Page 1

ISSUES SAME INJUSTICE; DIFFERENT DATE A reflection on the beating of Rodney King

hitting him with those billy clubs[baton].” BY CALEB SEWELL The case later went to court. On April 29, 1992 the jury ended Although in the past social media didn’t have a huge platform, up acquiting three of the officers, but couldn’t agree on the charges social injustice was still very loud in the public eye. against Officer Powell. One particular case sparked a riot: the beating of Rodney King. Oglesby stated, “I was frustrated. I was really angry. I can tell you King and his friends were viciously beaten by Los Angeles poright now I was pissed off. They sat there and played it[the footage of lice officers after a high-speed car chase on March 3, 1991. Officers the beating] over and over again...Everybody and their parents just noticed King speeding down the freeway, and attempted to pull him knew that those cops were going to be found guilty. Except the people over, but he continued to speed with no reluctance to stop. King later in Los Angeles because they’ve already stated that it was because if he got pulled been through it...I just couldn’t believe over it would have violated his parole for a it happened.” previous robbery conviction. Oglesby saw a narrative that too Later on, officers cornered King’s car. many have seen before. It makes people Officer Tim Singer ordered King and his two ask that question, passengers to exit the vehicle and to lie face We’ve come this far too only come down on the ground. One of King’s friends, this far? Bryant Allen, was grabbed, kicked, stomped, Hours after the verdict, the Los Anand threatened. While the other, Freddie geles riots broke out. Helms, was hit in the head while lying on Oglesby is from Florida, and he’s the ground. Helms had to be treated for a closely seen a similar incident. laceration on the top of his head. “I can remember in the summer of When King finally got out of the car, he 1980, the Miami riots, where a white was gagged and patted down. After getting PHOTO COURTESY: Mick Taylor/flickr Aftermath of Los Angles Riots, 1991 cop beat up a black motorist and killed up he grabbed his buttocks which Officer him. They were found not guilty and Melanie Singer took as King reaching for people tore up the streets. It just made me think..okay we’re still in the a weapon, an incorrect assumption because he was later found to be 60’s; it hasn’t changed, we still have white cops killing black folks and unarmed. Singer drew her pistol and pointed it at King, ordering him still getting away with it.” to lie on the ground. She then approached, gun drawn. The leading This made tensions high. Black people were still going through officer on the scene ordered for others to “swarm” King which is a key the sames things that they fought for in the 60s. The battle was won phrase for involving multiple officers who grab a suspect with empty with legislation, but the justice for all piece was missing and it still is hands, in order to quickly overcome potential resistance. missing today. King resisted by standing up to get the officers off his back. King There were other cases like the murder of James Byrd that hapwas then tasered twice and later on rises and rushes up. He was then pened in 1998. struck with a baton several times even after hitting the ground. King Including another social injustice situation with the murder of was beaten with power strokes 33 times including six kicks. The Matthew Shepard. recording of the incident by a citizen went to the news and it came to Tensions with social injustice were there, King being the big case. the forefront. But, things were mainly black and white, the shift began to change in After he was taken to the hospital, King was found to have a fracthe 21st century, especially after 9-11 which started putting the focus tured facial bone, a broken ankle, and many bruises and lacerations. on more than two groups of people. Security Guard Eric Oglesby said when he saw the beating on the news, “I was in shock and in outrage. Complete disbelief. To watch those beatings on television, I mean they were taking their turns, SECTION DESIGNER: EMMA LOVATO | THE NOSTALGIA ISSUE | PAGE 7

Issues Nostalgia.indd 1

5/16/17 3:39 PM


FACE-TO-FACE TALKING 90’s ENVIRONMENTALISTS DOMINATED ALUM CHATS FOCUS ON THE “SEEN” BY CALEB SEWELL Face-to-face communication seems like a rarity these days. Back in time, face-to-face communication is what most people relied on. Today, there’s multiple social media websites and ways to talk to people. Eaglecrest Alum, Shelly Lucero witnessed the change first hand. When she was in school relationships were different from the way they are now. “I had a few people that I would text every now and then, but mostly we just talked face to face,” said Lucero. At Eaglecrest and in society now, instead of seeing people talk faceto-face, the face-to-face is now face-to-phone. “Everyone is always texting or talking to people through video games and stuff. It’s always through the phone now,” she stated. Although it may seem easy to say that talking through the phone now is a lot easier than in person, face-to-face communication had its benefits. “Someone was always there for you to vent, rant, or just say anything,” Lucero said. “You always had company, and you never had to wait hours for someone to reply. Also you could never leave someone on ‘read’ you were face to face, they always had to reply.” With phone communication now being very prevalent, it can be hard to get the actual meaning of what someone is saying. “Being able to hear people’s tone in their voice when you were talking, things weren’t misinterpreted as they are now,” said Lucero. Times have changed. Things are going down in the ‘DMs’, but they aren’t going down in person. During Lucero’s time those face-to-face moments held meaning and are something that is lacking now. “[It was nice] being able to have a fun, surprise conversation at any moment,” Lucero pointed out. Those were the cherishable times which aren’t quite as common as now.

