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EMMA

KULCSAR


About Me Interior design offers a means to unite different elements in a transformative and unique way. I have always been interested in creative fields, spacial manipulation, and materiality so I am captivated by, not only the final product that design brings to life, but the process itself. While growing up, art and design were two of my greatest passions. Having always been an observant, visual, and detailoriented individual, I made sure to channel my creative talents in as many ways possible. After deciding to pursue my passion at Ryerson University, I have further advanced my skills and knowledge through experiential and hands-on learning —and enjoying every moment of it. I am currently studying at Ryerson School of Interior Design while, at the same time, interning at an internationally-renowned design firm. My objective is to better my understanding of all aspects of the design industry for both professional and personal goals. In the future, I hope to gain further practical experience working alongside professionals in my field.


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H I G H P A R K C E N T R E | G A L L E R Y + M I X E D U S E

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C R AT E R | W O O D W O R K I N G

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S E L V E D G E | A D A P T I V E R E U S E

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R E F O R M G R O U N D | M I X E D U S E

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T H E G R A N G E | R E TA I L + S T U D I O

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C H R O N O | L I G H T I N G D E S I G N

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S T AT I O N A R Y | P R O D U C T D E S I G N

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F O O D I E S | W O R K P L A C E

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Y E S 2 0 1 7 | E X H I B I T I O N D E S I G N


High Park Centre GALLERY + MIXED USE Fall 2017 | 4th Year

A multi-purpose recreational hub nestled within High Park’s natural environment, "The High Park Coalescent" provides the public with a highly functional public centre. Categorized by areas of exhibition, recreation, performance, and education, the design will coalesce the self and community; the interior with the exterior; public with private events; above-ground with below-ground; and passive experiences with the interactive. Bridging these gaps will help foster a diverse cultural relationship with the city and its surrounding green space, providing opportunities for celebrations, ceremonies and public gatherings. From an individual perspective, the passivity of the space allows for reflection, retreat, and introspection.

Level 01

SIDE

PARK DR

Level 00

Y

NSWA THE QUEE

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Above: Site plan; Right: Vantage points at site. Incited inspiration for architectural orientation and form.

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Level -01


H I G H P A R K C E N T R E | GALLERY + M I X E D U S E

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Exterior Rendering

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Reflective Pool Rooftop Green Space Green Garden Public Pavilion + Gallery Breakaway Storage Threshold Private Exhibition + Gallery

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Public Exhibition + Gallery Cafe + Eatery BOH Kitchen Public W/C Storage Mechanical Staff Rooms Administration

Approaching from the eastern paths, one encounters the ‘reflection pond’, public benching, rooftop green space, and the exhibition pavilion. Its orientation and geometry enforce community interaction, drawing both private and public audiences to coalesce with its interior and exterior programming.


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H I G H P A R K C E N T R E | GALLERY + MIXED USE

Private Exhibit Rendering Above: The private subterranean exhibition space is suitable for screenings and gallery functions. The design features angled interior walls to facilitate optimal exhibition views while reflecting natural light from wells above. Right: The pavilion space facilitates small musical or theatrical performances and its unique sloped-roof condition provides excellent acoustic properties. Pivoting windows on the north side can remain open during summer months to encourage interior-exterior circulation.

Pavilion Rendering: Public Performance


H I G H P A R K C E N T R E | GALLERY + M I X E D U S E

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Upon exiting the private exhibition area, the architecture pinches together, forcing circulation towards one unique seating area. Parallel to these walls is the triangular glass rooftop pool above, which brings unique lighting conditions and reflections to the underground space below. The natural elements of light and water create an ineffable, introspective spatial experience and exclusive atmospheric condition— enforcing users to slow down and appreciate their surroundings.

Private Exhibit Rendering

Stucco Siding Metal Flashing Gravel Parapet Support I-Beam Support Mullion & Pivoting Windows Below

Seamless Glass Railing Stucco Cap To Match Siding Steel Bent Plate Grass Roof Water Resistant Fabric Insulation And Blocking As Required Dashed Line Denotes Architectural Ceiling


Crater PRODUCT DESIGN Winter 2014 | 1st Year

This design effort focuses on hand-crafted, custom wooden utensils or kitchenware. “Crater” showcases the relationships between the tool and the user, as well as design and culture. The design is based upon the fusion of Japanese cuisine and the phases of the moon. Loosely structured around the form and utility of a bento box, “Crater” is meant to be an all-in-one product designed for sushi rolls, soy sauce, miso soup, and other fixings. The curves and voids within the internal structure are both conceptual and functional, as they act as storage, display, or holding areas.


