by Margaret Payne


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and Installs New Aumbry Thomas Wendland Crafts and Installs New Aumbry

Photo contributed by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin

In medieval times, an aumbry was a cupboard in the wall of a church or sacristy used to store the vessels for Eucharist, as well as the communion elements that Photo had already been consecrated, called the reserve sacrament. For a couple contributed by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin weeks there has literally been a hole in the wall while a new aumbry was being fashioned by our resident craftsman, Thomastimes, Wendland. Recently installed, theinwood andofcharacter the carpenter craftsmen style the restas of well the as In medieval an aumbry was a cupboard the wall a church reflect or sacristy used to store vessels for of Eucharist church interior. You will remember that Thomas earlier created a new communion rail and service table near the altar the communion elements already consecrated. For Emmanuel worshippers, a hole in the wall for two weeks was a sign of the to same historical as the original architecture. Wood found beneath the church buildingThomas was used for the goodwith things come. Now a motif new aumbry or tabernacle has been fashioned by our resident craftsman, Wendland. framing trim and brass hinges holding the door with its cross are 19th century style English hinges with tapered Recently installed, the aumbry reflects through its wood andwooden character, theinset, carpentercraftsmen already present in the plates. Look carefully next you was are in the sanctuary andchurch be sure to express yourused appreciation to Thomas for thisthe church interior. The wood for thetime cabinet found beneath the building and was for the framing trim while th to our worship space. addition doornew bears 19 century English tapered hinges. Thanks to Thomas, the hole in the wall is filled once again with a beautiful cupboard containing the symbols of holy food.

Photo contributed by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin Photo contributed by Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin


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Grief Recovery Group th

I will be leading a Grief Recovery Group beginning Sept. 21. This will be the 11 year that Emmanuel Parish has sponsored this outreach to the community. All of us suffer loss in our lives. Some losses seem minor. Others are more profound. Some losses take place gradually. Some are sudden and unexpected. When an individual suffers a loss that is characterized by the fact that from this day forward, life will never be the same, the grieving process begins and all of us experience that grieving in our own way. We live in such a diverse world that our preparation for experiencing grief is often limited. Meeting with others who are suffering loss and simply sharing the experience in a supportive setting can have a healing effect. Some people come looking for help to grieve a loss long past; others come to find relief from the pain of a more recent loss. Some find it helpful to attend the group for more than one series of meetings. The format for the meetings provides education about the grieving process and an opportunity for sharing and giving support to each other. If you or someone you know could benefit from attending the Grief Recovery Group please feel free to call me at 376-2098 if you have questions. You may sign up to participate by giving your name to Noel or Karen in the church office.

2010-20 11 Vestry M emb ers Kate Hansen Harlan Pedersen John Prince Jan Reid Jan Cleveland Chris Kenady Marguerite Olson Scott Heisinger Scott Jones Darleen Kent Jan Titus Bob Cook

Schedule for the meetings: Tues., Sept. 21 Thurs.,Sept. 23 Tues., Sept. 28 Thurs.,Sept. 30 Tues., Oct. 5 Tues., Oct. 12

Paris h Administr ators : Karen Blinn

All meetings will begin at 6:30 PM and end at 8:00 PM and will take place in the upper room of the Parish Hall. There will be 2 meetings the first two weeks. Participants are encouraged to attend all of the meetings and it will not be possible to admit new members after the second meeting.

Noel Jeffrey

Sexton : Luann Pamatian

Fountiene Prince, Ph.D.

Coor dinat or, Fam ily & Interg ener atio n al M in istr y :

Dinner Kitchen and Food Bank th

The monthly Dinner Kitchen was served up on Thursday, Aug. 26 with 65 neighbors enjoying a delicious meal of grilled salmon and chicken with a host of side dishes prepared by the Dinner Kitchen Crew. The Emmanuel team also went into action with prepared contributions for the Food th Bank Fund Raiser, on August 26 . In 25 years of quietly serving the island community, this was the first ever fund raiser, with proceeds going to build a new facility to house the Food Bank.

Cheryl Hunnicutt Danskin

Organ ist & Choir Dir ect or: Marianne Lewis

Rector : Bishop Craig B. Anderson


Emmanuel Episcopal Parish of Orcas Island

EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH Phone: 360.376.2352 E-Mail:Emmanuel@rockisland.com

How Can Suffering be Redemptive? The Gospel was first heard by people who were longing and thirsty, who were poor and oppressed in one sense or another. They knew their need and their emptiness. So we must go to the same place within ourselves to hear the Gospel. We must find the rejected and fearful parts within each of us and try to live there, if life has not yet put us there. That should allow us a deeper communion with the oppressed of the world, who are by far the majority of the human race since the beginnings of humanity. If we wish to enter more deeply into this mystery of redemptive suffering—which also means somehow entering more deeply into the heart of God—we have to ask God to allow us to feel some of their pain and loneliness, not just to know it intellectually. It is what we feel that we finally act on. Knowing is often just that, and nothing more. Adapted from Job and the Mystery of Suffering, p. 15

NE WSLETT ER ITE MS

Submitted by Nancy Ayer

It’s a community effort! Please submit your newsletter contributions in a Word .doc or .docx file to Karen Blinn via email. (Since you would type it anyway, submitting electronically saves the office staff from needing to retype – Thanks!) Your photos of Parish Events are appreciated! Photos are gratefully accepted and may be submitted electronically to Karen as well, preferably in .JPG file formats. Please note that the deadline for submissions to Emmanuel’s th Newsletter is 12 Noon on the 25 of every month.

Emmanuel Episcopal Church PO Box 8 Eastsound, WA 98245 Address Service Requested

We’re on the Web! Visit Us at www.orcasislandepiscopalchurch.org


Emmanuel September 2010 Newsletter