BY PHOENIX BRUNER The world population in 1990 was about 5.2 billion. Population and its effect on the environment were not the main concerns. Society did not know as much about how everyday life impacted the planet. However, efforts were being made to try and protect the environment and even improve the state it was in. One of the arguably most significant environmental policies created in the 90’s was the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement brought into place in order reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. There are only three nations that have not signed the agreement—Afghanistan, Sudan, and the United States. At that point in time, the focus in the United States was not on GHGs. It was on endangered species. “We had some very high profile endangered species, like the bald eagle,” AP Environmental Science teacher Kathy Fennell said. “There was a lot of emphasis being put on the recovery of those species.” Another major law passed was the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. This law meant to regulate the use of pesticides on crops. The public was learning how the use of certain pesticides affected people, especially children, who were more susceptible to the harmful effects. Fennell recalled hearing about children facing the effects of the pesticides. “There were apples in Oregon they had sprayed pesticides on,” Fennell said. “Kids were dying and getting mutated because of the juice made from the apples.” In the 1990’s, people focused on what they could actually see— the endangerment of major species and the harmful effects chemicals have on them.

ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT HITS MILESTONES BY EMMA LOVATO The Endangered Species Act of 1973 was originally enacted to provide for the conservation of species that were threatened throghout significant portions of their enviornments.

Technological advancements of the 90s allowed incentives for private companies to engage in conservation efforts. This proved successful as many of North America’s rarest animals were able to return to their native landscapes. Here are a few of them.

1990: The Northern Spotted Owl is listed as Threatened

1991: BlackFooted Ferrets are reintroduced to the wild in Wyoming

1993: Whooping Cranes are reintroduced to Florida

1994: The Arctic peregine falcon is delisted following recovery

1995: The gray wolf is reintroduced from Canada to Yellowstone National Park

1996: The California Condor is reintroduced into Northern Arizona

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

PAGE 8 | MAY 2017

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5/16/17 3:40 PM


‘NO DAYS OFF’

Faculty describe their experiences serving in the military during the 90’s BY HANNAH KHALIL The 90’s can be characterized as a time in which society continued to push the boundaries of culture; meanwhile, international political relations with the United States became ever more intertwined. These issues manifested themselves into a conflict in the Middle East known as The Gulf War. This was one of the first times the American public began familiarizing themselves with the idea of international terrorism from this part of the world. Americans found themselves amidst the rising strains between Iraq and Kuwait as they fought for their respective territories. Despite rising trends in international involvement, The United States Armed Forces saw a significant decrease of active military enlistment in the 90’s according to the Department of Defense. Among the few that chose to enlist, Eaglecrest administrator and math teacher, Eric Anderson was one of them. “I had an ROTC scholarship and it was a great way for me to go to college.” Anderson said. “It was an individual decision I made that I knew I would be proud of.” While it is not uncommon to find young men joining the military, what was rare in the 90’s was finding women. Charleen Harris, Attendance Assistant and an Air Force Veteran of Healthcare Administration describes her experience in the military at the age of 21, following an attempt at pursuing college. “It was the best decision I ever made.” Harris said. “It fulfilled a lot of dreams of completing my college, traveling, and meeting new people while serving my country.”

Harris’ experience of active duty was defined during a time in which the United States’ international affairs were tumultuous, and women started adopting new roles. “Women were entering more difficult positions than they were when I was in [the military] and starting to enter career fields where there were never women before.” Harris said. Speaking to women’s roles in the military conflicts of the early 90s Harris says that the Gulf War was the first time the military deployed women to combat zones. As women’s roles in the military continued to expand Eaglecrest administrator Charla Rosenberry decided to press pause on her teaching career to join the National Guard in 1997, during a peaceful time in international affairs, with the purpose of having her Master’s degree paid for. “It was relatively a peaceful world.” Rosenberry said. “There’s always a possibility [of being deployed] when you raise your hand. The reality of the time was that it could happen, but it was an off chance.” Rosenberry was then met with surprise when she was deployed post-9/11 after a year of being in Colorado as a “citizen soldier” and transitioning to a Dean’s position at Overland High School. “I said [to my mom] just pretend I’m going to summer camp. I thought about my life in terms of who will make my house payment, take care of my animals, what would happen to my coaching position in the fall, and if I would have a job to come back to.” Rosenberry said. “It’s a life changing experience. When you go to war there are no days off.”