C R AT E R | PRODUCT DESIGN

Images on right depict closed, open, and laid out components of “Crater’s” design. Its top section is designed to be removed and flipped—acting as a small tray for food. The indent represents a gibbous moon phase. The three middle storage components can be kept together or apart and can hold various solid or liquid food items. Their forms are inspired by full and crescent moon phases. Lastly, the base’s multi-functional design stores chop sticks, which (when removed) allows one to horizontally stack sushi rolls within the oblong indentation.

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Selvedge ADAPTIVE REUSE Winter 2015 | 2nd Year

“Selvedge” reinforces the link to Hespeler’s textile history and emerging art scene, creating a modern event space that integrates cohesively with its pedestrian area. Composed of three floors, the remodel features a gallery on the main floor and basement levels, along with a cafe and a resident area above .

Ground Floor Plan

Basement Plan


S E L V E D G E | ADAPTIVE REUSE

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Hespeler’s old post office repurposed to interlace with the local community, nearby regions, and its own internal structure. Located at the edge of the region’s downtown core, the heritage site is often overlooked. The concept of woven connectivity is reflected in both the atmosphere and programming of the space, thus revitalizing the heritage site and enhancing the economy and culture of the town.

Exterior Rendering

Weaving together with its surroundings, the design features stair-ramps that disappear into the existing street-scape. Most noticeably, the building is ‘wrapped’ in a perforated aluminum facade that mimics a twill pattern. Perforations are strategically placed to control privacy and lighting from entering the centre.


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S E L V E D G E | ADAPTIVE REUSE

Gallery Rendering The notion of weaving is brought into the space through circulation and interior form. The main artery throughout the gallery is a large ramp gesture, which breaks off into platforms for distinctive display areas. These plinths also act as seating levels during lecture programs (as displayed in floor plan on previous page). The clerestory windows are angled to conform to the descending ramp condition, and a ‘bias’ is introduced to the center of the building. This atrium brings in natural light, as well as an opportunity to display feature installations.

The gallery’s primary function is to exhibit artwork and textiles relating to fashion, design, and other fabrications. The space will inspire high quality unified design, creating a climate of economic success, while embracing art, culture, and the heritage of the surrounding community.

North Section


S E L V E D G E | ADAPTIVE REUSE

3D Detail

Sectional Perspective: East Section

Cafe Rendering Located at the east side of the building, the Cafe enforces the notion of wrapping through ceiling beams that come down to form floating bench seating. A twill pattern is reflected in the wood floor finish, and the perforated facade opens up at the corner of the site— connecting the interior and exterior.

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Reform Ground MIXED USE Winter 2016 | 3rd Year

Reform Ground is a multidisciplinary community centre that offers a supportive space for urban youth. It has been programmed vertically and horizontally to support mental health, fitness, collaboration, creativity and self-sustainability. Acting as an ‘urban campsite’, “Reform Ground” is a retreat-style environment with the intent of reflecting dynamic and exploratory way-finding through spatial manipulation. The interior concept is designed to impact the behaviour and place-making memory for users by encouraging community, relaxation, and providing a shelter from modern-day stressors.

Located on the ground floor of a condominium in Toronto, the design called for a mixed use centre that caters to the millennial demographic of the surrounding city. “Reform Ground’s” purpose is to provide a space for everyone to enjoy temporary, recurring, or long-term occupancy.

Exterior Rendering


R E F O R M G R O U N D | MIXED USE

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Seasonal Patio + Main Entry Vestibule Public Washroom Janitor’s Closet Gallery Area Lounge Cafe & Eatery Retail Entrance Secondary Vestibule Retail Zone Utility + Storage Room Washroom Dry Food Storage Refrigerator Storage Freezer Storage Cooking Studio Staff Room Employee Office Conference Room Rear Entryway Fitness Reception Shipping + Receiving Fitness Studio Female Change Room Male Change Room

Floor Plan

Angled roof conditions are implemented to replicate mountainous peaks, while enforcing different levels of intimacy in programming below. Higher ceilings are located throughout social spaces while lower ceiling conditions are placed in more private areas.

