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All events take place at the Slow Studio in London, UK, unless they are via webinar which means they take place in your own home at your computer. Webinars are broadcast live so that you may ask questions at the time (via iChat) and then they become yours to keep on your desktop!

Erik Madigan Heck for Mary Katrantzou

hi@slowstudio.co.uk Written and compiled by The Slow Studio, Unit 47, 110-116 Kingsgate Road, London NW6 2JG, UK

FASHION & TEXTILES, CULTURAL THEORY LECTURES, SUSTAINABILITY SEMINARS, FILM SHOWINGS AND MORE!

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Lecture 1: An Analysis of Status Anxiety, Why People Buy So Much Stuff and the Positive Implications for Designers as Change-makers Attend in person 2pm on March 24th 2012 (code L1) from ÂŁ40. Attend from your computer, iPad or smartphone via live webinar 6pm (GMT) on April 21st 2012 (code L1.5) from ÂŁ20. 2


Learn about the key cultural and psychological factors that contribute to an oblique everyday sense of status anxiety, what the impact of these are on social and environmental health and how designers may reconsider their design thinking and methodologies to reduce the destructive trend and steer paths towards sustainable capitalism.

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This lecture (L1, L1.5) introduces you to the motivations and drives that get people consuming so much, so often. Addressing a combination of psychology, culture, history and semiotics, you gain a cultural framework for thinking about your role as artist/designer/maker, how you got there, why you got there and insights into what your creativity does. Equipped with this knowledge, you have greater insight into what your creativity may and can do in the future for positive impact.

A showing of Alain de Botton’s documentary, Status Anxiety (2004), that brings together cultural and economic history, personal stories and poignant observations on the subject of consumerism, its mannerisms and motivations follows for further reflection. 4


Attend in person for the whole experience, including seminar and film showing at 2pm on March 24th 2012 from £40 (code L1). Attend via live webinar for the full lecture, seminar summary and iChat Q&A at 6pm (GMT) on April 21st 2012 from £20 (code L1.5). To book, PLEASE SELECT PRICE AND CLICK ‘BUY NOW’ UNDER ‘EVENT BOOKINGS’ IN THE RIGHT-HAND BLOG COLUMN. 5


Lecture 2: An Introduction to the Corporation’s Innate Psychological Relationship with Environmental Destruction Attend in person 2pm on June 16th 2012 (code L2) from £40. Attend from your computer, iPad or smartphone via live webinar 6pm (GMT+1) on July 28th 2012 (code L2.5) from £20. 6


Learn about the innate characteristics of the corporation and the effects of un-minded externalities. (An externality is an effect of a purchase or use decision by one set of parties on others who did not have a choice and whose interests were not taken into account). Inspired by the documentary, The Corporation (2003), this lecture hones into the World Health Organisation’s Personality Diagnostic Checklist as tool to analyse destructive corporate events, behaviours and motivations. Using the Personality Diagnostic Checklist, we begin to ‘see’ a psychological profile of the corporation and,see more You can all particularly, the the groups that run them. 7


The lecture (L2, L2.5) goes on to explore social and cultural traits such as bullying and destructive group behaviours from a psychoanalytic point of view. The lecturer, Dr Emma Neuberg, draws parallels between environmentally destructive corporate tendencies with anxiety expressed in groups. Ideas of environmental destruction and emotional hunger are addressed with the aid of British psychologist Morris Nitsun’s group phenomenon, the anti-group. The seminar aims to elucidate the role of the individual in actions of the group where blind behaviours lead to exponential externalities. From this viewpoint, we begin to see the importance of slow processing, slow thinking and slow working systems to help nurture resourcefulness and balance for individual, societal and environmental health. 8


A showing of The Corporation, (2003), follows the seminar for further insights and reflection. Attend in person for the whole experience, including seminar and film showing at 2pm on June 16th 2012 from £40 (code L2). Attend via live webinar for the full lecture, seminar summary and iChat Q&A at 6pm (GMT+1) on July 28th 2012 from £20 (code L2.5). To book, This lecture and seminar bring additional resonance and meaning to the discussions from the Slow Book Club on May 12th 2012 for those enrolled on the Slow Design School Programme.

PLEASE SELECT PRICE AND CLICK ‘BUY NOW’ UNDER ‘EVENT BOOKINGS’ IN THE RIGHT-HAND BLOG COLUMN. 9


Lecture 3: An Analysis of the Fast Living Capitalist Machine and Its Impact on Human, Animal and Ecological Balance Attend in person 2pm on August 11th 2012 (code L3) from ÂŁ40. Attend from your computer, iPad or smartphone via live webinar 6pm (GMT) on Nov 10th 2012 (code L3.5) from ÂŁ20. 10


The first part of this lecture looks at the human health costs of fast lifestyles where, broadly speaking, a quarter of the western population suffers mental health issues at some point in their lives and a third are seriously overweight (with a body mass index over 30). Following on from some of the corporate externalities discussed in Lecture 2, while also bearing in mind Alain de Botton’s lovelessness (Lecture 1) and Morris Nitsun’s psychic hunger (Lecture 2), we look at the use of growth hormones in everyday foodstuffs that actively promote weight gain.