DEATH STARTED THE LGBTQ+ CONVERSATION

Matthew Shepard’s death brought oppression of the gay community to the forefront BY PHOENIX BRUNER One of the most famous hate crimes committed against someone in the gay community was the assault — which turned into a murder — of Matthew Shepard in 1998. Shepard was an openly gay student at the University of Wyoming who was abducted, beaten, and then left tied to a fence to die. Shepard was in such bad shape that the bicyclist that first found him thought he was a scarecrow. Shepard was in a coma for four days before he died as a result of his extensive injuries and hypothermia. Even at his funeral, he could not escape the harsh words and treatment of the anti-gay community. Homophobic protesters from the Westboro Baptist Church showed up to the church on the day of the funeral. While not every gay man was beaten and left for dead, the death of Matthew Shepard brought the conversation of the discrimination against the gay community to the forefront. In some cases, gay people just did not come out because they feared the judgement of others. Science teacher Julie Schmidt’s mother was one of those people. “I didn’t grow up with two moms,” Schmidt said. “I grew up with a single mom that had a roommate.” Schmidt’s family ended up moving from Duluth, Minnesota to

San Diego, California when she was five years old. However, Schmidt was not aware of the real reason they were moving. To her, it was just a change of location. In reality, the move was a way for Schmidt’s mother and her mother’s partner to be together in a more accepting community. “When we got there, and they had this house together, I just didn’t even think about it,” she said. In high school, Schmidt started to see that her mom and her mom’s roommate may have been more than just friends. Her first real encounter with the gay community — a dance audition to be a costume character at Sea World — happened right before her senior year. In high school in the 1990’s, it was uncommon to see openly gay couples. “Nobody in high school, at that time, was openly gay,” Schmidt said. “It was very taboo.” At one point, Schmidt’s twin sister asked their mother if she was in a relationship with her roommate, and their mother said no. Their mother was so scared of the judgement she would face herself, but she also feared the ridicule her children might have faced just because they had gay parents. “It was so much harder, then, to feel like you belonged,” Schmidt said. “It wasn’t talked about.” THE NOSTALGIA ISSUE | PAGE 9

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5/16/17 3:40 PM


SUNSHINE ON A Build-A-Jeep Junior Riley Cox reconstructs a car CLOUDY DAY Taylor Geathers’ radiant personality earns her 2016 Homecoming Queen

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WINGS YEARBOOK STAFF

HERE COMES THE QUEEN: Senior Meklit Biliard crowns Taylor Geathers as Homecoming Queen at the Homecoming assembly in September. BY AVA AUGUSTUS When senior Taylor Geathers was crowned Homecoming Queen earlier this year, the senior class roared their approval and tears of happiness were shed. Geathers, who always keeps a smile on her face and stays positive, reflects the ideal queen. “I’ve never seen Taylor unhappy. She’s a ray of sunshine,” senior Selena Tuilaepa said. Geathers has managed to capture the attention and love of the senior class because of her ability to handle life with a attitude. “Taylor is a very unique young lady,” senior Maddie Chandler said. “Taylor and I

have been good friends since elementary school. She is always so sweet and caring.” Chandler, who was able to extend their friendship with her involvement in Peer Buddies this year, was thrilled to see Geathers recognized by the student body. “I am so happy she was able to get nominated and win homecoming queen,” Chandler said. “She is going to remember that forever.” When crowned, Geathers was able to finally see the impact she has had on her peers. “I felt really good about being nominated as queen,” Taylor Geathers said. “[I felt] a lot of excitement and acceptance.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RILEY COX BY EMMA LOVATO It was always junior Riley into that stuff, and he does that Cox’s wish to have his own jeep on the side now… I was always after seeing his father drive one. interested in it [too],” Cox said. Finally, the opportunity came Since then, Cox has put in knocking during his freshman about $4,500 worth of repairs— year to finally be able to have his which he earned while working own. as a ranch hand on his uncle’s Business teacher Mr. Seely, farm—to make it his dream car. sold Cox his old jeep that had “I took [the jeep] and cut excessive engine issues, and was out all the rust. I did a bunch of hardly fit to drive. body work, and all of the me“The engine didn’t run at chanical work under the hood. I all, there was a rebuilt the enbunch of rust gine completely. “I think it’s a skill no all over it, the one has­—being able I did a lot of suspension was the machine to work on cars. It’s completely shot, work myself, just not something the tires were and redid most people do anymore.” of the interior. bad, the interior was roughed up,” I buffed the —Riley Cox, 11 said Cox, who paint job and would spend the replaced a lot of next two years the suspension, fixing it up. too,” Cox said. A jeep in that condition While most students would would typically value around rather buy a new or used car, $2,000-$3,000 but Seely sold it to Cox found that the experience of him for $500. building it was irreplaceable. Despite it’s bad condition, “I think that it’s a skill no the hard work required to get it one has—being able to work on up and running was worth it to cars. It’s just not something that Cox. He was looking for a car to people do anymore; it’s kind of work on. a dying thing. Most people can’t “When my dad was in high change their oil, most people school, he got a 1965 Chevy 2 can’t do car work, so it’s a skill I Nova and he put a new engine in wanted to have, and what better it, and did a lot of the work him- way to learn it than to tackle an self. Him and his buddies were entire project,” Cox said.