West Section

This notion of compression and decompression provides users with suggestions for how to behave in different areas of the centre.

North Section

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R E F O R M G R O U N D | MIXED USE

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Programming Diagram: Wellness Zoning

Programming Diagram: Social Zoning

Social Physical Economic Mental

Gallery Retail Cafe & eatery Studio Fitness centre

Programming Diagram: Occupant Usage Employee Private Temporary stay Long-term stay In-and-out Emergency egress

Social Space + Gallery Rendering

The space is divided into four zones, focusing on social, physical, economic and mental health. “Reform Ground� provides a variety of spaces which offer healthy and affordable food options, counseling rooms, and educational programs designed to support mental health, entrepreneurship, and self-sustainability.

All furniture was customized to unify concept and function. A large park-bench was implemented within the social area to bringing people together. Hierarchy is created throughout the more private and intimate seating area, brought on by steps which act as secondary seating areas. A gallery wall (left) features local artist, connecting the surrounding community to the internal programming.


R E F O R M G R O U N D | MIXED USE

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Corridor + Cooking Studio Rendering

Cafe + Eatery Rendering

Top: Users can enter through the front or rear of the building and visit the cooking studio through the central corridor. Glass partitions separate these spaces to enforce views into workshops and studio sessions. Bottom: The foreground shows the centre’s cafe seating area In the distance is “Reform Ground’s” retail/market area where one can purchase prepared meals made on-site as well as packaged food items.


The Grange R E TA I L + S T U D I O Winter 2015 | 2nd Year

Operating at an urban scale, this design is focused on the development of an infill project within the village of Hespeler, Ontario. With the intent of reviving the town’s core along Queen St, two main programmatic components were included: the storefront and the studio. Built on conceptual retail development, “ The Grange” is a direct response for the town’s need for revival, accessing all opportunities while still acknowledging its heritage. The greengrocer and cooking school supports farms in Southern Ontario, promoting a sustainable, regionally-based organic food system within Hespeler.

Exterior Rendering

“The Grange” has a barn-like appearance both inside and out, using interior trusses and refurbished barnboard. Within, food vendors are organized side-by-side, providing guests with a farmers-market experience. All areas will display locally sourced goods as well as items made on site, interconnecting the studio space with retail floors below. The studio space on the second floor is also programmed to allow visitors to participate in culinary classes; educating the community on healthy eating and food preparation.

Food Market Rendering


T H E G R A N G E | RETAIL + STUDIO

The 2nd floor features the culinary studio and food-prep area. Its primary function is allows employees to prepare freshly made meals for the market below, however after-hours, it transforms into an educational zone where culinary workshops can be held for locals.

Elevator

Open to Below Culinary Studio + Food Prep Area

Second Floor Plan

The main floor, whose entry is located at street-front, will house freshly prepared food from the studio above. Elevator

Drive Through to Rear Parking

Market Area

Main Entry

Ground Floor Plan

The basement floor can be entered at grade through the rear entrance. This market area features fresh foods, produce, and deli products.

Rear Entry

Cold Storage

Elevator

W/C

Market Area

Basement Floor Plan

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Chrono LIGHTING DESIGN Winter 2015 | 2nd Year

Overexposure and addiction to technology has disrupted our circadian rhythms, affecting both mental and physical health. ‘Chrono’ is a direct response to this global issue and is modeled with anthropocentric design. The light modulator emulates warm natural light, which is scientifically proven to positively affect our mood and facilitate healthy sleeping patterns.

The illusion of a floating orb is implemented through the matte black base. As demonstrated in the top left image, the light modulator can be dimmed to its brightest function or left at a low dim for a very subtle glow (top right). The exterior shell can be removed for changes to its internal components.