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The second part of the lecture (L3, L3.5) focuses on ecological health in terms of marine life and aquatic life. We look at the detritus of fast living and focus on the Pacific Ocean’s ‘plastic island’ as sign of the scale of the problem. Our focus is on the impact of hormone disruptors from polymer–related exposure on marine and aquatic life. We trace the product life of everyday consumables from milk to garden chairs that contribute to these tales of ecological impairment, imbalance and destruction and open up a dialogue on what everyday products mean for humans and organisms on a biological level (to start with). The final part of the lecture explores the design tools available for addressing cycles of environmental destruction inherent in manufacturers’ traditional modi operandi and introduces methodologies that designer/makers, materials researchers and social and environmental entrepreneurs may employ to hinder these destructive cycles. 12


The lecture is followed by a seminar where we discuss how you might digest these insights further, perhaps begin a journey of research and integrate sustainable design methodologies in your practice and design thinking. This lecture and seminar offers a significant opportunity to think about new systems of production, lifestyles and communications that address disturbing corporate ‘fast’ actions, traditions and assumptions. The lecturer, Dr Emma Neuberg introduces her designs for an eco-industrial park that proposes a closed loop system for polymer-based products, by way of example on how to design and steer design thinking into more ecologically-aware directions.

Attend in person for the whole experience, including seminar and film showing at 2pm on August 11th 2012 from £40 (code L3). Attend via live webinar for the full lecture, seminar summary, Dr Neuberg’s pilot and iChat Q&A at 6pm (GMT) on Nov 10th 2012 from £20 (code L3.5). To book, PLEASE SELECT PRICE AND CLICK ‘BUY NOW’ UNDER ‘EVENT BOOKINGS’ IN THE RIGHT-HAND BLOG COLUMN. 13


Lecture 4: Sustainability and Unsustainability in the Fashion System

Attend in person 2pm on Dec 1st 2012 (code L4) from ÂŁ40. Attend from your computer, iPad or smartphone via live webinar 6pm (GMT) on Jan 26th 2013 (code L4.5) from ÂŁ20. 14


We hear so much about sustainable fashion but isn’t fashion inherently unsustainable? While great swathes of the global population are desperate to have stuff and own product made by Burberry, Prada, Dior and Versace in order to elevate their sense of symbolic self in their communities, there will be a continuous game of social catchup with cheaper versions made for everyone else. Emulation and survival are the name of this game. Where there is capitalism, there is fast-paced fashion: power, sex and social cohesion are central to fast global fashion and most people desire all three. 15


The first part of this lecture (L4, L4.5) looks at the abuses of power of the fashion and fashionable product corporations: the marketing machine and what it promotes, the factories that have antisuicide nets bolted to their exterior walls, the governments that let rivers run toxic with dyes and the babies born with no limbs, all in the name of the latest cut in jeans and sleeve silhouette. The second part of the lecture examines many of the sustainable fashion routes currently being explored – from the environmental to the political – and why. We look at a handful of models that propose new systems of manufacture, sourcing and behaviours and pave the way for the seminar on creating desire and momentum through new models. In the seminar, Dr Emma Neuberg showcases three projects that offer pioneering new models by Slow Textiles Group members - two that propose closed loop systems (one with direct health and well-being benefits) and one that proposes new ways of 16


designing that utilise pioneering methodologies for generating emotionally durable design. Attend in person for the whole experience, including seminar and STG presentation at 2pm on Dec 1st 2012 from £40 (code L4). Attend via live webinar for the full lecture, seminar summary, STG presentation and iChat Q&A at 6pm (GMT) on Jan 26th 2013 from £20 (code L4.5). To book, PLEASE SELECT PRICE AND CLICK ‘BUY NOW’ UNDER ‘EVENT BOOKINGS’ IN THE RIGHT-HAND BLOG COLUMN.

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JOIN THE SLOW DESIGN SCHOOL AND THEY’RE ALL FREE! hi@slowstudio.co.uk 18

info@slowtextiles.org Written and compiled by The Slow Studio, Unit 47, 110-116 Kingsgate Road, London NW6 2JG, UK

OUR EVENTS INTRODUCE YOU TO NEW DIALOGUES & OPPORTUNITIES.


Slow Lectures 2012