PAGE 6 | JAN. 2017

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FACE-TO-FACE TALKING 90’s ENVIRONMENTALISTS DOMINATED ALUM CHATS FOCUS ON THE “SEEN” BY CALEB SEWELL Face-to-face communication seems like a rarity these days. Back in time, face-to-face communication is what most people relied on. Today, there’s multiple social media websites and ways to talk to people. Eaglecrest Alum, Shelly Lucero witnessed the change first hand. When she was in school relationships were different from the way they are now. “I had a few people that I would text every now and then, but mostly we just talked face to face,” said Lucero. At Eaglecrest and in society now, instead of seeing people talk faceto-face, the face-to-face is now face-to-phone. “Everyone is always texting or talking to people through video games and stuff. It’s always through the phone now,” she stated. Although it may seem easy to say that talking through the phone now is a lot easier than in person, face-to-face communication had its benefits. “Someone was always there for you to vent, rant, or just say anything,” Lucero said. “You always had company, and you never had to wait hours for someone to reply. Also you could never leave someone on ‘read’ you were face to face, they always had to reply.” With phone communication now being very prevalent, it can be hard to get the actual meaning of what someone is saying. “Being able to hear people’s tone in their voice when you were talking, things weren’t misinterpreted as they are now,” said Lucero. Times have changed. Things are going down in the ‘DMs’, but they aren’t going down in person. During Lucero’s time those face-to-face moments held meaning and are something that is lacking now. “[It was nice] being able to have a fun, surprise conversation at any moment,” Lucero pointed out. Those were the cherishable times which aren’t quite as common as now.

BY PHOENIX BRUNER The world population in 1990 was about 5.2 billion. Population and its effect on the environment were not the main concerns. Society did not know as much about how everyday life impacted the planet. However, efforts were being made to try and protect the environment and even improve the state it was in. One of the arguably most significant environmental policies created in the 90’s was the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement brought into place in order reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. There are only three nations that have not signed the agreement—Afghanistan, Sudan, and the United States. At that point in time, the focus in the United States was not on GHGs. It was on endangered species. “We had some very high profile endangered species, like the bald eagle,” AP Environmental Science teacher Kathy Fennell said. “There was a lot of emphasis being put on the recovery of those species.” Another major law passed was the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. This law meant to regulate the use of pesticides on crops. The public was learning how the use of certain pesticides affected people, especially children, who were more susceptible to the harmful effects. Fennell recalled hearing about children facing the effects of the pesticides. “There were apples in Oregon they had sprayed pesticides on,” Fennell said. “Kids were dying and getting mutated because of the juice made from the apples.” In the 1990’s, people focused on what they could actually see— the endangerment of major species and the harmful effects chemicals have on them.

ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT HITS MILESTONES BY EMMA LOVATO The Endangered Species Act of 1973 was originally enacted to provide for the conservation of species that were threatened throghout significant portions of their enviornments.

Technological advancements of the 90s allowed incentives for private companies to engage in conservation efforts. This proved successful as many of North America’s rarest animals were able to return to their native landscapes. Here are a few of them.

1990: The Northern Spotted Owl is listed as Threatened

1991: BlackFooted Ferrets are reintroduced to the wild in Wyoming

1993: Whooping Cranes are reintroduced to Florida

1994: The Arctic peregine falcon is delisted following recovery

1995: The gray wolf is reintroduced from Canada to Yellowstone National Park

1996: The California Condor is reintroduced into Northern Arizona

PHOTO COURTESY U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

PAGE 8 | MAY 2017

Issues Nostalgia.indd 2

5/16/17 3:40 PM


EXPRESSION IS EVERYTHING For Oliver Godfrey, art is the outlet BY LOVATO heEMMA uses to comment on the world PHOTO BY BRIANNA KLESH

PASSION AND PERFORMANCE BY AMBER CAREY Art has been a centerpiece in Vivienne Blanco’s life for as long as her memory allows. “My parents used to bring me to the art museum every Saturday when I was little,” she said. Blanco was fascinated with the pieces that surrounded her: the details in the faces of portraits and the captivating patterns. Art remains an imperative part of her life and will for the rest of it. This year she entered a national contest called “Living Life to the Fullest.” She entered a piece called “Unlocked” for the theme “What Makes You Happy?” “Unlocked” is a piece she created last year for a Drawing and Painting 2 project using scratchboard, a type of artwork where she used special tools to etch a detailed pictured into layered clay. It portrays a young man in a forest finding a key. Her current art teacher Lisa Adams wasn’t surprised by her success. “There is not a medium or a subject matter that Vivienne cannot handle without style and grace,” Adams, said. Blanco was overwhelmed with shock when she won first place in the contest as her decision to enter was so last minute. She immediately called her mom to share the news and then continued to share the news with her friends. “After I heard about it, I was so proud of her,” junior Tallan Barrow-Traylor said. “I gave

her a hug for like a straight ten minutes.” This passion has led Blanco to know exactly what she wants to pursue when she is older. “I want to double major and be an art teacher and a special education teacher,” she said. As a leader in Peer Buddies and having significant involvement in the art program, she is already gaining much knowledge for her future career. “There is nothing more you can ask of someone than to inspire you to follow your passion,” Barrow-Traylor said, who has been inspired by Blanco’s commitment to her future. “She’s a good person to be around. She’ll make your day.” The most compelling facet of Vivienne’s art is how she shines through it. “She’s always been a person of character,” Jodi Peterson, who taught Blanco art for seven years, said. “She is very meticulous with her artwork and spends a lot of time with each piece that she does.” Her determination sculpts every aspect of her life, especially art. “The attention she gives to her work is the kind of time she will spend listening and helping a friend,” Adams said. “Vivienne is refined and poised with her work, her style is just like her— humble, kind and compassionate to all she encounters.”