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Stationary PRODUCT DESIGN Winter 2016 | 3rd Year

Inspired by the form of the paper clip, this design transforms its sculptural geometry into a product that supports both analog and digital forms with one stand. With three different resting angles, the stand allows for an all-in-one approach to showcasing, storing, and standing. The Stationary emphasizes the need for paper and digital devices in modern day living.

Working Position

Watching Position

Reading Position

Designed at a 55 degree position for working purposes. This is the ideal angle for users to interact/type on the surface of the tablet.

The other viewing perspective of 75 degrees, offers users the option of propping their tablet more upright so they can sit farther back and watch videos on their tablets.

The design allows one to place the spine and sides of a book or journal within the central void and flip pages. The angles and edges provide a sturdy stand for showcasing books.


Structural Axonometric Diagram

Foodies WORKPLACE Fall 2016 | 3rd Year

Foodies is a start-up food service consultation firm. The goal of the centre is to provide an evolving resource site for developing new restaurant concepts, assisting with existing restaurants, and culinary education. Services include: menu development, operational assistance, accounting services, branding , sustainability and design consulting. The interior is designed around new ways of working, intending to promote engagement, productivity, and sustainable practices. Foodies introduces solutions to modern challenges within office design by embracing the corporate paradigm shift of workplace comfort and efficiency: fostering collaboration as well as focus, encouraging engagement, and re-interpreting ergonomics.

Lobby Rendering


F O O D I E S | WORKPLACE

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Branding is featured throughout the building, most prominently in the entrance and the formal workstation areas. The curvature of the walls enables circulation and facilitates intuitive navigation. The building features collaborative work and meeting spaces as well as an integrated cafĂŠ.

Furniture Design Detail

Left: Walking into the office, visitors are introduced to the ‘boardwalk’ that runs through the entire centre and acts as a way-finding gesture. Below: The boardwalk rises up to create fixed workstations. This area is intentioned for employees only and features engaging, open-concept working areas. There are also more formal/ private work areas programmed in the rooms along the right.

Employee Area Rendering


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F O O D I E S | WORKPLACE

Circulation Diagram

Zoning Diagram

Privacy Diagram

User Programming Diagram

Highlights main artery through the centre, as emulated in the ‘boardwalk’ feature.

Areas are programmed to facilitate different working conditions: focus, collaborative, social, and learning.

Consideration was made into programming the centre for different audiences, based on common circulation.

Spaces are programmed based on factors of individual or shared ownership and usage.

Focus Collaboration

Socialization Learning

Public Client / Employee Employee only

‘We Shared’

‘I Shared’

‘We Owned’

‘I Owned’

This 3D fabricated wall feature is inspired by the veins of a leaf, re-imagined into a modern geometric form. It spans through employee offices to bring colour and uniqueness to the workstation areas.

Design Detail

Research Office Rendering


F O O D I E S | WORKPLACE

Outdoor Lounge

Research Team

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IT Team

Staff Recreation Space

Client Meeting Area

Employee Workstations

Arch + Design Team

Restaurant Management Team Cafe

Food Testing Area

Private Workrooms

Lobby MR 3 Entry

MR 1

MR 2

Floor Plan

West Section


Year End Show EXHIBITION DESIGN Fall + Winter 2017 | 4th Year

Ryerson School of Interior Design’s Year End Show is the annual exhibition that celebrates student excellence. Each year the event showcases exceptional student work in a new and captivating way. This year’s show is titled “Shift”, and its focus was catered towards increasing the visibility, understanding and appreciation of interior design, revealing the practice’s outstanding developments throughout integrated design practices. As the elected Chair of The Year End Show Committee, I had the opportunity to lead a team of Executives and Associates throughout the year; guiding the team towards the design, curation, and execution of our school’s end-of-year exhibition.

walls and tables

colour installation


Y E S 2 0 1 7 | EXHIBITION

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food tables

My role involved internal-organization, executive decision-making, team-building, relationships with students and faculty, and researching innovative methods of exhibition design. The work here demonstrates the result of group efforts— in which I participated throughout their concept, curation, fabrication, and final event process. I also led a smaller team of students in securing sponsorship opportunities which provided our committee with over $60,000 of monetary donations to fund our initiative.

foamcore display

Design Portfolio 2018  
Design Portfolio 2018  
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