BY JAYSON PROHASKA From a young age, Oliver Godfrey found retreat in the visual arts. When he was young, he designed a machine which could sort laundry into a washer, because he hated doing laundry. Godfrey involves himself in every realm of artistic talent. For his mother’s birthday in November, he gave her a personalized gift from his Ceramics class. Whether it was building forts with his younger brother, playing his ukulele, drawing or painting, Godfrey could be found doing something artistic. “I don’t know that Oliver would be Oliver without art and all its forms,” Malia Godfrey—Oliver’s mother—said. Though he describes his relationship with art as a lot of “screaming and crying,” he displays primarily “happiness” in the art he presents. One such piece of Godfrey’s was featured in the Winter Art Show—a self-portrait print he had done for Graphic Design. Art serves as somewhat a connective thread. Godfrey’s artistic lifestyle ties into his involvement in the LGBT community, which he has invested time and energy into because he is, by nature, helpful and kind-hearted. Affectionately nicknamed a “social avenger” by his mother, Godfrey is a member of the GSA and attends Rainbow Alley on Denver Colfax at least once or twice a month. Rainbow Alley is a safe space for LGBT-spectrum identified people. Regardless of who you are, you are welcome. Godfrey hopes to attend the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design—RMCAD—because Rainbow Alley went on a field trip to its campus, which appealed to him greatly. “For me, my meaning-in-life is to create stuff, [regardless of] whether it’s appreciated or not.”

PHOTO BY TAYLOR BROWN THE PEOPLE ISSUE | PAGE 11

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‘NO DAYS OFF’

Faculty describe their experiences serving in the military during the 90’s BY HANNAH KHALIL The 90’s can be characterized as a time in which society continued to push the boundaries of culture; meanwhile, international political relations with the United States became ever more intertwined. These issues manifested themselves into a conflict in the Middle East known as The Gulf War. This was one of the first times the American public began familiarizing themselves with the idea of international terrorism from this part of the world. Americans found themselves amidst the rising strains between Iraq and Kuwait as they fought for their respective territories. Despite rising trends in international involvement, The United States Armed Forces saw a significant decrease of active military enlistment in the 90’s according to the Department of Defense. Among the few that chose to enlist, Eaglecrest administrator and math teacher, Eric Anderson was one of them. “I had an ROTC scholarship and it was a great way for me to go to college.” Anderson said. “It was an individual decision I made that I knew I would be proud of.” While it is not uncommon to find young men joining the military, what was rare in the 90’s was finding women. Charleen Harris, Attendance Assistant and an Air Force Veteran of Healthcare Administration describes her experience in the military at the age of 21, following an attempt at pursuing college. “It was the best decision I ever made.” Harris said. “It fulfilled a lot of dreams of completing my college, traveling, and meeting new people while serving my country.”

Harris’ experience of active duty was defined during a time in which the United States’ international affairs were tumultuous, and women started adopting new roles. “Women were entering more difficult positions than they were when I was in [the military] and starting to enter career fields where there were never women before.” Harris said. Speaking to women’s roles in the military conflicts of the early 90s Harris says that the Gulf War was the first time the military deployed women to combat zones. As women’s roles in the military continued to expand Eaglecrest administrator Charla Rosenberry decided to press pause on her teaching career to join the National Guard in 1997, during a peaceful time in international affairs, with the purpose of having her Master’s degree paid for. “It was relatively a peaceful world.” Rosenberry said. “There’s always a possibility [of being deployed] when you raise your hand. The reality of the time was that it could happen, but it was an off chance.” Rosenberry was then met with surprise when she was deployed post-9/11 after a year of being in Colorado as a “citizen soldier” and transitioning to a Dean’s position at Overland High School. “I said [to my mom] just pretend I’m going to summer camp. I thought about my life in terms of who will make my house payment, take care of my animals, what would happen to my coaching position in the fall, and if I would have a job to come back to.” Rosenberry said. “It’s a life changing experience. When you go to war there are no days off.”

DEATH STARTED THE LGBTQ+ CONVERSATION

Matthew Shepard’s death brought oppression of the gay community to the forefront BY PHOENIX BRUNER One of the most famous hate crimes committed against someone in the gay community was the assault — which turned into a murder — of Matthew Shepard in 1998. Shepard was an openly gay student at the University of Wyoming who was abducted, beaten, and then left tied to a fence to die. Shepard was in such bad shape that the bicyclist that first found him thought he was a scarecrow. Shepard was in a coma for four days before he died as a result of his extensive injuries and hypothermia. Even at his funeral, he could not escape the harsh words and treatment of the anti-gay community. Homophobic protesters from the Westboro Baptist Church showed up to the church on the day of the funeral. While not every gay man was beaten and left for dead, the death of Matthew Shepard brought the conversation of the discrimination against the gay community to the forefront. In some cases, gay people just did not come out because they feared the judgement of others. Science teacher Julie Schmidt’s mother was one of those people. “I didn’t grow up with two moms,” Schmidt said. “I grew up with a single mom that had a roommate.” Schmidt’s family ended up moving from Duluth, Minnesota to

San Diego, California when she was five years old. However, Schmidt was not aware of the real reason they were moving. To her, it was just a change of location. In reality, the move was a way for Schmidt’s mother and her mother’s partner to be together in a more accepting community. “When we got there, and they had this house together, I just didn’t even think about it,” she said. In high school, Schmidt started to see that her mom and her mom’s roommate may have been more than just friends. Her first real encounter with the gay community — a dance audition to be a costume character at Sea World — happened right before her senior year. In high school in the 1990’s, it was uncommon to see openly gay couples. “Nobody in high school, at that time, was openly gay,” Schmidt said. “It was very taboo.” At one point, Schmidt’s twin sister asked their mother if she was in a relationship with her roommate, and their mother said no. Their mother was so scared of the judgement she would face herself, but she also feared the ridicule her children might have faced just because they had gay parents. “It was so much harder, then, to feel like you belonged,” Schmidt said. “It wasn’t talked about.” THE NOSTALGIA ISSUE | PAGE 9

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ACADEMICS DRESSING FOR SUCCESS: Dressing for success means dressing how you feel most confident

BY AMBER CAREY The “Dress for Success” mentality is the idea that one’s performance will be higher when dressed professionally. Schools and students alike have embraced this mindset, but it bears the question: does the idea have any merit behind it? In Erik Erikson’s Theory of Psychosocial Development, the fifth stage of development, Identity vs. Role Confusion, includes identity formation and peer acceptance. The clothes one wears have clear links to these perceptions of ourselves and others. Examples of this are how suits are associated with sophistication and glasses with being smart. “Adolescents are still in that identity and social acceptance phase like wanting to express yourself through your clothes,” Psychology teacher Hollie King said. This means a lot of clothing choices are influenced by the perceptions that others will have of us by wearing them. It also has a striking effect on how you perceive yourself as well. The way that you dress can affect your performance, and raise one’s self esteem. “I dress up because it makes me feel better and more confident,” junior Camryn Miller said. “If you feel confident then you will perform better.”

It is also a way to gain respect from peers and adults effectively. Humans make assumptions about other people as soon as they meet one another, and the way one is dressed affects the perception others have of you immensely. Other students such as senior Jessica Stoner don’t necessarily believe the notion has any merit. Her style habits range very little, regardless of any presentation or test. “[My style] usually ranges from sweats to sweats,” she said. “It’s easier to learn when you’re in a comfortable state.” The mind is very powerful and many people believe the notion that if we want something we are able to achieve it. “We are products of whatever we believe,” Psychology teacher, Heather Nelsen said. If we believe that our performance when testing or presenting is enhanced when we dress nice, then it will be.

“If you feel confident then you will perform better.” –Camryn Miller

ART BY HANNAH KHALIL

For many people, dressing for success allows them to present opposite of the way they feel; even when tired, dressing nicely helps exude an alert and confident presence.

YOUR DRESS FOR SUCCESS CHECKLIST Loose fitting tops are most comfortable when you have to sit in a desk for 2 hours Wear your best fitting jeans or pants Layers, just in case the room is too warm or too cold A watch to time yourself if there’s no clock in the room

PHOTO BY EMMA LOVATO

PAGE 4 | MARCH 2017 | SECTION DESIGNER: EMMA LOVATO

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AP SCHOLARS BUILD ACADEMIC FUTURES BY KENDALL UNGERMAN Students that follow the Advanced Placement route may sometimes seem as if they excel more than those who don’t. However, is there really an intelligence difference between these two groups, or do AP students simply approach school differently? One of the difficult parts of high school is discovering who we are—who we are as people and who we are in terms of academics. For the AP student, sometimes the most important part of high school is taking classes to obtain college credit. While there is a benefit of taking these courses, AP students are getting more than just the class. “I like to learn. I don’t just do it for the grade,” AP Scholar Marian Morcos said. The transition from middle school to high school can be shocking. Some students may be successful all the way through middle school without studying much or having to put in much time outside of school. This habit, however, must be broken in order to succeed in high school and beyond. “I still have some bad habits from middle school, procrastinating and whatnot,” AP Scholar Zabdiyel Tan said. “I feel like because the courses are challenging, you force yourself to get rid of these habits and teach yourself self-discipline.” According to Harvard professor Richard J. Light’s ten-year study published in Newsweek, it was time management that defined the difference between those who succeed in their classes and those who don’t. “The idea of time management is a nobrainer, but for students sometimes it’s not as obvious,” Light said. “Students really need to keep an eye on how they manage their time.” This looks different for every student because not everybody learns the same way. One AP Scholar put it this way: successful students learn how to “play the game” by the time they finish high school. For every person, studying for hours isn’t necessary. “I don’t really study, I just kind of look over things and take the test,” AP Scholar Chad Ronish said. “I pick things up well even when I don’t study.” The key aspect of Ronish’s success and in every other students’ success is learning what works and what doesn’t. We also shouldn’t devote every single moment outside of school

focusing our attention solely on academics. “All students are pressed for time and they need to be participating in extracurriculars,” Light said. “It’s how you divide up that time that makes the difference.” Along with time management, taking AP courses guides students in a direction that’ll best suit them for the future. Most students walk into high school unaware of what they will pursue in the future. For example, Morcos had an idea of what she wanted to pursue, but her high school courses changed this. “At the beginning of freshman year, I thought that I would go into veterinary medicine, but by the end of [high school] I was considering chemical engineering,” she said. “After [taking] Honors Chemistry, I started considering going into chemistry.” This pattern of developing a path for the future based on courses is not uncommon. “While taking AP courses, students are really trying to narrow down their gifts,” counselor Sean Hiland said. “You’re basically surveying the field. It helps you start to pull things off the plate and say ‘No, I don’t want to do that in college.’” This search for gifts helps students choose their major. While it may seem advanced students shoot for the stars in choosing their career path, it turns out they tend to be more practical when deciding on a major. “What is college? Some people want to go there and pursue their dreams and some people want to go there to make a living,” Tan said. “I think the role of college is to get a degree and get a good job and then you can think about what your dreams are.” Higher achieving students tend to think further in the future and and plan out what they believe will support their lifestyle. “My dad always tells me to do something that will support me in the future then follow your dreams later,” AP Scholar Miranda Jernberg said. It really comes down to this: AP Scholars, while they do excel in school as far as grades go, are far beyond just being “smart.” Being in challenging classes allows them to learn how to manage their time, learn in a way that works best for them, and decide on a future that will feature their intellectual strengths while also supporting them.

YEARNING FOR LEARING: The Best Ways to Study for Your Learning Type BY RUTH MECKONNEN

Every individual processes, retains, and comprehends information differently. Environmental, emotional, and cognitive factors each play a role in motivating us to complete assignments and have the most effective studying time. Knowing your preferred learning style will help you create personalized studying methods. If you don’t feel confident in your studying skills now, you may want to consider changing the way you learn. According to Teach.com, your learning style may fall into one (or more) of the four VARK categories: V(isual) Visual learners better digest information when they see it. Such individuals use images, diagrams, graphic organizers, and other spatial tools to grasp material. Watching a Crash Course video or incorporating your own sketches (i.e. studygram) could bring the information to life. A(uditory) Listening and speaking solidify new material for these individuals. If you find yourself remembering lectures and discussions while you sit down to study, you may find it helpful to contribute to the next socratic seminar or ask your teacher questions during class or on an off period. R(ead & Write) Students in this category learn best through words and may present themselves as avid readers and eager note-takers. By re-writing concepts in your own words, and using notecards you can gain a deeper understanding of even the most complex ideas K(inesthetic) Kinesthetic learners retain new information through tactile forms. These are the “hands-on” learners who use real-life examples to make studying more effective. If you belong to this group, consider re-doing a lab or activity, conducting a case study or personal experiment, or associating class material to personal experiences and events. PHOTO BY EMMA LOVATO

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DON’T SLEEP ON THE NEW START TIMES: Students weigh in on next year’s approved 8:20 AM start time “I have a seminary class an hour before school, so that would be really nice if they change the seminary start time.” —Anna Ames, 9

“I think it’s pointless because all extracurriculars are just gonna get pushed back later, and everyone’s sleep schedule is just gonna shift.” —Riley Cox, 11

“I’m concerned about after school activities. We [the swim team] already stay until about five o’ clock at night and with the late start we’ll be staying until six or six thiry.” —Grace Benskin, 11

“If it doesn’t change, I’ve been so used to it over the past three years that it won’t really affect me.” —Tallan Barrow-Traylor, 11

“I kinda like it, but I feel like it won’t help too many of us because I’ll still be at school later for extra-curriculars.” —Katharina Tucker, 9

“They’d probably have to push back practice schedules a lot, and a lot of people have commitments after practice, too. So they’d probably have to change the way we practice.” —Kyle Wagner, 11

PHOTOS BY EMMA LOVATO

SLEEP ESSENTIAL TO ACADEMICS: Why CCSD is changing start times BY ANTHONY ALESSANDRI Sleep is often identified as a vital aspect of life. Sleep includes health benefits for your heart, mind, self confidence, and the brain. As can be seen in several recent studies regarding sleep habits among adolescents, it has become clear that many teenagers do not sleep a sufficient amount and this is negatively affects them in school. Ironically, academics could be the reason they aren’t sleeping. Academics are essential to the success of any person in America, making it important to get an adequate amount of sleep every night. It is recommended to get eight to ten hours of sleep. These studies haven’t gone unnoticed. Many districts, including the Cherry Creek School District, have come to the realization of sleep habits among youth and have proposed ways to fix it. Scott Siegfried is the Associate Superintendent for the Cherry Creek School District. He is knowledgeable of these aforementioned sleep habits among youth, and is trying to make a change by altering high school start times. “[One thing is that] there are more adolescent car crashes in the mornings. [This could be due to] more anxiety, mood, and depressive disorders to get up in the morning,” Siegrfried said. Car crashes are just one thing sleep deprived adolescents can experience. As shown by Siegfried, lack of sleep can cause depressive orders and increased anxiety. This increased anxiety can cause health problems over time in students. These facts suggest that teenagers and adults need to find more time to add to their sleep schedule. A lack of sleep can be severely dangerous and unhealthy. Sophomore Alex Lay was diagnosed with insomnia in middle school. He knows firsthand how academics can be affected by sleep deprivation. “I was told it was because of stress from more school work, family obligations, and other academic issues. Sometimes, when I only get a couple hours of sleep, I get extremely distracted in classes, which is pretty often,” he said. Sleep and academics are directly related. If someone gets a very limited amount of sleep, chances are they will also receive a very limited amount of education.

Fatigue is one of the proven side effects of sleep deprivation. Fatigue can work into an academic school day, where a student is severely tired in the morning and can remain at this level of tiredness throughout the day. “There are lower grades, achievement, averages, athletic performances than those who sleep in,” Siegfried said. Some parents and faculty question why students don’t go to bed earlier so they aren’t sleep deprived. Many students have a very heavy workload after school. This can cause a student to stay awake until late at night. According to a survey taken at Eaglecrest of 202 students, 62 percent of them said that they will not go to bed until they finish their homework, no matter how late that is. In the same survey, nearly half of the students selected that they get five hours or less of sleep per night, while the other half said they get six or more hours of sleep. This survey provided a lot of data and evidence which could show a correlation between academics and sleep. This survey also included how Advanced Placement (AP) classes are playing a role in this. Within the majority of the students who do not go to sleep until they finish their homework and the ones who get less than five hours of sleep per night, the majority of them have four or five AP classes in their high school schedule. Every student in some way is affected on a daily basis by academics affecting their sleep habits or vice versa. In some circumstances, it’s a time management problem. If procrastination was not such a prominent factor in teens’ education, then sleep fatigue would not be as large of an issue. Unfortunately, the opposite goes as well, in which sleep fatigue can be caused by an extensive amount of homework given that one student cannot get entirely done each night and still get the recommended eight to ten hours of sleep and be up at the right time for school the next day. In the near future, things look to be changing for teenagers and their experience in education. How this will change, no one will know for sure until it happens. Until then, time management is exactly what every student needs.

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FOOD for

BRAIN POWER SALAD STEP 1: Gather freshly washed cherry tomatoes, one cucumber, and one ripe avocado

THOUGHT BY HANNAH KHALIL

Whether it’s the product of catchy marketing or scientific studies, the concept of “brain food” has been around for decades. In the new millennium, companies are taking extra steps to ensure that their products can uphold the desires of the public given the fitness revolution that seems to be sweeping our nation. Putting the pretty packaging and big claims that boast improved memory and brain health aside, what can really be said about this riveting concept of brain food? Research put out by WebMD and the FDA show that foods high in DHA, a structural fat found in the brain and eyes, tend to improve brain function and protect the brain from aging and losing mass through the strengthening of the mind’s omega-3 fatty acids. Other foods like blueberries and avocados have been shown to promote brain health by protecting the brain from oxidative stress and tend to help the body in establishing healthy blood pressure levels. But how can the science translate into daily life? AP Psychology and history teacher, Heather Nelsen, approaches this question by taking a look at diet. “I think it’s about the comprehensive balance of vegetables, proteins, and whole grains,” Nelsen said. She goes on to explain how the body as a whole contributes to brain health and that if people are not focusing on total body health, the brain will be negatively impacted. She agrees that most “brain foods” tend to be more marketing based and suggested a balance of nutrition to promote brain health, and in turn, overall health. Here are quick and delicious ways anyone can add nutrition that promotes a healthy body and mind:

STEP 2: Peel and slice the avocado into medium sized pieces and slice the cucumber as desired

STEP 3: Place all ingredients into a bowl and drizzle extra virgin olive oil on top with oregano and salt/pepper. Mix together and enjoy!

BLUEBERRY ALMOND WRAP STEP 1: Grab one wheat tortilla, peanut or almond butter, and freshly washed blueberries

STEP 3: Roll the tortilla into a burrito-like shape and cut into two halves

STEP 2: Spread the peanut or almond butter over the center of the tortilla and add blueberries on top

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2016-17 Eagle Quill Design Contributions  

This file is a compilation of pages from three separate issue that I designed for The Eagle Quill during my junior year

2016-17 Eagle Quill Design Contributions  

This file is a compilation of pages from three separate issue that I designed for The Eagle Quill during my junior year

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